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William Gore (bishop)

William Gore DD (died 25 February 1784) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland.[1]

He was born the son of the Right Reverend William Gore, Dean of Down and his wife Honora Prittie.

Previously the Dean of Cashel from 1736 to 1758,[2] he was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 17 March 1758, consecrated on 16 April of that year; translated to Elphin on 3 March 1762; and finally to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 5 March 1772.[3]

In 1783 he commissioned the building of a Manor House at Old Connaught, near Bray, but in County Dublin. Old Connaught House still exists today as a private and gated development of apartments in and around the Old House.

He died on 25 February 1784. He had married twice, firstly, Mary, daughter of Chidley Coote and secondly, Mary, daughter of William French, with whom he had a son, William, who became an MP.

References
  1. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
  2. "The Universal magazine", Volume 22 (1758) p22
  3. "Dodsley's annual register" Burke,E: London, J.Dodsley 1780
Church of England titles
Preceded byWilliam Carmichael Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1758–1762 Succeeded byJohn Oswald
Preceded byEdward Synge Bishop of Elphin 1762– 1772 Succeeded byJemmett Browne
Preceded byJohn Averell Bishop of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe 1772– 1784 Succeeded byWilliam Cecil Pery
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List of Old Harrovians

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The following is a list of some notable Old Harrovians , former pupils of Harrow School in the United Kingdom. Civil Service & Administration Sir Alex Allan , Chairman of the Joint Intelligence Committee Robin Butler, Baron Butler of Brockwell , Cabinet Secretary Taylor Combe, Esq., M.A., Secretary of Royal Society, Director of Society of Antiquaries, Keeper of British Museum. Walter Cunliffe, 1st Baron Cunliffe , Governor of the Bank of England John Dalrymple, 10th Earl of Stair , Governor of the Bank of Scotland John Saunders Gilliat , Governor of the Bank of England Henry Grenfell , Governor of the Bank of England Major Sir John Griffin, Courtier Alexander Hardinge, 2nd Baron Hardinge of Penshurst , Private Secretary to Edward VIII and George VI Stuart Holland, 2nd Baron Rotherham , Inspector, Ministry of Pensions Sir William A. Baillie-Hamilton , Private Secretary to the Chief Secretary for Ireland and to the Secretary of State for the Colonies Sir John Rupert "Jock" Colville Sir Kenelm Edward Digby



Alien 3

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List of Hillary Clinton presidential campaign non-political endorsements, 2016

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Booth (surname)

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Dean of Down

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Francis Tebbs Havergal

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Browne

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Edgewater (Barrytown, New York)

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Hubert Burge

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Evans Gambit

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The Evans Gambit is a chess opening characterised by the moves: 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 The Evans Gambit is an aggressive line of the Giuoco Piano , which normally continues with the positional moves 4.c3 or 4.d3. White offers a pawn to divert the Black bishop on c5. If Black accepts, White can follow up with c3 and d4, ripping open the center, while also opening diagonals to play Ba3 or Qb3 at some point, preventing Black from castling kingside and threatening the f7-pawn respectively. If Black declines, the b4-pawn stakes out space on the queenside, and White can follow up with a4 later in the game, potentially gaining a tempo by threatening to trap Black's dark-square bishop. According to Reuben Fine , the Evans Gambit poses a challenge for Black since the usual defenses (play ...d6 and/or give back the gambit pawn) are more difficult to pull off than with other gambits. (Interestingly, Fine was beaten by this gambit in a friendly game against Bobby Fischer , in just 17 moves. ) The Encyclopaedia of Ch



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Dugald Louis Poppelwell (2 July 1863 – 23 September 1939) was a New Zealand lawyer, local politician and conservationist. He was born in Tokomairiro (now Milton ), Otago , New Zealand in 1863. Early life Poppelwell was the tenth of twelve children of his parents, William Poppelwell, a Scottish mariner turned farmer, and his wife, Catherine Robertson McLachlan. His family's house was known for their hospitality, as well as being a centre for local Catholics. He attended the Christian Brothers' Boys' School in Dunedin, and was awarded the Bishop Moran's Scholarship in 1878. He later became a law clerk in the office of Donald Reid in Milton . He was also appointed lieutenant in the Bruce Rifle Volunteers in 1887. From 1889 to 1891 he studied law at the University of Otago , and once he was admitted as a lawyer, he moved to Gore to establish a practice there. Career Poppelwell was a liberal in politics, and was invited to stand for Parliament several times. He refused every time, but was elected to the Gore borou



Chancellor of the Order of the Garter

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The Chancellor of the Order of the Garter is an officer of the Order of the Garter . Officers of the Order of the Garter (left to right): Secretary (barely visible), Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter Principal King of Arms, Register, Prelate, Chancellor History of the office When the Order of the Garter was founded in 1348 at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle , by Edward III of England three officers were initially appointed to serve them, the Prelate, the Register and the Usher. In 1477 Edward IV decreed that the further position of Chancellor should be created to be responsible for the seal and its use. Accommodation was to be provided in what came to be called the Chancellor's Tower. The position of Chancellor was to be second in seniority to the Prelate and was granted to Richard Beauchamp , Bishop of Salisbury, and his successors in that position. At that time Windsor Chapel lay geographically in the See of Salisbury, although as a royal chapel it did not come under the direct jurisdiction of the



Leonard Williams (bishop)

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Edmund Tucker

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Edmund Ronald Tucker (23 March 1902 - 24 July 1964) was the headmaster of the Royal Grammar School , High Wycombe from 1933 till his death in 1964. Born in Colwyn Bay , Denbighshire , he was brought up in Swansea and educated at Swansea Grammar School . He was a scholar of Jesus College, Oxford , where he read Classics , and he later took at external degree (with 1st class honours) at London University . He came to RGS High Wycombe from Pocklington School where he had been Second Master for a number of years. Prior to teaching at Pocklington School, he had taught at Bemrose School , Derby. Tucker was appointed headmaster of RGS High Wycombe on 29 March 1933, succeeding George Wright Arnison, and remained head until his death. The school expanded greatly during his term of office and he was elected to the Headmaster's Conference in 1943. He was, as at 1959, a member of the All Soul's Group , a private group of influential administrators and educators that had first been convened in 1941 by the Warden of All



1801 in Ireland

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Events from the year 1801 in Ireland . Events 1 January – legislative union of Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland completed under the Act of Union 1800 , bringing about the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and abolition of the Parliament of Ireland . 3 November – James Murphy succeeds Hugh O'Reilly as Roman Catholic Bishop of Clogher , an office which he will hold until 1824 . First official, dedicated life-boat in Ireland stationed at Clontarf by the Dublin Ballast Board. Joseph Archer's Statistical Survey of the County Dublin is published. Births 22 September – William Hare, 2nd Earl of Listowel , peer and MP (died 1856 ). 23 November – Philip Gore, 4th Earl of Arran , Anglo-Irish peer and diplomat (died 1884 ). 28 December – Armar Lowry-Corry, 3rd Earl Belmore , politician and High Sheriff (died 1845 ). Deaths 3 January – Henry Prittie, 1st Baron Dunalley , politician (born 1743 ). 19 March – Ambrosio O'Higgins, 1st Marquis of Osorno , viceroy of Peru (b. c. 1720 ). 21 March – P



1675 in Ireland

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Events from the year 1675 in Ireland . Events September 22 – King Charles II of England orders the setting up of a commission to determine the cases of Connacht transplanters. Births February 7 – Hugh Howard , portrait painter (d. 1737 in London) May 4 – Robert FitzGerald, 19th Earl of Kildare (d. 1743 ) George Gore , Attorney-General for Ireland (d. 1753 ) Peter Holmes , politician (d. 1732 ) John Hopkins , poet (d. after 1700 ). Popham Seymour , landowner (k. 1699 ) William Stewart, 2nd Viscount Mountjoy , soldier (d. 1728 ) Approximate date – Charles Jervas , portrait painter (d. 1739 ) Deaths March 16 – Daniel Witter , Church of Ireland Bishop of Killaloe since 1669. March 18 – Arthur Chichester, 1st Earl of Donegall , soldier and politician (b. 1606 ) August 1 – Patrick Duffy , Roman Catholic Bishop of Clogher since 1673. Sir Audley Mervyn , lawyer, politician and soldier (b. 1603 ?) References Moody, T. W.; et al., eds. (1989). A New History of Ireland. 8 : A Chronology of Irish History. Oxford Universi



Bishop of Waterford and Lismore

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The Bishop of Waterford and Lismore is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Waterford and town of Lismore in the Republic of Ireland . The title was used by the Church of Ireland until 1838, and is still used by the Roman Catholic Church . History The bishopric is a union of the episcopal sees of Waterford and Lismore which were united by Pope Urban V in 1363. Following the Reformation , there were parallel successions. In the Church of Ireland the see continued until 1833 when it became part of the archbishopric of Cashel . In 1838, the Anglican province of Cashel lost its metropolitan status and became the bishopric of Cashel and Waterford . It was further united with the Sees of Ossory, Ferns and Leighlin to become the united bishopric of Cashel and Ossory in 1977. In the Roman Catholic Church the title remains as separate bishopric. The present Incumbent is the Most Reverend Alphonsus Cullinan , Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Waterford and Lismore , who was appointed by the H



Dean of Clogher

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The Dean of Clogher is a dignitary of the Diocese of Clogher within the Church of Ireland. The title may be held by any licensed incumbent in the diocese, not necessarily the rector of one of the cathedral parishes of Clogher. The Dean, with the Cathedral chapter, has responsibility for the cathedral life of St Macartan's, Clogher and St Macartin's, Enniskillen . The current incumbent is Kenny Hall, rector of Enniskillen . Deans of Clogher St Macartan's Cathedral, Clogher St Macartan's Cathedral, Enniskillen 1606 Robert Openshawe (afterwards Dean of Connor ) 1617 Robert Barclay or Berkeley 1660/1–1667 John Hodson (afterwards Bishop of Elphin , 1667) 1667–1675 John Roane (afterwards Bishop of Killaloe , 1675) 1675–1682 Richard Tennison (afterwards Bishop of Killala , 1682) 1682–1716 Joseph Williams 1716–1724 William Gore (afterwards Dean of Down , 1724) 1724–1727 Jonathan Smedley 1727/8–1730 Pascal (or Paul) Ducasse 1730 Edward Cressett 1737/8–1743 John Copping 1743–1761 William Langton 1761–1763 Edward Young



Fellows of The Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland

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Fellows of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland are the individuals who have been elected by the Council of the Royal Asiatic Society to further "the investigation of subjects connected with and for the encouragement of science literature and the arts in relation to Asia". Fellows are entitled to use the honorific post-nominal letters F.R.A.S. The Society was established in London in 1823 and received its Royal Charter from King George IV the following year. Since then, the Society has been a forum, through lectures, its journal, and other publications, for scholarship relating to Asian Studies of the highest level. The Royal Asiatic Society is the United Kingdom's senior learned society in Asian Studies , and is patronised by His Royal Highness The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales . At present the Society has about 700 Fellows, of whom half live abroad, and many of whom are highly accomplished and notable scholars of Asian Studies . Notable Fellows Sir Jehangir Hormasji Kothari Henry Thomas



Reichstag fire

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The Reichstag fire ( German : Reichstagsbrand ,   listen   ) was an arson attack on the Reichstag building (home of the German parliament ) in Berlin on 27 February 1933, just one month after Adolf Hitler had been sworn in as Chancellor of Germany . The Nazis stated that Marinus van der Lubbe , a Dutch council communist , was found near the building. The Nazis publicly blamed the fire on communist agitators in general, although in a German court in 1933, it was decided that Van Der Lubbe had acted alone, as he claimed to have done. After the fire, the Reichstag Fire Decree was passed. The fire was used as evidence by the Nazi Party that communists were plotting against the German government. The event is seen as pivotal in the establishment of Nazi Germany . The fire started in the Reichstag building, the assembly location of the German Parliament . A Berlin fire station received an alarm call that the building was on fire shortly after 21:00. By the time the police and firefighters arrived, the main Chambe



Dean of Lismore

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The Dean of Lismore is based at The Cathedral Church of St Carthage, Lismore in the united Diocese of Cashel and Ossory within the Church of Ireland. The current incumbent is Paul Draper. List of Deans of Lismore Lismore Cathedral ?–1549 James Butler 1564 Gerald FitzJames FitzGerald (deprived) 1583–1588 John Prendergast 1610-1614 Thomas Wilson 1614–1622 Michael Boyle (appointed Bishop of Waterford and Lismore 1619, but retained deanery in commendam until 1622) 1622–1622 Edward Brouncker 1622–1627/8 Robert Daborne 1628 John Grey 1630–1639/40 Robert Naylor (afterwards Dean of Limerick ) 1640–1647 Edward Parry (afterwards Bishop of Killaloe 1647) 1647 Richard Parry 1661–1663 Richard Underwood 1664–1666 Hugh Gore (afterwards Bishop of Waterford and Lismore 1666) 1666–1670 Richard Lingard 1670–1678 Michael Ward (afterwards Bishop of Ossory 1678) 1678–1682 Edward Jones (afterwards Bishop of Cloyne 1682) 1683–1690 Barzillai Jones 1691–1719 William Jephson 1719–1720 Arthur Price (afterwards Dean of Ferns , 1720) 1720



St Philip's Cathedral, Birmingham

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The Cathedral Church of Saint Philip is the Church of England cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Birmingham . Built as a parish church and consecrated in 1715, St Philip's became the cathedral of the newly formed Diocese of Birmingham in 1905. St Philip's was built in the early 18th century in the Baroque style by Thomas Archer and is located on Colmore Row , Birmingham , England. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building . St Philip's is the third smallest cathedral in England after Derby and Chelmsford . History Statue of Charles Gore , the 1st Bishop of Birmingham, by Thomas Stirling Lee Foundation St Philip's Church was planned when the nearby medieval church of St Martin in the Bull Ring became insufficient to house its congregation because of the growing population of Birmingham. The land, previously named the Barley Close, was donated by Robert Philips in 1710. It is one of the highest points in the district and is said to be at the same level as the cross on St Paul's Cathedral in London . Fol



History of the Church of England

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Chair of St Augustine, the archiepiscopal throne in Canterbury Cathedral , Kent The formal history of the Church of England is traditionally dated by the Church to the Gregorian mission to England by Saint Augustine of Canterbury in AD 597. As a result of Augustine's mission, Christianity in England , from Anglican perspective, came under the authority of the Pope . However, in 1534 King Henry VIII declared himself to be supreme head of the Church of England . This resulted in a schism with the Papacy. As a result of this schism, many non-Anglicans consider that the Church of England only existed from the 16th century Protestant Reformation . However, Christianity arrived in the British Isles around AD 47 during the Roman Empire according to Gildas's De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae . Archbishop Restitutus and others are known to have attended the council of Arles in 314. Christianity developed roots in Sub-Roman Britain and later Ireland , Scotland , and Pictland . The Anglo-Saxons (Germanic pagans who pr



Fannie Flagg

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Fannie Flagg (born Patricia Neal ; September 21, 1944) is an American actress, comedian and author. She is best known as a semi-regular panelist on the 1973–82 versions of the game show Match Game and for the 1987 novel Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe , which was adapted into the 1991 movie Fried Green Tomatoes . She was nominated for an Academy Award for the screenplay adaptation. Early life Born Patricia Neal in Birmingham, Alabama , Flagg is the only-child of William Hurbert Neal, Jr., a small-business owner and projectionist, and Marion Leona ( née LeGore). Aside from a brief period on the Gulf Coast near the town of Point Clear , Flagg spent her childhood in the Birmingham area. Encouraged by her father, Flagg became interested in writing and performing at an early age, writing her first stage play when she was only 10 years old. As a teen, she entered the Miss Alabama pageant, where she won a scholarship to a local acting school for one year. After that, Flagg began co-hosting a locally p



Henry Wakefield (bishop of Birmingham)

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Henry Russell Wakefield was an Anglican Bishop and author in the first quarter of the 20th century. Born on 1 December 1854 he was educated at Tonbridge School and the University of Bonn . Ordained in 1877 after a period at Ripon College Cuddesdon , following two London curacies he was Incumbent at several parishes before senior posts as Prebendary of St Paul’s Cathedral , Dean of Norwich and finally Bishop of Birmingham . He was also a member of the London School Board representing the Marylebone Division from 1897-1900 and Mayor of St Marylebone in 1903-1905. Described in his Times obituary as a "layman’s bishop" he died on 9 January 1933. Between 1908 and 1914 he was the sole Church of England representative on the Executive Committee of the National Service League Notes “A Fortnight at the Front”, 1915; “Simple Answers to some Great Questions”, 1916; “Life won through Death”, 1917; and “The Church after the War” 1918 British Library Catalogue accessed 21:20 June 12th 2008 The Bishop Of Birmingham. Co



Demon Knight

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Demon Knight (also known as Tales from the Crypt Presents: Demon Knight ) is a 1995 American action comedy horror film directed by Ernest Dickerson , starring Billy Zane , William Sadler , and Jada Pinkett Smith . Brenda Bakke , CCH Pounder , Dick Miller , and Thomas Haden Church co-star. Demon Knight is a feature-length film presented by the HBO series Tales from the Crypt , and features scenes with the Crypt Keeper (voiced by John Kassir , as in the series) at the beginning and end of the film. The film was followed by Bordello of Blood ; although it is not a direct sequel , the key artifact from this film makes an appearance. Plot Prologue A woman had recently murdered a man, who wakes up from the dead to hack his killer, while she takes a bath...right before the corpse could hack the woman to death, whole thing turns out to be a film shoot with the Crypt Keeper directing. The angry Crypt Keeper berates the lead actor for his lack of talent and during his tirade, he suddenly becomes aware of the viewers, f



John F. Kennedy

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John Fitzgerald " Jack " Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to by his initials JFK , was an American statesman who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. Kennedy served at the height of the Cold War , and much of his presidency focused on managing relations with the Soviet Union . He was a member of the Democratic Party who represented Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate prior to becoming president. Kennedy was born in Brookline, Massachusetts , to Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. and Rose Kennedy . A scion of the Kennedy family , he graduated from Harvard University in 1940 before joining the United States Naval Reserve the following year. During World War II , Kennedy commanded a series of PT boats in the Pacific theater and earned the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for his service. After the war, Kennedy represented Massachusetts's 11th congressional district in the Unit

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Ecclesiastical Household

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The Ecclesiastical Household is a part of the Royal Household of the sovereign of the United Kingdom . Reflecting the different constitutions of the churches of England and Scotland , there are separate households in each nation. England The Church of England Ecclesiastical Household comprises the College of Chaplains, and the associated Chapel Royal , the Royal Almonry Office, various Domestic Chaplains , and service Chaplains. The College of Chaplains is under the Clerk of the Closet , an office dating from 1437. It is normally held by a diocesan bishop, who may however remain in office after leaving his see. The current clerk is James Newcome , Bishop of Carlisle . The Deputy Clerk of the Closet , a new office dating only from 1677, is Paul Wright, Domestic Chaplain to the Sovereign and Sub-dean of the Chapel Royal and the sole full-time clerical member of the household. The sub-dean is assisted by Richard Bolton and William Whitcombe, the Priests-in-Ordinary to the Sovereign. The Clerk of the Closet is r



1703 in Ireland

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Events from the year 1703 in Ireland . Events June 11 – Charles Hickman is consecrated as Church of Ireland Bishop of Derry . September 11 – a privateering expedition comprising the ships St George and Cinque Ports commanded by William Dampier leaves Kinsale for South America . Parliament of Ireland assembles, the first under Anne, Queen of Great Britain , and the first for five years. Popery Act (An Act to prevent the further Growth of Popery), enacted by the Parliament of Ireland , reintroduces gavelkind : when a Roman Catholic dies, his estate is to be divided equally among his sons (legitimate or otherwise) if they retain their Catholic faith. Treason Act (Ireland) 1703 , enacted by the Parliament of Ireland, enforces the Protestant line of succession to the British throne . Sir Robert Doyne is appointed as Chief Justice of the Irish Common Pleas . The Parliament of Ireland investigates the possibility of improving navigation on the rivers Shannon and Barrow and constructing a Newry Canal . Births Februar



List of serial killers by number of victims

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A serial killer is a person who murders three or more people, in two or more separate events over a period of time, for primarily psychological reasons. There are gaps of time between the killings, which may range from a few hours to many years. This list shows serial killers from the 20th century to present day by number of victims . In many cases, the exact number of victims assigned to a serial killer is not known, and even if that person is convicted of a few, there can be the possibility that he/she killed many more. The complex nature of serial killers, their crimes, discrepancies caused by geographic location and/or time, and the investigations related to these persons results in difficulties in organization and ranking. To address this, multiple categories have been provided in order to more accurately describe the nature of certain serial murders. This is not a reflection of an individual's overall rank which may or may not vary depending on personal opinion concerning the nature and circumstances o



Alfred Janes

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Alfred George Janes (30 June 1911 – 3 February 1999) was a Welsh artist , who worked in Swansea and Croydon . He experimented with many forms, but is best known for his meticulous still lifes and portraits . He is also remembered as one of The Kardomah Gang , an informal group of young artists in Swansea that included the poets Dylan Thomas and Vernon Watkins , and the composer Daniel Jones . Early life Alfred George Janes was born on 30 June 1911, in the city centre of Swansea , South Wales , above his parents' fruit and flower shop in Castle Square . He attended the Bishop Gore School and then the Swansea School of Art and Crafts (now part of Swansea Metropolitan University ). At the age of 16 he exhibited at the 1928 National Eisteddfod (held in Treorchy that year). Three years later, while he was still concentrating on still lifes and portraits, he was commissioned to paint a portrait of the mayor of Swansea, Arthur Lovell. In 1931 he painted a portrait of a 17-year-old Mervyn Levy , thought to hav



Victor Hay, 21st Earl of Erroll

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Victor Alexander Sereld Hay, 21st Earl of Erroll and 4th Baron Kilmarnock , KCMG (17 October 1876 – 20 February 1928), was a British diplomat, a writer and briefly a member of the House of Lords . Family Erroll was the first son of Charles Hay, 20th Earl of Erroll (1852–1927) and his wife Mary, daughter of Edmund and Lady Harriett L'Estrange. He succeeded his father in the earldom in 1927. In 1900, he married Mary Lucy Victoria, only daughter of Sir Allan Mackenzie, 2nd Baronet, of Glen Muick, Aberdeenshire , and they had two sons and one daughter. Josslyn Hay, 22nd Earl of Erroll , who married Lady Myra Sackville, daughter of the Earl De La Warr , and had issue. Gilbert Boyd, 6th Baron Kilmarnock , who married firstly The Hon. Rosemary Guest, daughter of Viscount Wimborne , and had issue. Married secondly Denise Coker, and had issue. He was born Gilbert Hay, but his name was changed to Boyd in 1941. Lady Rosemary Hay, who married firstly Lt.-Col. Rupert Ryan and had issue, and married secondly Major James Gr



List of English writers

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List of English writers lists writers in English, born or raised in England (or who lived in England for a lengthy period) , who already have Wikipedia pages . References for the information here appear on the linked Wikipedia pages. The list is incomplete – please help to expand it by adding Wikipedia page-owning writers who have written extensively in any genre or field, including science and scholarship. Please follow the entry format. A seminal work added to a writer's entry should also have a Wikipedia page. This is a subsidiary to the List of English people . There are or should be similar lists of Irish , Scots , Welsh , Manx , Jersey, and Guernsey writers. Abbreviations: AV = Authorized King James Version of the Bible, awa = also wrote/writes as, b. = born, c. = circa ; century, cc. = centuries; cleric = Anglican priest, d. = died, fl. = floruit , or. = originally, RC = Roman Catholic , SF = science fiction , YA = young adult fiction This literature-related list is incomplete ; you can help by expandi



List of The Office (U.S. TV series) characters

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The Office is a television series based on the British television comedy of the same name . The format of the series is a parody of the fly on the wall documentary technique that intersperses traditional situation comedy segments with mock interviews with the show's characters, provides the audience access to the ongoing interior monologues for all of the main characters, as well as occasional insights into other characters within the show. Main and recurring cast Key:      = Starring (credited after the opening title sequence, with star billing) Key:      = Recurring Key:      = Guest Key:      = Special Guest Actor Character Appearances Season 1 Season 2 Season 3 Season 4 Season 5 Season 6 Season 7 Season 8 Season 9 Main characters Steve Carell Michael Scott Main Special Guest Rainn Wilson Dwight Schrute Main John Krasinski Jim Halpert Main Jenna Fischer Pam Beesly Main B. J. Novak Ryan Howard Main Special Guest Ed Helms Andy Bernard Starring Main James Spader Robert California Guest Main Additional main ch



Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

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Jacqueline Lee " Jackie " Kennedy Onassis ( née Bouvier ; ; July 28, 1929 – May 19, 1994) was the wife of the 35th President of the United States, John F. Kennedy , and First Lady of the United States from 1961 until his assassination in 1963 . Bouvier was the elder daughter of Wall Street stockbroker John Vernou Bouvier III and socialite Janet Lee Bouvier . In 1951, she graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in French literature from George Washington University and went on to work for the Washington Times-Herald as an inquiring photographer. In 1952, Bouvier met Congressman John F. Kennedy at a dinner party. In November of that year, he was elected as a United States Senator from Massachusetts, and the couple married in 1953. They had four children, two of whom died in infancy. As First Lady, she was known for her highly publicized restoration of the White House and her emphasis on arts and culture. On November 22, 1963, she was riding with the President in a motorcade in Dallas , Texas, when he was assas

User feedback about Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis:

Folder: 10 Classiest Women Ever

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#7 on the list of all-time classy women. She lived her life with style and grace in the ever-watching eyes of the world.


Hensley Henson

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Herbert Hensley Henson (8 November 1863 – 27 September 1947) was an Anglican priest, scholar and controversialist. He was Bishop of Hereford , 1918–20 and Bishop of Durham , 1920–39. The son of a zealous member of the Plymouth Brethren , Henson was not allowed to go to school until he was fourteen, and was largely self-educated. He was admitted to the University of Oxford , and gained a first-class degree in 1884. In the same year he was elected as a Fellow of All Souls , where he began to make a reputation as a speaker. He was ordained as a priest in 1888. Feeling a vocation to minister to the urban poor, Henson served in the East End of London and Barking before becoming chaplain of an ancient hospice in Ilford in 1895. In 1900 he was appointed to the high-profile post of vicar of St Margaret's, Westminster and canon of Westminster Abbey . While there, and as Dean of Durham (1913–18), he wrote prolifically and sometimes controversially. The Anglo-Catholic wing of the Church took exception to his liberal the



Alexander Hamilton

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Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 – July 12, 1804) was an American statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States . He was an influential interpreter and promoter of the U.S. Constitution , as well as the founder of the nation's financial system, the Federalist Party , the United States Coast Guard , and The New York Post newspaper. As the first Secretary of the Treasury , Hamilton was the main author of the economic policies of the George Washington administration . He took the lead in the funding of the states' debts by the Federal government , as well as the establishment of a national bank , a system of tariffs, and friendly trade relations with Britain. His vision included a strong central government led by a vigorous executive branch, a strong commercial economy, with a national bank and support for manufacturing, plus a strong military. This was challenged by Virginia agrarians Thomas Jefferson and James Madison , who formed a rival party, the Democratic-Republican Party .



Matavai Bay

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Matavai Bay is a bay on the north coast of Tahiti , the largest island in the Windward group of French Polynesia . It is in the commune of Mahina , approximately 8 km east of the capital Pape'ete . Early European voyages The bay was visited by European voyages of discovery in the second half of 18th century for wood, water and supplies. As late as 1802, Governor King of New South Wales considered Tahiti "the only island that needs little or no precaution for the safety of those who visit it" Samuel Wallis The first European known to have visited Tahiti was Lieutenant Samuel Wallis , in Dolphin , who landed on 17 June 1767 in Matavai Bay. The first contacts with the native Tahitians were difficult, since on the 24 and the 26 June 1767, canoes tried to take the ship and beach it. In retaliation, the English sailors opened fire on the canoes and on the crowds on the hills. In reaction to this powerful counter-attack, the inhabitants of the bay laid down offerings for the English, showing their wish for peace o



List of Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In guests

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This is a list of the guests who appeared on the American sketch comedy television program Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In , which ran from January 22, 1968, to May 14, 1973. The program, hosted by Dan Rowan and Dick Martin with a regularly featured cast , made prominent use of celebrity guests during each episode. Some guests had a prominent role in an episode, while others appeared for a single gag. Some guests filmed a number of pieces at a time, which were then used in a number of different episodes. 1968 Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass Don Adams Nancy Ames Eve Arden Pamela Austin Barbara Bain Kaye Ballard Billy Barty Elgin Baylor The Bee Gees Harry Belafonte Milton Berle Shelley Berman Joey Bishop John Byner Godfrey Cambridge Leo G. Carroll Rosemary Clooney Tim Conway Joseph Cotten Robert Culp Tony Curtis Arlene Dahl Bill Dana Bobby Darin Jimmy Dean Phyllis Diller Hugh Downs Kirk Douglas Nanette Fabray Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Sally Field Barbara Feldon James Garner Greer Garson Mitzi Gaynor George Gobe



Adolf Eichmann

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Otto Adolf Eichmann ( pronounced ; 19 March 1906 – 1 June 1962) was a German Nazi SS - Obersturmbannführer (lieutenant colonel) and one of the major organizers of the Holocaust . Eichmann was tasked by SS- Obergruppenführer (general/lieutenant general) Reinhard Heydrich with facilitating and managing the logistics involved in the mass deportation of Jews to ghettos and extermination camps in German-occupied Eastern Europe during World War II . In 1960, Eichmann was captured in Argentina by the Mossad , Israel's intelligence service. Following a widely publicised trial in Israel, he was found guilty of war crimes and hanged in 1962. After an unremarkable school career, Eichmann briefly worked for his father's mining company in Austria , where the family had moved in 1914. He worked as a travelling oil salesman beginning in 1927, and joined both the Nazi Party and the SS in 1932. After returning to Germany in 1933, he joined the Sicherheitsdienst (SD; Security Service), where he was appointed head of the depart



Bill Price (physicist)

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Professor William Charles Price FRS (1 April 1909 – 10 March 1993) was a British physicist (spectroscopy). Brought up in Swansea, he spent his career at the universities of Cambridge and London. His work was important for identifying the hydrogen bond structure of DNA base pairs . Early life and studies William Charles Price was born on 1 April 1909. He went to the Bishop Gore School in Swansea, where his contemporaries included the young poet Dylan Thomas , whose father taught English at the school. He failed to get a state scholarship to Oxford in 1927. He gained a BSc in Physics from Swansea University in 1930. Price then spent three years as a Fellow at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore , Maryland, USA. He was appointed to the University of Cambridge on a 1851 Research Fellowship in 1935, at the university's Physical Chemical Laboratory - working with Martin Lowry until 1936, then with Ronald George Wreyford Norrish . In 1937 he became university demonstrator; and from 1938 a Prize Fellow of Trinity C



Dave Chappelle

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David Khari Webber Chappelle ( , born August 24, 1973) is an American stand-up comedian, actor, writer, and producer. After beginning his film career in 1993 as Ahchoo in Mel Brooks ' Robin Hood: Men in Tights , he landed supporting roles in box office hits including The Nutty Professor , Con Air , You've Got Mail , Blue Streak and Undercover Brother . His first lead role was in the 1998 comedy film Half Baked , which he co-wrote with Neal Brennan . Chappelle also starred in the ABC TV series Buddies . In 2003, Chappelle became more widely known for his sketch comedy television series, Chappelle's Show , also co-written with Brennan, which ran until his retirement from the show two years later. The show continues to run in late-night syndication and on television networks around the world. By 2006, Chappelle was called the "comic genius of America" by Esquire and, in 2013, "the best" by a Billboard writer. Chappelle lives with his family in Yellow Springs, Ohio , and performs touring stand-up comedy all acros



Hohenzollern Castle

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Hohenzollern Castle (German:   Burg Hohenzollern   ) is the ancestral seat of the imperial House of Hohenzollern . The third of three castles on the site, it is located atop Berg Hohenzollern , a 234-metre (768 ft) bluff rising above the towns of Hechingen and Bisingen in the foothills of the Swabian Jura of central Baden-Württemberg , Germany . A popular tourist destination, Hohenzollern castle has over 300,000 visitors per year, making it one of the most visited castles in Germany. The first fortress on the mountain was constructed in the early 11th century. Over the years the House of Hohenzollern split several times, but the castle remained in the Swabian branch , the dynastic seniors of the Franconian-Brandenburgian cadet branch that later acquired its own imperial throne. This castle was completely destroyed in 1423 after a ten-month siege by the free imperial cities of Swabia . A larger and sturdier structure was constructed from 1454 to 1461, which served as a refuge for the Catholic Swabian Hohenzol



List of Wales national rugby union players

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List of Wales national rugby union players is a list of players who have represented Wales at rugby union . The list only includes players who have played in a Test match for the senior team. The players are listed in order of chronological appearance for the national team. Players that were first capped during the same match are listed in order of those that began in the starting line up before replacements and then in alphabetical order by surname. Number Name Debut opposition Debut date Caps Tries Con Pen Drop 1 Bevan, James James Bevan England 19 February 1881 1 0 0 0 0 2 Darbishire, Godfrey Godfrey Darbishire England 19 February 1881 1 0 0 0 0 3 Girling, Barry Barry Girling England 19 February 1881 1 0 0 0 0 4 Harding, George George Harding England 19 February 1881 4 0 0 0 0 5 Lewis, Edward Edward Lewis England 19 February 1881 1 0 0 0 0 6 Mann, Bathurst Bathurst Mann England 19 February 1881 1 0 0 0 0 7 Newman, Charlie Charlie Newman England 19 February 1881 10 0 0 0 0 8 Peake, Edward Edward Peake Engla



List of serial killers in the United States

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This is a list of serial killers in the United States . Convicted serial killers Charles Albright : also known as "The Eyeball Killer"; convicted of murdering three prostitutes in Dallas , Texas ; sentenced to life imprisonment in 1994 Rodney Alcala : also known as "The Dating Game Killer"; convicted rapist and serial killer, born in San Antonio , Texas, killed at least eight women in California , New York and Washington . Sentenced to death in 2010. Howard Arthur Allen : killed three elderly people, as well as assault, burglary , and arson . Sentenced to death in 1988. Richard Angelo : also known as "The Angel of Death". New York nurse convicted of 4 murders; also linked to 6 other deaths. Suspected of killing up to 25 people. Sentenced to life in prison. Amy Archer-Gilligan : poisoned a husband and four of her nursing home's residents with arsenic or strychnine in Windsor, Connecticut in the 1910s; total could possibly be 48 to 60. Sentenced to death in 1917, although her sentence was commuted. Benjamin Atk



Philip K. Dick

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Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer notable for publishing works of science fiction . Dick explored philosophical, social, and political themes in novels with plots dominated by monopolistic corporations, authoritarian governments , alternate universes , and altered states of consciousness . His work reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology , and often drew upon his life experiences in addressing the nature of reality , identity , drug abuse , schizophrenia , and transcendental experiences. Born in Illinois before moving to California, Dick began publishing science fiction stories in the 1950s, initially finding little commercial success. His 1962 alternate history novel The Man in the High Castle earned Dick early acclaim, including a Hugo Award for Best Novel . He followed with science fiction novels such as Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968) and Ubik (1969). His 1974 novel Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said won the John W. Campbell Mem



Phineas Gage

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Phineas P. Gage (1823–1860) was an American railroad construction foreman remembered for his improbable survival of an accident in which a large iron rod was driven completely through his head, destroying much of his brain's left frontal lobe , and for that injury's reported effects on his personality and behavior over the remaining twelve years of his life‍—‌effects sufficiently profound (for a time at least) that friends saw him as "no longer Gage."   The iron's path, per Harlow Long known as the "American Crowbar Case"‍—‌once termed "the case which more than all others is cal­cu­lated to excite our wonder, impair the value of prognosis , and even to subvert our phys­i­o­log­i­cal doctrines"   ‍—‌Phineas Gage influenced nineteenth-century discussion about the mind and brain, par­tic­u­larly debate on cerebral local­i­za­tion , ​​ and was perhaps the first case to suggest the brain's role in deter­min­ing per­son­al­ity, and that damage to specific parts of the brain might induce specific per­son­al­ity c




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