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William Gore (bishop)

William Gore DD (died 25 February 1784) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland.[1]

He was born the son of the Right Reverend William Gore, Dean of Down and his wife Honora Prittie.

Previously the Dean of Cashel from 1736 to 1758,[2] he was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 17 March 1758, consecrated on 16 April of that year; translated to Elphin on 3 March 1762; and finally to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 5 March 1772.[3]

In 1783 he commissioned the building of a Manor House at Old Connaught, near Bray, but in County Dublin. Old Connaught House still exists today as a private and gated development of apartments in and around the Old House.

He died on 25 February 1784. He had married twice, firstly, Mary, daughter of Chidley Coote and secondly, Mary, daughter of William French, with whom he had a son, William, who became an MP.

References
  1. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
  2. "The Universal magazine", Volume 22 (1758) p22
  3. "Dodsley's annual register" Burke,E: London, J.Dodsley 1780
Church of England titles
Preceded byWilliam Carmichael Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1758–1762 Succeeded byJohn Oswald
Preceded byEdward Synge Bishop of Elphin 1762– 1772 Succeeded byJemmett Browne
Preceded byJohn Averell Bishop of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe 1772– 1784 Succeeded byWilliam Cecil Pery
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William Gore

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William Gore may refer to: William Gore (15th-century MP) for Maldon (UK Parliament constituency) Sir William Gore, 3rd Baronet (died 1700), Irish Custos Rotulorum of Leitrim William Gore (died 1739) (c. 1675–1739), English MP for Colchester, Cricklade and St Albans (UK Parliament constituency) William Gore (Lord Mayor of London) (died 1708), Lord Mayor of London 1701 William Crampton Gore (1871–1946), Irish artist Bill Gore (1912–1986), American chemical engineer William Gore Ouseley (1797–1866), British diplomat William Gore (bishop) 18th-century Irish Anglican Bishop William D. Gore, Sheriff of San Diego County since 2009 Parliament of Ireland William Gore (died 1730), MP for Leitrim 1703–1730, Donegal Borough William Gore (1703–1748), MP for Kilkenny City William Gore (1709–1769), MP for Leitrim 1730–1760 and 1768–1769 William Gore (1744–1815), MP for Leitrim 1769–1776 William Gore (1767–1832), MP for Carrick See also William Ormsby-Gore (disambiguation) William Gore may refer to: Wil ...more...



William Gore (bishop)

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William Gore DD (died 25 February 1784) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland. He was born the son of the Right Reverend William Gore, Dean of Down and his wife Honora Prittie. Previously the Dean of Cashel from 1736 to 1758, he was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 17 March 1758, consecrated on 16 April of that year; translated to Elphin on 3 March 1762; and finally to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 5 March 1772. In 1783 he commissioned the building of a Manor House at Old Connaught, near Bray, but in County Dublin. Old Connaught House still exists today as a private and gated development of apartments in and around the Old House. He died on 25 February 1784. He had married twice, firstly, Mary, daughter of Chidley Coote and secondly, Mary, daughter of William French, with whom he had a son, William, who became an MP. References Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.ISBN 0-5 ...more...



Bishop Gore School

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The Bishop Gore School (Welsh: Ysgol Esgob Gore) is a secondary school in Swansea in Wales, founded on 14 September 1682 by Hugh Gore (1613–1691), Bishop of Waterford and Lismore. It is situated in Sketty, close to Singleton Park and Swansea University. In December 2013 the school was ranked in the second highest of five bands by the Welsh Government, based on performance in exams, value added performance, disadvantaged pupils' performance, and attendance. History Grammar school Established as a Free Grammar School, initially in Goat Street (a site now part of Princess Way in the city centre), for "the gratuitous instruction of twenty boys, sons of the most indigent burgesses, and in the event of a dissolution of the corporation, to sons of the poorest inhabitants of the town", it has since known several names and locations. In September 1853 the school moved, as the boys-only Swansea Grammar School, to Mount Pleasant into a new building designed by the architect Thomas Taylor. The building was extended ...more...



Gore Vidal

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Eugene Luther Gore Vidal ( born Eugene Louis Vidal ; October 3, 1925 – July 31, 2012) was an American writer and public intellectual known for his patrician manner, epigrammatic wit, and polished style of writing. Vidal was born to a political family; his maternal grandfather, Thomas Pryor Gore , served as United States senator from Oklahoma (1907–1921 and 1931–1937). He was a Democratic Party politician who twice sought elected office; first to the United States House of Representatives (New York, 1960), then to the U.S. Senate (California, 1982). As a political commentator and essayist, Vidal's principal subject was the history of the United States and its society, especially how the militaristic foreign policy reduced the country to a decadent empire . His political and cultural essays were published in The Nation , the New Statesman , the New York Review of Books , and Esquire magazines. As a public intellectual, Gore Vidal's topical debates on sex, politics, and religion with other intellectuals and wri ...more...



Spencer Gore (sportsman)

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Spencer William Gore (10 March 1850 – 19 April 1906) was an English tennis player who won the first Wimbledon tournament in 1877 and a first-class cricketer who played for Surrey County Cricket Club (1874-1875). Early years Harrow cricket team of 1869 for the match against Eton. Gore is front row, fourth from the left. West Side House, Wimbledon, where Gore was born and raised Spencer William Gore was the son of the Hon. Charles Alexander Gore, grandson of the second Earl of Arran , and Lady Augusta Lavinia Priscilla (née Ponsonby), a daughter of the fourth Earl of Bessborough . His mother's first marriage was to William Petty-FitzMaurice, Earl of Kerry , who died in 1836. His father was the Commissioner of Woods and Forests . His two brothers were the theologian Charles Gore , the first Bishop of Birmingham , and Sir Francis Charles Gore, Solicitor to the Board of Inland Revenue . Spencer was born and raised within a mile of the All England Croquet Club at West Side House , Wimbledon Common , Surrey . He w ...more...



Charles Gore

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Charles Gore CR (1853–1932) was the Bishop of Oxford. He was one of the most influential Anglican theologians of the 19th century, helping reconcile the church to some aspects of biblical criticism and scientific discovery, while remaining Catholic in his interpretation of the faith and sacraments. Also known for his social action, Gore became an Anglican bishop and founded the priestly Community of the Resurrection as well as co-founded the Christian Social Union. Early life and career Charles Gore was born on 22 January 1853 into an Anglo-Irish aristocratic family as the third son of Charles Alexander Gore, son of the Earl of Arran, and Lady Augusta Lavinia Priscilla (née Ponsonby), a daughter of the fourth Earl of Bessborough. His brother Spencer was the first winner of the Wimbledon Championships. Gore was raised in a low-church Anglican family and was confirmed by the church at the age of eight years. He was attracted to the high-church sacramental tradition and ritualism of Anglo-Catholicism at a ...more...



Prince-bishop

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Johann Otto von Gemmingen, Prince-Bishop of Augsburg (1591–1598) A prince-bishop is a bishop who is also the civil ruler of some secular principality and sovereignty. Thus the principality or prince-bishopric ruled politically by a prince-bishop could wholly or largely overlap with his diocesan jurisdiction, since some parts of his diocese, even the city of his residence, could be exempt from his civil rule, obtaining the status of free imperial city. If the episcopal see is an archbishopric, the correct term is prince-archbishop; the equivalent in the regular (monastic) clergy is prince-abbot. A prince-bishop is usually considered an elected monarch. In the West, with the decline of imperial power from the 4th century onwards in the face of the barbarian invasions, sometimes Christian bishops of cities took the place of the Roman commander, made secular decisions for the city and led their own troops when necessary. Later relations between a prince-bishop and the burghers were invariably not cordial. ...more...



Wilfrid Gore Browne

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Wilfrid Gore Browne (6 May 1859 – 15 March 1928) was an Anglican bishop, the first Bishop of Kimberley and Kuruman from 1912 to 1928. He was described as a saintly bishop with "a keen sense of humour" and "a winning courtesy." Early life and education Gore Browne was born in India on 6 May 1859, the youngest of the family of Col Sir Thomas Gore Browne KCMG, spending his early years in New Zealand where his father was Governor. He was educated, with his brother Frank Gore Browne, K.C., at Harrow School (from 1873) and at Trinity College, Cambridge where he took his degree in 1881. Before his ordination Gore Browne enlisted with the 11th Hussars for six months "with the object of getting experience which would help him in his work among men." Wilfrid Gore Browne was the uncle of Stewart Gore-Browne , the founder of Shiwa Ngandu in Zambia . Ordination to Priesthood and work in Darlington and Pretoria Ordained deacon in the Diocese of Durham in 1882, priest in 1883, his first post was as Curate at Pallion ...more...



Gore (surname)

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Gore is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: Al Gore (born 1948), environmental activist and US politician (45th Vice President of the United States, Tennessee senator) Albert Gore, Sr. (1907–1998), United States Senator from Tennessee; father of Al Gore Arthur Gore , multiple individuals Bill Gore (1912–1986), founder of W. L. Gore and Associates, makers of Gore-Tex Bobby Gore (1936–2013), American activist Catherine Gore (1799–1861), British novelist and dramatist Charles Gore multiple individuals Charles Gore (1853–1932), English divine and Anglican bishop who founded the Community of the Resurrection Charles Gore (artist) (1759–1807), landscape artist, Grand Tour traveler Charles Stephen Gore (1793–1869), British Army officer David Alan Gore (1957-2012), American serial killer David Gore (1823-1911), American politician Francis Gore (1769–1852), British Army officer and colonial administrator Frank Gore (born 1983), American football player Frederick Gore (1913–2009), British painter Gordon ...more...



Bush v. Gore

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Bush v. Gore , 531 U.S. 98 (2000), was a decision of the United States Supreme Court resolving the dispute surrounding the 2000 presidential election . The ruling was issued on December 12, 2000. On December 9, the Court had preliminarily halted the Florida recount that was occurring. Eight days earlier, the Court unanimously decided the closely related case of Bush v. Palm Beach County Canvassing Board , 531 U.S. 70 (2000). The Electoral College was scheduled to meet on December 18, 2000, to decide the election. In a per curiam decision , the Court ruled that there was an Equal Protection Clause violation in using different standards of counting in different counties and ruled that no alternative method could be established within the time limit set by Title 3 of the United States Code (3 U.S.C.), § 5 ("Determination of controversy as to appointment of electors"), which was December 12. The vote regarding the Equal Protection Clause was 7–2, and regarding the lack of an alternative method was 5–4. Three co ...more...



Thomas Gore Browne

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Colonel Sir Thomas Robert Gore Browne KCMG CB (3 July 1807 – 17 April 1887) was a British colonial administrator, who was Governor of St Helena , Governor of New Zealand , Governor of Tasmania and Governor of Bermuda . Early life Browne was born in Aylesbury , Buckinghamshire, England, the first son of Robert Browne of Morton House , in Buckinghamshire , and of Sarah Dorothea Steward; his younger brother was Harold Browne (later Bishop of Winchester .) He served with the British Army in Afghanistan and India . In 1824 he purchased an Ensigncy in the 44th Foot , but three months later exchanged into the 28th Foot . In 1829 he purchased a Captaincy . In 1836, as a Major, he exchanged into the 41st Foot . In 1842 he was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Army, in 1845 he purchased the Lieutenant-Colonelcy of the 41st Foot, and in 1849 he exchanged into the 21st Foot . He was Governor of St Helena from July 1851 to December 1854. He was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Army in 1854, by which time he was back i ...more...



Earl of Arran

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Earl of Arran is a title in both the Peerage of Scotland and the Peerage of Ireland . The two titles refer to different places: the Isle of Arran in Scotland, and the Aran Islands in Ireland. The Scottish earldom is a subsidiary title of the Duke of Hamilton , whereas the Irish earldom is a separate title held by the Gore family. Scottish creations Feudal Earldom of Arran Arms of feudal Earls of Arran: Argent, a lymphad with the sails furled proper flagged gules. The feudal Earldom of Arran supposedly had its caput at Lochranza Castle . The arms of the feudal Earl of Arran are: Argent, a lymphad with the sails furled proper flagged gules. These are quartered today with the arms of Hamilton (Gules, three cinquefoils ermine) by the Duke of Hamilton. In a similar fashion the arms of the feudal Earldom of Orkney are quartered by the present Earl of Caithness, the arms of the feudal Barony (or Earldom) of Lorne are now quartered by the Duke of Argyll, and the arms of the feudal Lord of the Isles are quartered wi ...more...



List of heroes of the Christian Church in the Anglican Communion

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This is a list of heroes of the Christian Church in the Anglican Communion. The Anglican Communion is an international association of national and regional Anglican churches (and a few other episcopal churches) in full communion with the Church of England (which is regarded as the mother church of the worldwide communion) and specifically with its principal primate, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Heroes Jesus Alcuin Alfred the Great Lancelot Andrewes Bishop Henry Mary Brant Thomas Bray William Grant Broughton John Bunyan Joseph Butler Josephine Butler Caroline Chisholm John Donne Nick Enderby Nicholas Ferrar George Fox Charles Gore Robert Grosseteste Reginald Heber George Herbert Walter Hilton Richard Hooker John Horden Charles Inglis Ini Kopuria John Keble Thomas Ken Geoffrey Anketell Studdert Kennedy Edward King (English bishop) Lanfranc Stephen Langton Hugh Latimer William Laud William Law Li Tim-Oi Janani Luwum Robert Machray Frederick Maurice Bernard Mizeki John M ...more...



William Jones

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William Jones may refer to: Academics and authors William Jones (mathematician) (1675–1749), Welsh mathematician who proposed the use of the symbol π William Jones (college principal) (1676–1725), Principal of Jesus College, Oxford, 1720–1725 William Jones (Welsh radical) (1726–1795), Welsh poet, antiquary and radical William Jones (naturalist) (1745–1818), English naturalist and entomologist Sir William Jones (philologist) (1746–1794), English philologist who proposed a relationship among Indo-European languages William Jones (anthropologist) (1871–1909), Native American specialist in Algonquian languages W. S. Jones (William Samuel Jones, 1920–2007), Welsh language writer William Eifion Jones (1925–2004), Welsh marine botanist Military figures William Jones (1803–1864), Union Lieutenant Colonel and owner of the Colonel William Jones House in Indiana William E. Jones (1824–1864), Confederate cavalry general William Gore Jones (1826–1888), British admiral William Jones (sailor) (1831–?), American Civil War sa ...more...



John Ponsonby, 4th Earl of Bessborough

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John William Ponsonby, 4th Earl of Bessborough, PC (31 August 1781 – 16 May 1847), known as Viscount Duncannon from 1793 to 1844, was a British Whig politician. He was notably Home Secretary in 1834 and served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland between 1846 and 1847, the first years of the Great Famine. Background and education Henrietta Ponsonby, Countess of Bessborough with her sons William and John by John Hoppner (1787) A member of the prominent Ponsonby family of Cumberland, he was the eldest son of Frederick Ponsonby, 3rd Earl of Bessborough, and Lady Henrietta Frances, daughter of John Spencer, 1st Earl Spencer. Sir Frederick Cavendish Ponsonby and William Ponsonby, 1st Baron de Mauley, were his younger brothers, while Lady Caroline Lamb was his younger sister. Ponsonby's mother was Lord Granville's lover prior to his marriage to Lady Harriet Cavendish, the Countess of Bessborough's niece. Lord Granville fathered two illegitimate children through her: Harriette Stewart and George Stewart. Lord Bess ...more...



Francis Paget

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Francis Paget (20 March 1851 – 2 August 1911) was an English theologian , author and the 33rd Bishop of Oxford . Life He was the second son of the noted surgeon Sir James Paget, 1st Baronet , and brother of Luke Paget , Bishop of Chester. " The House " Paget as caricatured by Spy ( Leslie Ward ) in Vanity Fair , November 1894 He was educated at St Marylebone Grammar School , Shrewsbury and Christ Church, Oxford . Ordained priest he became preacher at Whitehall in 1882 and Vicar of Bromsgrove in 1885. An eminent scholar, he was subsequently Regius Professor of Pastoral Theology at the University of Oxford and Dean at his old college . After the death of the Right Reverend William Stubbs in April 1901, Paget was recommended to succeed him as Bishop of Oxford. He was elected bishop the following month, and consecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury in St. Paul´s Cathedral 29 June 1901. A couple of days later he was received by King Edward VII and invested as Chancellor of the Order of the Garter , an offi ...more...



Sir Ralph Gore, 4th Baronet

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Sir Ralph Gore, 4th Baronet (c. 1675 – 23 February 1733) was a Speaker of the Irish House of Commons . He is now chiefly remembered for building Belle Isle Castle . The Gore Baronetcy, of Magherabegg in the County of Donegal, was created in the Baronetage of Ireland on 2 February 1622 for Paul Gore (shown also as 1st baronet of Manor Gore, the Anglicized version). Ralph was the eldest son of Sir William Gore, 3rd Baronet and his wife Hannah Hamilton, daughter and co-heiress of James Hamilton of Manorhamilton and niece of Gustavus Hamilton, 1st Viscount Boyne . Ralph inherited the estate of Manorhamilton from his mother. He was appointed High Sheriff of Leitrim for 1710. The fourth Baronet served as Chancellor of the Irish Exchequer and as Speaker of the Irish House of Commons . He represented Donegal Borough in the Irish House of Commons from 1703 until 1713 and then Donegal County from 1713 until 1727. Subsequently, he sat for Clogher until his death in 1733. Family He married firstly Elizabeth Colville, dau ...more...



Anglican Diocese of Brisbane

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The Anglican Diocese of Brisbane is based in Brisbane , Queensland , Australia. The diocesan bishop's seat is St John's Cathedral, Brisbane . The current Archbishop of Brisbane is Phillip Aspinall , who was formerly the elected Primate of the Anglican Church of Australia . The diocese stretches from the south-eastern coastline of Queensland , south to the New South Wales border, and west to the Northern Territory and South Australian borders. History Queen Victoria created the Anglican Diocese of Brisbane and in 1859 appointed Edward Tufnell (1814–1896) as the first diocesan bishop . Tufnell designated St John's Cathedral in Brisbane as the pro-cathedral. The central stained glass windows in the apse, the crucifixion, at St Mary's Church, was donated by Bishop Tufnell. The second bishop was Matthew Hale , who was translated from Perth in 1876. Hale was succeeded by William Webber , who was the last man to be only Bishop of Brisbane (from 1885 to 1904) as the new ecclesiastical province of Brisbane would i ...more...



William Williams (bishop)

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William Williams (18 July 1800 – 9 February 1878) was the first Anglican Bishop of Waiapu and the father and grandfather of two others. Williams was consecrated as the Bishop of Waiapu on 3 April 1859 at the meeting of the General Synod at Wellington. Williams led the Church Missionary Society (CMS) missionaries in translating the Bible into Māori and he also published an early dictionary and grammar of the Māori language . Early life Williams was born in Nottingham to Thomas and Mary Williams on 18 July 1800. His paternal grandfather was the Reverend Thomas Williams (1725–1770), a Congregational minister at the Independent Chapel of Gosport. After the death of William's father in 1804, his mother moved with her younger children to Southwell, Nottinghamshire where she opened a school for young girls. William Williams was educated at Moravian school , Fairfield, Manchester then at Southwell Grammar School under the Revd E. Footit. Williams completed an apprenticeship to a Mr Forster, a Southwell surgeon. Wil ...more...



Ralph Gore, 1st Earl of Ross

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General Ralph Gore, 1st Earl of Ross (23 November 1725 – September 1802), known as Sir Ralph Gore, 6th Baronet from 1746 until 1764, subsequently as The Lord Gore until 1768 and then as The Viscount Belleisle until 1772, was an Irish soldier, politician and peer. Background Born at Belle Isle Castle, he was the second son of Sir Ralph Gore, 4th Baronet and his second wife Elizabeth, only daughter of St George Ashe, at that time Bishop of Clogher. Gore was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and in 1744, he purchased a lieutenantcy in the 33rd Regiment of Foot. In 1746, he succeeded his older brother St George as baronet. Military career In the middle of the War of the Austrian Succession, Gore joined the regiment in Flandern in 1745 and took over a company. At the Battle of Fontenoy on 11 May, he was hit on his right arm by a shot, however quickly recovered. During the Battle of Lauffeld on 2 July 1747 all his superior officers were killed or severely wounded, so command of the battalion fell to Gore, w ...more...



Alwyn Williams (bishop)

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Alwyn Terrell Petre Williams (20 July 1888 – 18 February 1968) was Bishop of Durham (1939–1952) and then Bishop of Winchester (1952–1961). Family and education Born the eldest son of John (a physician) and Adeline (née Peter) Williams, at Barrow-in-Furness , Lancashire , he was educated at Rossall School and then went up to Jesus College, Oxford , where he had a remarkable career. He was a Scholar of his college and took a Triple First in Classical Moderations (1908), Greats (1910), and Modern History (1911), having won the Gladstone Historical Essay in 1909. He was elected a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford for the period 1911–1918. Williams married Margaret, née Stewart, of Perthshire , on 23 August 1914; they had no children, and she died in 1958. Career He was ordained deacon on St Thomas' day (21 December) 1913 and priest on 20 December 1914 — both times by Charles Gore , Bishop of Oxford , at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford — and soon moved to Winchester College , where he was Assistant Master ...more...



William Pery, 1st Baron Glentworth

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William Cecil Pery, 1st Baron Glentworth (26 July 1721 – 4 July 1794) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland. He was born on 26 July 1721, the son of Reverend Stackpole Pery and Jane Twigg, and educated at Trinity College, Dublin. His elder brother was Edmund Pery, 1st Viscount Pery. Previously the Dean of Derry, he was nominated Bishop of Killala and Achonry on 7 January 1781 and consecrated on 18 February that year. He was translated to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 13 May 1784. He was created Baron Glentworth, of Mallow in the Peerage of Ireland, in 1790 and died on 4 July 1794. William Street in Limerick is named after him, as were Cecil Street, Glentworth Street and Mallow Street. Pery firstly married Jane Walcott and following her death, married secondly Dorothea Lewis. He was succeeded in his title by his son, Edmund Pery, who was later made Earl of Limerick. His daughter, Hon. Eleanor Pery, married Sir Vere Hunt, 1st Baronet. She died in 1821. References Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. ...more...



William Carmichael (bishop)

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William Carmichael (1702–1765) was Archbishop of Dublin for a brief period in 1765. He was the son of the second Earl of Hyndford. He had previously been Archdeacon of Buckingham (1742–1753), Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh (1753–1758), Ferns and Leighlin (1758) and Meath (1758–1765). He died on 15 December 1765. References Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 350–351. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. Genealogical Web site thePeerage.com Church of England titles Preceded byNicholas Clagett Archdeacon of Buckingham 1742–1753 Succeeded byJohn Taylor Preceded byArthur Smyth Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1753–1758 Succeeded byWilliam Gore Preceded byJohn Garnet Bishop of Ferns and Leighlin April 1758–June 1758 Succeeded byThomas Salmon Preceded byHenry Maule Bishop of Meath 1758–1765 Succeeded byRichard Pococke Preceded byCharles Cobbe Archbishop of Dublin May 1765–December 1765 Succeeded byArthu ...more...



John Oswald (bishop)

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John Oswald DD was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland. He was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 1 April 1762 and consecrated on 4 July that year; translated to Dromore on 7 May 1763; and finally to Raphoe on 25 August 1763. He died on 4 March 1780. References Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.ISBN 0-521-56350-X. ” The annual register” London, J.Dodsley, 1765 ”A political index to the histories of Great Britain & Ireland Volume 3" Beatson,R: London, Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme, 1806 Church of England titles Preceded byWilliam Gore (bishop) Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1762–1763 Succeeded byDenison Cumberland Preceded byGeorge Marlay Bishop of Dromore May 1763– August 1763 Succeeded byEdward Young Preceded byRobert Downes Bishop of Raphoe 1772– 1784 Succeeded byJames Hawkins John Oswald DD was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland. He was nominated Bis ...more...



Henry Wakefield (bishop of Birmingham)

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Henry Russell Wakefield was an Anglican Bishop and author in the first quarter of the 20th century. Born on 1 December 1854 he was educated at Tonbridge School and the University of Bonn . Ordained in 1877 after a period at Ripon College Cuddesdon , following two London curacies he was Incumbent at several parishes before senior posts as Prebendary of St Paul’s Cathedral , Dean of Norwich and finally Bishop of Birmingham . He was also a member of the London School Board representing the Marylebone Division from 1897-1900 and Mayor of St Marylebone in 1903-1905. Described in his Times obituary as a "layman’s bishop" he died on 9 January 1933. Between 1908 and 1914 he was the sole Church of England representative on the Executive Committee of the National Service League Notes “A Fortnight at the Front”, 1915; “Simple Answers to some Great Questions”, 1916; “Life won through Death”, 1917; and “The Church after the War” 1918 British Library Catalogue accessed 21:20 June 12th 2008 The Bishop Of Birmingham. Co ...more...



Leonard Williams (bishop)

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William Leonard Williams (1829–1916) was an Anglican Bishop of Waiapu . He was regarded as an eminent scholar of the Māori language . Early life A 1930 publication of his book Williams was born on the 22 July 1829 at Paihia , Bay of Islands, New Zealand. He was the third child and first son of William Williams of the Church Mission Society and his wife, Jane . His father was the first Bishop of Waiapu , Leonard Williams was the third bishop, and his son, Herbert Williams , was the 6th bishop of Waiapu. He was educated in New Zealand before attending Magdelen Hall (now Hertford College, Oxford ) from 1847 where he obtained a third class honours degree in June 1852. He became a member of the Church Missionary Society and undertook theological training at the Church Missionary Society College, Islington . He was admitted to Deacon's Orders by the Bishop of London on 22 March 1853. Leonard met the daughters of Mr. J. B. Wanklyn of Halecat, Witherslack , Cumbria when visiting his aunt, Catherine Heathcote, at S ...more...



Richard Lovelace

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Richard Lovelace (pronounced , homophone of "loveless") (9 December 1617 – 1657) was an English poet in the seventeenth century. He was a cavalier poet who fought on behalf of the king during the Civil War . His best known works are " To Althea, from Prison ", and " To Lucasta, Going to the Warres ". Biography Early life and family Richard Lovelace was born on 9 December 1617. His exact birthplace is unknown, and may have been Woolwich , Kent , or Holland . He was the oldest son of Sir William Lovelace and Anne Barne Lovelace. He had four brothers and three sisters. His father was from a distinguished military and legal family; the Lovelace family owned a considerable amount of property in Kent. His father, Sir William Lovelace, knt., was a member of the Virginia Company and an incorporator in the second Virginia Company in 1609. He was a soldier and died during the war with Spain and Holland in the Siege of Groenlo (1627) a few days before the town fell. Richard was nine years old when his father died. Lov ...more...



Calendar of saints (Episcopal Church)

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The veneration of saints in the Episcopal Church is a continuation of an ancient tradition from the early Church which honors important and influential people of the Christian faith. The usage of the term "saint" is similar to Roman Catholic and Orthodox traditions. Those in high church or Anglo-Catholic traditions may explicitly invoke saints as intercessors in prayer, though saints are mainly recognized in the Episcopal Church as merely examples in history of good Christian people. This is the calendar of saints found in the Book of Common Prayer, Lesser Feasts and Fasts and additions made at recent General Conventions; the relevant official resources of the Episcopal Church. About feasts, fasts, the Anglican Communion and the liturgical calendar The Episcopal Church publishes Lesser Feasts and Fasts, which contains feast days for the various men and women the Church wishes to honor. This book is updated every three years, when notable people can be added to the liturgical calendar by the General Conve ...more...



Edgewater (Barrytown, New York)

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Edgewater is a historic house near Barrytown in Dutchess County, New York , United States. Built about 1824, the house is a contributing property to the Hudson River Historic District . Edgewater's principal architectural feature is a monumental colonnade of six Doric columns, looking out across a lawn to the Hudson River. Writing in 1942, the historians Eberlein and Hubbard described Edgewater as an exemplar of "...the combined dignity and subtle grace that marked the houses of the Federal Era..." 1820-1852 (Livingston Family Era) The history of Edgewater dates back to December 23, 1819, when Bishop Hobart of New York City married "Lowndes Brown, esq. of Charleston S.C. to Miss Margaretta Livingston, daughter of John R. Livingston, esq." The groom, Rawlins Lowndes Brown (1792–1852), was a graduate of Yale, class of 1806, and had been (as recently as September 1819 when he resigned his commission) Captain Lowndes Brown in charge of Company G stationed on Governors Island . In 1824, possibly as a belated ...more...



John Griffith (Anglican clergyman)

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John Griffith was among the most prominent clergyman in industrial south Wales during the second half of the nineteenth century. He was rector of Aberdare from 1846 until 1859. From 1859 until his death in 1885 he was vicar of Merthyr Tydfil where he proved a strong supporter of workers' rights and, by the end of his life a supporter of the disestablishment of the Church of England in Wales. This reflected the way in which he gradually abandoned the strong Tory principles that he espoused at the beginning of his career at Aberdare. He died on 24 April 1885. Early life and career Griffith was born in 1818 or 1819 in Llanbadarn Fawr , Cardiganshire, the son of Thomas Griffith. He commenced his education at Ystradmeurig School, which was a popular choice amongst the gentlemen farmers of Cardiganshire for educating their sons. He proceeded to Swansea Grammar School and Christ's College, Cambridge, he was ordained a priest in 1843. After a short period as curate of Astbury in Cheshire, Griffith benefitted from ...more...



William Hamblett

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William Alexander Harry Hamblett (1879 – 11 August 1960) was the Archdeacon of Central Otago from 1945 to 1949; and Archdeacon of North Otago from 1949 to 1952. Hamblett was born in Gisborne, New Zealand in 1879 and educated at the University of Durham. He was ordained in 1913 and his first post was as Curate at Taieri. Later he was Vicar of Gore and then of St. Matthew's Church, Dunedin. He was Examining Chaplain to the Bishop of Dunedin from 1934 to 1950 and a Residentiary canon of St. Paul's Cathedral, Dunedin from 1942 to 1945. He died on 11 August 1960. References "Blain's Directory of the Clergy of Dunedin " Copyright the Reverend Dr. Michael Blain, 2003 Reproduced online with permission at [1] Crockford's Clerical Directory 1959/60 p482 London: OUP, 1948 Heritage NZ Crockford's Clerical Directory 1948 p550 London: OUP, 1948 William Alexander Harry Hamblett (1879 – 11 August 1960) was the Archdeacon of Central Otago from 1945 to 1949; and Archdeacon of North Otago from 1949 to 1952. H ...more...



Lux Mundi (book)

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Lux Mundi: A Series of Studies in the Religion of the Incarnation is a collection of 12 essays by liberal Anglo-Catholic theologians published in 1889. It was edited by Charles Gore , then the principal of Pusey House, Oxford , and a future Bishop of Oxford . Gore's essay, "The Holy Spirit and Inspiration", which showed an ability to accept discoveries of contemporary science, marked a break from the conservative Anglo-Catholic thought of figures such as Edward Bouverie Pusey . He subsequently remedied Christological deficiency in his 1891 Bampton Lectures , The Incarnation of the Son of God. Gore and Lux Mundi came to influence the 20th-century Archbishop of Canterbury William Temple . List of contributors H. S. Holland ("Faith") Aubrey Moore ("The Christian Doctrine of God") J. R. Illingworth ("The Problem of Pain: its bearing on faith in God" and "The Incarnation in relation to Development") E. S. Talbot ("The Preparation in History for Christ") R. C. Moberley ("The Incarnation as the Basis of Dogma") A ...more...



Gore Hill Cemetery

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Gore Hill Memorial Cemetery is located in the northern Sydney suburb of St Leonards in New South Wales, Australia, and is one of the oldest and largest remaining cemeteries in metropolitan Sydney. It was established on 19 May 1868 by the New South Wales politician William Tunks. The first body was interred in 1877, and until its closure in 1974, 14,456 burials took place. Most burials took place between 1900 and 1930. History and background Several local councils administered the cemetery until 1875, when trustees from various denominations of churches took over the role. Scattered throughout the cemetery are the remains of a number of deceased persons initially buried in the Devonshire Street Cemetery. The remains were transferred before the redevelopment of Devonshire Street Cemetery in 1901. There are 17 war graves of Commonwealth service personnel of World War I, registered and maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. By the 1950s burials had decreased, and in 1974 the cemetery ceased ...more...



Dean of Down

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The Dean of Down is based in The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Downpatrick within the Diocese of Down and Dromore of the Church of Ireland. The current incumbent is T. Henry Hull. Deans of Down Down Cathedral 1541 Connor Magennis 1609–1622 John Gibson 1623–1627 Robert Dawson (afterwards Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh, 1627) 1627–1635 Henry Leslie (afterwards Bishop of Down and Connor, 1635 1635 William Coote (died before 1657) 1661/2 Thomas Bayly (afterwards Archdeacon of Connor, 1663 and then Bishop of Killala and Achonry, 1664) 1663/4–1669 Daniel Witter (afterwards Bishop of Killaloe 1669–1681/2 William Sheridan (afterwards Bishop of Kilmore and Ardagh, 1682) 1682-1682 Benjamin Phipps 1682/3–1709 John M'Neale 1709–1717 Ralph Lambert (afterwards Bishop of Dromore, 1717) 1717–1721 Benjamin Pratt 1721/2–1723 Charles Fairfax 1723/4–1731 William Gore 1731/2–1739 Richard Daniel 1739–1744 Thomas Fletcher (afterwards Bishop of Dromore, 1744) 1744–176 ...more...



Chancellor of the Order of the Garter

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The Chancellor of the Order of the Garter is an officer of the Order of the Garter . Officers of the Order of the Garter (left to right): Secretary (barely visible), Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter Principal King of Arms, Register, Prelate, Chancellor History of the office When the Order of the Garter was founded in 1348 at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle , by Edward III of England three officers were initially appointed to serve them, the Prelate, the Register and the Usher. In 1477 Edward IV decreed that the further position of Chancellor should be created to be responsible for the seal and its use. Accommodation was to be provided in what came to be called the Chancellor's Tower. The position of Chancellor was to be second in seniority to the Prelate and was granted to Richard Beauchamp , Bishop of Salisbury, and his successors in that position. At that time Windsor Chapel lay geographically in the See of Salisbury, although as a royal chapel it did not come under the direct jurisdiction of the ...more...



Community of the Resurrection

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Some members of the community The Community of the Resurrection ( CR ) is an Anglican religious community for men in England . It is based in Mirfield , West Yorkshire , and has 17 members as of July 2016. The community reflects Anglicanism in its broad nature and is strongly engaged in the life of the Anglican Communion . It also has a long tradition of ecumenical outlook and practice. CR is dedicated to the mystery of Christ's resurrection. The Constitutions of the community state that the Community of the Resurrection is called specially to public, prophetic witness to the Christian hope of the Kingdom. The common life and corporate worship of its members is properly made visible in its works, which embrace social and missionary concern.... The dedication to the Resurrection does not indicate an obligation to particular works or particular places, but rather a commitment to make public the fruits of the community life and worship in order to proclam the world made new in Christ... its charism... is to live ...more...



St George Ashe

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St George Ashe, by Hugh Howard St. George Ashe, D.D. (1658 – 27 February 1718) was a Church of Ireland cleric who served successively as Bishop of Cloyne, Clogher and Derry in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. He is remembered now chiefly for his alleged role in performing a secret marriage between Jonathan Swift and Esther Johnson (Stella). Background and early life Ashe was born in County Roscommon in 1658, younger son of Thomas Ashe and his wife Mary St George, daughter of Richard St George of Athlone. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he became a Fellow, and Professor of Mathematics; he afterwards acted as secretary and chaplain to the British Embassy at Vienna. Returning to Ireland in 1692, he was made Provost of Trinity College, Dublin. Bishop He was consecrated Bishop of Cloyne in 1695, and promoted to the see of Clogher in 1697, and to that of Derry in 1717. He spent a large sum on refurbishing the episcopal palace at Clogher. He refused to become Archbishop of Tuam i ...more...



List of American expatriate writers

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A Conrad Aiken Washington Allston, artist, writer on art Maya Angelou, poet, memoirs Alan Ansen John Ashbery B James Baldwin Djuna Barnes John Peale Bishop Jane Bowles Paul Bowles Kay Boyle John Horne Burns William S. Burroughs C Eldridge Cleaver, non- fiction; criminal, leading "Black Panther" Ira Cohen, poet, publisher Cid Corman Gregory Corso Caresse Crosby Harry Crosby, "Black Sun Press" Robert Crumb, comics D Edward Dahlberg William Demby Helen DeWitt Irene Dische Mabel Dodge (Luhan) J. P. Donleavy Hilda Doolittle, H. D. Edward Dorn John Dos Passos Andrea Dworkin, memoirs, feminist E T. S. Eliot F F. Scott Fitzgerald Janet Flanner John Gould Fletcher Charles Henri Ford Robert Lee Frost G William Gaddis William Gibson, science fiction Horatio Greenough, artist, essays on art H Bret Harte Marsden Hartley Ernest Hemingway Patricia Highsmith Chester Himes Russell Hoban Langston Hughes I Rachel Ingalls J Henry James Ted Joans James Jones ...more...



Lancing College

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Lancing College is an independent boarding and day school founded in 1848 by Nathaniel Woodard. The school is based in 550 acres (2.2 km ) of countryside in West Sussex, east of Worthing near the village of Lancing, on the south coast of England. Lancing educates c. 550 pupils between the ages of 13 and 18; the co-educational ratio is c. 60:40 boys to girls. The college is situated on a hill which is part of the South Downs, and the campus dominates the local landscape. The college overlooks the River Adur, and the Ladywell Stream, a holy well or sacred stream within the College grounds, has pre-Christian significance. Woodard's aim was to provide education "based on sound principle and sound knowledge, firmly grounded in the Christian faith." Lancing was the first of a family of more than 30 schools founded by Woodard (others include Hurstpierpoint College, Ardingly College, Bloxham School and Worksop College). Roughly 65% of pupils are boarders, at a cost of £32,910 per year; c. 35% are day pupils, at a ...more...



William Wogan (religious writer)

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William Wogan (1678 – 24 January 1758) was an Irish religious writer, close to a number of leading evangelicals of his time, and sympathetic with early Methodism . Life Possibly born in Ireland, he was the son of Ethelred Wogan, the rector of Gumfreston in Pembrokeshire , Wales and vicar of Penally . He was educated at Swansea Grammar School , Westminster School from 1694 (where he became school captain), and Trinity College, Cambridge which he entered in 1700. Without graduating, he became tutor in the family of Sir Robert Southwell ; who died in 1702, leaving the family headed by Edward Southwell his son, who was Secretary of State for Ireland from 27 June 1702. In 1710 Wogan went to Ireland, as clerk to Edward Southwell who was acting as secretary to James Butler, 2nd Duke of Ormonde , the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland . In 1712 he joined the British army as a lieutenant, where he became a paymaster stationed in Dublin. From about 1727, Wogan lived at Ealing in Middlesex, but died at his daughter's house a ...more...



Francis Tebbs Havergal

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Francis Tebbs Havergal (1829–1890), author and editor. The youngest son of William Henry Havergal was born 27 Aug. 1829. He was a bible-clerk of New College, Oxford (B.A. 1852, M.A. 1857); he became vicar-choral in Hereford Cathedral, 1853–1874, vicar of Pipe and Lyde, 1861–74, and of Upton Bishop, 1874–90, and prebendary of Hereford, 1877–90. He died at Upton on 27 July 1890. Publications The Visitor's Hand Guide to Hereford Cathedral, 1869; 6th ed. 1882. Fasti Herefordenses, 1869. Monumental Inscriptions in Hereford Cathedral, 1881. Records of Upton Bishop, 1883. Herefordshire Words and Phrases, 1887. Memorials of the Rev. Sir Frederick Arthur Gore Ouseley, Baronet, 1889. Francis Tebbs Havergal (1829–1890), author and editor. The youngest son of William Henry Havergal was born 27 Aug. 1829. He was a bible-clerk of New College, Oxford (B.A. 1852, M.A. 1857); he became vicar-choral in Hereford Cathedral, 1853–1874, vicar of Pipe and Lyde, 1861–74, and of Upton Bishop, 1874–90, and prebendary of H ...more...



Alfred Janes

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Alfred George Janes (30 June 1911 – 3 February 1999) was a Welsh artist , who worked in Swansea and Croydon . He experimented with many forms, but is best known for his meticulous still lifes and portraits . He is also remembered as one of The Kardomah Gang , an informal group of young artists in Swansea that included the poets Dylan Thomas and Vernon Watkins , and the composer Daniel Jones . Early life Alfred George Janes was born on 30 June 1911, in the city centre of Swansea , South Wales , above his parents' fruit and flower shop in Castle Square . He attended the Bishop Gore School and then the Swansea School of Art and Crafts (now part of Swansea Metropolitan University ). At the age of 16 he exhibited at the 1928 National Eisteddfod (held in Treorchy that year). Three years later, while he was still concentrating on still lifes and portraits, he was commissioned to paint a portrait of the mayor of Swansea, Arthur Lovell. In 1931 he painted a portrait of a 17-year-old Mervyn Levy , thought to hav ...more...



Booth (surname)

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Booth is a surname of English origin. At the time of the British Census of 1881, its relative frequency was highest in Cheshire (4.2 times the British average), followed by Derbyshire , Yorkshire , Lancashire , Nottinghamshire , Aberdeenshire , Lincolnshire , Staffordshire and Westmorland . In all other British counties, its relative frequency was below national average. The name Booth may refer to: A Aaron Booth , a New Zealand Decathlete Agnes Booth , an American actress Alan Booth , a British travel writer Albert Booth (1928–2010), a British politician Alfred Allen Booth (1872–1948), a British shipowner (created a baronet in 1916) Andy Booth , an English footballer Andrew Donald Booth (1918–2009), a British electrical engineer, physicist and computer scientist Annie Booth , an American jazz pianist Antony Booth (1931-2017), a British actor Anthony Clarke Booth (1846–1899), a recipient of the Victoria Cross Asia Booth (1835–1888), a poet August Wayne Booth , a fictional character from the TV show Once Upon ...more...



Saints in Anglicanism

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The term " saint " is a context-specific translation of the Latin "sanctus", meaning sacred, and originally referred to a sacred (extremely holy) person—however, since the 10th century, the Church has reserved the status of saint to people its official canon law (including calendar) has recognised for outstanding Christian service and conduct. When the Church of England was in union with Rome saints arose in the form of canonisation . Those martyrs and confessors recognised before the 10th century and since the break with Rome in the 16th century are generally still considered both "saints" and "Saints". "Hero/heroine" are sometimes to refer to those holy people whom the church synod or an individual church praises as having had special benevolence who have lived and died since the split with Rome. It considers such muted terms a reversion to a more simple and cautious doctrine which emphasises empowerment ( subsidiarity ) to all members and components of the church. The provinces of the Anglican Communion t ...more...



Charles Hay, 20th Earl of Erroll

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Charles Gore Hay, 20th Earl of Erroll, KT, CB (7 February 1852 – 8 July 1927), styled Lord Hay until 1891, was a Scottish soldier and Conservative politician. Biography Hay was the son of William Harry Hay, 19th Earl of Erroll, and his wife Eliza Amelia Gore. His maternal grandfather was General the Hon. Sir Charles Gore, KH, GCB (1793 – 1869), a Waterloo officer, a son of the 2nd Earl of Arran and a brother of the Duchess of Inverness. He succeeded his father in the earldom in 1891. Lord Hay was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Royal Horse Guards on 7 July 1869. He was promoted to lieutenant on 19 August 1871, to captain on 11 September 1875, to major on 1 July 1881, to lieutenant-colonel on 24 September 1887, and to colonel on 18 January 1895. Following the outbreak of the Second Boer War in late 1899, he volunteered for active service and was commissioned in the Imperial Yeomanry. He took part in the Battle of Paardeberg (February 1900), following which he was in charge of prisoners from Piet ...more...



Edward Synge (bishop of Elphin)

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Edward Synge (1691–1762) was an Anglican bishop in the Church of Ireland who was the Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh (1730–1732), Bishop of Cloyne (1732–1734), Bishop of Ferns and Leighlin (1734–1740) and Bishop of Elphin (1740–1762). His father was Edward Synge, Archbishop of Tuam. His grandfather was Edward Synge, Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross and his brother Nicholas Synge Bishop of Killaloe. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, obtaining a Master of Arts degree in 1712 and a Doctorate of Divinity in 1728. He was briefly Provost of Tuam and Chancellor of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, before he was nominated the Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 14 May 1730 and consecrated on 7 June 1730. He was subsequently translated to Cloyne on 22 March 1732, then to Ferns and Leighlin on 8 February 1734, and finally to Elphin on 15 May 1740. Synge's musical ability made a strong impression on Handel when the composer was in Dublin; Handel referred to Synge as 'a Nobleman very learned in Musick'. S ...more...



Thomas Robson

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The Very Revd Thomas Claude Robson was the first Anglican Dean of Kimberley, and Rector of St Cyprian's Cathedral, Kimberley , South Africa . Background and prospects at St Cyprian’s in 1905 Canon Robson came to St Cyprian’s Church in 1905, a Parish still worshiping in a wood and iron church in Jones Street, Kimberley, a structure imported as a prefabricated kit from England in 1879. Grand plans for a new church had been proposed in a public meeting in 1901, but little progress had been made towards their realisation. Archdeacon William Arthur Holbech , who had been Rector at the time, had gone on to become Dean of Bloemfontein. Robson’s predecessor, Archdeacon H.A. Douglas-Hamilton , was appointed in 1903, encountering an impatient faction within the congregation who additionally were at odds with the Archdeacon’s churchmanship – specifically with respect to liturgical practices. This faction removed itself from the parish, building its own brick church of St John the Evangelist in Woodley Street – a parish ...more...



Calendar of saints (Church of England)

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The Church of England commemorates many of the same saints as those in the General Roman Calendar , mostly on the same days, but also commemorates various notable (often post- Reformation ) Christians who have not been canonised by Rome, with a particular though not exclusive emphasis on those of English origin. There are differences in the calendars of other churches of the Anglican Communion (see Saints in Anglicanism ). The only person canonised in a near-conventional sense by the Church of England since the English Reformation is St Charles the Martyr ( King Charles I ), although he is not widely recognised by Anglicans as a saint outside the Society of King Charles the Martyr . The Church of England has no mechanism for canonising saints, and unlike the Roman Catholic Church it makes no claims regarding the heavenly status of those whom it commemorates in its calendar. For this reason, the Church of England avoids the use of the prenominal title "Saint" with reference to uncanonised individuals and is re ...more...



Diocese of Kimberley and Kuruman

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The Diocese of Kimberley and Kuruman is a diocese in the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, and encompasses the area around Kimberley and Kuruman and overlaps the Northern Cape Province and North West Province of South Africa. It is presided over by the Bishop of Kimberley and Kuruman, currently Ossie Swartz. The seat of the Bishop of Kimberley and Kuruman is at St Cyprian's Cathedral, Kimberley. There have so far been 12 bishops of the See, though one of these served for two different periods of time. Formation of the diocese The Anglican presence on the Diamond Fields and in Kimberley’s hinterland, from the early 1870s, was at first administered from Bloemfontein, initially under Allan Webb, the oldest parish here being St Mary's, Barkly West. By the early 1890s, however, there was a feeling in some quarters that the Diocese of Bloemfontein was too big and there were proposals for the formation of a separate Bishopric with its seat in Kimberley. But in the event the bishops decided upon establishing th ...more...



Bill Price (physicist)

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Professor William Charles Price FRS (1 April 1909 – 10 March 1993) was a British physicist (spectroscopy). Brought up in Swansea, he spent his career at the universities of Cambridge and London. His work was important for identifying the hydrogen bond structure of DNA base pairs . Early life and studies William Charles Price was born on 1 April 1909. He went to the Bishop Gore School in Swansea, where his contemporaries included the young poet Dylan Thomas , whose father taught English at the school. He failed to get a state scholarship to Oxford in 1927. He gained a BSc in Physics from Swansea University in 1930. Price then spent three years as a Fellow at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore , Maryland, USA. He was appointed to the University of Cambridge on a 1851 Research Fellowship in 1935, at the university's Physical Chemical Laboratory - working with Martin Lowry until 1936, then with Ronald George Wreyford Norrish . In 1937 he became university demonstrator; and from 1938 a Prize Fellow of Trinity C ...more...




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