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William Gore (bishop)

William Gore DD (died 25 February 1784) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland.[1]

He was born the son of the Right Reverend William Gore, Dean of Down and his wife Honora Prittie.

Previously the Dean of Cashel from 1736 to 1758,[2] he was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 17 March 1758, consecrated on 16 April of that year; translated to Elphin on 3 March 1762; and finally to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 5 March 1772.[3]

In 1783 he commissioned the building of a Manor House at Old Connaught, near Bray, but in County Dublin. Old Connaught House still exists today as a private and gated development of apartments in and around the Old House.

He died on 25 February 1784. He had married twice, firstly, Mary, daughter of Chidley Coote and secondly, Mary, daughter of William French, with whom he had a son, William, who became an MP.

References
  1. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
  2. "The Universal magazine", Volume 22 (1758) p22
  3. "Dodsley's annual register" Burke,E: London, J.Dodsley 1780
Church of England titles
Preceded byWilliam Carmichael Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1758–1762 Succeeded byJohn Oswald
Preceded byEdward Synge Bishop of Elphin 1762– 1772 Succeeded byJemmett Browne
Preceded byJohn Averell Bishop of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe 1772– 1784 Succeeded byWilliam Cecil Pery
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William Gore

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William Gore may refer to: William Gore (15th-century MP) for Maldon (UK Parliament constituency) Sir William Gore, 3rd Baronet (died 1700), Irish Custos Rotulorum of Leitrim William Gore (died 1739) (c. 1675–1739), English MP for Colchester, Cricklade and St Albans (UK Parliament constituency) William Gore (Lord Mayor of London) (died 1708), Lord Mayor of London 1701 William Crampton Gore (1871–1946), Irish artist Bill Gore (1912–1986), American chemical engineer William Gore Ouseley (1797–1866), British diplomat William Gore (bishop) 18th-century Irish Anglican Bishop William D. Gore, Sheriff of San Diego County since 2009 Parliament of Ireland William Gore (died 1730) , MP for Leitrim 1703–1730, Donegal Borough William Gore (1703–1748) , MP for Kilkenny City William Gore (1709–1769) , MP for Leitrim 1730–1760 and 1768–1769 William Gore (1744–1815) , MP for Leitrim 1769–1776 William Gore (1767–1832) , MP for Carrick See also William Ormsby-Gore (disambiguation) William Gore may refer to: William Gore (15th-



William Gore (bishop)

topic

William Gore DD (died 25 February 1784) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland . He was born the son of the Right Reverend William Gore, Dean of Down and his wife Honora Prittie. Previously the Dean of Cashel from 1736 to 1758, he was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 17 March 1758, consecrated on 16 April of that year; translated to Elphin on 3 March 1762; and finally to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 5 March 1772. In 1783 he commissioned the building of a Manor House at Old Connaught, near Bray, but in County Dublin. Old Connaught House still exists today as a private and gated development of apartments in and around the Old House. He died on 25 February 1784. He had married twice, firstly, Mary, daughter of Chidley Coote and secondly, Mary, daughter of William French, with whom he had a son, William, who became an MP. References Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0-521-56



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Lancing College

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Lancing College is an independent boarding and day school founded in 1848 by Nathaniel Woodard . The school is based in 550 acres (2.2 km ) of countryside in West Sussex , east of Worthing near the village of Lancing , on the south coast of England. Lancing educates c. 550 pupils between the ages of 13 and 18; the co-educational ratio is c. 60:40 boys to girls. The college is situated on a hill which is part of the South Downs , and the campus dominates the local landscape. The college overlooks the River Adur and the Ladywell Stream, a holy well or sacred stream within the College grounds has pre-Christian significance. Woodard's aim was to provide education "based on sound principle and sound knowledge, firmly grounded in the Christian faith." Lancing was the first of a family of more than 30 schools founded by Woodard (others include Hurstpierpoint College , Ardingly College , Bloxham School and Worksop College ). Roughly 65% of pupils are boarders, at a cost of £32,910 per year; c. 35% are day pupils, at



William Carmichael (bishop)

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William Carmichael (1702–1765) was Archbishop of Dublin for a brief period in 1765. He was the son of the second Earl of Hyndford . He had previously been Archdeacon of Buckingham (1742–1753), Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh (1753–1758), Ferns and Leighlin (1758) and Meath (1758–1765). He died on 15 December 1765. References Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 350–351. ISBN   0-521-56350-X . Genealogical Web site thePeerage.com Church of England titles Preceded by Nicholas Clagett Archdeacon of Buckingham 1742–1753 Succeeded by John Taylor Preceded by Arthur Smyth Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1753–1758 Succeeded by William Gore Preceded by John Garnet Bishop of Ferns and Leighlin April 1758–June 1758 Succeeded by Thomas Salmon Preceded by Henry Maule Bishop of Meath 1758–1765 Succeeded by Richard Pococke Preceded by Charles Cobbe Archbishop of Dublin May 1765–December 1765 Succeeded by Arthur S



September 19

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September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years ) in the Gregorian calendar . There are 103 days remaining until the end of the year. This date is slightly more likely to fall on a Monday, Wednesday or Saturday (58 in 400 years each) than on Thursday or Friday (57), and slightly less likely to occur on a Tuesday or Sunday (56). Events 335 – Flavius Dalmatius is raised to the rank of Caesar by his uncle, emperor Constantine I . 634 – Siege of Damascus : The Rashidun Arabs under Khalid ibn al-Walid capture Damascus from the Byzantine Empire . 1356 – Battle of Poitiers : An English army under the command of Edward, the Black Prince defeats a French army and captures the French king, John II . 1676 – Jamestown is burned to the ground by the forces of Nathaniel Bacon during Bacon's Rebellion . 1777 – American Revolutionary War : British forces win a tactically expensive victory over the Continental Army in the First Battle of Saratoga . 1778 – The Continental Congress passes the first United States



Thomas Gore Browne

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Colonel Sir Thomas Robert Gore Browne KCMG CB (3 July 1807 – 17 April 1887) was a British colonial administrator, who was Governor of St Helena , Governor of New Zealand , Governor of Tasmania and Governor of Bermuda . Early life Browne was born in Aylesbury , Buckinghamshire, England, the first son of Robert Browne of Morton House , in Buckinghamshire , and of Sarah Dorothea Steward; his younger brother was Harold Browne (later Bishop of Winchester .) He served with the British Army in Afghanistan and India . In 1824 he purchased an Ensigncy in the 44th Foot , but three months later exchanged into the 28th Foot . In 1829 he purchased a Captaincy . In 1836, as a Major, he exchanged into the 41st Foot . In 1842 he was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Army, in 1845 he purchased the Lieutenant-Colonelcy of the 41st Foot, and in 1849 he exchanged into the 21st Foot . He was Governor of St Helena from July 1851 to December 1854. He was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Army in 1854, by which time he was back i



Anglican Diocese of Brisbane

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The Anglican Diocese of Brisbane is based in Brisbane , Queensland , Australia. The diocesan bishop's seat is St John's Cathedral, Brisbane . The current Archbishop of Brisbane is Phillip Aspinall , who was formerly the elected Primate of the Anglican Church of Australia . The diocese stretches from the south-eastern coastline of Queensland , south to the New South Wales border, and west to the Northern Territory and South Australian borders. History Queen Victoria created the Anglican Diocese of Brisbane and in 1859 appointed Edward Tufnell (1814–1896) as the first diocesan bishop . Tufnell designated St John's Cathedral in Brisbane as the pro-cathedral. The central stained glass windows in the apse, the crucifixion, at St Mary's Church, was donated by Bishop Tufnell. The second bishop was Matthew Hale , who was translated from Perth in 1876. Hale was succeeded by William Webber , who was the last man to be only Bishop of Brisbane (from 1885 to 1904) as the new ecclesiastical province of Brisbane would i



Calendar of saints (Episcopal Church)

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The veneration of saints in the Episcopal Church is a continuation of an ancient tradition from the early Church which honors important and influential people of the Christian faith. The usage of the term "saint" is similar to Roman Catholic and Orthodox traditions. Those in high church or Anglo-Catholic traditions may explicitly invoke saints as intercessors in prayer , though saints are mainly recognized in the Episcopal Church as merely examples in history of good Christian people. This is the calendar of saints found in the Book of Common Prayer , Lesser Feasts and Fasts and additions made at recent General Conventions; the relevant official resources of the Episcopal Church. About feasts, fasts, the Anglican Communion and the liturgical calendar The Episcopal Church publishes Lesser Feasts and Fasts, which contains feast days for the various men and women the Church wishes to honor. This book is updated every three years, when notable people can be added to the liturgical calendar by the General Conventi



Dean of Down

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The Dean of Down is based in The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Downpatrick within the Diocese of Down and Dromore of the Church of Ireland . The current incumbent is T. Henry Hull. Deans of Down Down Cathedral 1541 Connor Magennis 1609–1622 John Gibson 1623–1627 Robert Dawson (afterwards Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh , 1627) 1627–1635 Henry Leslie (afterwards Bishop of Down and Connor , 1635 1635 William Coote (died before 1657) 1661/2 Thomas Bayly (afterwards Archdeacon of Connor, 1663 and then Bishop of Killala and Achonry , 1664) 1663/4–1669 Daniel Witter (afterwards Bishop of Killaloe 1669–1681/2 William Sheridan (afterwards Bishop of Kilmore and Ardagh , 1682) 1682-1682 Benjamin Phipps 1682/3–1709 John M'Neale 1709–1717 Ralph Lambert (afterwards Bishop of Dromore , 1717) 1717–1721 Benjamin Pratt 1721/2–1723 Charles Fairfax 1723/4–1731 William Gore 1731/2–1739 Richard Daniel 1739–1744 Thomas Fletcher (afterwards Bishop of Dromore , 1744) 1744–1768 Patrick Delany 1768–1787 James



Alwyn Williams (bishop)

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Alwyn Terrell Petre Williams (20 July 1888 – 18 February 1968) was Bishop of Durham (1939–1952) and then Bishop of Winchester (1952–1961). Family and education Born the eldest son of John (a physician) and Adeline (née Peter) Williams, at Barrow-in-Furness , Lancashire , he was educated at Rossall School and then went up to Jesus College, Oxford , where he had a remarkable career. He was a Scholar of his college and took a Triple First in Classical Moderations (1908), Greats (1910), and Modern History (1911), having won the Gladstone Historical Essay in 1909. He was elected a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford for the period 1911–1918. Williams married Margaret, née Stewart, of Perthshire , on 23 August 1914; they had no children, and she died in 1958. Career He was ordained deacon on St Thomas' day (21 December) 1913 and priest on 20 December 1914 — both times by Charles Gore , Bishop of Oxford , at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford — and soon moved to Winchester College , where he was Assistant Master



Leonard Williams (bishop)

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William Leonard Williams (1829–1916) was an Anglican Bishop of Waiapu . He was regarded as an eminent scholar of the Māori language . Early life A 1930 publication of his book Williams was born on the 22 July 1829 at Paihia , Bay of Islands, New Zealand. He was the third child and first son of William Williams of the Church Mission Society and his wife, Jane . His father was the first Bishop of Waiapu , Leonard Williams was the third bishop, and his son, Herbert Williams , was the 6th bishop of Waiapu. He was educated in New Zealand before attending Magdelen Hall (now Hertford College, Oxford ) from 1847 where he obtained a third class honours degree in June 1852. He became a member of the Church Missionary Society and undertook theological training at the Church Missionary Society College, Islington . He was admitted to Deacon's Orders by the Bishop of London on 22 March 1853. Leonard met the daughters of Mr. J. B. Wanklyn of Halecat, Witherslack , Cumbria when visiting his aunt, Catherine Heathcote, at S



Desmond Tutu

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Desmond Mpilo Tutu CH (born 7 October 1931) is a South African social rights activist and retired Anglican bishop who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid . He was the first black Archbishop of Cape Town and bishop of the Church of the Province of Southern Africa (now the Anglican Church of Southern Africa ). Since the demise of apartheid in South Africa, Tutu has campaigned to fight HIV/AIDS , tuberculosis , poverty , racism , sexism , homophobia , and transphobia . He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984; the Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism in 1986; the Pacem in Terris Award in 1987; the Sydney Peace Prize in 1999; the Gandhi Peace Prize in 2007; and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. He has also compiled several books of his speeches and sayings. Early life Desmond Mpilo Tutu was born on 7 October 1931 in Klerksdorp , Transvaal , the second of four children of Zacheriah Zililo Tutu and his wife, Aletta Tutu, and the only son. Tutu's family moved to Joh



Francis Tebbs Havergal

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Francis Tebbs Havergal (1829–1890), author and editor. The youngest son of William Henry Havergal was born 27 Aug. 1829. He was a bible-clerk of New College , Oxford (B.A. 1852, M.A. 1857); he became vicar-choral in Hereford Cathedral , 1853–1874, vicar of Pipe and Lyde , 1861–74, and of Upton Bishop , 1874–90, and prebendary of Hereford, 1877–90. He died at Upton on 27 July 1890. Publications The Visitor's Hand Guide to Hereford Cathedral, 1869; 6th ed. 1882. Fasti Herefordenses, 1869. Monumental Inscriptions in Hereford Cathedral, 1881. Records of Upton Bishop, 1883. Herefordshire Words and Phrases, 1887. Memorials of the Rev. Sir Frederick Arthur Gore Ouseley, Baronet, 1889. Francis Tebbs Havergal (1829–1890), author and editor. The youngest son of William Henry Havergal was born 27 Aug. 1829. He was a bible-clerk of New College , Oxford (B.A. 1852, M.A. 1857); he became vicar-choral in Hereford Cathedral , 1853–1874, vicar of Pipe and Lyde , 1861–74, and of Upton Bishop , 1874–90, and prebendary of Herefo



Sam Waterston

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Samuel Atkinson Waterston (born November 15, 1940) is an American actor, producer and director. Among other roles, he is noted for his portrayal of Sydney Schanberg in The Killing Fields (1984), for which he received an Academy Award nomination, and his starring role as Jack McCoy on the long-running NBC television series Law & Order (1994–2010), which brought him Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Awards . He has been nominated for multiple Golden Globe, Screen Actors Guild, BAFTA and Emmy awards, having starred in over eighty film and television productions during his fifty-year career. He has also starred in numerous stage productions. AllMovie historian Hal Erickson characterized Waterston as having "cultivated a loyal following with his quietly charismatic, unfailingly solid performances." Waterston received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2010 and was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame in 2012. Early life and education Waterston, the third of four siblings (Roberta, George,



List of Hillary Clinton presidential campaign non-political endorsements, 2016

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This is a list of notable non-political figures and organizations who have publicly indicated support for Hillary Clinton in the 2016 United States presidential election . Those who indicated their support after Hillary Clinton's presumptive nomination on June 11 are denoted with an asterisk. Notable individuals Activists, humanitarians, and labor leaders Gloria Allred Bryan Ball Joyce Bender Chaz Bono R. Thomas Buffenbarger Chelsea Clinton Amal Clooney Activists for civil and human rights Gloria Allred * Ruby Bridges * Amal Clooney Benjamin Crump Hazel Dukes , former President: NAACP Myrlie Evers-Williams , former Chair: NAACP Fred D. Gray Jesse Jackson ,* founder: Rainbow/PUSH Ben Jealous ,* former President: NAACP Vernon Jordan , former President: National Urban League Lonnie C. King Jr. Lily Mazahery * DeRay Mckesson * Janet Murguía ,* President: National Council of La Raza Billy Murphy Jr. Carlotta Walls LaNier * Activists against bullying, domestic violence, sex trafficking, and gun violence Hannah Alpe



William Jones

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William Jones may refer to: Academics and authors William Jones (mathematician) (1675–1749), Welsh mathematician who proposed the use of the symbol π William Jones (college principal) (1676–1725), Principal of Jesus College, Oxford, 1720–1725 William Jones (Welsh radical) (1726–1795), Welsh poet, antiquary and radical William Jones (naturalist) (1745–1818), English naturalist and entomologist Sir William Jones (philologist) (1746–1794), English philologist who proposed a relationship among Indo-European languages William Jones (anthropologist) (1871–1909), Native American specialist in Algonquian languages W. S. Jones (William Samuel Jones, 1920–2007), Welsh language writer William Eifion Jones (1925–2004), Welsh marine botanist Military figures William Jones (1803–1864), Union Lieutenant Colonel and owner of the Colonel William Jones House in Indiana William E. Jones (1824–1864), Confederate cavalry general William Gore Jones (1826–1888), British admiral William Jones (sailor) (1831–?), American Civil War sa



Community of the Resurrection

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Some members of the community The Community of the Resurrection ( CR ) is an Anglican religious community for men in England . It is based in Mirfield , West Yorkshire , and has 17 members as of July 2016. The community reflects Anglicanism in its broad nature and is strongly engaged in the life of the Anglican Communion . It also has a long tradition of ecumenical outlook and practice. CR is dedicated to the mystery of Christ's resurrection. The Constitutions of the community state that "the Community of the Resurrection is called specially to public, prophetic witness to the Christian hope of the Kingdom. The common life and corporate worship of its members is properly made visible in its works, which embrace social and missionary concern.... The dedication to the Resurrection does not indicate an obligation to particular works or particular places, but rather a commitment to make public the fruits of the community life and worship in order to proclam the world made new in Christ... its charism... is to liv



Battle of Britain

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The Battle of Britain ( German : die Luftschlacht um England, literally "the air battle for England") was a military campaign of the Second World War when the Royal Air Force (RAF) defended the United Kingdom (UK) against the German Air Force ( Luftwaffe ) attacks from the end of June 1940. It is described as the first major campaign fought entirely by air forces. The British officially recognise its duration as from 10 July until 31 October 1940, which overlaps with the period of large-scale night attacks known as the Blitz , that lasted from 7 September 1940 to 11 May 1941 while German historians do not accept this subdivision and regard it as a campaign lasting from July 1940 to June 1941 including the Blitz. The primary objective of the Nazi German forces was to compel Britain to agree to a negotiated peace settlement. In July 1940 the air and sea blockade began, with the Luftwaffe mainly targeting coastal-shipping convoys, ports and shipping centres, such as Portsmouth . On 1 August, the Luftwaffe was



Peter Vaughan

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Peter Vaughan (born Peter Ewart Ohm ; 4 April 1923 – 6 December 2016) was a British character actor , known for many supporting roles in British film and television productions. He also worked extensively on the stage. He was best known for his role as Grouty in the sitcom Porridge (despite appearing in only three episodes and the 1979 film) and also had a recurring role alongside Robert Lindsay in Citizen Smith , written by John Sullivan . He also had parts as Tom Franklin in Chancer (1990–91), playing the father of Anthony Hopkins 's character in The Remains of the Day , and as Maester Aemon in HBO 's Game of Thrones (2011–15), his final role. Early life He was born Peter Ewart Ohm on 4 April 1923, in Wem , Shropshire , the son of a bank clerk, Max Ohm, who was an Austrian immigrant, and Eva Wright, a nurse. The family later moved to Wellington in the same county, where he began schooling; he later said it was while reciting a poem at infant school in Wellington that he experienced the applause and ad



Charles Hay, 20th Earl of Erroll

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Charles Gore Hay, 20th Earl of Erroll , KT , CB (7 February 1852 – 8 July 1927), styled Lord Hay until 1891, was a Scottish soldier and Conservative politician. Biography Hay was the son of William Harry Hay, 19th Earl of Erroll, and his wife Eliza Amelia Gore. His maternal grandfather was General the Hon. Sir Charles Gore, KH , GCB (1793 – 1869), a Waterloo officer, a son of the 2nd Earl of Arran and a brother of the Duchess of Inverness . He succeeded his father in the earldom in 1891. Lord Hay was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Royal Horse Guards on 7 July 1869. He was promoted to lieutenant on 19 August 1871, to captain on 11 September 1875, to major on 1 July 1881, to lieutenant-colonel on 24 September 1887, and to colonel on 18 January 1895. Following the outbreak of the Second Boer War in late 1899, he volunteered for active service and was commissioned in the Imperial Yeomanry . He took part in the Battle of Paardeberg (February 1900), following which he was in charge of prisoners from Piet



Edward Brooke

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Edward William Brooke III (October 26, 1919 – January 3, 2015) was an American Republican politician. In 1966 , he became the first African American popularly elected to the United States Senate . He represented Massachusetts in the Senate from 1967 to 1979. Born and raised in Washington, D.C. , Brooke graduated from the Boston University School of Law after serving in the United States Army during World War II . After serving as chairman of the Finance Commission of Boston , Brooke won election as Massachusetts Attorney General in 1962. In 1966, he defeated Democratic Governor Endicott Peabody in a landslide to win election to the Senate. In the Senate, Brooke aligned with the liberal faction of Republicans. He co-wrote the Civil Rights Act of 1968 , which prohibits housing discrimination . Brooke became a prominent critic of President Richard Nixon and was the first Senate Republican to call for Nixon's resignation in light of the Watergate scandal . Brooke won re-election in 1972, but he was defeated by P



Saints in Anglicanism

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The term " saint " is a context-specific translation of the Latin "sanctus", meaning sacred, and originally referred to a sacred (extremely holy) person—however, since the 10th century, the Church has reserved the status of saint to people its official canon law (including calendar) has recognised for outstanding Christian service and conduct. When the Church of England was in union with Rome saints arose in the form of canonisation . Those martyrs and confessors recognised before the 10th century and since the break with Rome in the 16th century are generally still considered both "saints" and "Saints". "Hero/heroine" are sometimes to refer to those holy people whom the church synod or an individual church praises as having had special benevolence who have lived and died since the split with Rome. It considers such muted terms a reversion to a more simple and cautious doctrine which emphasises empowerment ( subsidiarity ) to all members and components of the church. The provinces of the Anglican Communion t




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