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William Gore (bishop)

William Gore DD (died 25 February 1784) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland.[1]

He was born the son of the Right Reverend William Gore, Dean of Down and his wife Honora Prittie.

Previously the Dean of Cashel from 1736 to 1758,[2] he was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 17 March 1758, consecrated on 16 April of that year; translated to Elphin on 3 March 1762; and finally to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 5 March 1772.[3]

In 1783 he commissioned the building of a Manor House at Old Connaught, near Bray, but in County Dublin. Old Connaught House still exists today as a private and gated development of apartments in and around the Old House.

He died on 25 February 1784. He had married twice, firstly, Mary, daughter of Chidley Coote and secondly, Mary, daughter of William French, with whom he had a son, William, who became an MP.

References
  1. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
  2. "The Universal magazine", Volume 22 (1758) p22
  3. "Dodsley's annual register" Burke,E: London, J.Dodsley 1780
Church of England titles
Preceded byWilliam Carmichael Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1758–1762 Succeeded byJohn Oswald
Preceded byEdward Synge Bishop of Elphin 1762– 1772 Succeeded byJemmett Browne
Preceded byJohn Averell Bishop of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe 1772– 1784 Succeeded byWilliam Cecil Pery
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William Gore (bishop)

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William Gore (bishop)

William Gore DD (died 25 February 1784) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland.[1] He was born the son of the Right Reverend William Gore, Dean of Down and his wife Honora Prittie. Previously the Dean of Cashel from 1736 to 1758,[2] he was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 17 March 1758, consecrated on 16 April of that year; translated to Elphin on 3 March 1762; and finally to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 5 March 1772.[3] In 1783 he commissioned the building of a Manor House at Old Connaught, near Bray, but in County Dublin. Old Connaught House still exists today as a private and gated development of apartments in and around the Old House. He died on 25 February 1784. He had married twice, firstly, Mary, daughter of Chidley Coote and secondly, Mary, daughter of William French, with whom he had a son, William, who became an MP. References Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ...more...



William Gore

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William Gore

William Gore may refer to: William Gore (15th-century MP) for Maldon (UK Parliament constituency) Sir William Gore, 3rd Baronet (died 1700), Irish Custos Rotulorum of Leitrim William Gore (died 1739) (c. 1675–1739), English MP for Colchester, Cricklade and St Albans (UK Parliament constituency) William Gore (Lord Mayor of London) (died 1708), Lord Mayor of London 1701 William Crampton Gore (1871–1946), Irish artist Bill Gore (1912–1986), American chemical engineer William Gore Ouseley (1797–1866), British diplomat William Gore (bishop) 18th-century Irish Anglican Bishop William D. Gore, Sheriff of San Diego County since 2009 Parliament of Ireland William Gore (died 1730), MP for Leitrim 1703–1730, Donegal Borough William Gore (1703–1748), MP for Kilkenny City William Gore (1709–1769), MP for Leitrim 1730–1760 and 1768–1769 William Gore (1744–1815), MP for Leitrim 1769–1776 William Gore (1767–1832), MP for Carrick See also William Ormsby-Gore (disambiguation) ...more...



Bishop Gore School

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Bishop Gore School

The Bishop Gore School (Welsh: Ysgol Esgob Gore) is a secondary school in Swansea in Wales, founded on 14 September 1682 by Hugh Gore (1613–1691), Bishop of Waterford and Lismore. It is situated in Sketty, close to Singleton Park and Swansea University. In December 2013 the school was ranked in the second highest of five bands by the Welsh Government, based on performance in exams, value added performance, disadvantaged pupils' performance, and attendance. HistoryGrammar school Established as a Free Grammar School, initially in Goat Street (a site now part of Princess Way in the city centre), for "the gratuitous instruction of twenty boys, sons of the most indigent burgesses, and in the event of a dissolution of the corporation, to sons of the poorest inhabitants of the town", it has since known several names and locations. In September 1853 the school moved, as the boys-only Swansea Grammar School, to Mount Pleasant into a new building designed by the architect Thomas Taylor. The building was extended in 18 ...more...



William Pery, 1st Baron Glentworth

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William Pery, 1st Baron Glentworth

William Cecil Pery, 1st Baron Glentworth (26 July 1721 – 4 July 1794) was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland.[1] He was born on 26 July 1721, the son of Reverend Stackpole Pery and Jane Twigg, and educated at Trinity College, Dublin.[2] His elder brother was Edmund Pery, 1st Viscount Pery. Previously the Dean of Derry, he was nominated Bishop of Killala and Achonry on 7 January 1781 and consecrated on 18 February that year. He was translated to Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe on 13 May 1784. He was created Baron Glentworth, of Mallow in the Peerage of Ireland, in 1790 and died on 4 July 1794. William Street in Limerick is named after him,[3] as were Cecil Street, Glentworth Street and Mallow Street.[4] Pery firstly married Jane Walcott and following her death, married secondly Dorothea Lewis. He was succeeded in his title by his son, Edmund Pery, who was later made Earl of Limerick. His daughter, Hon. Eleanor Pery, married Sir Vere Hunt, 1st Baronet. She died in 1821. References Fryde, E. B.; Gr ...more...



Spencer Gore (sportsman)

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Spencer Gore (sportsman)

Spencer William Gore (10 March 1850 – 19 April 1906) was an English tennis player who won the first Wimbledon tournament in 1877 and a first-class cricketer who played for Surrey County Cricket Club (1874-1875). Early years Harrow cricket team of 1869 for the match against Eton. Gore is front row, fourth from the left. West Side House, Wimbledon, where Gore was born and raised Spencer William Gore was the son of the Hon. Charles Alexander Gore, grandson of the second Earl of Arran, and Lady Augusta Lavinia Priscilla (née Ponsonby), a daughter of the fourth Earl of Bessborough. His mother's first marriage was to William Petty-FitzMaurice, Earl of Kerry, who died in 1836. His father was the Commissioner of Woods and Forests. His two brothers were the theologian Charles Gore, the first Bishop of Birmingham, and Sir Francis Charles Gore, Solicitor to the Board of Inland Revenue. Spencer was born and raised within a mile of the All England Croquet Club at West Side House, Wimbledon Common, Surrey. He ...more...



John Oswald (bishop)

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John Oswald (bishop)

John Oswald DD was an 18th-century Anglican bishop in Ireland.[1] He was nominated Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh on 1 April 1762 and consecrated on 4 July that year;[2] translated to Dromore on 7 May 1763; and finally to Raphoe on 25 August 1763.[3]He died on 4 March 1780. References Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.ISBN 0-521-56350-X. ” The annual register” London, J.Dodsley, 1765 ”A political index to the histories of Great Britain & Ireland Volume 3" Beatson,R: London, Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme, 1806 Church of England titles Preceded byWilliam Gore (bishop) Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1762–1763 Succeeded byDenison Cumberland Preceded byGeorge Marlay Bishop of Dromore May 1763– August 1763 Succeeded byEdward Young Preceded byRobert Downes Bishop of Raphoe 1772– 1784 Succeeded byJames Hawkins ...more...



List of Murphy Brown episodes

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List of Murphy Brown episodes

The following is a list of episodes for the television sitcom Murphy Brown. The series premiered on November 14, 1988, on CBS, and ended on May 18, 1998. A total of 247 episodes were produced, spanning ten seasons. Series overview Season Episodes Originally aired Nielsen ratings[1] First aired Last aired Rank Rating Tied with 1 22 November 14, 1988 May 22, 1989 N/A N/A N/A 2 27 September 18, 1989 May 21, 1990 27 14.7 N/A 3 26 September 17, 1990 May 20, 1991 6 16.9 N/A 4 26 September 16, 1991 May 18, 1992 3 18.6 N/A 5 25 September 21, 1992 May 17, 1993 4 17.9 N/A 6 25 September 20, 1993 May 16, 1994 9 16.3 N/A 7 26 September 19, 1994 May 22, 1995 16 14.1 N/A 8 24 September 18, 1995 May 20, 1996 18 12.3 Walker, Texas RangerPrimetime Live 9 24 September 24, 1996 May 18, 1997 N/A N/A N/A 10 22 October 1, 1997 May 18, 1998 N/A N/A N/A 11 13 2018 2019 TBA TBA TBA EpisodesSeason 1 (1988–89) No. in series No. in season Title Directed by Written by Original air date 1 1 ...more...



Timeline of Spanish history

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Timeline of Spanish history

This is a timeline of Spanish history, comprising important legal and territorial changes and political events in Spain and its predecessor states. To read about the background to these events, see History of Spain. 8th century Year Date Event 718 The Visigothic nobleman Pelagius of Asturias rebelled against the Umayyad Caliphate. 722 Summer Battle of Covadonga: Forces loyal to Pelagius decimated an Umayyad army sent to reconquer them in a valley in the Picos de Europa. Pelagius was elected princeps of the independent Kingdom of Asturias with his capital at Cangas de Onís. 737 Pelagius died. He was succeeded as princeps by his son Favila of Asturias. 739 Favila was killed by a bear while hunting. He was succeeded by his brother-in-law Alfonso I the Catholic of Asturias, the son of Peter of Cantabria, the duke of Cantabria. 740 Asturias conquered and annexed Galicia. 757 Alfonso the Catholic died. He was succeeded as king by his son Fruela I the Cruel of Asturias. 768 14 January ...more...



John Griffith (priest)

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John Griffith (priest)

John Griffith was among the most prominent clergyman in industrial south Wales during the second half of the nineteenth century. He was rector of Aberdare from 1846 until 1859. From 1859 until his death in 1885 he was vicar of Merthyr Tydfil where he proved a strong supporter of workers' rights and, by the end of his life a supporter of the disestablishment of the Church of England in Wales. This reflected the way in which he gradually abandoned the strong Tory principles that he espoused at the beginning of his career at Aberdare.[1] He died on 24 April 1885.[2] Early life and career Griffith was born in 1818 or 1819 in Llanbadarn Fawr, Cardiganshire, the son of Thomas Griffith. He commenced his education at Ystradmeurig School, which was a popular choice amongst the gentlemen farmers of Cardiganshire for educating their sons.[3] He proceeded to Swansea Grammar School and Christ's College, Cambridge, he was ordained a priest in 1843.[4] After a short period as curate of Astbury in Cheshire, Griffith benefit ...more...



List of WTF with Marc Maron episodes

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List of WTF with Marc Maron episodes

WTF with Marc Maron is an American twice-weekly podcast hosted by stand up comedian Marc Maron. The program primarily consists of interviews with comedians and comedy writers, as well as others in the entertainment and radio communities. WTF has featured a number of notable guests, including Robin Williams, Ben Stiller, Conan O'Brien, Chris Rock, Zach Galifianakis, Louis C.K., and President Barack Obama. The show is produced by Maron's former Air America co-worker, Brendan McDonald. WTF began on September 1, 2009. As of December 21, 2017, 876 episodes have been released. Episodes2009 episodes No. Title Original release date 1 "Jeff Ross" September 1, 2009 2 "Jim Earl / Matthew Weiss" September 7, 2009 3 "Patton Oswalt / Lawton Smalls / Matthew" (Kent Jones as Lawton Smalls) September 10, 2009 4 "David Feldman" September 14, 2009 5 "John Oliver / Dr. Maron / Matthew" September 17, 2009 6 "David Cross" September 21, 2009 7 "Nick Griffin / Marc's Mom / Sam Seder" September 24, 2009 8 "Carolin ...more...



Edmund Tucker

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Edmund Tucker

Edmund Ronald Tucker (23 March 1902 - 24 July 1964) was the headmaster of the Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe from 1933 till his death in 1964. Born in Colwyn Bay, Denbighshire, he was brought up in Swansea and educated at Swansea Grammar School. He was a scholar of Jesus College, Oxford, where he read Classics, and he later took at external degree (with 1st class honours) at London University. He came to RGS High Wycombe from Pocklington School where he had been Second Master for a number of years. Prior to teaching at Pocklington School, he had taught at Bemrose School, Derby. Tucker was appointed headmaster of RGS High Wycombe on 29 March 1933, succeeding George Wright Arnison, and remained head until his death. The school expanded greatly during his term of office and he was elected to the Headmaster's Conference in 1943. He was, as at 1959, a member of the All Soul's Group, a private group of influential administrators and educators that had first been convened in 1941 by the Warden of All Soul's Co ...more...



List of Live episodes

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List of Live episodes

The daytime talk show Live with Kelly and Ryan, starring Kelly Ripa and Ryan Seacrest, officially debuted on May 1, 2017, but is a continuation of the series that previously co-starred Regis Philbin or Michael Strahan. Note: Although the co-hosts may have read a couple of emails during the broadcast, it does not necessarily count as a "Inbox" segment. LIVE! with Kelly and Michael (2013–2016) – Season 26 (2013–14)September 2013 Date Co-hosts "Host chat"[1] Guests / segments[2] "Kelly and Michael's Inbox"[3] September 2 Kelly Ripa & Michael Strahan Lisa Kudrow, Selena Gomez, Dr. Wendy Bazilian September 3 Kelly Ripa & Michael Strahan Demi Lovato, Cedric the Entertainer, Jennifer Nettles, The Anniversary Games September 4 Kelly Ripa & Michael Strahan Zachary Quinto, Mel B, Tamar Braxton, The Anniversary Games September 5 Kelly Ripa & Michael Strahan Arsenio Hall, Jennifer Hudson, Ariana Grande, The Anniversary Games September 6 Kelly Ripa & Michael Strahan ...more...



Charles Gore

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Charles Gore

Charles Gore CR (1853–1932) was the Bishop of Oxford. He was one of the most influential Anglican theologians of the 19th century, helping reconcile the church to some aspects of biblical criticism and scientific discovery, while remaining Catholic in his interpretation of the faith and sacraments. Also known for his social action, Gore became an Anglican bishop and founded the priestly Community of the Resurrection as well as co-founded the Christian Social Union. Early life and career Charles Gore was born on 22 January 1853 into an Anglo-Irish aristocratic family[1] as the third son of Charles Alexander Gore,[2] son of the Earl of Arran, and Lady Augusta Lavinia Priscilla (née Ponsonby), a daughter of the fourth Earl of Bessborough.[3] His brother Spencer was the first winner of the Wimbledon Championships. Gore was raised in a low-church Anglican family[4] and was confirmed by the church at the age of eight years.[5] He was attracted to the high-church sacramental tradition and ritualism of Anglo-Cathol ...more...



Gore Vidal

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Gore Vidal

Eugene Luther Gore Vidal ( born Eugene Louis Vidal; October 3, 1925 – July 31, 2012) was an American writer and public intellectual known for his patrician manner, epigrammatic wit, and polished style of writing. Vidal was born to a political family; his maternal grandfather, Thomas Pryor Gore, served as United States senator from Oklahoma (1907–1921 and 1931–1937). He was a Democratic Party politician who twice sought elected office; first to the United States House of Representatives (New York, 1960), then to the U.S. Senate (California, 1982). As a political commentator and essayist, Vidal's principal subject was the history of the United States and its society, especially how the militaristic foreign policy reduced the country to a decadent empire. His political and cultural essays were published in The Nation, the New Statesman, the New York Review of Books, and Esquire magazines. As a public intellectual, Gore Vidal's topical debates on sex, politics, and religion with other intellectuals and writers ...more...



William Willson

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William Willson

William Willson may refer to: William H. Willson, pioneer of the U.S. state of Oregon See also William Wilson (disambiguation) Robert William Willson, English Roman Catholic bishop William Willson may refer to: William H. Willson, pioneer of the U.S. state of Oregon See also William Wilson (disambiguation) Robert William Willson, English Roman Catholic bishop ...more...



William Wogan (religious writer)

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William Wogan (religious writer)

William Wogan (1678 – 24 January 1758) was an Irish religious writer, close to a number of leading evangelicals of his time, and sympathetic with early Methodism.[1] Life Possibly born in Ireland,[1] he was the son of Ethelred Wogan, the rector of Gumfreston in Pembrokeshire, Wales and vicar of Penally. He was educated at Swansea Grammar School, Westminster School from 1694 (where he became school captain), and Trinity College, Cambridge which he entered in 1700.[2][3] Without graduating, he became tutor in the family of Sir Robert Southwell; who died in 1702, leaving the family headed by Edward Southwell his son, who was Secretary of State for Ireland from 27 June 1702.[1][4] In 1710 Wogan went to Ireland, as clerk to Edward Southwell who was acting as secretary to James Butler, 2nd Duke of Ormonde, the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. In 1712 he joined the British army as a lieutenant, where he became a paymaster stationed in Dublin.[1][5] From about 1727, Wogan lived at Ealing in Middlesex, but died at his d ...more...



Wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton

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Wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton

The wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton took place on 29 April 2011 at Westminster Abbey in London, United Kingdom. The groom, Prince William, is second in the line of succession to the British throne. The bride, Catherine Middleton, had been his girlfriend since 2004. The Dean of Westminster, John Hall, presided at the service; the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, conducted the marriage; Richard Chartres, the Bishop of London, preached the sermon; and a reading was given by the bride's brother, James. William's best man was his brother, Prince Harry, while the bride's sister, Pippa, was maid of honour. The ceremony was attended by the bride's and groom's families, as well as members of foreign royal dynasties, diplomats, and the couple's chosen personal guests. After the ceremony, the couple made the traditional appearance on the balcony of Buckingham Palace. As Prince William was not the heir apparent to the throne, the wedding was not a full state occasion and many details were left ...more...



Bush v. Gore

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Bush v. Gore

Bush v. Gore, 531 U.S. 98 (2000), was a decision of the United States Supreme Court that settled a recount dispute in Florida's 2000 presidential election. The ruling was issued on December 12, 2000. On December 9, the Court had preliminarily halted the Florida recount that was occurring. Eight days earlier, the Court unanimously decided the closely related case of Bush v. Palm Beach County Canvassing Board, 531 U.S. 70 (2000). The Electoral College was scheduled to meet on December 18, 2000, to decide the election. In a per curiam decision, the Court ruled that there was an Equal Protection Clause violation in using different standards of counting in different counties and ruled that no alternative method could be established within the time limit set by Title 3 of the United States Code (3 U.S.C.), § 5 ("Determination of controversy as to appointment of electors"), which was December 12.[1] The vote regarding the Equal Protection Clause was 7–2, and regarding the lack of an alternative method was 5–4.[2] T ...more...



List of Scotland national rugby union players

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List of Scotland national rugby union players

List of Scottish national rugby union players is a list of people who have played for the Scotland national rugby union team. The list only includes players who have played in a Test match. Note that the "position" column lists the position at which the player made his Test debut, not necessarily the position for which he is best known. A position in parentheses indicates that the player debuted as a substitute. Scotland's International Rugby Capped Players Number Name Position Date first cap obtained Opposition 1 John Arthur halfback 1871-03-27 v England at Edinburgh 2 William Brown fullback 1871-03-27 v England at Edinburgh 3 Angus Buchanan forward 1871-03-27 v England at Edinburgh 4 Thomas Chalmers fullback 1871-03-27 v England at Edinburgh 5 Alfred Clunies-Ross fullback 1871-03-27 v England at Edinburgh 6 Andrew Colville forward 1871-03-27 v England at Edinburgh 7 William Cross halfback 1871-03-27 v England at Edinburgh 8 Daniel Drew forward 1871-03-27 v England at Edinburgh 9 James ...more...



Bill Price (physicist)

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Bill Price (physicist)

Professor William Charles Price FRS (1 April 1909 – 10 March 1993) was a British physicist (spectroscopy). Brought up in Swansea, he spent his career at the universities of Cambridge and London. His work was important for identifying the hydrogen bond structure of DNA base pairs.[1] Early life and studies William Charles Price was born on 1 April 1909. He went to the Bishop Gore School in Swansea, where his contemporaries included the young poet Dylan Thomas, whose father taught English at the school. He failed to get a state scholarship to Oxford in 1927. He gained a BSc in Physics from Swansea University in 1930. Price then spent three years as a Fellow at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. He was appointed to the University of Cambridge on a 1851 Research Fellowship in 1935, at the university's Physical Chemical Laboratory - working with Martin Lowry until 1936, then with Ronald George Wreyford Norrish. In 1937 he became university demonstrator; and from 1938 a Prize Fellow of Trinity ...more...



Wilfrid Gore Browne

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Wilfrid Gore Browne

Wilfrid Gore Browne[1] (6 May 1859 – 15 March 1928) was an Anglican bishop, the first Bishop of Kimberley and Kuruman from 1912 to 1928.[2] He was described as a saintly bishop with "a keen sense of humour" and "a winning courtesy."[3] Early life and education Gore Browne was born in India on 6 May 1859, the youngest of the family of Col Sir Thomas Gore Browne KCMG, spending his early years in New Zealand where his father was Governor.[4] He was educated, with his brother Frank Gore Browne, K.C., at Harrow School (from 1873) and at Trinity College, Cambridge where he took his degree in 1881.[3][5][6] Before his ordination Gore Browne enlisted with the 11th Hussars for six months "with the object of getting experience which would help him in his work among men."[3] Wilfrid Gore Browne was the uncle of Stewart Gore-Browne, the founder of Shiwa Ngandu in Zambia. Ordination to Priesthood and work in Darlington and Pretoria Ordained deacon in the Diocese of Durham in 1882, priest in 1883,[3] his first post was a ...more...



List of curlers

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List of curlers

This is a list of sportspersons who play the sport of curling, past and present, sorted by nationality. Canadian curlers are further sorted by province.  Andorra Men Women Josep Garcia Carles Herrero Cesar Mialdea Oscar Zazo  Australia Men Women Ted Bassett Wyatt Buck Andy Campbell Gerald Chick Sean Hall Dean Hewitt Stephen Hewitt David Imlah Steve Johns Brian Johnson Daniel Joyce Tom Kidd Jay Merchant Hugh Millikin Ian Palangio Matthew Panoussi Vaughan Rosier Trevor Schumm Derek Smith Ricky Tasker John Theriault Mike Woloschuk Janet Cobden Kim Forge Sandy Gagnon Lynette Kate Gill Lynn Hewitt Kate Montenay Jenny Riordan Laurie Weeden Ellen Weir Madeleine Kate Wilson Helen Wright  Austria Men Women Mathias Genner Florian Huber Christian Roth Andreas Unterberger Sebastian Wunderer Constanze Hummelt Claudia Toth Karina Toth  Belarus Men Women Ilya Shalamitski Ilya Shalamitskin Aliaksei Smotrin Ekaterina Kirillova ...more...



William Carmichael (bishop)

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William Carmichael (bishop)

William Carmichael (1702–1765) was Archbishop of Dublin for a brief period in 1765.[1] He was the son of the second Earl of Hyndford.[2] He had previously been Archdeacon of Buckingham (1742–1753), Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh (1753–1758), Ferns and Leighlin (1758) and Meath (1758–1765). He died on 15 December 1765.[3] References Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 350–351. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. Genealogical Web site thePeerage.com Church of England titles Preceded byNicholas Clagett Archdeacon of Buckingham 1742–1753 Succeeded byJohn Taylor Preceded byArthur Smyth Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh 1753–1758 Succeeded byWilliam Gore Preceded byJohn Garnet Bishop of Ferns and Leighlin April 1758–June 1758 Succeeded byThomas Salmon Preceded byHenry Maule Bishop of Meath 1758–1765 Succeeded byRichard Pococke Preceded byCharles Cobbe Archbishop of Dublin Ma ...more...



Alfred Janes

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Alfred Janes

Alfred George Janes (30 June 1911 – 3 February 1999) was a Welsh artist, who worked in Swansea and Croydon. He experimented with many forms, but is best known for his meticulous still lifes and portraits. He is also remembered as one of The Kardomah Gang, an informal group of young artists in Swansea that included the poets Dylan Thomas and Vernon Watkins, and the composer Daniel Jones. Early life Alfred George Janes was born on 30 June 1911, in the city centre of Swansea, South Wales, above his parents' fruit and flower shop in Castle Square. He attended the Bishop Gore School and then the Swansea School of Art and Crafts (now part of Swansea Metropolitan University). At the age of 16 he exhibited at the 1928 National Eisteddfod (held in Treorchy that year). Three years later, while he was still concentrating on still lifes and portraits, he was commissioned to paint a portrait of the mayor of Swansea, Arthur Lovell. In 1931 he painted a portrait of a 17-year-old Mervyn Levy, thought to have been the paint ...more...



Bishop of Waterford and Lismore

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Bishop of Waterford and Lismore

The Bishop of Waterford and Lismore is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Waterford and town of Lismore in the Republic of Ireland. The title was used by the Church of Ireland until 1838, and is still used by the Roman Catholic Church. History The bishopric is a union of the episcopal sees of Waterford and Lismore which were united by Pope Urban V in 1363. Following the Reformation, there were parallel successions. In the Church of Ireland the see continued until 1833 when it became part of the archbishopric of Cashel. In 1838, the Anglican province of Cashel lost its metropolitan status and became the bishopric of Cashel and Waterford. It was further united with the Sees of Ossory, Ferns and Leighlin to become the united bishopric of Cashel and Ossory in 1977. In the Roman Catholic Church the title remains as separate bishopric. The present Incumbent is the Most Reverend Alphonsus Cullinan, Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Waterford and Lismore, who was appointed by the Holy ...more...



William Williams (bishop)

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William Williams (bishop)

To be distinguished from William Williams (missionary) (1859–1892) in Khasi Hills India William Williams (18 July 1800 – 9 February 1878) was the first Anglican Bishop of Waiapu and the father and grandfather of two others.[3] Williams was consecrated as the Bishop of Waiapu on 3 April 1859 at the meeting of the General Synod at Wellington.[4] Williams led the Church Missionary Society (CMS) missionaries in translating the Bible into Māori and he also published an early dictionary and grammar of the Māori language. Early life Williams was born in Nottingham to Thomas and Mary Williams on 18 July 1800. His paternal grandfather was the Reverend Thomas Williams (1725–1770), a Congregational minister at the Independent Chapel of Gosport.[5][6][7] After the death of William's father in 1804, his mother moved with her younger children to Southwell, Nottinghamshire where she opened a school for young girls.[8] William Williams was educated at Moravian school, Fairfield, Manchester then at Southwell Grammar Schoo ...more...



Prince-bishop

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Prince-bishop

Johann Otto von Gemmingen, Prince-Bishop of Augsburg (1591–1598) A prince-bishop is a bishop who is also the civil ruler of some secular principality and sovereignty. Thus the principality or prince-bishopric ruled politically by a prince-bishop could wholly or largely overlap with his diocesan jurisdiction, since some parts of his diocese, even the city of his residence, could be exempt from his civil rule, obtaining the status of free imperial city. If the episcopal see is an archbishopric, the correct term is prince-archbishop; the equivalent in the regular (monastic) clergy is prince-abbot. A prince-bishop is usually considered an elected monarch. In the West, with the decline of imperial power from the 4th century onwards in the face of the barbarian invasions, sometimes Christian bishops of cities took the place of the Roman commander, made secular decisions for the city and led their own troops when necessary. Later relations between a prince-bishop and the burghers were invariably not cordial. As c ...more...



Charles Granville Bruce

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Charles Granville Bruce

Brigadier-General The Honourable Charles Granville Bruce, CB, MVO (7 April 1866 – 12 July 1939) was a Himalayan veteran and leader of the second and third British expeditions to Mount Everest in 1922 and 1924. Background and early life Charles Granville Bruce was the youngest of the fourteen children of Henry Bruce, 1st Baron Aberdare (1815–1895) and Norah Napier (1827-1897). His father was born at Duffryn, Aberdare, attended Swansea Grammar School, and trained as a barrister. In the 1830s, coal was discovered beneath the family's land, and with the development of the industry they became rich. Henry Bruce was stipendiary magistrate for Merthyr Tydfil, 1847 to 1854, Liberal member of parliament for Merthyr Tydfil, 1852 to 1869, and Home Secretary in Gladstone's government, 1868 to 1873. He was created first Baron Aberdare, of Duffryn, in 1873. His mother was youngest daughter of General Sir William Francis Patrick Napier. Bruce was educated at Harrow and Repton. His early life alternated between the 'pompou ...more...



Hohenzollern Castle

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Hohenzollern Castle

Hohenzollern Castle (German:  Burg Hohenzollern ) is the ancestral seat of the imperial House of Hohenzollern.[a] The third of three hilltop castles on the site, it is located atop Mount Hohenzollern, above and south of Hechingen, on the edge of the Swabian Jura of central Baden-Württemberg, Germany. The first fortress on the mountain was constructed in the early 11th century. Over the years the House of Hohenzollern split several times, but the castle remained in the Swabian branch, the dynastic seniors of the Franconian-Brandenburgian cadet branch that later acquired its own imperial throne. This castle was completely destroyed in 1423 after a ten-month siege by the free imperial cities of Swabia. A larger and sturdier structure was constructed from 1454 to 1461, which served as a refuge for the Catholic Swabian Hohenzollerns, including during the Thirty Years' War. By the end of the 18th century it was thought to have lost its strategic importance and gradually fell into disrepair, leading to the demoliti ...more...



San Francisco 49ers draft history

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San Francisco 49ers draft history

This page is a list of San Francisco 49ers NFL Draft selections. The first draft the 49ers participated in was the 1950 NFL Draft, in which they made Leo Nomellini of Minnesota their first ever selection. Key = Pro Bowler = MVP = Hall of Famer 1950 NFL Draft Round Pick # Overall Name Position College 1 11 11 Leo Nomellini Defensive tackle Minnesota 2 9 23 Don Campora Offensive tackle Pacific 3 10 37 Ray Collins Defensive tackle Louisiana State 4 9 49 Morris Bailey End Texas Christian 5 10 63 Harry Kane Center Pacific 6 9 75 Don Van Pool End Oklahoma A&M 7 10 89 Lindy Berry Quarterback Texas Christian 8 9 101 Ellery Williams End Santa Clara 9 10 115 Pete Zinach Back West Virginia 10 9 127 Bob Celeri Quarterback California 11 10 141 Harley Dow Tackle San Jose State 12 9 153 Don Burke Back Southern California 13 10 167 Lou Cecconi Back Pittsburgh 14 9 179 Tom Payne End Santa Clara 15 10 193 Leo Crampsey End St. Bonaventure 16 9 205 Charley Shaw Guard Oklahoma ...more...



Thomas Gore Browne

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Thomas Gore Browne

Colonel Sir Thomas Robert Gore Browne KCMG CB (3 July 1807 – 17 April 1887) was a British colonial administrator, who was Governor of St Helena, Governor of New Zealand, Governor of Tasmania and Governor of Bermuda. Early life Browne was born in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, England, the first son of Robert Browne of Morton House, in Buckinghamshire, and of Sarah Dorothea Steward; his younger brother was Harold Browne (later Bishop of Winchester.) He served with the British Army in Afghanistan and India. In 1824 he purchased an Ensigncy in the 44th Foot, but three months later exchanged into the 28th Foot. In 1829 he purchased a Captaincy. In 1836, as a Major, he exchanged into the 41st Foot. In 1842 he was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Army, in 1845 he purchased the Lieutenant-Colonelcy of the 41st Foot, and in 1849 he exchanged into the 21st Foot. He was Governor of St Helena from July 1851 to December 1854.[1] He was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Army in 1854, by which time he was back in his orig ...more...



List of The Nerdist Podcast episodes

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List of The Nerdist Podcast episodes

The Nerdist Podcast is a weekly interview show hosted by Chris Hardwick who is usually accompanied by Jonah Ray and Matt Mira.[1][2][3] Guests are varied, though typically relate to either stand-up comedy, nerd culture, or both. "Hostful" episodes have no guest, and instead feature Hardwick, Ray, and Mira.[3] Episodes2010 Episode No. Episode Title / Guest Release date Sources 1 "Tom Lennon" February 8, 2010 TBA 2 "Drew Carey" February 16, 2010 [1] 3 "Adam Carolla" February 23, 2010 TBA 4 "Rob Huebel & Motion City Soundtrack" March 2, 2010 TBA 5 "Jon Hamm" March 9, 2010 [2] 6 "Joel McHale" March 16, 2010 TBA 7 "Andy Richter" March 23, 2010 TBA 8 "Jim Gaffigan" March 30, 2010 TBA 9 "Mike Shinoda" April 6, 2010 TBA 10 "Adam Savage (live at Largo)" April 13, 2010 [1][2] 11 "Eugene Mirman & God’s Pottery" April 20, 2010 TBA 12 "OK Go" April 23, 2010 TBA 13 "The Muppets" April 27, 2010 TBA 14 "Stan Lee (from the 2010 NAB Show)" May 4, 2010 TBA 15 "Rob Zombie" May 11, 201 ...more...



List of Warrington Wolves players

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List of Warrington Wolves players

Warrington Wolves (named Warrington Zingari in 1876, and just Warrington from 1877 to 1996) are an English rugby league club who have had numerous notable players throughout their history. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] № Name Début Last Match Position Appearances Tries Goals Drop goals Points captain Honours Representative Records/Notes 312 Abbott, NormanNorman Abbott 25 April 1925 Centre 1 0 0 0 0 signed from Wigan Old Boys RUFC 867 Abram, DarrenDarren Abram 8 March 1987 Centre 1 0 0 0 0 … 637 Affleck, KeithKeith Affleck 12 April 1963 5 September 1969 Fullback 96 15 197 2 443 kicked 100 goals in 1966-67 season 515 Alderton, KenKen Alderton 21 January 1950 28 January 1950 Left-Wing 2 0 0 0 0 début at Wigan in front of 35,000 crowd 100 Aldred, ?.?. Aldred 15 March 1902 Forward 1 0 0 0 0 played in Challenge Cup tie against Barrow at Wilderspool 445 Allan, ?.?. Allan 4 May 1940 18 May 1940 Second-row, Loose forward/Lock 4 1 0 0 3 only t ...more...



Gore (surname)

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Gore (surname)

Gore is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: Al Gore (born 1948), environmental activist and US politician (45th Vice President of the United States, Tennessee senator) Albert Gore, Sr. (1907–1998), United States Senator from Tennessee; father of Al Gore Arthur Gore, multiple individuals Bill Gore (1912–1986), founder of W. L. Gore and Associates, makers of Gore-Tex Bobby Gore (1936–2013), American activist Catherine Gore (1799–1861), British novelist and dramatist Charles Gore multiple individuals Charles Gore (1853–1932), English divine and Anglican bishop who founded the Community of the Resurrection Charles Gore (artist) (1759–1807), landscape artist, Grand Tour traveler Charles Stephen Gore (1793–1869), British Army officer David Alan Gore (1957-2012), American serial killer David Gore (1823-1911), American politician Francis Gore (1769–1852), British Army officer and colonial administrator Frank Gore (born 1983), American football player Frederick Gore (1 ...more...



Anglican Diocese of Brisbane

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Anglican Diocese of Brisbane

St John's Cathedral, Brisbane The Anglican Diocese of Brisbane is based in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. The diocesan bishop's seat is St John's Cathedral, Brisbane. The current Archbishop of Brisbane is Phillip Aspinall, who was formerly the elected Primate of the Anglican Church of Australia. The diocese stretches from the south-eastern coastline of Queensland, south to the New South Wales border, and west to the Northern Territory and South Australian borders. History Queen Victoria created the Anglican Diocese of Brisbane and in 1859[1] appointed Edward Tufnell (1814–1896) as the first diocesan bishop.[2] Tufnell designated St John's Cathedral in Brisbane as the pro-cathedral. The central stained glass windows in the apse, the crucifixion, at St Mary's Church, was donated by Bishop Tufnell. The second bishop was Matthew Hale, who was translated from Perth in 1876.[3] Hale was succeeded by William Webber,[4] who was the last man to be only Bishop of Brisbane (from 1885 to 1904) as the new ecclesias ...more...



Bishop of Worcester

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Bishop of Worcester

The Bishop of Worcester is the head of the Church of England Diocese of Worcester in the Province of Canterbury, England. The title can be traced back to the foundation of the diocese in the year 680.[2][3] From then until the 16th century, the bishops were in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church. During the Reformation, the church in England broke away from the authority of the Pope and the Roman Catholic Church, at first temporarily and later more permanently. Since the Reformation, the Bishop and Diocese of Worcester has been part of the Church of England and the Anglican Communion. The diocese covers most of the county of Worcestershire, the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley and parts of the City of Wolverhampton.[4] The Episcopal see is in the city of Worcester where the bishop's throne is located at the Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary.[5] The bishop's official residence is the Old Palace, Worcester.[6] The bishops had two residences outside the city: Hartlebury Castle near ...more...



All The Stations

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All The Stations

All The Stations is a 2017 documentary series published on YouTube, which sees couple Geoff Marshall and Vicki Pipe visit all 2,563 stations on Great Britain's National Rail railway network. The journey took fourteen weeks and six days, starting at Penzance railway station on 7 May 2017 and finished at Wick railway station on 19 August 2017. They subsequently visited Kenilworth station on the day it was due to open - Sunday 10th December 2017 - to bring the total to 2,564 stations. Overview All The Stations was crowdfunded via Kickstarter, raising a total of £38,654 in 40 days (from 15 February to 27 March 2017). Marshall and Pipe used All Line Rover tickets, and every contributor who donated £10 or more to the Kickstarter campaign was able to adopt a station – and their name appeared on the map on the project's website. The money earned from the crowdfunding allowed four main documentary episodes to be published each week on YouTube - there were 59 episodes in total - but the fund also paid for 11 'bonus' ...more...



Howel Gwyn

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Howel Gwyn

Howel Gwyn (24 June 1806 – 25 January 1888) of Dyffryn, Neath, was a British Conservative politician, who represented Penryn and Falmouth (1847–57) and Brecon (1866–68).[1] Early life Gwyn was the son of William Gwyn and Mary Anne Roberts. His mother was the daughter of John Roberts of Barnstaple, Devon.[1] He was educated privately at Neath and at Swansea Grammar School.[1] Public life Gwyn participated in the public life of several Welsh counties. He was High Sheriff of Glamorgan in 1837, of Carmarthenshire in 1838 and of Breconshire in 1844.[1] Gwyn successfully contested Penryn and Falmouth at the 1847 General Election and continued to represent the borough until 1857.[1] He represented Brecon from 1866 until 1869 when he was unseated by petition. Having been returned for Brecon in 1868 it was generally accepted that his supporters had been caught engaged in bribery.[2] The following year, a petition was brought forward to unseat him due to allegations of bribery and illegal activities. Gwyn was largel ...more...



Ralph Gore, 1st Earl of Ross

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Ralph Gore, 1st Earl of Ross

General Ralph Gore, 1st Earl of Ross (23 November 1725 – September 1802),[1] known as Sir Ralph Gore, 6th Baronet from 1746 until 1764, subsequently as The Lord Gore until 1768 and then as The Viscount Belleisle until 1772, was an Irish soldier, politician and peer. Background Born at Belle Isle Castle, he was the second son of Sir Ralph Gore, 4th Baronet and his second wife Elizabeth, only daughter of St George Ashe, at that time Bishop of Clogher.[2] Gore was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and in 1744, he purchased a lieutenantcy in the 33rd Regiment of Foot.[2] In 1746, he succeeded his older brother St George as baronet.[3] Military career In the middle of the War of the Austrian Succession, Gore joined the regiment in Flanders in 1745 and took over a company.[4] At the Battle of Fontenoy on 11 May, he was hit on his right arm by a shot, however quickly recovered.[4] During the Battle of Lauffeld on 2 July 1747 all his superior officers were killed or severely wounded, so command of the battalion f ...more...



Earl of Arran

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Earl of Arran

James Hamilton, 2nd Earl of Arran Earl of Arran is a title in both the Peerage of Scotland and the Peerage of Ireland. The two titles refer to different places: the Isle of Arran in Scotland, and the Aran Islands in Ireland. The Scottish earldom is a subsidiary title of the Duke of Hamilton, whereas the Irish earldom is a separate title held by the Gore family. Scottish creationsFeudal Earldom of Arran Arms of feudal Earls of Arran: Argent, a lymphad with the sails furled proper flagged gules.[1] The feudal Earldom of Arran supposedly had its caput at Lochranza Castle.[2] The arms of the feudal Earl of Arran are: Argent, a lymphad with the sails furled proper flagged gules. These are quartered today with the arms of Hamilton (Gules, three cinquefoils ermine) by the Duke of Hamilton.[3] In a similar fashion the arms of the feudal Earldom of Orkney are quartered by the present Earl of Caithness, the arms of the feudal Barony (or Earldom) of Lorne are now quartered by the Duke of Argyll, and the arms o ...more...



John Gwyn Jeffreys

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John Gwyn Jeffreys

John Gwyn Jeffreys FRS (18 January 1809 – 21 January 1885) was a British conchologist and malacologist. Biography John Gwyn Jeffreys was born in Britain on 18 January 1809, at Swansea, Wales. He was the eldest son of J. Jeffreys of Fynone, Glamorgan.[1] Jeffreys was educated in Swansea at the Bishop Gore School (Swansea Grammar School). From the age of seventeen, he was an apprentice to one of the principal solicitors of Swansea, before going to London, where he qualified as a barrister in 1838.[2] Jeffreys worked as a solicitor in Swansea until 1856, when he was called to the bar in London.[3] But his greater passion was for conchology. He was not satisfied simply to form a collection, but was interested in all aspects of the biology of molluscs. On 2 April 1840 he became a Fellow of the Royal Society. On 21 June that year he married Ann Nevill at Llangennech.[4] They would have a son[1] and four daughters; and were the grandparents of the physicist, Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley. In 1866 Jeffreys retired ...more...



Peter Vaughan

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Peter Vaughan

Peter Vaughan (born Peter Ewart Ohm; 4 April 1923 – 6 December 2016) was a British character actor, known for many supporting roles in British film and television productions.[1] He also worked extensively on the stage. He was best known for his role as Grouty in the sitcom Porridge (despite appearing in only three episodes and the 1979 film) and also had a recurring role alongside Robert Lindsay in Citizen Smith, written by John Sullivan. He also had parts as Tom Franklin in Chancer (1990–91), playing the father of Anthony Hopkins's character in The Remains of the Day, and as Maester Aemon in HBO's Game of Thrones (2011–15), his final role. Early life He was born Peter Ewart Ohm[2] on 4 April 1923,[3] in Wem, Shropshire,[4] the son of a bank clerk, Max Ohm, who was an Austrian immigrant,[5] and Eva Wright, a nurse.[6] The family later moved to Wellington in the same county, where he began schooling; he later said it was while reciting a poem at infant school in Wellington that he experienced the applause a ...more...



Bishop of Oxford

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Bishop of Oxford

The Bishop of Oxford is the diocesan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Oxford in the Province of Canterbury; his seat is at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford. The current bishop is Steven Croft, following the confirmation of his election to the See on 6 July 2016.[1] History The origins of Christianity in this part of England go back at least to the 7th century, when Saint Birinus brought his mission to the West Saxons in 634. The West Saxon King Cynegils was baptised in the River Thames near the present site of Dorchester Abbey, where the original See was established. The see was transferred in 1092 to Winchester, before being absorbed into the Diocese of Lincoln, the vast extent of which covered much of central and eastern England from the River Thames to the Humber. King Henry VIII, acting now as head of the Church in England, established by Act of Parliament in 1542 six new dioceses, mostly out of the spoils of the suppressed monasteries. These six were Bristol, Chester, Gloucester, Oxford, Pete ...more...



William Robert Grove

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William Robert Grove

Sir William Robert Grove, PC, FRS FRSE (11 July 1811 – 1 August 1896) was a Welsh judge and physical scientist.[1] He anticipated the general theory of the conservation of energy, and was a pioneer of fuel cell technology.[1] He invented the Grove voltaic cell. Early life Born in Swansea, Wales, Grove was the only child of John, a magistrate and deputy lieutenant of Glamorgan, and his wife, Anne née Bevan. His early education was in the hands of private tutors, before he attended Brasenose College, Oxford to study classics, though his scientific interests may have been cultivated by mathematician Baden Powell. Otherwise, his taste for science has no clear origin though his circle in Swansea was broadly educated. He graduated in 1832. In 1835 he was called to the bar by Lincoln's Inn. In the same year, Grove joined the Royal Institution and was a founder of the Swansea Literary and Philosophical Society, an organisation with which he maintained close links.[2] Scientific work Grove's 1839 gas voltaic b ...more...



Battle on the Ice

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Battle on the Ice

The Battle on the Ice (Russian: Ледовое побоище, Ledovoye poboish'ye); German: Schlacht auf dem Eise; Estonian: Jäälahing; German: Schlacht auf dem Peipussee) was fought between the Republic of Novgorod led by prince Alexander Nevsky and the crusader army led by the Livonian branch of the Teutonic Knights on April 5, 1242, at Lake Peipus. The battle is notable for having been fought largely on the frozen lake, and this gave the battle its name. The battle was a significant defeat sustained by the crusaders during the Northern Crusades, which were directed against pagans and Eastern Orthodox Christians rather than Muslims in the Holy Land. The Crusaders' defeat in the battle marked the end of their campaigns against the Orthodox Novgorod Republic and other Slavic territories for the next century. The event was glorified in Sergei Eisenstein's historical drama film Alexander Nevsky, released in 1938, which created a popular image of the battle often mistaken for the real events. Sergei Prokofiev turned his sc ...more...



Dennis Wheatley

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Dennis Wheatley

Dennis Yeats Wheatley (8 January 1897 – 10 November 1977) was an English writer whose prolific output of thrillers and occult novels made him one of the world's best-selling authors from the 1930s through the 1960s. His Gregory Sallust series was one of the main inspirations for Ian Fleming's James Bond stories.[1] Early life Wheatley was born in South London to Albert David and Florence Elizabeth Harriet (Baker) Wheatley. He was the eldest of three children in the family, which owned Wheatley & Son of Mayfair, a wine business. He admitted to having little aptitude for schooling and was later expelled from Dulwich College for allegedly forming a "secret society" (as he mentions in his introduction to The Devil Rides Out). Soon after his expulsion Wheatley became a British Merchant Navy officer cadet on the training ship HMS Worcester. Military service Wheatley was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant into the Royal Field Artillery during the First World War, receiving his basic training at Biscot Camp[2] ...more...



John Shelby Spong

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John Shelby Spong

John Shelby "Jack" Spong (born June 16, 1931) is a retired American bishop of the Episcopal Church. From 1979 to 2000 he was Bishop of Newark (based in Newark, New Jersey). He is a liberal Christian theologian, religion commentator and author. He calls for a fundamental rethinking of Christian belief away from theism and traditional doctrines.[1] Early life and career Spong was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, and educated in Charlotte public schools. He attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa honor society and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1952. He received his Master of Divinity degree from the Virginia Theological Seminary in 1955. He has had honorary Doctor of Divinity degrees conferred on him by Virginia Theological Seminary and Saint Paul's College, Virginia, as well as an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters conferred by Muhlenberg College in Pennsylvania. In 2005, he wrote: "[I have] immerse[d] myself in contemporary Biblical ...more...



Joss Ackland

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Joss Ackland

Sidney Edmond Jocelyn Ackland, CBE (born 29 February 1928) is an English actor who has appeared in more than 130 film and television roles.[1] He was nominated for the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role for portraying Jock Delves Broughton in White Mischief (1987). Early life Ackland was born in North Kensington, London, the son of Ruth (Izod) and Sydney Norman Ackland.[2] He was trained by Elsie Fogerty at the Central School of Speech and Drama, then based at the Royal Albert Hall, London.[3] Ackland and his wife, the former Rosemary Kirkcaldy, were married on 18 August 1951 when Ackland was 23 and she 22. She was an actress and Ackland wooed her when they appeared on stage together in the town of Pitlochry in Scotland. The couple struggled initially as Ackland's acting career was in its infancy. They moved to Kenya, where Ackland managed a tea plantation for six months, but, deciding it was too dangerous, they moved to Cape Town, South Africa. Though they both obtained steady acting jobs in So ...more...



Royal Chapel of All Saints

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Royal Chapel of All Saints

The Royal Chapel of All Saints or Queen Victoria's Chapel is a Grade II listed church in the grounds of the Royal Lodge in Windsor Great Park, Berkshire, England.[1] The chapel is situated in the grounds of Royal Lodge. The chapel is a Royal Peculiar, and serves as an informal parish church for the inhabitants and staff of the Windsor Great Park. Services at the chapel are often attended by members of the British Royal family, and the Queen regularly worships at the church for reasons of privacy.[2][3] The chaplaincy of the Royal Chapel All Saints is held by one of the Canons of the College of St George at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.[3] History The chapel is the successor to the chapels built at Royal Lodge and Cumberland Lodge for the use of their royal occupants and their staff. By the mid 1820s, George IV frequently resided at Royal Lodge during his refurbishment of Windsor Castle, and a larger chapel was required for the worship of his household and staff. The chapel was built by Jeffry Wyatville ...more...



William Jones

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William Jones

William Jones may refer to: Academics and authors William Jones (mathematician) (1675–1749), Welsh mathematician who proposed the use of the symbol π William Jones (college principal) (1676–1725), Principal of Jesus College, Oxford, 1720–1725 William Jones (Welsh radical) (1726–1795), Welsh poet, antiquary and radical William Jones (naturalist) (1745–1818), English naturalist and entomologist Sir William Jones (philologist) (1746–1794), English philologist who proposed a relationship among Indo-European languages William Jones (anthropologist) (1871–1909), Native American specialist in Algonquian languages W. S. Jones (William Samuel Jones, 1920–2007), Welsh language writer William Eifion Jones (1925–2004), Welsh marine botanist Military figures William Jones (1803–1864), Union Lieutenant Colonel and owner of the Colonel William Jones House in Indiana William E. Jones (1824–1864), Confederate cavalry general William Gore Jones (1826–1888), British admiral William Jones (sailor) (1831– ...more...




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