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William Gore (bishop)

William Gore DD (died 25 February 1784) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland.[1]

He was born the son of the Right Reverend William Gore, Dean of Down and his wife Honora Prittie.

Previously the Dean of Cashel from 1736 to 1758,[2] he was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 17 March 1758, consecrated on 16 April of that year; translated to Elphin on 3 March 1762; and finally to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 5 March 1772.[3]

In 1783 he commissioned the building of a Manor House at Old Connaught, near Bray, but in County Dublin. Old Connaught House still exists today as a private and gated development of apartments in and around the Old House.

He died on 25 February 1784. He had married twice, firstly, Mary, daughter of Chidley Coote and secondly, Mary, daughter of William French, with whom he had a son, William, who became an MP.

References
  1. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
  2. "The Universal magazine", Volume 22 (1758) p22
  3. "Dodsley's annual register" Burke,E: London, J.Dodsley 1780
Church of England titles
Preceded byWilliam Carmichael Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1758–1762 Succeeded byJohn Oswald
Preceded byEdward Synge Bishop of Elphin 1762– 1772 Succeeded byJemmett Browne
Preceded byJohn Averell Bishop of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe 1772– 1784 Succeeded byWilliam Cecil Pery
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Battle on the Ice

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Battle on the Ice

The Battle on the Ice (Russian: Ледовое побоище, Ledovoye poboish'ye); German: Schlacht auf dem Eise; Estonian: Jäälahing; German: Schlacht auf dem Peipussee) was fought between the Republic of Novgorod led by prince Alexander Nevsky and the crusader army led by the Livonian branch of the Teutonic Knights on April 5, 1242, at Lake Peipus. The battle is notable for having been fought largely on the frozen lake, and this gave the battle its name. The battle was a significant defeat sustained by the crusaders during the Northern Crusades, which were directed against pagans and Eastern Orthodox Christians rather than Muslims in the Holy Land. The Crusaders' defeat in the battle marked the end of their campaigns against the Orthodox Novgorod Republic and other Slavic territories for the next century. The event was glorified in Sergei Eisenstein's historical drama film Alexander Nevsky, released in 1938, which created a popular image of the battle often mistaken for the real events. Sergei Prokofiev turned his sc ...more...



Thomas Talbot (Upper Canada)

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Thomas Talbot (Upper Canada)

Portrait of Colonel Thomas Talbot Colonel the Honourable Thomas Talbot (July 19, 1771 – February 5, 1853) was an Irish-born Canadian soldier and politician. Background Talbot was born at Malahide Castle near Dublin, Ireland. He was the fourth son of Richard Talbot and his wife Margaret Talbot, 1st Baroness Talbot of Malahide (see the Baron Talbot of Malahide). Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron Talbot de Malahide and Sir John Talbot were his elder brothers. Early military career Talbot received a commission in the army as ensign before he was twelve years old, and was appointed at sixteen to aid his relative, the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland He saw active service in Holland and at Gibraltar. Canada Talbot immigrated to Canada in 1791, where he became personal secretary to John Graves Simcoe, Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada. After returning to England, Talbot convinced the government to allow him to implement a land settlement scheme along the shore of Lake Erie. He chose property which today is in Elgin County ...more...



Rondo Hatton

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Rondo Hatton

Rondo Hatton (April 22, 1894 – February 2, 1946)[1], nicknamed "the Ugliest Man in Pictures", was an American journalist and occasional film actor with a minor career playing thuggish bit and extra parts in Hollywood B movies, culminating in his elevation to horror movie star-status with Universal Studios in the last two years of his life, and posthumously as a movie cult icon. He was known for his unique facial features, which were the result of acromegaly, a syndrome caused by a disorder of the pituitary gland. Early years Hatton was born in Hagerstown, Maryland.[2] The family moved several times during Hatton’s youth before settling in Hillsborough, Florida.[3] He starred in track and football at Hillsborough High School and was voted Handsomest Boy in his class his senior year.[3] Rondo Hatton as he appeared in the 1913 Hillsborough High School yearbook. In Tampa, Hatton worked as a sportswriter for The Tampa Tribune. He continued working as a journalist until after World War I, when the symptoms ...more...



List of United States national ice hockey team rosters

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List of United States national ice hockey team rosters

Below is a list of various national ice hockey team rosters of the United States of America. The men's teams, the women's teams and the junior teams are included. Men's Olympics1920 Summer Olympics (won silver medal)Head Coach: Cornelius Fellows Position Name Height (cm) Weight (kg) Birthdate Birthplace Team G Raymond Bonney 175 April 2, 1892 Phoenix, New York St. Paul A.C. G Cyril Weidenborner 167 64 March 30, 1895 Saint Paul, Minnesota St. Paul A.C. D Edward Fitzgerald 180 79 August 3, 1890 Northfield, Minnesota St. Paul A.C. D Moose Goheen 183 99 February 9, 1894 White Bear Lake, Minnesota St. Paul A.C. D Leon Tuck 175 82 May 25, 1891 Melrose, Massachusetts Boston AA Rover Herbert Drury 170 75 March 2, 1896 Midland, Ontario Pittsburgh AA F Frank Synott December 28, 1891 Chatham, New Brunswick Boston AA LW Anthony Conroy 174 70 October 19, 1895 Saint Paul, Minnesota St. Paul A.C. C George Geran 175 82 August 3, 1896 Holyoke, Massachusetts Boston AA ...more...



William Hamblett

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William Hamblett

William Alexander Harry Hamblett (1879 – 11 August 1960) was the Archdeacon of Central Otago from 1945 to 1949;[1] and Archdeacon of North Otago from 1949 to 1952.[2] Hamblett was born in Gisborne, New Zealand in 1879 and educated at the University of Durham. He was ordained in 1913 and his first post was as Curate at Taieri. Later he was Vicar of Gore and then of St. Matthew's Church, Dunedin.[3] He was Examining Chaplain to the Bishop of Dunedin from 1934 to 1950 and a Residentiary canon of St. Paul's Cathedral, Dunedin from 1942 to 1945.[4] He died on 11 August 1960. References "Blain's Directory of the Clergy of Dunedin " Copyright the Reverend Dr. Michael Blain, 2003 Reproduced online with permission at [1] Crockford's Clerical Directory 1959/60 p482 London: OUP, 1948 Heritage NZ Crockford's Clerical Directory 1948 p550 London: OUP, 1948 ...more...



List of people from Berlin

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List of people from Berlin

Berlin The following is a list of notable people who were born in Berlin, Germany. Statesmen Frederick the Great Wilhelm II, German Emperor Eduard Bernstein (1850–1932), politician (SPD), member of the Reichstag Anna of Brandenburg (1487–1514), noblewoman and mother of Christian III (King of Denmark) Eberhard Diepgen (born 1941), politician (CDU), Governing Mayor of Berlin Kurt Eisner (1867–1919), politician (SPD, USPD) Frederick the Great (1712–1786), King of Prussia from 1740 until 1786 Frederick William (1620 – 1688), Elector of Brandenburg and Duke of Prussia from 1640 until 1688 Frederick William I (1688–1740), King in Prussia and Elector of Brandenburg from 1713 until 1740 Frederick William II (1744–1797), King of Prussia from 1786 until 1797 George V of Hanover (1819—1878), King of Hanover from 1851 until 1866 Gregor Gysi (born 1948), politician (The Left) Klaus Gysi (1912–1999), Minister of Culture and state secretary for church affairs of GDR Reinhard Klimmt (b ...more...



Ecclesiastical Household

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Ecclesiastical Household

The Ecclesiastical Household is a part of the Royal Household of the sovereign of the United Kingdom.[1] Reflecting the different constitutions of the churches of England and Scotland, there are separate households in each nation. England The Church of England Ecclesiastical Household comprises the College of Chaplains, and the associated Chapel Royal, the Royal Almonry Office, various Domestic Chaplains, and service Chaplains. The College of Chaplains is under the Clerk of the Closet, an office dating from 1437. It is normally held by a diocesan bishop, who may however remain in office after leaving his see. The current clerk is James Newcome, Bishop of Carlisle. The Deputy Clerk of the Closet, a new office dating only from 1677, is Paul Wright, Domestic Chaplain to the Sovereign and Sub-dean of the Chapel Royal and the sole full-time clerical member of the household. The sub-dean is assisted by Richard Bolton and William Whitcombe, the Priests-in-Ordinary to the Sovereign. The Clerk of the Closet is resp ...more...



Anglican Diocese of Dunedin

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Anglican Diocese of Dunedin

Arms of the Diocese of Dunedin The Diocese of Dunedin is one of the thirteen dioceses and hui amorangi of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia.[1] The diocese covers the same area as the provinces of Otago and Southland in the South Island of New Zealand. Area 65,990 km², population 272,541 (2001). Anglicans are traditionally the third largest religious group in Otago and Southland after Presbyterians and Roman Catholics. Description of arms: Gules between a cross saltire argent, four starts argent on the fess point a Bible. The diocese was established in 1869. The seat of the Bishop of Dunedin is St. Paul's Cathedral, Dunedin. The diocese has a total of 33 parishes. The adaption of "Local Shared Ministry" has been a strategy by which local people are ordained to serve in a parish which cannot afford to support full-time professional clergy. The diocese includes Anglo-Catholic, broad and Evangelical parishes. History The first person named as Bishop of Dunedin was Henry Lascelles ...more...



Arnstadt

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Arnstadt

Arnstadt (German pronunciation:  ( listen)) is a town in Ilm-Kreis, Thuringia, Germany, on the river Gera about 20 kilometres south of Erfurt, the capital of Thuringia. Arnstadt is one of the oldest towns in Thuringia, and has a well-preserved historic centre with a partially preserved town wall. The town is nicknamed Das Tor zum Thüringer Wald ("The Gateway to the Thuringian Forest") because of its location on the northern edge of that forest. Arnstadt has a population of some 25,000. The city centre is on the west side of Gera. The municipality comprises four "villages": Angelhausen–Oberndorf, Dosdorf–Espenfeld, Rudisleben, and Siegelbach. The neighbouring municipalities are Wachsenburggemeinde, Kirchheim, Alkersleben, thorn Home, Wipfratal, Plaue and Gossel. History A deed of gift issued 1 May 704 in Würzburg by the Thuringian Duke Hedan II to the Anglo-Saxon bishop Willibrord of Utrecht is the first written reference to Arnstadt ("Arnestati"), along with two other towns—the oldest documented reference of ...more...



Richard Lovelace

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Richard Lovelace

Richard Lovelace (pronounced , homophone of "loveless") (9 December 1617 – 1657) was an English poet in the seventeenth century. He was a cavalier poet who fought on behalf of the king during the Civil War. His best known works are "To Althea, from Prison", and "To Lucasta, Going to the Warres". BiographyEarly life and family Richard Lovelace was born on 9 December 1617.[1] His exact birthplace is unknown, and may have been Woolwich, Kent, or Holland.[2] He was the oldest son of Sir William Lovelace and Anne Barne Lovelace. He had four brothers and three sisters. His father was from a distinguished military and legal family; the Lovelace family owned a considerable amount of property in Kent. His father, Sir William Lovelace, knt., was a member of the Virginia Company and an incorporator in the second Virginia Company in 1609. He was a soldier and died during the war with Spain and the Dutch Republic in the Siege of Groenlo (1627) a few days before the town fell. Richard was nine years old when his father d ...more...



Benson, Oxfordshire

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Benson, Oxfordshire

Benson is a village and civil parish in South Oxfordshire, England. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 4,754. The village is about 1  ⁄ miles (2.4 km) north of Wallingford at the foot of the Chiltern Hills at the confluence of a chalk stream (Ewelme Brook) and the River Thames, next to Benson Lock. Being on the northern (eastern) bank of the Thames, Benson has always been in Oxfordshire, unlike nearby Wallingford and Abingdon, Oxfordshire, which were part of Berkshire until the 1974 boundary changes. The village is on river silts and gravel, just above the surrounding marshy land that gives nearby settlements of Preston Crowmarsh, Crowmarsh Gifford, and Rokemarsh their names. The fertile land which surrounds the village meant that farming was the main source of employment until the 20th century. Toponym The toponym was originally Villam Regiam, "The King's Town". Later it was Bensington, from the Old English Bænesingtun meaning "farmstead of the people of [a man called] Benesa". The villag ...more...



Larry Echo Hawk

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Larry Echo Hawk

Larry J. Echo Hawk (born August 2, 1948) is an attorney, legal scholar and politician. In 2012, he was named as a general authority of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). On May 20, 2009, Echo Hawk joined the administration of U.S. President Barack Obama as the United States Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs.[1] He previously served as the elected Attorney General of Idaho from 1991 to 1995, being the first Native American elected to that position.[2] He also served two terms in the State House of Idaho. Early life, marriage and education Echo Hawk was born into the federally recognized Pawnee Nation in Cody, Wyoming, in 1948 to Ernest and Emma Jane Echo Hawk, where his father worked with the oil and gas industry. He was enrolled as a member of the tribe, whose reservation is in Oklahoma. Shortly before Larry was to start first grade, the family moved to Farmington, New Mexico. Larry and his family joined the LDS Church when he was 14.[3] He later baptized Tere ...more...



Bishop of Elphin

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Bishop of Elphin

The Cathedral of St John the Baptist, Sligo, the episcopal seat of the Church of Ireland bishops of Elphin. The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Sligo, the episcopal seat of the Roman Catholic bishops of Elphin. The Bishop of Elphin (Irish: Easpag Ail Finn) is an episcopal title which takes its name after the village of Elphin, County Roscommon, Ireland. In the Roman Catholic Church it remains a separate title, but in the Church of Ireland it has been united with other bishoprics. History From the time Christianity first arrived in Ireland in the first half of the 5th century (in the form of Palladius's mission), the early church was centred around monastic settlements. Patrick founded such a settlement in an area known as Corcoghlan, now known as Elphin, in 434 or 435. Following the Synod of Rathbreasail in the year 1111, the Diocese of Elphin was formally established.[1][2] Following the Reformation of the 16th century and related turmoil, there were parallel apostolic successions. In the ...more...



Ripon College Cuddesdon

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Ripon College Cuddesdon

Ripon College Cuddesdon is a Church of England theological college in Cuddesdon, a village 5.5 miles (8.9 km) outside Oxford, England. It is the largest ministry training institution in the Church of England. History Ripon College Cuddesdon was formed from an amalgamation in 1975 of Cuddesdon College and Ripon Hall. The name of the college, which is incorporated by royal charter, deliberately contains no comma. Cuddesdon College Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford, founded Cuddesdon College in April 1853, as the Oxford Diocesan Seminary to train graduates from Oxford and Cambridge. Its original buildings, designed by the Diocesan Architect for Oxford G. E. Street, were built opposite the Cuddesdon Palace. The Neo-Gothic buildings are regarded as the first important design by Street and influenced much of his later work.[1] The College opened in June 1854 and quickly became known as Cuddesdon College. A larger chapel, built at first-floor level and with decorations by Clayton and Bell, was added by Street i ...more...



List of people from La Jolla

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List of people from La Jolla

La Jolla This is a list of notable people who were born or who lived a significant amount of time in La Jolla, San Diego, California. Notable residentsSports Buzzie Bavasi - Major League Baseball executive, lived in La Jolla from 1968 until death in 2008 Rolf Benirschke - placekicker for San Diego Chargers, graduated from La Jolla High School Dan Bilzerian - professional poker player, lives in La Jolla Debbie Bramwell-Washington - IFBB professional bodybuilder Chase Budinger - NBA player for Minnesota Timberwolves, born in La Jolla Conor Chinn - professional soccer player for New York Red Bulls, born in La Jolla Gerry Driscoll - championship sailor, businessperson, lived in La Jolla until death in 2011 Dick Enberg - sportscaster for NBC and CBS Sports, resided in La Jolla Doug Flutie - quarterback for San Diego Chargers and other NFL teams J. J. Isler - yachtswoman, two-time Olympic medalist and America's Cup competitor, born in La Jolla Gene Littler - professional golfer, 1961 U.S. O ...more...



2017–18 Isthmian League

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2017–18 Isthmian League

The 2017–18 season is the 103rd season of the Isthmian League, which is an English football competition featuring semi-professional and amateur clubs from London, East and South East England. It is also the twelfth season for the current incarnations of the Premier, North and South Divisions and the first as the Bostik League following a sponsorship deal with Bostik. Premier Division Team changes To the Premier Division Promoted from Division One North Brightlingsea Regent Thurrock Promoted from Division One South Tooting & Mitcham United Dorking Wanderers Relegated from National League South Margate From the Premier Division Promoted to National League South Havant & Waterlooville Bognor Regis Town Relegated to the North Division Canvey Island AFC Sudbury Grays Athletic League table Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation 1 Dulwich Hamlet 38 23 9 6 77 36 +41 78 Promotion to the National League North / South 2 Folkestone Invicta 38 22 7 9 ...more...



Holyrood Abbey

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Holyrood Abbey

The ruins of Holyrood Abbey Holyrood Abbey is a ruined abbey of the Canons Regular in Edinburgh, Scotland. The abbey was founded in 1128 by King David I. During the 15th century, the abbey guesthouse was developed into a royal residence, and after the Scottish Reformation the Palace of Holyroodhouse was expanded further. The abbey church was used as a parish church until the 17th century, and has been ruined since the 18th century. The remaining walls of the abbey lie adjacent to the palace, at the eastern end of Edinburgh's Royal Mile. The site of the abbey is protected as a scheduled monument. Etymology of name Rood is an old word for the cross which Jesus Christ was crucified upon; thus the name Holyrood is equivalent to "Holy Cross." History The Chapel Royal at the time of James VII Legend relates that in 1127, while King David I was hunting in the forests to the east of Edinburgh during the Feast of the Cross, he was thrown from his horse after it had been startled by a hart. According to var ...more...



Johnny Carson

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Johnny Carson

John William Carson (October 23, 1925 – January 23, 2005) was an American television host, comedian, writer, and producer. He is best known as the host of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (1962–1992). Carson received six Emmy Awards, the Television Academy's 1980 Governor's Award, and a 1985 Peabody Award. He was inducted into the Television Academy Hall of Fame in 1987. Carson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1992 and received a Kennedy Center Honor in 1993.[1] Although his show was already successful by the end of the 1960s, it was during the 1970s that Carson became an American icon and remained so even after his retirement in 1992. He adopted a casual, conversational approach with extensive interaction with guests, an approach pioneered by Arthur Godfrey and previous Tonight Show hosts Steve Allen and Jack Paar. Former late-night host and friend David Letterman had cited Carson's influence.[2] Early life and career John William Carson was born on October 23, 1925, in Corning, Iowa ...more...



The Hoya

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The Hoya

The Hoya, founded in 1920, is the oldest and largest student newspaper of Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., serving as the university’s newspaper of record. The Hoya is a once-weekly, student-run paper that prints every Friday and online regularly throughout the year, with a print circulation of 5,000 during the academic year. The newspaper has four main editorial sections: News, Opinion, Sports and The Guide, a weekly arts and lifestyle magazine. It also publishes several annual special issues including a New Student Guide, a basketball preview and biannual food and fashion issues. Although The Hoya is not financially independent from the university, it is produced, managed and edited entirely by students. Over 200 students are involved in the publication of the paper. History The Leavey Center, opened in 1988, is home to The Hoya offices. Founding The first issue of The Hoya was published on January 14, 1920, under the editorship of Joseph R. Mickler, Jr. Student journalism at Georgetown ca ...more...



Roman Catholic Diocese of Dunedin

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Roman Catholic Diocese of Dunedin

The Latin Rite Catholic Diocese of Dunedin is a suffragan diocese of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Wellington. It was formed on 26 November 1869 from a portion of the territory in the Diocese of Wellington, before it was elevated to an archdiocese. St. Joseph's Cathedral, Dunedin Ordinaries of Dunedin Tenure Incumbent Life 1869 to 1895 Patrick Moran (1823 to 1895) 1896 to 1918 Michael Verdon (1838 to 1918) 1920 to 1957 James Whyte (1868 to 1957) 1957 to 1985 John Patrick Kavanagh (1913 to 1985) 1985 to 2004 Leonard Anthony Boyle (1930 to 2016) 2004 to 2018 Colin David Campbell (b. 1941) 2018 to present Michael Dooley (b. 1961) Other bishops Hugh John O'Neill Coadjutor Bishop of Dunedin (1943-1946) Current bishops Michael Dooley, 7th Bishop of Dunedin Colin David Campbell, Bishop Emeritus of Dunedin. Cathedral St. Joseph's Cathedral, Dunedin Secondary schools Kavanagh College, Dunedin St Kevin's College, Oamaru St Peter's College, Gore Verdon College, Invercargill ...more...



Culham

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Culham

Culham is a village and civil parish in a bend of the River Thames, 1 mile (1.6 km) south of Abingdon in Oxfordshire. The parish includes Culham Science Centre and the European School, Culham. The parish is bounded by the Thames to the north, west and south, and by present and former field boundaries to the east. It is low-lying and fairly flat, rising from the Thames floodplain in the south to a north-facing escarpment in the north up to 260 feet (80 m) above sea level.[1] The 2011 Census recorded its population as 453.[2] Manor The toponym comes from the Old English Cula's hamm, referring to the village's position in a bend of the Thames. Culham is known to have existed by the reign of King Coenwulf of Mercia early in the 9th century, by which time the manor belonged to Abingdon Abbey. Soon after the Norman conquest of England part of the manor was seized by William the Conqueror, but the land was restored to the abbey and remained in its possession until the dissolution of the monasteries in 1538.[3] T ...more...



The World's Billionaires 2015

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The World's Billionaires 2015

The World's Billionaires 2015 edition was the 29th annual ranking of The World's Billionaires by Forbes magazine. The list estimated the net worth of the world's richest people. The new list was released online on March 2, 2015. As of 2015, Bill Gates has been placed at the top of this list 16 times. Annual list Bill Gates was again named the richest person in the world in Forbes Magazine's annual list of the world's billionaires. This is the 16th time that the founder of Microsoft has claimed the top spot. Carlos Slim, Mexican business magnate, came in second as he had in 2014. Warren Buffett of Berkshire Hathaway placed third while the founder of Zara, Amancio Ortega of Spain, slipped down a position from last year to number four. Larry Ellison, the founder of Oracle rounded off the top five. Christy Walton was the highest ranking female at number eight. America's Evan Spiegel, co-founder of photo messaging app Snapchat, became the youngest billionaire this year at the age of 24. At age 99, David Rockefell ...more...



Henry Wakefield (bishop of Birmingham)

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Henry Wakefield (bishop of Birmingham)

Henry Russell Wakefield was an Anglican Bishop and author[1] in the first quarter of the 20th century.[2] Born on 1 December 1854 he was educated at Tonbridge School and the University of Bonn. Ordained in 1877 after a period at Ripon College Cuddesdon,[3] following two London curacies he was Incumbent at several parishes [4] before senior posts as Prebendary of St Paul’s Cathedral, Dean of Norwich[5] and finally Bishop of Birmingham. He was also a member of the London School Board representing the Marylebone Division from 1897-1900[6] and Mayor of St Marylebone in 1903-1905.[3] Described in his Times obituary as a "layman’s bishop" he died on 9 January 1933.[7] Between 1908 and 1914 he was the sole Church of England representative on the Executive Committee of the National Service League [8] Notes “A Fortnight at the Front”, 1915; “Simple Answers to some Great Questions”, 1916; “Life won through Death”, 1917; and “The Church after the War” 1918 British Library Catalogue accessed 21:20 June 12th 2008 ...more...



Black Act

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Black Act

The Black Act (9 Geo. 1 c. 22) was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain passed in 1723 in response to a series of raids by two groups of poachers, known as the Blacks. Arising in the aftermath of the South Sea Bubble's collapse and the ensuing economic downturn, the Blacks gained their name from their habit of blacking their faces when undertaking poaching raids. They quickly demonstrated both "a calculated programme of action, and a conscious social resentment", and their activities led to the introduction of the Black Act to Parliament on 26 April 1723; it came into force on 27 May. The Act introduced the death penalty for over 50 criminal offences, including being found in a forest while disguised, and "no other single statute passed during the eighteenth century equalled [the Black Act] in severity, and none appointed the punishment of death in so many cases". Following a criminal law reform campaign in the early 19th century, it was largely repealed on 8 July 1823, when a reform bill introduced by R ...more...



Jonathan Firth

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Jonathan Firth

Jonathan Stephen Firth (born 6 April 1967) is an English actor best known for his roles in such noted British television productions as Middlemarch, Far from the Madding Crowd, and Victoria & Albert. He lives in Islington, North London. Early life Jonathan Firth was born in Brentwood, Essex, England, to Shirley Jean (née Rolles) and David Norman Lewis Firth. His parents were both children of Methodist missionaries in India, who worked as teachers in Nigeria after their marriage.[1] He is the younger brother of actor Colin Firth and voice coach Kate Firth. The family moved many times, from Billericay to Brentwood, Essex, and then to St. Louis, Missouri (USA) for a year when Jonathan was five.[1] Upon returning to England the family settled in Winchester, Hampshire, where his father became a history lecturer at King Alfred's College and his mother was a comparative religion lecturer at King Alfred's College, Winchester (now the University of Winchester).[1] Firth studied at Central School of Speech and ...more...



Hensley Henson

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Hensley Henson

Herbert Hensley Henson (8 November 1863 – 27 September 1947) was an Anglican priest, scholar and controversialist. He was Bishop of Hereford, 1918–20 and Bishop of Durham, 1920–39. The son of a zealous member of the Plymouth Brethren, Henson was not allowed to go to school until he was fourteen, and was largely self-educated. He was admitted to the University of Oxford, and gained a first-class degree in 1884. In the same year he was elected as a Fellow of All Souls, where he began to make a reputation as a speaker. He was ordained as a priest in 1888. Feeling a vocation to minister to the urban poor, Henson served in the East End of London and Barking before becoming chaplain of an ancient hospice in Ilford in 1895. In 1900 he was appointed to the high-profile post of vicar of St Margaret's, Westminster and canon of Westminster Abbey. While there, and as Dean of Durham (1913–18), he wrote prolifically and sometimes controversially. The Anglo-Catholic wing of the Church took exception to his liberal theolog ...more...



Leonard Williams (bishop)

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Leonard Williams (bishop)

William Leonard Williams (1829–1916) was an Anglican Bishop of Waiapu. He was regarded as an eminent scholar of the Māori language. Early life A 1930 publication of his book Williams was born on the 22 July 1829 at Paihia, Bay of Islands, New Zealand. He was the third child and first son of William Williams of the Church Mission Society and his wife, Jane. His father was the first Bishop of Waiapu, Leonard Williams was the third bishop, and his son, Herbert Williams, was the 6th bishop of Waiapu. He was educated in New Zealand before attending Magdelen Hall (now Hertford College, Oxford) from 1847 where he obtained a third class honours degree in June 1852. He became a member of the Church Missionary Society and undertook theological training at the Church Missionary Society College, Islington. He was admitted to Deacon's Orders by the Bishop of London on 22 March 1853. Leonard met the daughters of Mr. J. B. Wanklyn of Halecat, Witherslack, Cumbria when visiting his aunt, Catherine Heathcote, at Sou ...more...



James Hector

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James Hector

Sir James Hector KCMG FRS FRSE(16 March 1834 – 6 November 1907) was a Scottish geologist, naturalist, and surgeon who accompanied the Palliser Expedition as a surgeon and geologist. He went on to have a lengthy career as a government employed man of science in New Zealand, and during this period he dominated the Colony's scientific institutions in a way that no single man has since. Early life He was born at 11 Danube Street in Stockbridge, Edinburgh the son of Alexander Hector WS and his wife, Margaret Macrostie. He attended the Edinburgh Academy from 1844 to 1845. At 14, he began articles as an actuary at his father's office. He joined University of Edinburgh as a medical student and received his medical degree in 1856 at the age of 22. Palliser expedition Shortly after receiving his medical degree, upon the recommendation of Sir Roderick Murchison – director-general of the British Geological Survey – Hector was appointed geologist on the Palliser Expedition under the command of John Palliser. The goal o ...more...



John Ponsonby, 4th Earl of Bessborough

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John Ponsonby, 4th Earl of Bessborough

John William Ponsonby, 4th Earl of Bessborough, PC (31 August 1781 – 16 May 1847), known as Viscount Duncannon from 1793 to 1844, was a British Whig politician. He was notably Home Secretary in 1834 and served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland between 1846 and 1847, the first years of the Great Famine. Background and education Henrietta Ponsonby, Countess of Bessborough with her sons William and John by John Hoppner (1787) A member of the prominent Ponsonby family of Cumberland, he was the eldest son of Frederick Ponsonby, 3rd Earl of Bessborough, and Lady Henrietta Frances, daughter of John Spencer, 1st Earl Spencer. Sir Frederick Cavendish Ponsonby and William Ponsonby, 1st Baron de Mauley, were his younger brothers, while Lady Caroline Lamb was his younger sister. Ponsonby's mother was Lord Granville's lover prior to his marriage to Lady Harriet Cavendish, the Countess of Bessborough's niece. Lord Granville fathered two illegitimate children through her: Harriette Stewart and George Stewart. Lord Bessbo ...more...



Francis Tebbs Havergal

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Francis Tebbs Havergal

Francis Tebbs Havergal (1829–1890), author and editor. The youngest son of William Henry Havergal was born 27 Aug. 1829. He was a bible-clerk of New College, Oxford (B.A. 1852, M.A. 1857); he became vicar-choral in Hereford Cathedral, 1853–1874, vicar of Pipe and Lyde, 1861–74, and of Upton Bishop, 1874–90, and prebendary of Hereford, 1877–90. He died at Upton on 27 July 1890. Publications The Visitor's Hand Guide to Hereford Cathedral, 1869; 6th ed. 1882. Fasti Herefordenses, 1869. Monumental Inscriptions in Hereford Cathedral, 1881. Records of Upton Bishop, 1883. Herefordshire Words and Phrases, 1887. Memorials of the Rev. Sir Frederick Arthur Gore Ouseley, Baronet, 1889. ...more...



Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh

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Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh

The Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh was the Ordinary of the Church of Ireland diocese of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh, comprising the southern part of County Galway and a small area of County Roscommon, Republic of Ireland. History Roland Lynch, Bishop of Kilmacduagh, held the see of Clonfert "in commendam" from 1602 until his death in 1625; thereafter the sees of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh were united. Under the Church Temporalities (Ireland) Act 1833, the see of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh were united with Killaloe and Kilfenora to form the united bishopric of Killaloe and Clonfert in 1834.[1] List of bishops Bishops of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh From Until Incumbent Notes 1627 1643 Robert Dawson Nominated 29 August 1626; consecrated 4 May 1627; died 13 April 1643 1644 1664 William Bailie Nominated 22 December 1643; consecrated 2 May 1644; died 11 August 1664 1664 1684 Edward Wolley Nominated 5 November 1664; consecrated 16 April 1665; died 1684; also known as Edward Woolly 1684 1690 See vacant During ...more...



1685

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1685

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 1685. 1685 was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1685th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 685th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1685, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. July 6: Battle of Sedgemoor. EventsJanuary–June February 6 – Catholic James Stuart, Duke of York, becomes King James II of England and Ireland ,and King James VII of Scotland, in succession to his brother Charles II (1630–1685), King of England, Scotland, and Ireland since 1660. James II and VII reigns until deposed, in 1688. February 20 – René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, intending to establish a colony near the mouth of the Mississippi River, lands with 200 surviving colonists at Matagorda Bay on the Te ...more...



Edward Synge (bishop of Elphin)

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Edward Synge (bishop of Elphin)

Edward Synge (1691–1762) was an Anglican bishop in the Church of Ireland who was the Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh (1730–1732), Bishop of Cloyne (1732–1734), Bishop of Ferns and Leighlin (1734–1740) and Bishop of Elphin (1740–1762). His father was Edward Synge, Archbishop of Tuam. His grandfather was Edward Synge, Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross and his brother Nicholas Synge Bishop of Killaloe. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, obtaining a Master of Arts degree in 1712 and a Doctorate of Divinity in 1728. He was briefly Provost of Tuam and Chancellor of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, before he was nominated the Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 14 May 1730 and consecrated on 7 June 1730.[1] He was subsequently translated to Cloyne on 22 March 1732,[2] then to Ferns and Leighlin on 8 February 1734,[3] and finally to Elphin on 15 May 1740.[4] Synge's musical ability made a strong impression on Handel when the composer was in Dublin; Handel referred to Synge as 'a Nobleman very learned in ...more...



Jean Baptiste Pompallier

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Jean Baptiste Pompallier

Jean-Baptiste François Pompallier (11 December 1802 – 21 December 1871) was the first Roman Catholic bishop in New Zealand and, with priests and brothers of the Marist order, he organised the Roman Catholic Church throughout the country. He was born in Lyon, France. He arrived in New Zealand in 1838 as Vicar Apostolic of Western Oceania, but made New Zealand the centre of his operations. In 1848 he became the first Roman Catholic Bishop of Auckland. He returned to France in 1868 and died in Puteaux, near Paris, on 21 December 1871, aged 69. His exhumed remains were returned to New Zealand in 2001 and they were re-interred under the altar at St Mary's, Motuti, in 2002. Appointment and voyage On Trinity Sunday 1835, the pope created the Vicariate Apostolic of Western Oceania. The priests chosen for Western Oceania came from the newly founded French order the Society of Mary (Marists) formed by Father Jean-Claude Colin in Lyon. On 29 April 1836 Pope Gregory XVI endorsed the Marist order; he assigned to it the ...more...



List of schools in West Sussex

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List of schools in West Sussex

This is a list of schools in West Sussex, England. State-funded schoolsPrimary schools Albourne CofE Primary School, Albourne Aldingbourne Primary School, Westergate All Saints CofE Primary, Horsham Amberley CofE First School, Amberley Arundel CofE Primary School, Arundel Arunside School, Horsham Ashington CofE First School, Ashington Ashurst CofE Primary School, Steyning Ashurst Wood Primary School, Ashurst Wood Balcombe CofE Controlled Primary School, Balcombe Baldwins Hill Primary School, East Grinstead Barnham Primary School, Barnham Bartons Infant School, Bognor Regis Bewbush Academy, Crawley Billingshurst Infant School, Billingshurst Billingshurst Junior School, Billingshurst Birchwood Grove Community Primary School, Burgess Hill Birdham CofE Primary School, Birdham Bishop Tufnell CofE Infant School, Felpham Bishop Tufnell CofE Junior School, Felpham Blackthorns Community Primary School, Lindfield Blackwell Primary School, East Grinstead Bognor Regis Nursery S ...more...



List of serial killers by number of victims

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List of serial killers by number of victims

A serial killer is a person who murders three or more people, in two or more separate events over a period of time, for primarily psychological reasons.[1] There are gaps of time between the killings, which may range from a few hours to many years. This list shows serial killers from the 20th century to present day by number of victims. In many cases, the exact number of victims assigned to a serial killer is not known, and even if that person is convicted of a few, there can be the possibility that he/she killed many more. The complex nature of serial killers, their crimes, discrepancies caused by geographic location and/or time, and the investigations related to these persons results in difficulties in organization and ranking. To address this, multiple categories have been provided in order to more accurately describe the nature of certain serial murders. This is not a reflection of an individual's overall rank which may or may not vary depending on personal opinion concerning the nature and circumstances ...more...



List of Western Michigan University alumni

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List of Western Michigan University alumni

The following is a list of Western Michigan University alumni. Note some of the individuals listed may have only attended the university at one point and not graduated. Arts and literature Bonnie Jo Campbell, author Xavier Davis, pianist Gwen Frostic, artist, naturalist, poet laureate of Michigan, namesake of WMU's Frostic School of Art, 1929 Bachelor of Arts James D. Griffioen, writer and photographer Patrick Maher, author[1] Hideaki Miyamura, potter Howard Norman, novelist Arleta Richardson, author Carey Salerno, poet Jamie Thomas, poet Terry Wooten, poet Business Robert Bobb, Emergency Financial Manager for the Detroit Public Schools Alec Gores, billionaire president of the Gores Group with an estimated net worth of $1.3 billion Gerrard Wendell Haworth, businessman, founder of Haworth, Inc. Richard Haworth, businessman, Chairman of Haworth, Inc., WMU trustee John Roa, entrepreneur and investor, founder of ÄKTA & SocialCrunch Timothy E. Hoeksema (1972), founder ...more...



Exton, Hampshire

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Exton, Hampshire

Exton is a small village and civil parish in the City of Winchester district of Hampshire, England. The village lies in the South Downs National Park, on the west bank of the River Meon, immediately to the north of Corhampton. It is located two miles north east of Droxford and five miles north east of Bishops Waltham. Its name first appears in 940 as East Seaxnatune, meaning "farmstead of the East Saxons". The parish straddles the Meon Valley, including higher ground of the South Downs to either side, with Old Winchester Hill to the east and the southern part of Beacon Hill (shared with Warnford parish) to the west. It is crossed from east to west by the present temporary route of the South Downs Way long distance footpath. The A32 and the Meon Valley Railway footpath cross from north to south. The parish contains numerous archaeological sites including a Mesolithic flint working site, Bronze Age bowl barrows and the Iron Age fort at Old Winchester Hill. There are also Roman and Dark Age sites and the site ...more...



Evans Gambit

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Evans Gambit

The Evans Gambit is a chess opening characterised by the moves: 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 The Evans Gambit is an aggressive line of the Giuoco Piano, which normally continues with the positional moves 4.c3 or 4.d3. White offers a pawn to divert the Black bishop on c5. If Black accepts, White can follow up with c3 and d4, ripping open the center, while also opening diagonals to play Ba3 or Qb3 at some point, preventing Black from castling kingside and threatening the f7-pawn respectively. If Black declines, the b4-pawn stakes out space on the queenside, and White can follow up with a4 later in the game, potentially gaining a tempo by threatening to trap Black's dark-square bishop. According to Reuben Fine, the Evans Gambit poses a challenge for Black since the usual defenses (play ...d6 and/or give back the gambit pawn) are more difficult to pull off than with other gambits. (Interestingly, Fine was beaten by this gambit in a friendly game against Bobby Fischer, in just 17 moves. ) The Encyclopaedia of Ch ...more...



1646

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1646

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 1646. Battles of La Naval de Manila 1646 was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1646th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 646th year of the 2nd millennium, the 46th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1646, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. It is one of eight years (CE) to contain each Roman numeral once (1000(M)+500(D)+100(C)+(-10(X)+50(L))+5(V)+1(I) = 1646). EventsJanuary–June February 16 – First English Civil War – The Battle of Great Torrington, Devon: Royalist resistance in the West Country is ended. February 28 – Roger Scott is tried in Massachusetts, for sleeping in church. March 6 – Joseph Jenkes obtains the first colonial machine patent, in Massachusetts. March 15 – Start of thye Battles of La Naval de Ma ...more...



Saints in Anglicanism

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Saints in Anglicanism

The term "saint" is a context-specific translation of the Latin "sanctus", meaning sacred, and originally referred to a sacred (extremely holy) person—however, since the 10th century, the Church has reserved the status of saint to people its official canon law (including calendar) has recognised for outstanding Christian service and conduct. When the Church of England was in union with Rome saints arose in the form of canonisation. Those martyrs and confessors recognised before the 10th century and since the break with Rome in the 16th century are generally still considered both "saints" and "Saints".[1] "Hero/heroine" are sometimes to refer to those holy people whom the church synod or an individual church praises as having had special benevolence who have lived and died since the split with Rome. It considers such muted terms a reversion to a more simple and cautious doctrine which emphasises empowerment (subsidiarity) to all members and components of the church. The provinces of the Anglican Communion the ...more...



Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island

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Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island

The Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island is a diocese of the Ecclesiastical Province of Canada of the Anglican Church of Canada. It encompasses the provinces of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island and has two cathedrals: All Saints' in Halifax and St. Peter's in Charlottetown. It is the oldest Anglican diocese outside the British Islands. Its de facto see city is Halifax (where the synod offices are located), and its roughly 24 400 Anglicans distributed in 239 congregations are served by approximately 153 clergy and 330 lay readers according to the last available data. According to the 2001 census, 120,315 Nova Scotians identified themselves as Anglicans (13% of the province's population), while 6525 Prince Edward Islanders did the same. History The first recorded Anglican services in Nova Scotia were held in Annapolis Royal on October 10, 1710 and in Cape Breton Island in 1745. The Diocese was created on 11 August 1787 by Letters Patent of George III which "erected the Province of Nova Scotia in ...more...



Chancellor of the Order of the Garter

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Chancellor of the Order of the Garter

The Chancellor of the Order of the Garter is an officer of the Order of the Garter. Officers of the Order of the Garter (left to right): Secretary (barely visible), Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter Principal King of Arms, Register, Prelate, Chancellor History of the office When the Order of the Garter was founded in 1348 at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, by Edward III of England three officers were initially appointed to serve them, the Prelate, the Register and the Usher. In 1477 Edward IV decreed that the further position of Chancellor should be created to be responsible for the seal and its use. Accommodation was to be provided in what came to be called the Chancellor's Tower. The position of Chancellor was to be second in seniority to the Prelate and was granted to Richard Beauchamp, Bishop of Salisbury, and his successors in that position. At that time Windsor Chapel lay geographically in the See of Salisbury, although as a royal chapel it did not come under the direct jurisdiction of ...more...



Bishop's University

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Bishop's University

Bishop's University (French: Université Bishop's) is an English-language and predominantly undergraduate university in Lennoxville, Quebec, Canada. Bishop's is one of three universities in the province of Quebec that teach primarily in English (the others being McGill University and Concordia University, both in Montreal). The university shares a campus with its neighbour, Champlain College Lennoxville, an English-language public college. It remains one of Canada's few primarily undergraduate universities. Established in 1843 as Bishop's College and affiliated with the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge in 1853, the school remained under the Anglican church's direction from its founding until 1947. Since that time, the university has been a non-denominational institution. Bishop's University has graduated fifteen Rhodes Scholars. History Bishop's College was established by Bishop George Jehoshaphat Mountain on December 9, 1843, in Lennoxville, Quebec, for the education of members of the C ...more...



Apostolic succession

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Apostolic succession

Episcopal consecration of Deodatus; Claude Bassot (1580-1630). Apostolic succession is the method whereby the ministry of the Christian Church is held to be derived from the apostles by a continuous succession, which has usually been associated with a claim that the succession is through a series of bishops.[1] This series was seen originally as that of the bishops of a particular see founded by one or more of the apostles. According to historian Justo L. González, apostolic succession is generally understood today as meaning a series of bishops, regardless of see, each consecrated by other bishops, themselves consecrated similarly in a succession going back to the apostles.[2] According to the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue Between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church, "apostolic succession" means more than a mere transmission of powers. It is succession in a Church which witnesses to the apostolic faith, in communion with the other Churches, witnesses of the same apostolic ...more...



Diocese of Kimberley and Kuruman

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Diocese of Kimberley and Kuruman

The Diocese of Kimberley and Kuruman is a diocese in the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, and encompasses the area around Kimberley and Kuruman and overlaps the Northern Cape Province and North West Province of South Africa. It is presided over by the Bishop of Kimberley and Kuruman, currently Ossie Swartz. The seat of the Bishop of Kimberley and Kuruman is at St Cyprian's Cathedral, Kimberley. There have so far been 12 bishops of the See, though one of these served for two different periods of time. Formation of the diocese The Anglican presence on the Diamond Fields and in Kimberley’s hinterland, from the early 1870s, was at first administered from Bloemfontein, initially under Allan Webb, the oldest parish here being St Mary's, Barkly West. By the early 1890s, however, there was a feeling in some quarters that the Diocese of Bloemfontein was too big and there were proposals for the formation of a separate Bishopric with its seat in Kimberley. But in the event the bishops decided upon establishing the m ...more...



Southern Records

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Southern Records

Southern Records is an independent record label closely associated with Crass Records, Corpus Christi Records and Dischord Records. It is based in London and previously had offices in Chicago (closed November 2008), Le Havre (closed July 2009) and Berlin (closed December 2008). Southern was originally a recording studio owned and operated by John Loder.[1] Loder became friends with musician, author and poet Penny Rimbaud and collaborated with him and others in an experimental progressive band called EXIT. Rimbaud later formed anarchist punk band Crass, and Southern Studios and John Loder were the obvious choice of venue for the recording of their first album The Feeding of the 5000, originally released on Small Wonder Records.[1] When Small Wonder encountered problems manufacturing the release, due to the allegedly blasphemous nature of some of the lyrics, Crass determined they would need to start their own label to take full responsibility and control of their output. Loder facilitated this by acting as the ...more...



Sir Ralph Gore, 4th Baronet

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Sir Ralph Gore, 4th Baronet

Sir Ralph Gore, 4th Baronet (c. 1675 – 23 February 1733) was a Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. He is now chiefly remembered for building Belle Isle Castle. The Gore Baronetcy, of Magherabegg in the County of Donegal, was created in the Baronetage of Ireland on 2 February 1622 for Paul Gore (shown also as 1st baronet of Manor Gore, the Anglicized version). Ralph was the eldest son of Sir William Gore, 3rd Baronet and his wife Hannah Hamilton, daughter and co-heiress of James Hamilton of Manorhamilton and niece of Gustavus Hamilton, 1st Viscount Boyne. Ralph inherited the estate of Manorhamilton from his mother. He was appointed High Sheriff of Leitrim for 1710.[1] The fourth Baronet served as Chancellor of the Irish Exchequer and as Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. He represented Donegal Borough in the Irish House of Commons from 1703 until 1713 and then Donegal County from 1713 until 1727. Subsequently, he sat for Clogher until his death in 1733. Family He married firstly Elizabeth Colville, ...more...



Temple of Concordia, Agrigento

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Temple of Concordia, Agrigento

The Temple of Concordia (Italian: Tempio della Concordia) is an ancient Greek temple in the Valle dei Templi (Valley of the Temples) in Agrigento (Greek: Akragas) on the south coast of Sicily, Italy. It is the largest and best-preserved Doric temple in Sicily and one of the best-preserved Greek temples in general, especially of the Doric order. Overview The temple was built c. 440–430 BC. The well-preserved peristasis of six by thirteen columns stands on a crepidoma of four steps (measuring 39.42 m × 16.92 m (129.3 ft × 55.5 ft), and 8.93 m (29.3 ft) high) The cella measures 28.36 m × 9.4 m (93.0 ft × 30.8 ft). The columns are 6 m (20 ft) high and carved with twenty flutes and harmonious entasis (tapering at the tops of the columns and swelling around the middles). It is constructed, like the nearby Temple of Juno, on a solid base designed to overcome the unevenness of the rocky terrain. It has been conventionally named after Concordia, the Roman goddess of harmony, for the Roman-era Latin inscription found ...more...



1700 in Ireland

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1700 in Ireland

Events from the year 1700 in Ireland. Events Laurence Hyde, Earl of Rochester December 28 – Laurence Hyde, 1st Earl of Rochester, appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.[1][2] Arts and literature c. March – the Yellow Book of Lecan is acquired by antiquary Edward Lhuyd. An edition of the late 16th-century Scots poet Alexander Montgomerie's The Cherrie and the Slae is printed in Ulster. Births Wikisource has original text related to this article: James Arbuckle James Arbuckle, poet and critic (d. 1742)[3] Daniel O'Reilly, Roman Catholic Bishop of Clogher (d. 1778) James Stopford, 1st Earl of Courtown, politician (d. 1770) William O'Brien, 4th Earl of Inchiquin, peer and politician (d. 1777) Deaths Henry Colley, politician (b. 1648) Sir William Gore, 3rd Baronet. References John Cannon (2004). A Dictionary of British History. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-158022-2. Court-Register and Statesmans Remembrancer. G. Robinson. 1782. p. 66. Leslie Stephen; Sir Sid ...more...




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