Revolvy Trivia Quizzes Revolvy Lists Revolvy Topics

William Gore (bishop)

William Gore DD (died 25 February 1784) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland.[1]

He was born the son of the Right Reverend William Gore, Dean of Down and his wife Honora Prittie.

Previously the Dean of Cashel from 1736 to 1758,[2] he was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 17 March 1758, consecrated on 16 April of that year; translated to Elphin on 3 March 1762; and finally to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 5 March 1772.[3]

In 1783 he commissioned the building of a Manor House at Old Connaught, near Bray, but in County Dublin. Old Connaught House still exists today as a private and gated development of apartments in and around the Old House.

He died on 25 February 1784. He had married twice, firstly, Mary, daughter of Chidley Coote and secondly, Mary, daughter of William French, with whom he had a son, William, who became an MP.

References
  1. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
  2. "The Universal magazine", Volume 22 (1758) p22
  3. "Dodsley's annual register" Burke,E: London, J.Dodsley 1780
Church of England titles
Preceded byWilliam Carmichael Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1758–1762 Succeeded byJohn Oswald
Preceded byEdward Synge Bishop of Elphin 1762– 1772 Succeeded byJemmett Browne
Preceded byJohn Averell Bishop of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe 1772– 1784 Succeeded byWilliam Cecil Pery
Continue Reading...
Content from Wikipedia Licensed under CC-BY-SA.

Bishop of Waterford and Lismore

topic

The Bishop of Waterford and Lismore is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Waterford and town of Lismore in the Republic of Ireland . The title was used by the Church of Ireland until 1838, and is still used by the Roman Catholic Church . History The bishopric is a union of the episcopal sees of Waterford and Lismore which were united by Pope Urban V in 1363. Following the Reformation , there were parallel successions. In the Church of Ireland the see continued until 1833 when it became part of the archbishopric of Cashel . In 1838, the Anglican province of Cashel lost its metropolitan status and became the bishopric of Cashel and Waterford . It was further united with the Sees of Ossory, Ferns and Leighlin to become the united bishopric of Cashel and Ossory in 1977. In the Roman Catholic Church the title remains as separate bishopric. The present Incumbent is the Most Reverend Alphonsus Cullinan , Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Waterford and Lismore , who was appointed by the H ...more...



Jonathan Firth

topic

Jonathan Stephen Firth (born 6 April 1967) is an English actor best known for his roles in such noted British television productions as Middlemarch, Far from the Madding Crowd, and Victoria & Albert. He lives in Islington, North London. Early life Jonathan Firth was born in Brentwood, Essex, England, to Shirley Jean (née Rolles) and David Norman Lewis Firth. His parents were both children of Methodist missionaries in India, who worked as teachers in Nigeria after their marriage. He is the younger brother of actor Colin Firth and voice coach Kate Firth. The family moved many times, from Billericay to Brentwood, Essex, and then to St. Louis, Missouri (USA) for a year when Jonathan was five. Upon returning to England the family settled in Winchester, Hampshire, where his father became a history lecturer at King Alfred's College and his mother was a comparative religion lecturer at King Alfred's College, Winchester (now the University of Winchester). Firth studied at Central School of Speech and Drama ...more...



List of Old Harrovians

topic

The following is a list of some notable Old Harrovians, former pupils of Harrow School in the United Kingdom. Civil Service and administration Sir Alex Allan, Chairman of the Joint Intelligence Committee Robin Butler, Baron Butler of Brockwell, Cabinet Secretary Taylor Combe, Esq., M.A., Secretary of Royal Society, Director of Society of Antiquaries, Keeper of British Museum. Walter Cunliffe, 1st Baron Cunliffe, Governor of the Bank of England John Dalrymple, 10th Earl of Stair, Governor of the Bank of Scotland John Saunders Gilliat, Governor of the Bank of England Henry Grenfell, Governor of the Bank of England Alexander Hardinge, 2nd Baron Hardinge of Penshurst, Private Secretary to Edward VIII and George VI Stuart Holland, 2nd Baron Rotherham, Inspector, Ministry of Pensions Sir William A. Baillie-Hamilton, Private Secretary to the Chief Secretary for Ireland and to the Secretary of State for the Colonies Sir John Rupert "Jock" Colville Sir Kenelm Edward Digby, Under Secretary of State at th ...more...



St Cyprian's Cathedral, Kimberley

topic

The Cathedral Church of St Cyprian the Martyr, Kimberley, is the seat of the Bishop of the Kimberley and Kuruman, Anglican Church of Southern Africa. The building was dedicated in 1908, becoming a Cathedral when the Synod of Bishops mandated formation of the new Diocese of Kimberley and Kuruman in October 1911. The first Bishop, the Rt Revd Wilfrid Gore Browne, was enthroned there on 30 June 1912. The Parish of St Cyprian dates back to 1871 when a chapelry of the Parish of All Saints, Du Toit's Pan, Diocese of Bloemfontein, at first met in a tent in the nearby New Rush, on the Diamond Fields, a place later renamed Kimberley. Beginnings Churches in diggers' camps on the South African Diamond Fields met initially in tents in 1870-71. The first Anglican Church to be built was St Mary’s in Barkly West. The nascent St Cyprian's congregation gathered later in a metal-roofed building, the Odd Fellows' Hall near the Market Square and, from 1880 to 1908, in Jones Street, in a prefabricated wood and iron building ...more...



Bill Price (physicist)

topic

Professor William Charles Price FRS (1 April 1909 – 10 March 1993) was a British physicist (spectroscopy). Brought up in Swansea, he spent his career at the universities of Cambridge and London. His work was important for identifying the hydrogen bond structure of DNA base pairs . Early life and studies William Charles Price was born on 1 April 1909. He went to the Bishop Gore School in Swansea, where his contemporaries included the young poet Dylan Thomas , whose father taught English at the school. He failed to get a state scholarship to Oxford in 1927. He gained a BSc in Physics from Swansea University in 1930. Price then spent three years as a Fellow at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore , Maryland, USA. He was appointed to the University of Cambridge on a 1851 Research Fellowship in 1935, at the university's Physical Chemical Laboratory - working with Martin Lowry until 1936, then with Ronald George Wreyford Norrish . In 1937 he became university demonstrator; and from 1938 a Prize Fellow of Trinity C ...more...



Hensley Henson

topic

Herbert Hensley Henson (8 November 1863 – 27 September 1947) was an Anglican priest, scholar and controversialist. He was Bishop of Hereford , 1918–20 and Bishop of Durham , 1920–39. The son of a zealous member of the Plymouth Brethren , Henson was not allowed to go to school until he was fourteen, and was largely self-educated. He was admitted to the University of Oxford , and gained a first-class degree in 1884. In the same year he was elected as a Fellow of All Souls , where he began to make a reputation as a speaker. He was ordained as a priest in 1888. Feeling a vocation to minister to the urban poor, Henson served in the East End of London and Barking before becoming chaplain of an ancient hospice in Ilford in 1895. In 1900 he was appointed to the high-profile post of vicar of St Margaret's, Westminster and canon of Westminster Abbey . While there, and as Dean of Durham (1913–18), he wrote prolifically and sometimes controversially. The Anglo-Catholic wing of the Church took exception to his liberal the ...more...



St Philip's Cathedral, Birmingham

topic

The Cathedral Church of Saint Philip is the Church of England cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Birmingham. Built as a parish church and consecrated in 1715, St Philip's became the cathedral of the newly formed Diocese of Birmingham in 1905. St Philip's was built in the early 18th century in the Baroque style by Thomas Archer and is located on Colmore Row, Birmingham, England. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building. St Philip's is the third smallest cathedral in England after Derby and Chelmsford. History Statue of Charles Gore, the 1st Bishop of Birmingham, by Thomas Stirling Lee Foundation St Philip's Church was planned when the nearby medieval church of St Martin in the Bull Ring became insufficient to house its congregation because of the growing population of Birmingham. The land, previously named the Barley Close, was donated by Robert Philips in 1710. It is one of the highest points in the district and is said to be at the same level as the cross on St Paul's Cathedral in London. Fo ...more...



Dugald Poppelwell

topic

Dugald Louis Poppelwell (2 July 1863 – 23 September 1939) was a New Zealand lawyer, local politician and conservationist. He was born in Tokomairiro (now Milton ), Otago , New Zealand in 1863. Early life Poppelwell was the tenth of twelve children of his parents, William Poppelwell, a Scottish mariner turned farmer, and his wife, Catherine Robertson McLachlan. His family's house was known for their hospitality, as well as being a centre for local Catholics. He attended the Christian Brothers' Boys' School in Dunedin, and was awarded the Bishop Moran's Scholarship in 1878. He later became a law clerk in the office of Donald Reid in Milton . He was also appointed lieutenant in the Bruce Rifle Volunteers in 1887. From 1889 to 1891 he studied law at the University of Otago , and once he was admitted as a lawyer, he moved to Gore to establish a practice there. Career Poppelwell was a liberal in politics, and was invited to stand for Parliament several times. He refused every time, but was elected to the Gore borou ...more...



Roman Catholic Diocese of Dunedin

topic

The Latin Rite Catholic Diocese of Dunedin is a suffragan diocese of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Wellington . It was formed on 26 November 1869 from a portion of the territory in the Diocese of Wellington, before it was elevated to an archdiocese. St. Joseph's Cathedral, Dunedin Ordinaries of Dunedin Tenure Incumbent Life 1869 to 1895 Patrick Moran (1823 to 1895) 1896 to 1918 Michael Verdon (1838 to 1918) 1920 to 1957 James Whyte (1868 to 1957) 1957 to 1985 John Patrick Kavanagh (1913 to 1985) 1985 to 2004 Leonard Anthony Boyle (1930 to 2016) 2004 to present Colin David Campbell (1941- ) Other bishops Hugh John O'Neill Coadjutor Bishop of Dunedin (1943-1946) Current bishops Colin David Campbell , 6th Bishop of Dunedin. Cathedral St. Joseph's Cathedral, Dunedin Secondary schools Kavanagh College , Dunedin St Kevin's College , Oamaru St Peter's College , Gore Verdon College , Invercargill See also Holy Cross Seminary Holy Name Seminary St. Mary's Basilica, Invercargill Roman Catholicism in New Zealand Lis ...more...



Dean of Clogher

topic

The Dean of Clogher is a dignitary of the Diocese of Clogher within the Church of Ireland. The title may be held by any licensed incumbent in the diocese, not necessarily the rector of one of the cathedral parishes of Clogher. The Dean, with the Cathedral chapter, has responsibility for the cathedral life of St Macartan's, Clogher and St Macartin's, Enniskillen . The current incumbent is Kenny Hall, rector of Enniskillen . Deans of Clogher St Macartan's Cathedral, Clogher St Macartan's Cathedral, Enniskillen 1606 Robert Openshawe (afterwards Dean of Connor ) 1617 Robert Barclay or Berkeley 1660/1–1667 John Hodson (afterwards Bishop of Elphin , 1667) 1667–1675 John Roane (afterwards Bishop of Killaloe , 1675) 1675–1682 Richard Tennison (afterwards Bishop of Killala , 1682) 1682–1716 Joseph Williams 1716–1724 William Gore (afterwards Dean of Down , 1724) 1724–1727 Jonathan Smedley 1727/8–1730 Pascal (or Paul) Ducasse 1730 Edward Cressett 1737/8–1743 John Copping 1743–1761 William Langton 1761–1763 Edward Young ...more...



Apostolic succession

topic

Apostolic succession is the method whereby the ministry of the Christian Church is held to be derived from the apostles by a continuous succession, which has usually been associated with a claim that the succession is through a series of bishops . This series was seen originally as that of the bishops of a particular see founded by one or more of the apostles . According to historian Justo L. González , apostolic succession is generally understood today as meaning a series of bishops, regardless of see, each consecrated by other bishops, themselves consecrated similarly in a succession going back to the apostles. According to the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue Between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church , "apostolic succession" means more than a mere transmission of powers. It is succession in a Church which witnesses to the apostolic faith, in communion with the other Churches, witnesses of the same apostolic faith. The "see ( cathedra ) plays an important role in inserting ...more...



Browne

topic

Browne is a variant of the English surname Brown (surname) , meaning "brown-haired" or "brown-skinned". It may sometimes be derived from French le Brun with similar meaning. The Mac A Brehons clan of Co. Donegal have anglicized as Browne since about 1800. The name has also been used throughout North America as an anglicization of the surname Pardo . Adam Browne , Australian writer Andrew Browne , several people Sir Anthony Browne (died 1548) , Standard Bearer of England Anthony Browne (author) (born 1946), author of children's books Anthony Browne (UK politics) , journalist Anucha Browne Sanders , American basketball player Aurora Browne , Canadian actress and comedian Baron Browne , American bassist Barrington Browne , Guyanese cricketer Booker Brown , American football player George Buckston Browne (1850 - 1945), English physician Bud Browne , film director Byron Browne , American baseball player Carl Browne (1849-1914), American journalist and political activist in Coxey's Army Chance Browne , American c ...more...



Dean of Lismore

topic

The Dean of Lismore is based at The Cathedral Church of St Carthage, Lismore in the united Diocese of Cashel and Ossory within the Church of Ireland. The current incumbent is Paul Draper. List of Deans of Lismore Lismore Cathedral ?–1549 James Butler 1564 Gerald FitzJames FitzGerald (deprived) 1583–1588 John Prendergast 1610-1614 Thomas Wilson 1614–1622 Michael Boyle (appointed Bishop of Waterford and Lismore 1619, but retained deanery in commendam until 1622) 1622–1622 Edward Brouncker 1622–1627/8 Robert Daborne 1628 John Grey 1630–1639/40 Robert Naylor (afterwards Dean of Limerick ) 1640–1647 Edward Parry (afterwards Bishop of Killaloe 1647) 1647 Richard Parry 1661–1663 Richard Underwood 1664–1666 Hugh Gore (afterwards Bishop of Waterford and Lismore 1666) 1666–1670 Richard Lingard 1670–1678 Michael Ward (afterwards Bishop of Ossory 1678) 1678–1682 Edward Jones (afterwards Bishop of Cloyne 1682) 1683–1690 Barzillai Jones 1691–1719 William Jephson 1719–1720 Arthur Price (afterwards Dean of Ferns , 1720) 1720 ...more...



Richard Woodman (martyr)

topic

Woodman from Warbleton (and nine others) were burnt in Lewes. Richard Woodman (1524?–1557) was a Protestant martyr, who was born in Buxted and lived in nearby Warbleton in East Sussex . He was burnt during the Marian Persecutions in 1557 in Lewes . The cult of the Sussex Martyrs is said to have been started using an etching by James Henry Hurdis of Woodman burning as a Protestant martyr. Life Woodman was born around 1524 in Buxted in East Sussex; he became an ironmaster , and became known whilst running an "iron-making" business that employed one hundred people. During a sermon at St Mary the Virgin Church, Warbleton, Woodman was arrested for having words with the rector which are said to have identified Woodman as a Protestant. Woodman said that the rector was preaching the exact opposite of what he previously said (before Mary was Queen). Woodman lived close to the church and his foundry was also adjacent. Woodman was in contravention of a 1553 law which protected preachers from criticism whilst preaching ...more...



Peter Vaughan

topic

Peter Vaughan (born Peter Ewart Ohm ; 4 April 1923 – 6 December 2016) was a British character actor , known for many supporting roles in British film and television productions. He also worked extensively on the stage. He was best known for his role as Grouty in the sitcom Porridge (despite appearing in only three episodes and the 1979 film) and also had a recurring role alongside Robert Lindsay in Citizen Smith , written by John Sullivan . He also had parts as Tom Franklin in Chancer (1990–91), playing the father of Anthony Hopkins 's character in The Remains of the Day , and as Maester Aemon in HBO 's Game of Thrones (2011–15), his final role. Early life He was born Peter Ewart Ohm on 4 April 1923, in Wem , Shropshire , the son of a bank clerk, Max Ohm, who was an Austrian immigrant, and Eva Wright, a nurse. The family later moved to Wellington in the same county, where he began schooling; he later said it was while reciting a poem at infant school in Wellington that he experienced the applause and ad ...more...



Ecclesiastical Household

topic

The Ecclesiastical Household is a part of the Royal Household of the sovereign of the United Kingdom. Reflecting the different constitutions of the churches of England and Scotland, there are separate households in each nation. England The Church of England Ecclesiastical Household comprises the College of Chaplains, and the associated Chapel Royal, the Royal Almonry Office, various Domestic Chaplains, and service Chaplains. The College of Chaplains is under the Clerk of the Closet, an office dating from 1437. It is normally held by a diocesan bishop, who may however remain in office after leaving his see. The current clerk is James Newcome, Bishop of Carlisle. The Deputy Clerk of the Closet, a new office dating only from 1677, is Paul Wright, Domestic Chaplain to the Sovereign and Sub-dean of the Chapel Royal and the sole full-time clerical member of the household. The sub-dean is assisted by Richard Bolton and William Whitcombe, the Priests-in-Ordinary to the Sovereign. The Clerk of the Closet is resp ...more...



First English Civil War

topic

The First English Civil War (1642–1646) began the series of three wars known as the English Civil War (or "Wars"). "The English Civil War" was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651, and includes the Second English Civil War (1648–1649) and the Third English Civil War (1649–1651). Overview Convention uses the name "The English Civil War" (1642–1651) to refer collectively to the civil wars in England and the Scottish Civil War , which began with the raising of King Charles I's standard at Nottingham on 22 August 1642, and ended on 3 September 1651 at the Battle of Worcester . There was some continued organised Royalist resistance in Scotland, which lasted until the surrender of Dunnottar Castle to Parliament's troops in May 1652, but this resistance is not usually included as part of the English Civil War. The English Civil War can be divided into three: the First English Civil War (1642–1646), the Second English Civil ...more...



February 16

topic

February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 318 days remaining until the end of the year (319 in leap years). This date is slightly more likely to fall on a Tuesday, Thursday or Saturday (58 in 400 years each) than on Sunday or Monday (57), and slightly less likely to occur on a Wednesday or Friday (56). Events 116 – Emperor Trajan sends laureatae to the Roman Senate at Rome on account of his victories and conquest of Parthia. 1249 – Andrew of Longjumeau is dispatched by Louis IX of France as his ambassador to meet with the Khagan of the Mongol Empire. 1270 – Grand Duchy of Lithuania defeats the Livonian Order in the Battle of Karuse. 1630 – Dutch forces led by Hendrick Lonck capture Olinda in what was to become part of Dutch Brazil. 1646 – Battle of Torrington, Devon: The last major battle of the first English Civil War. 1699 – First Leopoldine Diploma is issued by the Holy Roman Emperor, recognizing the Greek Catholic clergy enjoyed the same privileges as Roman Cath ...more...



1675 in Ireland

topic

Events from the year 1675 in Ireland. Events September 22 – King Charles II of England orders the setting up of a commission to determine the cases of Connacht transplanters. Births February 7 – Hugh Howard, portrait painter (d. 1737 in London) May 4 – Robert FitzGerald, 19th Earl of Kildare (d. 1743) George Gore, Attorney-General for Ireland (d. 1753) Peter Holmes, politician (d. 1732) John Hopkins, poet (d. after 1700). Popham Seymour, landowner (k. 1699) William Stewart, 2nd Viscount Mountjoy, soldier (d. 1728) Approximate date – Charles Jervas, portrait painter (d. 1739) Deaths March 16 – Daniel Witter, Church of Ireland Bishop of Killaloe since 1669. March 18 – Arthur Chichester, 1st Earl of Donegall, soldier and politician (b. 1606) August 1 – Patrick Duffy, Roman Catholic Bishop of Clogher since 1673. Sir Audley Mervyn, lawyer, politician and soldier (b. 1603?) References Moody, T. W.; et al., eds. (1989). A New History of Ireland. 8: A Chronology of Irish History. Oxford Uni ...more...



John Wilkins

topic

John Wilkins , FRS (1614–1672) was an Anglican clergyman , natural philosopher and author, and was one of the founders of the Royal Society . He was Bishop of Chester from 1668 until his death. Wilkins is one of the few persons to have headed a college at both the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge . He was a polymath , although not one of the most important scientific innovators of the period. His personal qualities were brought out, and obvious to his contemporaries, in reducing political tension in Interregnum Oxford, in founding the Royal Society on non-partisan lines, and in efforts to reach out to religious nonconformists . He was one of the founders of the new natural theology compatible with the science of the time. He is particularly known for An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language (1668) in which, amongst other things, he proposed a universal language and an integrated system of measurement, similar to the metric system . Wilkins lived in a period of great p ...more...



Lynne Cheney

topic

Lynne Ann Cheney ( ; née Vincent ; born August 14, 1941) is an American author, scholar, and former talk-show host. She is the wife of the 46th Vice President of the United States , Dick Cheney and served as the Second Lady of the United States from 2001 to 2009. Childhood and education Lynne Ann Vincent was born on August 14, 1941 in Casper , Wyoming . Her mother, Edna Lolita (née Lybyer), became a deputy sheriff , and her father, Wayne Edwin Vincent, was an engineer . A descendant of Mormon pioneers , and with roots in Denmark , Sweden , England , Ireland , and Wales , she was raised Presbyterian and became Methodist upon her marriage to Dick Cheney. Cheney received her Bachelor of Arts degree in English literature with highest honors from Colorado College . She continued her education with a Master of Arts degree from the University of Colorado in Boulder , and a PhD in 19th century British literature from the University of Wisconsin–Madison . (Her dissertation was entitled " Matthew Arnold 's Possible P ...more...



St. Matthias' Church, Nottingham

topic

St. Matthias' Church, Nottingham, was a Church of England church in Sneinton, Nottingham, between 1868 and 2003. It is a Grade II listed building. Anglican Church It was designed by Thomas Chambers Hine and Robert Evans. It was consecrated as a chapel of ease in the parish of St. Stephen's Church, Sneinton by The Rt. Revd. John Jackson the Bishop of Lincoln on 6 May 1868. It was built for the sum of £3,000. (equivalent to £247,720 in 2016), . The chancel was damaged by enemy action during the Second World War. Anglican incumbents 1869-1882 Frederick Armine Wodehouse 1882-1890 Arthur Powys Woodhouse 1890-1892 George Perry-Gore 1892-1900 William Henry Castell Malton 1900-1903 William Walker 1903-1904 Anonymous 1904-1912 Ralph Mowbray Howard 1912-1931 John Henry Tomlinson 1931-1954 Frederick Llewellyn Forsaith Rees 1955-1990 Kenneth Leigh Bennett 1990-1993 William Albert Porter 1994-2002 Rodney Frederic Brittain Smith 2003- Malcolm Crook Organ The three manual organ was by E. Wragg & ...more...



Jean Baptiste Pompallier

topic

Jean-Baptiste François Pompallier (11 December 1802 – 21 December 1871) was the first Roman Catholic bishop in New Zealand and, with priests and brothers of the Marist order , he organised the Roman Catholic Church throughout the country. He was born in Lyon , France. He arrived in New Zealand in 1838 as Vicar Apostolic of Western Oceania, but made New Zealand the centre of his operations. In 1848 he became the first Roman Catholic Bishop of Auckland . He returned to France in 1868 and died in Puteaux , near Paris, on 21 December 1871, aged 69. His exhumed remains were returned to New Zealand in 2001 and they were re-interred under the altar at St Mary's, Motuti , in 2002. Educational institutions named in his honour include Pompallier Catholic College , Whangarei (1969). There are Pompallier houses at Sacred Heart College, Auckland (1903), St. Bernard's College, Lower Hutt (1947), Carmel College, Auckland (1957), St John's College, Hamilton (1961), St Peter's College, Gore (1969), Liston College, Auckland (1 ...more...



Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville, 3rd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos

topic

Richard Plantagenet Campbell Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville, 3rd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos GCSI PC DL (10 September 1823 – 26 March 1889), styled Earl Temple until 1839 and Marquess of Chandos from 1839 to 1861, was a British soldier, politician and administrator of the 19th century. He was a close friend and subordinate of Benjamin Disraeli and served as the Secretary of State for the Colonies from 1867 to 1868 and Governor of Madras from 1875 to 1880. Buckingham was the only son of Richard Temple-Grenville, 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos , and was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford . He joined the British Army , eventually rising to become a colonel . Buckingham entered politics, as Lord Chandos, in 1846 when he was elected unopposed from Buckinghamshire as a candidate of the Conservative Party . Buckingham served as Member of Parliament from 1846 to 1857, when he resigned. He contested a re-election in 1859, but lost. Buckingham served in various political offices during his tenur ...more...



Edmund Tucker

topic

Edmund Ronald Tucker (23 March 1902 - 24 July 1964) was the headmaster of the Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe from 1933 till his death in 1964. Born in Colwyn Bay, Denbighshire, he was brought up in Swansea and educated at Swansea Grammar School. He was a scholar of Jesus College, Oxford, where he read Classics, and he later took at external degree (with 1st class honours) at London University. He came to RGS High Wycombe from Pocklington School where he had been Second Master for a number of years. Prior to teaching at Pocklington School, he had taught at Bemrose School, Derby. Tucker was appointed headmaster of RGS High Wycombe on 29 March 1933, succeeding George Wright Arnison, and remained head until his death. The school expanded greatly during his term of office and he was elected to the Headmaster's Conference in 1943. He was, as at 1959, a member of the All Soul's Group, a private group of influential administrators and educators that had first been convened in 1941 by the Warden of All Soul's C ...more...



Alien 3

topic

Alien 3 (stylized as ALIEN³ ) is a 1992 American science-fiction horror film directed by David Fincher and written by David Giler , Walter Hill and Larry Ferguson , from a story by Vincent Ward , and starring Sigourney Weaver reprising her role as Ellen Ripley . It is the third film installment in the Alien franchise . Set right after the events of Aliens , Ripley and an Alien organism ( Tom Woodruff, Jr. ) are the only survivors of the Colonial Marine spaceship Sulaco 's escape pod's crash on a planet housing a penal colony populated by violent male inmates. Additional roles are played by Charles Dance , Brian Glover , Charles S. Dutton , Ralph Brown , Paul McGann , Danny Webb , Lance Henriksen , Holt McCallany , and Danielle Edmond. The film faced problems during production, including shooting without a script, with various screenwriters and directors attached. Fincher, in his feature directorial debut , was brought in to direct after a proposed version with Vincent Ward as director was cancelled well into ...more...



Battle of Britain

topic

The Battle of Britain (German: Luftschlacht um England, literally "the air battle for England") was a military campaign of the Second World War, in which the Royal Air Force (RAF) defended the United Kingdom (UK) against large-scale attacks by the German Air Force (Luftwaffe). It has been described as the first major military campaign fought entirely by air forces. The British officially recognise the battle's duration as being from 10 July until 31 October 1940, which overlaps the period of large-scale night attacks known as the Blitz, that lasted from 7 September 1940 to 11 May 1941. German historians do not accept this subdivision and regard the battle as a single campaign lasting from July 1940 to June 1941, including the Blitz. The primary objective of the Nazi German forces was to compel Britain to agree to a negotiated peace settlement. In July 1940 the air and sea blockade began, with the Luftwaffe mainly targeting coastal-shipping convoys, ports and shipping centres, such as Portsmouth. On 1 Augu ...more...



Ormsby-Gore Commission

topic

The Ormsby-Gore Commission was a Parliamentary Commission , with the official title The East Africa Commission Its chairman, William Ormsby-Gore , later fourth Baron Harlech, was appointed in June 1924 together with two other Member of Parliament. The terms of reference for the commission, which was appointed by the short-lived First MacDonald ministry , included to report on measures to accelerate economic development, to improve the social conditions of African residents, to investigate employment practices and to secure closer cooperation between the five British dependencies in East and Central Africa. The commission recommended that transport and other infrastructure should be improved as a precondition of possible later administrative union. It expressed concern over issues of land ownership and the conditions of Africans living on European owned estates, and suggested that promoting commercial agriculture by Africans could be a solution to the problem of labour migration. By the time the commission rep ...more...



Church of Holy Trinity, Stapleton

topic

The Church of Holy Trinity is an Anglican church on Bell Hill in Stapleton , Bristol , England. It has been designated as a grade II* listed building . It was built in 1857 by John Norton , in a gothic revival style, with a spire which reaches 52 metres (171 ft). It is believed that a church has occupied this site for at least 500 years. The rebuilding of the church was funded by James Henry Monk , Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol. Pennant stone from the local Broom Hill quarry, was used in the construction, with Bath Stone dressings. It has a three- bay chancel and five-bay nave . Inside the church is a font in the West porch dates from around 1000 AD. There is also a Victorian ornate font with a cover, which was imported from another church. The organ, by Vowles of Bristol was installed in the 1970s. There is a stained glass window dating from 1887 which was made by Charles Eamer Kempe . One of the other windows is a memorial to Captain Gore-Langton, the son of William Gore-Langton (1760–1847) . wh ...more...



Southern Records

topic

Southern Records is an independent record label closely associated with Crass Records , Corpus Christi Records and Dischord Records . It is based in London and previously had offices in Chicago (closed November 2008), Le Havre (closed July 2009) and Berlin (closed December 2008). Southern was originally a recording studio owned and operated by John Loder . Loder became friends with musician, author and poet Penny Rimbaud and collaborated with him and others in an experimental progressive band called EXIT . Rimbaud later formed anarchist punk band Crass , and Southern Studios and John Loder were the obvious choice of venue for the recording of their first album The Feeding of the 5000 , originally released on Small Wonder Records . When Small Wonder encountered problems manufacturing the release, due to the allegedly blasphemous nature of some of the lyrics, Crass determined they would need to start their own label to take full responsibility and control of their output. Loder facilitated this by acting as t ...more...



Evans Gambit

topic

The Evans Gambit is a chess opening characterised by the moves: 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 The Evans Gambit is an aggressive line of the Giuoco Piano , which normally continues with the positional moves 4.c3 or 4.d3. White offers a pawn to divert the Black bishop on c5. If Black accepts, White can follow up with c3 and d4, ripping open the center, while also opening diagonals to play Ba3 or Qb3 at some point, preventing Black from castling kingside and threatening the f7-pawn respectively. If Black declines, the b4-pawn stakes out space on the queenside, and White can follow up with a4 later in the game, potentially gaining a tempo by threatening to trap Black's dark-square bishop. According to Reuben Fine , the Evans Gambit poses a challenge for Black since the usual defenses (play ...d6 and/or give back the gambit pawn) are more difficult to pull off than with other gambits. (Interestingly, Fine was beaten by this gambit in a friendly game against Bobby Fischer , in just 17 moves. ) The Encyclopaedia of Ch ...more...



Fellows of The Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland

topic

Fellows of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland are the individuals who have been elected by the Council of the Royal Asiatic Society to further "the investigation of subjects connected with and for the encouragement of science literature and the arts in relation to Asia". The Society was established in London in 1823 and received its Royal Charter from King George IV the following year. Since then, the Society has been a forum, through lectures, its journal, and other publications, for scholarship relating to Asian Studies of the highest level. The Royal Asiatic Society is the United Kingdom's senior learned society in Asian Studies , and is patronised by His Royal Highness The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales . At present the Society has about 700 Fellows, of whom half live abroad, and many of whom are highly accomplished and notable scholars of Asian Studies . List of Notable Fellows of the RAS Sir Jehangir Hormasji Kothari Henry Thomas Colebrooke Sir Richard Francis Burton Edward Byles Co ...more...



Catholicity

topic

Catholicity or Catholicism (from Greek καθολικισμός , katholikismos , "universal doctrine") is a concept that encompasses the beliefs and practices of numerous Christian denominations , most notably those that describe themselves as Catholic in accordance with the Four Marks of the Church , as expressed in the Nicene Creed of the First Council of Constantinople in 381: "[I believe] in one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church. While catholicism is most commonly associated with the faith and practices of the Catholic Church led by the Pope in Rome , the traits of catholicity, and thus the term catholic, are also claimed and possessed by other denominations such as the Eastern Orthodox Church , the Oriental Orthodox Church , the Assyrian Church of the East . It also occurs in Anglicanism and some Protestant denominations , as well as Independent Catholicism . While traits used to define catholicity, as well as recognition of these traits in other denominations, vary among these groups, such attributes include ...more...



Hubert Burge

topic

Hubert Murray Burge KCVO (9 August 1862 – 11 June 1925) was an Anglican priest, headmaster of Winchester College , Bishop of Southwark and Bishop of Oxford . Life Burge was born on in 1862 and educated at Bedford School , Marlborough and University College, Oxford . His first post after graduation was as a Schoolmaster at Wellington College after which he was Fellow and Dean of his old college . He received a Bachelor of Divinity (BD) in March 1902, and at the same time received a Doctorate of Divinity (DD). He was Headmaster of Repton from 1900 to 1901 and then of Winchester from 1901 to 1911, before his elevation to the Episcopate as Bishop of Southwark in 1911. Translated to Oxford in 1919 and appointed Clerk of the Closet , he was later also a Sub-Prelate of the Order of St John of Jerusalem and Chancellor of the Most Noble Order of the Garter . He was a keen cricketer. Burge was made a Knight Commander of the Royal Victorian Order in the 1925 Birthday Honours , days before he died in office on 11 Jun ...more...



Johnny Carson

topic

John William Carson (October 23, 1925 – January 23, 2005) was an American talk show host and comedian, best known for his 30 years as host of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (1962–1992). Carson received six Emmy Awards , the Television Academy 's 1980 Governor's Award, and a 1985 Peabody Award . He was inducted into the Television Academy Hall of Fame in 1987. Carson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1992 and received a Kennedy Center Honor in 1993. Although his show was already successful by the end of the 1960s, it was during the 1970s Carson became an American icon and remained so even after his retirement in 1992. He adopted a casual, conversational approach with extensive interaction with guests, an approach pioneered by Arthur Godfrey and previous Tonight Show hosts Steve Allen and Jack Paar . Former late-night host and friend David Letterman had cited Carson's influence. Early life and career John William Carson was born on October 23, 1925, in Corning, Iowa , to Homer Lloyd "Kit ...more...



John Perowne

topic

John Perowne, Bishop of Worcester John James Stewart Perowne (3 March 1823 – 6 November 1904) was an English Anglican bishop. Born in Burdwan, Bengal, Perowne was a member of a notable clerical family, whose origins were Hugenot. Life He was educated at Norwich School, and at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, becoming a fellow in 1849 and where his brother Edward was later Master. After holding a chair in King's College London, he became, in 1862, the fourth vice-principal of St Davids College, Lampeter, a college with which he was already familiar, for he had been external examiner between 1851 and 1852. The ageing Principal of the college took a backseat, and Perowne effectively 'took the reins' until his departure from Lampeter in 1872. In 1868 he was elected Hulsean lecturer, taking as his subject Immortality or rather conditional immortality; stating "The immortality of the soul is a phantom which eludes your eager grasp.". He was elected canon of Llandaff in 1869, dean of Peterborough 1878, ...more...



Birmingham Crematorium

topic

Birmingham Crematorium is a Protestant crematorium in the Perry Barr district of Birmingham, England, designed by Frank Osborne and opened in 1903. A columbarium was added in 1928. The crematorium is now owned and operated by Dignity plc. Opening Cremation was not declared legal in Great Britain until 1885, by precedent from the trial of William Price. Despite the opening of Woking Crematorium in 1878 and the passing of the Cremation Act 1902, which came into effect on 1 April 1903, it remained controversial, on religious grounds, in the first decade of the twentieth century. However, proposals to build a crematorium for the city of Birmingham, the ninth such facility in the United Kingdom, received support from Sir Oliver Lodge, Principal of the University of Birmingham, and were given the approval of the three local bishops: Edmund Knox (Coventry), Augustus Legge (Lichfield) and Charles Gore (Worcester) (Birmingham did not have its own bishop until 1905). In a letter read at the opening ceremony, Bisho ...more...



East Woodhay

topic

East Woodhay is a village and civil parish in Hampshire , England, situated approximately 6 miles (10 km) south-west of Newbury in Berkshire . As of the 2001 census , it had a population of 2,794, increasing to 2,914 at the 2011 Census. War Memorial The parish of East Woodhay contains a number of villages and hamlets , including Ball Hill, Heath End , Hatt Common, Woolton Hill and East End. The last two contain schools: Woolton Hill Junior School, St Thomas's Church of England Infant School, and St. Martin 's Church of England Primary School. The parish also has a small, triangular village green containing a war memorial and was once the site of the village stocks . Woolton Hill also has a local village shop and post office and has "The Chase" which is administered by The National Trust . The dialling code is 01635, the postcode is RG20, part of the postal district of Reading, also in Berkshire. The district council, Basingstoke and Deane , is in Hampshire. St. Martin's School, East End History Meaning of nam ...more...



Anglican Diocese of Dunedin

topic

Arms of the Diocese of Dunedin The Diocese of Dunedin is one of the thirteen dioceses and hui amorangi of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia . The diocese covers the same area as the provinces of Otago and Southland in the South Island of New Zealand . Area 65,990 km², population 272,541 (2001). Anglicans are traditionally the third largest religious group in Otago and Southland after Presbyterians and Roman Catholics. Description of arms: Gules between a cross saltire argent, four starts argent on the fess point a Bible. The diocese was established in 1869. The seat of the Bishop of Dunedin is St. Paul's Cathedral, Dunedin . The diocese has a total of 33 parishes. The adaption of "Local Shared Ministry" has been a strategy by which local people are ordained to serve in a parish which cannot afford to support full-time professional clergy. The diocese includes Anglo-Catholic , broad and Evangelical parishes. History The first person named as Bishop of Dunedin was Henry Lascelles Jenne ...more...



Hohenzollern Castle

topic

Hohenzollern Castle (German:  Burg Hohenzollern ) is the ancestral seat of the imperial House of Hohenzollern. The third of three hilltop castles on the site, it is located atop Mount Hohenzollern, above and south of Hechingen, on the edge of the Swabian Jura of central Baden-Württemberg, Germany. The first fortress on the mountain was constructed in the early 11th century. Over the years the House of Hohenzollern split several times, but the castle remained in the Swabian branch, the dynastic seniors of the Franconian-Brandenburgian cadet branch that later acquired its own imperial throne. This castle was completely destroyed in 1423 after a ten-month siege by the free imperial cities of Swabia. A larger and sturdier structure was constructed from 1454 to 1461, which served as a refuge for the Catholic Swabian Hohenzollerns, including during the Thirty Years' War. By the end of the 18th century it was thought to have lost its strategic importance and gradually fell into disrepair, leading to the demolition ...more...



Demon Knight

topic

Demon Knight (also known as Tales from the Crypt Presents: Demon Knight ) is a 1995 American action comedy horror film directed by Ernest Dickerson , starring Billy Zane , William Sadler and Jada Pinkett Smith . Brenda Bakke , C. C. H. Pounder , Dick Miller and Thomas Haden Church co-star. Demon Knight is a feature-length film presented by the HBO series Tales from the Crypt , and features scenes with the Crypt Keeper (voiced by John Kassir , as in the series) at the film's beginning and ending. The film was followed by Bordello of Blood ; although it is not a direct sequel , the key artifact from this film makes an appearance. Plot Prologue A woman, having recently murdered a man, soaks in the bath. The corpse of the murdered man then awakens and attempts to murder the woman. Right before the corpse hacks the woman to death, the whole thing turns out to be a film shoot with the Crypt Keeper directing. While the angry Crypt Keeper berates the lead actor ( John Larroquette ) for his lack of talent, he becomes ...more...



Richard I of England

topic

Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 until his death. He also ruled as Duke of Normandy, Aquitaine and Gascony, Lord of Cyprus, Count of Poitiers, Anjou, Maine, and Nantes, and was overlord of Brittany at various times during the same period. He was the third of five sons of King Henry II of England and Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine. He was known as Richard Cœur de Lion or Richard the Lionheart because of his reputation as a great military leader and warrior. He was also known in Occitan as Oc e No (Yes and No), because of his reputation for terseness. By the age of 16, Richard had taken command of his own army, putting down rebellions in Poitou against his father. Richard was a central Christian commander during the Third Crusade, leading the campaign after the departure of Philip II of France and scoring considerable victories against his Muslim counterpart, Saladin, although he did not retake Jerusalem from Saladin. Richard spoke both French and Occitan. He wa ...more...



Bishop of Worcester

topic

The Bishop of Worcester is the head of the Church of England Diocese of Worcester in the Province of Canterbury , England . The title can be traced back to the foundation of the diocese in the year 680. From then until the 16th century, the bishops were in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church . During the Reformation , the church in England broke away from the authority of the Pope and the Roman Catholic Church, at first temporarily and later more permanently. Since the Reformation, the Bishop and Diocese of Worcester has been part of the Church of England and the Anglican Communion . The diocese covers most of the county of Worcestershire , the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley and parts of the City of Wolverhampton . The Episcopal see is in the city of Worcester where the bishop's throne is located at the Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary . The bishop's official residence is the Old Palace, Worcester . The bishops had two residences outside the city: Hartlebury Castle near Ki ...more...



Heroes of the West (1932 film)

topic

Heroes of the West (1932) is a Universal Pre-Code movie serial that depicts the dangers and thrills of building a transcontinental railroad. This was the 82nd serial (and the 14th serial with sound) to be released by Universal. Plot overview John Blaine – helped by his teenaged son and daughter, Noah and Ann – work to build a section of a transcontinental railroad "through the heart of the wild and wooly west." Unfortunately for them but fortunately for film-goers who love Western adventure, their section threads through Wyoming territory, dangerously close to hostile Indians. In addition to tribulations inherent in the Old West , work is hindered by crooked foreman Rance Judd, who is "secretly in the pay of a rival contractor and aims to make Blaine lose his government railroad contract by fouling up construction in any way he can" with help from his henchmen Butch Gore, Bart Eaton, and Buckskin Joe. Blaine is aided by a group of men also working on the railroad: surveyor Tom Crosby, scout Noah Blaine, an ...more...



1700 in Ireland

topic

Events from the year 1700 in Ireland. Events Laurence Hyde, Earl of Rochester December 28 – Laurence Hyde, 1st Earl of Rochester, appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Arts and literature c. March – the Yellow Book of Lecan is acquired by antiquary Edward Lhuyd. An edition of the late 16th-century Scots poet Alexander Montgomerie's The Cherrie and the Slae is printed in Ulster. Births Wikisource has original text related to this article: James Arbuckle James Arbuckle, poet and critic (d. 1742) Daniel O'Reilly, Roman Catholic Bishop of Clogher (d. 1778) James Stopford, 1st Earl of Courtown, politician (d. 1770) William O'Brien, 4th Earl of Inchiquin, peer and politician (d. 1777) Deaths Henry Colley, politician (b. 1648) Sir William Gore, 3rd Baronet. References John Cannon (2004). A Dictionary of British History. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-158022-2. Court-Register and Statesmans Remembrancer. G. Robinson. 1782. p. 66. Leslie Stephen; Sir Sidney Lee (1885). Dict ...more...



Horatio Powys

topic

Horatio Powys (1805–1877) was a priest in the Church of England and Bishop of Sodor and Man. Powys, born on 20 November 1805, was third son of Thomas Powys, 2nd Baron Lilford (1775–1825), by Henrietta Maria, eldest daughter of Robert Vernon Atherton of Atherton Hall, Lancashire. He was educated at Harrow and at St. John's College, Cambridge, where he graduated M.A. in 1826, and was later created D.D. in 1854. In 1831 he became the rector of the parish of Warrington, Lancashire and he was for some time rural dean of Cheshire. Strongly impressed with the necessity for improved education, he succeeded in establishing the training college at Chester and the institution for the education of the daughters of the clergy at Warrington, both of which proved permanently successful. On 5 July 1854 he was nominated to the bishopric of Sodor and Man. He made successful endeavours to uphold the rights of the see, and involved himself in much litigation, including a lengthy dispute with the Rev. William Drury, the Vicar ...more...



Will Geer

topic

Will Geer (March 9, 1902 – April 22, 1978) was an American actor and social activist, known for his portrayal of Grandpa Zebulon Tyler Walton in the 1970s TV series The Waltons . Personal life Geer was born William Aughe Ghere in Frankfort, Indiana , the son of Katherine (née Aughe), a teacher, and Roy Aaron Ghere, a postal worker. His father left the family when the boy was only 11 years old. He was deeply influenced by his grandfather, who taught him the botanical names of the plants in his native state. Geer started out to become a botanist , studying the subject and obtaining a master's degree at the University of Chicago . While at Chicago, he also became a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. He began his acting career touring in tent shows and on riverboats . He worked on several left -oriented documentaries, including narrating Sheldon Dick 's Men and Dust, about silicosis among miners. Geer was also the lover of homosexual activist Harry Hay . In 1934, Hay met Geer at the Tony Pastor Theatre, wh ...more...



Bishop's University

topic

Bishop's University ( French : Université Bishop's ) is an English-language and predominantly undergraduate university in Lennoxville , Quebec , Canada . Bishop's is one of three universities in the province of Quebec that teach primarily in English (the others being McGill University and Concordia University , both in Montreal ). The university shares a campus with its neighbour, Champlain College Lennoxville , an English-language public college . It remains one of Canada's few primarily undergraduate universities. Established in 1843 as Bishop's College and affiliated with the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge in 1853, the school remained under the Anglican church's direction from its founding until 1947. Since that time, the university has been a non-denominational institution. Bishop's University has graduated fifteen Rhodes Scholars . History Bishop's College was established by Bishop George Jehoshaphat Mountain on December 9, 1843, in Lennoxville, Quebec, for the education of members ...more...



Agnes Mason

topic

Agnes Mason (10 August 1849 – 19 December 1941) was a British nun. She was the founder of a religious order of the Anglican Communion , the Community of the Holy Family . Life Mason was born in Laugharne in 1849. She was the daughter of George William and Marianne Mason of Morton Hall in Nottinghamshire. Her brother Arthur James Mason was to be a Professor at Cambridge and her sister Harriet was a poor-law inspector and botanical illustrator . Another brother George Edward Mason was the rector at Whitwell and later principal of a theological college in the Transkei. Mason spent some years educating Edward before she went to Newnham College, Cambridge . After gaining her degree she taught at Bedford College. Holmhurst St Mary Mason used this house as a convent From 1892 to 1895 she worked at the Guild of the Epiphany which she left. She started the Anglican Community of the Holy Family with the help of several supporters. The purpose of the community was to improve women's education. Her supporters were Char ...more...




Next Page
Javascript Version
Revolvy Server https://www.revolvy.com