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The UK is the next to lock down the country. Assessing the price.

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The UK is the next to lock down the country. Assessing the price.

The novel coronavirus, also known as Covid-19, has spread in more than 120 countries already. Many countries have already been affected by the virus and thousands of people have been infected. The World Health Organization has announced the epidemic as the pandemic, meaning that the virus has spread to most of the countries. Due to the rapid spread of the virus, many countries have already limited industries and certain sectors in the performance. Some of the most active sectors have been the key focus. Industries such as airlines, trading, and transportation have already restricted the operations and have admitted certain strict measures. The world economy is suffering from the virus and from the shut down of most of the sectors. Stocks have been decreased by almost 30% and the companies are going bankrupt. The employers are having a hard time maintaining the employees and paying out salaries. This is one of the toughest economic conditions for the past several years. It has been predicted the future effect

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Short (finance)

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Short (finance)

Schematic representation of physical short selling in two steps. The short seller borrows shares and immediately sells them. The short seller then expects the price to decrease, after which the seller can profit by purchasing the shares to return to the lender. In finance, being short in an asset means investing in such a way that the investor will profit if the value of the asset falls. This is the opposite of a more conventional "long" position, where the investor will profit if the value of the asset rises. There are a number of ways of achieving a short position. The most fundamental method is so-called "physical" short-selling, which involves borrowing assets (often securities such as shares or bonds) and selling them. The investor will later purchase the same number of type of securities in order to return them to the lender. If the price has fallen between the time of the initial sale and the time the equivalent securities are repurchased, the investor will have made a profit equal to the difference.

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Canal

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Canal

The Alter Strom, in the sea resort of Warnemünde, Germany. The Royal Canal in Ireland. Small boat canals such as the Basingstoke Canal fuelled the industrial revolution in much of Europe and the United States. Bridge on the Naviglio Grande, in the town of Cassinetta di Lugagnano, in Italy Canal in Broek in Waterland, Netherlands. Canal in Venice. Canals are waterways channels, or artificial waterways, for water conveyance, or to service water transport vehicles. They may also help with irrigation. It can be thought of as an artificial version of a river. In most cases, the engineered works will have a series of dams and locks that create reservoirs of low speed current flow. These reservoirs are referred to as slack water levels, often just called levels. A canal is also known as a navigation when it parallels a river and shares part of its waters and drainage basin, and leverages its resources by building dams and locks to increase and lengthen its stretches of slack water levels while sta

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Pub

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Pub

A thatched country pub, The Williams Arms, near Braunton, Devon, England A city pub, The World's End, Camden Town, London The Ale-House Door (painting of c. 1790 by Henry Singleton) A pub, or public house, is an establishment licensed to sell alcoholic drinks, which traditionally include beer (such as ale) and cider. It is a social drinking establishment and a prominent part of British,[1] Irish,[2] Breton, New Zealand, Canadian, South African and Australian cultures.[3] In many places, especially in villages, a pub is the focal point of the community. In his 17th-century diary, Samuel Pepys described the pub as "the heart of England".[4] Pubs can be traced back to Roman taverns,[5] through the Anglo-Saxon alehouse to the development of the tied house system in the 19th century. In 1393, King Richard II of England introduced legislation that pubs had to display a sign outdoors to make them easily visible for passing ale tasters, who would assess the quality of ale sold.[6] Most pubs focus on offerin

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Filling station

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Filling station

The Skovshoved Filling Station, in operation since 1935, in Copenhagen, Denmark Portable filling station (manufacturer - Robotanks LLC) A Shell filling station in Sabah, Malaysia An MOL filling station in Luduș, Transylvania, Romania Orlen station for refueling boats, Poland A Royal Dutch Shell filling station and garage in Mijnsheerenland, The Netherlands, late-1970s A filling station is a facility that sells fuel and engine lubricants for motor vehicles. The most common fuels sold in the 2010s are gasoline (gasoline or gas in the United States and Canada, generally petrol elsewhere) and diesel fuel. A filling station that sells only electric energy is also known as a charging station, while a typical filling station can also be known as a fueling or gas station (United States and Canada), gasbar (Canada), gasoline stand or SS[Note 1] (Japan), petrol pump or petrol bunk (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh), garage, petrol station (Australia, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Singapore, South Africa, Unit

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Parking

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Parking

Cars parked at the side of the street Parking is the act of stopping and disengaging a vehicle and leaving it unoccupied. Parking on one or both sides of a road is often permitted, though sometimes with restrictions. Some buildings have parking facilities for use of the buildings' users. Countries and local governments have rules for design and use of parking spaces. Parking facilities A multi-story car park in Gloucester, England Parking lot in New York City with capacity multiplied by stacking with lifts An underground parking garage at the University of Minnesota A car elevator in a parking garage Facilities include indoor and outdoor private property belonging to a house, the side of the road where metered or laid out for such use, a parking lot (North American English) or car park (British English), indoor and outdoor multi-level structures, shared underground parking facilities and facilities for particular types of vehicle such as dedicated structures for cycle parking. In the U.S., a

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Edmund Burke

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Edmund Burke

Edmund Burke (12 January [NS] 1729[2] – 9 July 1797) was an Irish[3][4][5] statesman and philosopher. Born in Dublin, Burke served as a member of parliament (MP) between 1766 and 1794 in the House of Commons of Great Britain with the Whig Party after moving to London in 1750. Burke was a proponent of underpinning virtues with manners in society and of the importance of religious institutions for the moral stability and good of the state.[6] These views were expressed in his A Vindication of Natural Society. He criticized British treatment of the American colonies, including through its taxation policies. Burke also supported the rights of the colonists to resist metropolitan authority, although he opposed the attempt to achieve independence. He is remembered for his support for Catholic emancipation, the impeachment of Warren Hastings from the East India Company, and his staunch opposition to the French Revolution. In his Reflections on the Revolution in France, Burke asserted that the revolution was destro

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Carbon footprint

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Carbon footprint

The carbon footprint explained Visual representation of carbon footprint A carbon footprint is historically defined as the total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions caused by an individual, event, organization, or product, expressed as carbon dioxide equivalent.[1] Greenhouse gases, including the carbon-containing gases carbon dioxide and methane, can be emitted through the burning of fossil fuels, land clearance and the production and consumption of food, manufactured goods, materials, wood, roads, buildings, transportation and other services.[2] In most cases, the total carbon footprint cannot be calculated exactly because of inadequate knowledge of and data about the complex interactions between contributing processes, including the influence of natural processes that store or release carbon dioxide. For this reason, Wright, Kemp, and Williams proposed the following definition of a carbon footprint: A measure of the total amount of carbon dioxide (CO) and methane (CH) emissions of a defined population, s

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Dominic Raab

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Dominic Raab

Dominic Rennie Raab (born 25 February 1974)[1] is a British politician serving as First Secretary of State and Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs since July 2019. A member of the Conservative Party, he has also been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Esher and Walton since 2010. On 6 April 2020, Raab began deputising as Prime Minister following Boris Johnson's admission to intensive care due to his persistent and worsening symptoms of COVID-19.[2] Raab was appointed Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Ministry of Justice on 12 May 2015. When Prime Minister Theresa May appointed her first government a year later, he returned to the backbenches. Following the 2017 general election, he was appointed Minister of State for Courts and Justice. When the government was reshuffled in January 2018, Raab moved to the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.[3] In July 2018, May promoted Raab to his first Cabinet role, becoming the Secretary of State for Exiting the European

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Panama Canal

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Panama Canal

Location of Panama between Pacific (bottom) and Caribbean (top), with canal at top center The panamax ship MSC Poh Lin exiting the Miraflores locks, March 2013 The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is an artificial 82 km (51 mi) waterway in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a conduit for maritime trade. Canal locks are at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 m (85 ft) above sea level, and then lower the ships at the other end. The original locks are 32.5 m (110 ft) wide. A third, wider lane of locks was constructed between September 2007 and May 2016. The expanded canal began commercial operation on June 26, 2016. The new locks allow transit of larger, neo-Panamax ships, capable of handling more cargo.[1] The construction of the Panama Canal is where the expression "Another Day, Another Dollar" comes from, as the workers w

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Alexander Povetkin

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Alexander Povetkin

Alexander Vladimirovich "Sasha" Povetkin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Влади́мирович Пове́ткин; born 2 September 1979) is a Russian professional boxer who held the WBA (Regular) heavyweight title from 2011 to 2013 and challenged twice for the unified heavyweight championship; firstly against Wladimir Klitschko for the WBA (Super), IBF, WBO, IBO, The Ring, and lineal titles in 2013 and again against Anthony Joshua for the WBA (Super), IBF, WBO, and IBO titles in 2018. As an amateur he won gold medals in the super-heavyweight division at the 2002 and 2004 European Championships, 2003 World Championships, and 2004 Olympics. As of February 2020, Povetkin is ranked as the world's seventh best active heavyweight by BoxRec, the Transnational Boxing Rankings Board and The Ring magazine. Amateur career After a successful amateur kickboxing career that included winning World Junior championship in 1997, World title in 1999 and a European professional kickboxing title in 2000, Povetkin won his first major boxing tournament at

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2019 United Kingdom general election

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2019 United Kingdom general election

The 2019 United Kingdom general election was held on Thursday 12 December 2019. The Conservative Party, having failed to obtain a majority in the 2017 general election, had faced prolonged parliamentary deadlock over Brexit while it governed in minority with the support of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), a situation which had forced the resignation of the previous Prime Minister Theresa May. As a result, Boris Johnson called for an early election to take place in December; legislation to achieve this was eventually approved. In July 2019, after May's resignation, Johnson was elected as Conservative leader and appointed as Prime Minister. Johnson could not induce Parliament to approve a revised withdrawal agreement by the end of October, and chose to call for a snap election. The House of Commons supported the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 by 438–20, setting the election date for 12 December.[3] Johnson needed to obtain an overall majority in the election in order to accomplish his main g

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Economics of climate change mitigation

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Economics of climate change mitigation

Total extreme weather cost and number of events costing more than $1 billion in the United States from 1980 to 2011. This article is about the economics of climate change mitigation. Mitigation of climate change involves actions that are designed to limit the amount of long-term global warming.[1] Mitigation may be achieved through the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or through the enhancement of sinks that absorb GHGs, for example forests. Definitions In this article, the phrase “climate change” is used to describe a change in the climate, measured in terms of its statistical properties, e.g., the global mean surface temperature.[2] In this context, “climate” is taken to mean the average weather. Climate can change over period of time ranging from months to thousands or millions of years. The classical time period is 30 years, as defined by the World Meteorological Organization. The climate change referred to may be due to natural causes, e.g., changes in the sun's output, or due human activit

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Eurofighter Typhoon

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Eurofighter Typhoon

The Eurofighter Typhoon is a twin-engine, canard–delta wing, multirole fighter.[6][7] The Typhoon was designed originally as an air superiority fighter[8] and is manufactured by a consortium of Airbus, BAE Systems and Leonardo that conducts the majority of the project through a joint holding company, Eurofighter Jagdflugzeug GmbH formed in 1986. NATO Eurofighter and Tornado Management Agency manages the project and is the prime customer.[9] The aircraft's development effectively began in 1983 with the Future European Fighter Aircraft programme, a multinational collaboration among the UK, Germany, France, Italy and Spain. Disagreements over design authority and operational requirements led France to leave the consortium to develop the Dassault Rafale independently. A technology demonstration aircraft, the British Aerospace EAP, first took flight on 6 August 1986; the first prototype of the finalised Eurofighter made its first flight on 27 March 1994. The aircraft's name, Typhoon, was adopted in September 1998

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Bicycle-sharing system

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Bicycle-sharing system

Bicycle sharing system in Melbourne A bicycle-sharing system, public bicycle scheme,[1] or public bike share (PBS) scheme,[2] is a service in which bicycles are made available for shared use to individuals on a short term basis for a price or free. Many bike share systems allow people to borrow a bike from a "dock" and return it at another dock belonging to the same system. Docks are special bike racks that lock the bike, and only release it by computer control. The user enters payment information, and the computer unlocks a bike. The user returns the bike by placing it in the dock, which locks it in place. Other systems are dockless. For many systems, smartphone mapping apps show nearby available bikes and open docks. History The first bike sharing projects were initiated by local community organisations, or as charitable projects intended for the disadvantaged, or to promote bicycles as a non-polluting form of transport, or they were business enterprises to rent out bicycles. Ernest Callenbach's novel

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River Trent

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River Trent

The Trent passes over a man-made waterfall in Hollin Wood just downstream from its source. The River Trent is the third-longest river in the United Kingdom. Its source is in Staffordshire on the southern edge of Biddulph Moor. It flows through and drains most of the metropolitan central and northern Midlands south and east of its source north of Stoke-on-Trent. The river is known for dramatic flooding after storms and spring snowmelt, which in past times often caused the river to change course. The river passes through Stoke-on-Trent, Burton upon Trent, Stone, Staffordshire, Rugeley and Nottingham before joining the River Ouse at Trent Falls to form the Humber Estuary, which empties into the North Sea between Hull in Yorkshire and Immingham in Lincolnshire. The course of the river has often been described as the boundary between the Midlands and the north of England.[5][6] Name The name "Trent" is possibly from a Romano-British word meaning "strongly flooding". More specifically, the name may be a contrac

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New Keynesian economics

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New Keynesian economics

New Keynesian economics is a school of contemporary macroeconomics that strives to provide microeconomic foundations for Keynesian economics. It developed partly as a response to criticisms of Keynesian macroeconomics by adherents of new classical macroeconomics. Two main assumptions define the New Keynesian approach to macroeconomics. Like the New Classical approach, New Keynesian macroeconomic analysis usually assumes that households and firms have rational expectations. However, the two schools differ in that New Keynesian analysis usually assumes a variety of market failures. In particular, New Keynesians assume that there is imperfect competition[1] in price and wage setting to help explain why prices and wages can become "sticky", which means they do not adjust instantaneously to changes in economic conditions. Wage and price stickiness, and the other market failures present in New Keynesian models, imply that the economy may fail to attain full employment. Therefore, New Keynesians argue that macroec

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Nestlé

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Nestlé

Nestlé S.A. (French: ) is a Swiss multinational food and drink processing conglomerate corporation headquartered in Vevey, Vaud, Switzerland. It is the largest food company in the world, measured by revenues and other metrics, since 2014.[3][4][5][6][7] It ranked No. 64 on the Fortune Global 500 in 2017[8] and No. 33 on the 2016 edition of the Forbes Global 2000 list of largest public companies.[9] Nestlé's products include baby food, medical food, bottled water, breakfast cereals, coffee and tea, confectionery, dairy products, ice cream, frozen food, pet foods, and snacks. Twenty-nine of Nestlé's brands have annual sales of over CHF1 billion (about US$1.1 billion),[10] including Nespresso, Nescafé, Kit Kat, Smarties, Nesquik, Stouffer's, Vittel, and Maggi. Nestlé has 447 factories, operates in 189 countries, and employs around 339,000 people.[11] It is one of the main shareholders of L'Oreal, the world's largest cosmetics company.[12] Nestlé was formed in 1905 by the merger of the Anglo-Swiss Milk Company,

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Lotus Elan

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Lotus Elan

Lotus Elan is the name of two separate ranges of automobiles produced by Lotus Cars. The first range of cars (1962–1975) comprised: Two seater sports cars: Lotus Type 26 drop head coupé (DHC) marketed as the Elan 1500, Elan 1600, and Elan S2 (Series 2). Lotus Type 36 fixed head coupé (FHC) marketed as the Elan S3, the Elan S4 and, lastly, in a higher performance model, the Elan Sprint. Lotus Type 45 drop head coupé, replacing the Type 26, delivered in parallel with the Type 36 in S3, S4 and Sprint form. Lotus Type 26R racing version of the Type 26. Four seater sports car (rear seats suitable for children): Lotus Type 50, fixed head coupé, marketed as the Elan +2. After the S2 was released the original Elan 1500 and Elan 1600 models were typically referred to as the S1 (Series 1) although the car was never explicitly marketed as such. Today, all models (S1-Sprint) are often cited collectively as the 1960s Elans. The second range of cars (1989–1995) comprised: Two seater sports cars: Lotus Type

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Congestion pricing

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Congestion pricing

Electronic Road Pricing gantry in Singapore, the first city in the world to implement an urban cordon area congestion pricing scheme. Congestion pricing or congestion charges is a system of surcharging users of public goods that are subject to congestion through excess demand, such as through higher peak charges for use of bus services, electricity, metros, railways, telephones, and road pricing to reduce traffic congestion; airlines and shipping companies may be charged higher fees for slots at airports and through canals at busy times. Advocates claim this pricing strategy regulates demand, making it possible to manage congestion without increasing supply. According to the economic theory behind congestion pricing, the objective of this policy is the use of the price mechanism to make users conscious of the costs that they impose upon one another when consuming during the peak demand, and that they should pay for the additional congestion they create, thus encouraging the redistribution of the demand in s

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Education

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Education

Lecture at the Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University, in Prague, Czech Republic School children sitting in the shade of an orchard in Bamozai, near Gardez, Paktya Province, Afghanistan Student participants in the FIRST Robotics Competition, Washington, D.C. Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include teaching, training, storytelling, discussion and directed research. Education frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, however learners can also educate themselves.[1] Education can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational. The methodology of teaching is called pedagogy. Formal education is commonly divided formally into such stages as preschool or kindergarten, primary school, secondary school and then college, university, or apprenticeship. A ri

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Bicycle

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Bicycle

The most popular bicycle model—and most popular vehicle of any kind in the world—is the Chinese Flying Pigeon, with about 500 million produced.[1] Classic bell of a bicycle A bicycle, also called a bike or cycle, is a human-powered or motor-powered, pedal-driven, single-track vehicle, having two wheels attached to a frame, one behind the other. A bicycle rider is called a cyclist, or bicyclist. Bicycles were introduced in the 19th century in Europe, and by the early 21st century, more than 1 billion were in existence at a given time.[1][2][3] These numbers far exceed the number of cars, both in total and ranked by the number of individual models produced.[4][5][6] They are the principal means of transportation in many regions. They also provide a popular form of recreation, and have been adapted for use as children's toys, general fitness, military and police applications, courier services, bicycle racing, and bicycle stunts. The basic shape and configuration of a typical upright or "safety bicycle", h

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Peak uranium

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Peak uranium

Peak uranium is the point in time that the maximum global uranium production rate is reached. After that peak, according to Hubbert peak theory, the rate of production enters a terminal decline. While uranium is used in nuclear weapons, its primary use is for energy generation via nuclear fission of the uranium-235 isotope in a nuclear power reactor.[1] Each kilogram of uranium-235 fissioned releases the energy equivalent of millions of times its mass in chemical reactants, as much energy as 2700 tons of coal, but uranium-235 is only 0.7% of the mass of natural uranium.[2] Uranium-235 is a finite non-renewable resource.[1][3] Advances in breeder reactor technology could allow the current reserves of uranium to provide power for humanity for billions of years, thus making nuclear power a sustainable energy.[4] However, in 2010 the International Panel on Fissile Materials said "After six decades and the expenditure of the equivalent of tens of billions of dollars, the promise of breeder reactors remains largel

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Top Gear challenges

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Top Gear challenges

Top Gear challenges are a segment of the Top Gear television programme where the presenters are tasked by the producers, or each other, to prove or do various things related to vehicles. Novelty/stunt challenges Novelty challenges and short stunt films are typically based on absurd premises, such as jumping a bus over motorcycles (instead of the more typical scenario of a motorcycle jumping over buses), or a nun driving a monster truck. These features have become much less prominent over the life of the programme (they were much more regular during the first four series); they have been superseded in later series by the "How hard can it be?" and Cheap car challenges, which are much larger in scope. How fast do you have to drive to be undetected by a speed camera? Series One, Episode One How many motorcycles can a double-decker bus jump over? Series One, Episode Two Can Grannies do doughnuts? Series One, Episode Three Can you make an 'average' car into a 007/Bond car, for less than £300? Series O

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Toyota Celica

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Toyota Celica

The Toyota Celica (Japanese: トヨタ セリカ) or is an automobile produced by Toyota from 1970 to 2006. The Celica name derives from the Latin word coelica meaning "heavenly" or "celestial". In Japan, the Celica was exclusive to the Toyota Corolla Store dealer chain. Produced across seven generations, the Celica was powered by various four-cylinder engines, and bodystyles included convertibles and liftback or notchback coupés. The first three generations of North American market Celicas were powered by variants of Toyota's R series engine. In August 1985, the car's drive layout was changed from rear-wheel drive to front-wheel drive, and all-wheel drive turbocharged models were offered from 1986 to 1999. Variable valve timing came in certain Japanese models starting from December 1997 and became standard in all models from the 2000 model year. Celica variants were spun off as separate models, notably the Celica Supra (later Toyota Supra). Celica: The name is derived from the Spanish word for "heavenly" or "celestial

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Lada Niva

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Lada Niva

The Lada 4×4, formerly called the Lada Niva or VAZ-2121 (Russian: Лада Нива; Niva (нива) is the Russian word for "field" but meaning crop field), is an off-road vehicle designed and produced by the Russian (former Soviet) manufacturer AvtoVAZ specifically for the rural market, although models made for urban use are sold. It was the first mass-production off-road vehicle to combine a unibody architecture with a coil-sprung independent front suspension, and is a predecessor to current crossover SUVs, nearly all of which follow this format; it inspired the Suzuki Vitara.[3] Like the Vitara, the Lada 4×4 uses a recirculating-ball truck steering box for off-road reliability. Pickup and emergency-van versions are produced by VAZInterService. Following the demise of the Land Rover Defender in 2016, the Niva is the longest running four wheel drive vehicle still in production in its original form. Name The Lada 4×4 was formerly called the Lada Niva, or the VAZ-2121 in the domestic Russian market. The name change o

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Automotive safety

topic

Automotive safety

Crash testing is one of the components of automotive safety. Automotive safety is the study and practice of design, construction, equipment and regulation to minimize the occurrence and consequences of traffic collisions involving motor vehicles. Road traffic safety more broadly includes roadway design. One of the first formal academic studies into improving motor vehicle safety was by Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory of Buffalo, New York. The main conclusion of their extensive report is the crucial importance of seat belts and padded dashboards.[1] However, the primary vector of traffic-related deaths and injuries is the disproportionate mass and velocity of an automobile compared to that of the predominant victim, the pedestrian. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 80% of cars sold in the world are not compliant with main safety standards. Only 40 countries have adopted the full set of the seven most important regulations for car safety.[2] In the United States, a pedestrian is injured by a

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Proton Suprima S

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Proton Suprima S

The Proton Suprima S, codenamed P3-22A is a five-door compact hatchback engineered by Malaysian automobile manufacturer Proton. It was released on 17 August 2013 and is based on Proton's next generation P2 platform. The Suprima S complements the Proton Prevé saloon and has been designed with larger emphasis on international markets. Etymology The name Suprima has its roots in the English word, Supreme. The S suffix stands for Sports. History Pre-launch Proton P3-22A prototype with camouflage taping. The Proton P3-22A has been in development alongside its sister car, the Proton Prevé, then code named Proton P3-21A since 2009. The first spyshot of a P3-22A prototype, taken on 14 December 2012 received high publicity from local online media.[4][5] Although heavily masked, the prototype revealed that the majority of exterior panels and features with the exception of the area to the rear of the C-pillar have been carried over from the Prevé. 8 days later, another different prototype was sighted, revealing l

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Peavey Electronics

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Peavey Electronics

Peavey Electronics Corporation is an American company that designs, develops, manufactures and markets professional audio equipment.[2] One of the largest audio equipment manufacturers in the world, it is headquartered in Meridian, Mississippi. History Hartley Peavey founded Peavey Electronics in 1965, having built his first amplifier in 1957. Peavey Electronics is privately owned. In 2011, Inc. magazine profiled the global success story of music and audio innovator Hartley Peavey and Peavey Electronics Corporation. "Hartley Peavey dreamed of becoming a rock star," wrote Inc.'s Kasey Wehrum. "Though he lacked the chops to become the next Chuck Berry, his name has been etched into the pantheon of rock 'n' roll history."[3] Company information Peavey Headquarters in Meridian, Mississippi Peavey currently owns 1.5 million square feet (140,000 m2) of manufacturing/assembly area over 33 facilities across North America, Europe and Asia, 18 of which are located in Mississippi. Products are manufactured main

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Mitsubishi i-MiEV

topic

Mitsubishi i-MiEV

The Mitsubishi i-MiEV (MiEV is an acronym for Mitsubishi innovative Electric Vehicle[5]) is a five-door hatchback electric car produced in the 2010s by Mitsubishi Motors, and is the electric version of the Mitsubishi i. Rebadged variants of the i-MiEV are also sold in Europe by PSA Peugeot Citroën (PSA) as the Peugeot iOn and Citroën C-Zero. The i-MiEV was the world's first modern highway-capable mass production electric car.[6][7] The i-MiEV was launched for fleet customers in Japan in July 2009, and on April 1, 2010, for the wider public.[8] International sales to Asia, Australia and Europe started in 2010, with further markers in 2011 including Central and South America. Fleet and retail customer deliveries in the U.S. and Canada began in December 2011.[9][10] The American-only version, called "i", is larger than the Japanese version and has several additional features.[11][12] According to the manufacturer, the i-MiEV all-electric range is 160 kilometres (100 mi) on the Japanese test cycle. The range fo

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Trident (UK nuclear programme)

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Trident (UK nuclear programme)

Trident, also known as the Trident nuclear programme or Trident nuclear deterrent, covers the development, procurement and operation of nuclear weapons in the United Kingdom and their means of delivery. Its purpose as stated by the Ministry of Defence is to "deter the most extreme threats to our national security and way of life, which cannot be done by other means".[1] Trident is an operational system of four Vanguard-class submarines armed with Trident II D-5 ballistic missiles, able to deliver thermonuclear warheads from multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicles (MIRVs). It is operated by the Royal Navy and based at Clyde Naval Base on the west coast of Scotland. At least one submarine is always on patrol to provide a continuous at-sea capability. Each one carries up to eight missiles and forty warheads, although their capacity is higher. The missiles are manufactured in the United States, while the warheads are British. The British government initially negotiated with the Carter administration

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Wii U

topic

Wii U

The Wii U ( WEE YOO) is a home video game console developed by Nintendo as the successor to the Wii.[6] Released in late 2012,[7][8] it is the first eighth-generation video game console[9][10] and competed with Microsoft's Xbox One and Sony's PlayStation 4. The Wii U is the first Nintendo console to support HD graphics. The system's primary controller is the Wii U GamePad, which features an embedded touchscreen, directional buttons, analog sticks, and action buttons. The screen can be used either as a supplement to the main display or in supported games to play the game directly on the GamePad. The Wii U Pro Controller can be used in its place as a more traditional alternative. The Wii U is backward compatible with all Wii software and accessories. Games can support any combination of the GamePad, Wii Remote, Nunchuk, Balance Board, or Nintendo's Classic Controller or Wii U Pro Controller. Online functionality centers around the Nintendo Network platform and Miiverse, an integrated social networking service

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China–United States trade war

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China–United States trade war

The China–United States trade war (Chinese: 中美贸易战; pinyin: Zhōngměi Màoyìzhàn) is an ongoing economic conflict between the world's two largest national economies, China and the United States. President Donald Trump in 2018 began setting tariffs and other trade barriers on China with the goal of forcing it to make changes to what the U.S. says are "unfair trade practices".[1] Among those trade practices and their effects are the growing trade deficit, the theft of intellectual property, and the forced transfer of American technology to China.[2] Since the 1980s, Trump has advocated tariffs to reduce the U.S. trade deficit and promote domestic manufacturing, saying the country was being "ripped off" by its trading partners; imposing tariffs became a major plank of his presidential campaign. Although some economists and politicians argue that the United States' persistent trade deficit is problematic, many economists argue that it is not a problem,[3] and few advocate tariffs as a solution.[4][5][6][7] In the

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Tesla Model X

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Tesla Model X

The Tesla Model X is a mid-size all-electric luxury SUV made by Tesla, Inc.. The vehicle is unique in the concept that it uses falcon wing doors instead of traditional automotive doors. The Model X was developed from the full-sized sedan platform of the Tesla Model S. The Model X has an EPA Size Class as an SUV,[8] and shares ~30% of its content with the Model S, half of the originally planned ~60%, and weighs about 10 percent more. Both the Model X and Model S are being produced at the Tesla Factory in Fremont, California. The prototype was unveiled at Tesla's design studios in Hawthorne, California on February 9, 2012.[11][12] First deliveries of the Model X began in September 2015.[13] After one full year on the market, in 2016, the Model X ranked seventh among the world's best-selling plug-in cars.[14] As of February 14, 2020, the Model X is only available as the Long Range Plus with an estimated EPA range of 351 miles (565 km) and the Performance model with an estimated EPA range of 305 miles (491 km)

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Subprime mortgage crisis

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Subprime mortgage crisis

The United States subprime mortgage crisis was a nationwide financial crisis, occurring between 2007 and 2010, that contributed to the U.S. recession of December 2007 – June 2009.[1][2] It was triggered by a large decline in home prices after the collapse of a housing bubble, leading to mortgage delinquencies, foreclosures, and the devaluation of housing-related securities. Declines in residential investment preceded the recession and were followed by reductions in household spending and then business investment. Spending reductions were more significant in areas with a combination of high household debt and larger housing price declines.[3] The housing bubble preceding the crisis was financed with mortgage-backed securities (MBSes) and collateralized debt obligations (CDOs), which initially offered higher interest rates (i.e. better returns) than government securities, along with attractive risk ratings from rating agencies. While elements of the crisis first became more visible during 2007, several major f

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All Things Must Pass

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All Things Must Pass

All Things Must Pass is a triple album by English rock musician George Harrison. Recorded and released in 1970, it was Harrison's first solo work after the break-up of the Beatles in April that year, and his third solo album overall. It includes the hit singles "My Sweet Lord" and "What Is Life", as well as songs such as "Isn't It a Pity" and the title track that had been turned down for inclusion on releases by the Beatles. The album reflects the influence of Harrison's musical activities with artists such as Bob Dylan, the Band, Delaney & Bonnie and Billy Preston during 1968–70, and his growth as an artist beyond his supporting role to former bandmates John Lennon and Paul McCartney. All Things Must Pass introduced Harrison's signature sound, the slide guitar, and the spiritual themes that would be present throughout his subsequent solo work. The original vinyl release consisted of two LPs of songs and a third disc of informal jams, titled Apple Jam. Several commentators interpret Barry Feinstein's alb

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Smart grid

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Smart grid

Characteristics of a smart grid (right) versus the traditional system (left) Video about smart grids A smart grid is an electrical grid which includes a variety of operation and energy measures including smart meters, smart appliances, renewable energy resources, and energy efficient resources.[1][2] Electronic power conditioning and control of the production and distribution of electricity are important aspects of the smart grid.[3] Smart grid policy is organized in Europe as Smart Grid European Technology Platform.[4] Policy in the United States is described in 42 U.S.C. ch. 152, subch. IX § 17381. Roll-out of smart grid technology also implies a fundamental re-engineering of the electricity services industry, although typical usage of the term is focused on the technical infrastructure.[5] Background Historical development of the electricity grid The first alternating current power grid system was installed in 1886 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.[6] At that time, the grid was a centralized un

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Wentworth (season 7)

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Wentworth (season 7)

The seventh season of television drama series Wentworth premiered on Showcase in Australia on 28 May 2019.[1] It is executive produced by FremantleMedia's director of drama, Jo Porter. The seventh season picks up a few months after the events of last season's finale, the presumed closure of the case of Joan Ferguson and the subsequent arrest of former acting Governor, Derek Channing. This season introduces multiple new recurring characters, Dr. Greg Miller (David de Lautour), Sean Brody (Rick Donald), Narelle Stang (Morgana O'Reilly), and Kylee Webb (Geraldine Hakewill). Plot With the case of Joan Ferguson presumably closed, a significantly pregnant Vera and her co-conspirators in the Freak's demise, Will and Jake, are off the hook, at least for now. Meanwhile, Wentworth's eclectic mix of misfits are fracturing as the powers of love, deception and revenge threaten to break them apart for good. The on-set of dementia finds Liz clutching at any semblance of hope while Boomer has to deal with the residual of

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Sanctions against Iran

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Sanctions against Iran

There have been a number of sanctions against Iran imposed by a number of countries, especially the United States, and international entities. The first sanctions were those imposed by the United States in November 1979 after a group of radical students seized the American Embassy in Tehran and took the people inside hostage. The sanctions by Executive Order 12170 included freezing about $12 billion in Iranian assets, including bank deposits, gold and other properties, and a trade embargo. These sanctions were lifted in January 1981 as part of the Algiers Accords, which was a negotiated settlement of the hostages’ release. The second sanctions by the United States were imposed under Ronald Reagan in 1987 because of Iran's actions from 1981-1987 against the U.S. and other shipping vessels in the Persian Gulf and support for terrorism.[1] The sanctions were expanded in 1995 to include firms dealing with the Iranian government.[2] The third sanctions were imposed in December 2006 pursuant to UNSC Resolution 17

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Information and communication technologies for development

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Information and communication technologies for development

An OLPC class in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D) refers to the application of information and communication technologies (ICT) toward social, economic, and political development, with a particular emphasis on helping poor and marginalized people and communities. It aims to help in international development by bridging the digital divide and providing equitable access to technologies. ICT4D is grounded in the notions of "development", "growth", "progress" and "globalization" and is often interpreted as the use of technology to deliver a greater good.[1] Another similar term used in the literature is "digital development".[2] ICT4D draws on theories and frameworks from many disciplines, including sociology, economics, development studies, library, information science, and communication studies.[3] History A telecentre in Gambia The ICT4D paradigm grew out of attempts to use information and communications technology (ICT) for development[4]. Its

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Newcomen atmospheric engine

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Newcomen atmospheric engine

Animation of a schematic Newcomen steam engine.– Steam is shown pink and water is blue.– Valves move from open (green) to closed (red) The atmospheric engine was invented by Thomas Newcomen in 1712, and is often referred to simply as a Newcomen engine. The engine was operated by condensing steam drawn into the cylinder, thereby creating a partial vacuum which allowed the atmospheric pressure to push the piston into the cylinder. It was the first practical device to harness steam to produce mechanical work.[1][2] Newcomen engines were used throughout Britain and Europe, principally to pump water out of mines. Hundreds were constructed through the 18th century. James Watt's later engine design was an improved version of the Newcomen engine that roughly doubled fuel efficiency. Many atmospheric engines were converted to the Watt design, for a price based on a fraction of the savings in fuel. As a result, Watt is today better known than Newcomen in relation to the origin of the steam engine. Precursors Prior

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William Petty

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William Petty

Sir William Petty FRS (26 May 1623 – 16 December 1687) was an English economist, physician, scientist and philosopher. He first became prominent serving Oliver Cromwell and the Commonwealth in Ireland. He developed efficient methods to survey the land that was to be confiscated and given to Cromwell's soldiers. He also remained a significant figure under King Charles II and King James II, as did many others who had served Cromwell. Petty was briefly a Member of the Parliament of England and was also a scientist, inventor, and merchant, and was a charter member of the Royal Society. It is for his theories on economics and his methods of political arithmetic that he is best remembered, however, and to him is attributed the philosophy of "laissez-faire" in relation to government activity. He was knighted in 1661. He was the great-grandfather of Prime Minister William Petty Fitzmaurice, 2nd Earl of Shelburne and 1st Marquess of Lansdowne. Life and influences Petty was born and buried in Romsey, and was a frien

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Tony Blair

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Tony Blair

Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1997 to 2007 and Leader of the Labour Party from 1994 to 2007. After his resignation, he was appointed Special Envoy of the Quartet on the Middle East, an office which he held until 2015. He currently runs the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change. Born in Edinburgh, Blair's father was a barrister and academic. After attending the private Fettes College, he studied law at St John's College, Oxford and became a barrister. He became involved in Labour politics and was elected Member of Parliament for Sedgefield in 1983. He supported moving the party to the centre of British politics in an attempt to help it win power (it had been out of government since 1979). He was appointed to the party's frontbench in 1988 and became Shadow Home Secretary in 1992. He became Leader of the Opposition on his election as Labour Party leader in 1994, following the sudden death of his predecessor, John

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Europe

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Europe

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia and is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, the Mediterranean Sea to the south, and Asia to the east. Europe is commonly considered to be separated from Asia by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[9] However, Europe is generally accorded the status of a full continent because of its great physical size and the weight of history and tradition. Europe covers about 10,180,000 square kilometres (3,930,000 sq mi), or 2% of the Earth's surface (6.8% of land area), making it the sixth largest continent. Politically, Europe is divided into about fifty sovereign states, of which Russia is the largest and most populous, spanning 39% of the continent and comprising 15% of its population. Europe had a total population of about 741

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Tesla Model S

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Tesla Model S

The Tesla Model S is an all-electric five-door liftback sedan, produced by Tesla, Inc., and introduced on June 22, 2012.[10] As of February 16, 2020, the Model S Long Range Plus has an EPA range of 390 miles (630 km), which is higher than any other battery electric car.[11][12] Model S vehicles built after October 2016 have the option of an advanced driver assistance system that allows the car to operate without assistance from the driver, but the driver must supervise continuously and take control if there is an issue. This feature is called Autopilot.[13] Sentry mode is available on Autopilot hardware 2+, built after August 2017.[14] Sentry Mode senses and records suspicious activity around the car. Autopilot 2.0 also includes Enhanced Summon, which allows the car to drive through a parking lot to find you, without anybody in the driver's seat.[15] In 2013, the Model S became the first electric car to top the monthly new-car-sales ranking in any country, twice leading in Norway, in September and December

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2019–20 coronavirus pandemic in mainland China

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2019–20 coronavirus pandemic in mainland China

COVID-19 cases in mainland China       Deaths        Recoveries        Tested        Clinically diagnosed (C.D.)        Tested or C.D. Date # of cases(excluding C.D.) # of cases(including C.D.) 2019-12-31 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 27(n.a.) ⋮ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 27(=) 2020-01-03 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 44(+63%) 2020-01-04 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 44(=) 2020-01-05 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 59(+34%) ⋮ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 2020-01-10 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 41(n.a.) ⋮ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 41(=) 2020-01-16 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 45(+9.7%) 2020-01-17 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 62(+38%) 2020-01-18 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 121(+95%) 2020-01-19 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 198(+64%) 2020-01-20 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 291(+47%) 2020-01-21 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 440(+51%) 2020-01-22 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 571(+30%) 2020-01-23 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 830(+45%) 2020-01-24 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 1,287(+55%) 2020-01-25 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 1,975(+53%) 2020-01-26 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 2,744(+39%) 2020-01-27 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 4,515(+64%) 2020-01-28 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 5,974(+32%) 2020-01-29 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 7,711(+29%) 2020-01-30 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 9,692(+26%) 202

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Socio-economic impact of the 2019–20 coronavirus outbreak

topic

Socio-economic impact of the 2019–20 coronavirus outbreak

The 2019–20 coronavirus outbreak has had further reaching consequences beyond the disease and efforts to quarantine it. There have been widespread reports of supply shortages of pharmaceuticals[1] and manufactured goods due to factory disruption in China,[2] with certain localities (such as Italy[3] and Hong Kong[4]) seeing panic buying and consequent shortages of food and other essential grocery items.[5] The technology industry in particular has been warning about delays to shipments of electronic goods.[6] A number of provincial-level administrators of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) were dismissed over their handling of the quarantine efforts in Central China, a sign of discontent with the political establishment's response to the outbreak in those regions. It is likely in a move to protect Communist Party general secretary Xi Jinping from people's anger over the coronavirus outbreak.[7] Some commentators have suggested that outcry over the disease could be a rare protest against the CCP.[8] Additional

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Computer security

topic

Computer security

While most aspects of computer security involve digital measures such as electronic passwords and encryption, physical security measures such as metal locks are still used to prevent unauthorized tampering. Computer security, cybersecurity[1] or information technology security (IT security) is the protection of computer systems and networks from the theft of or damage to their hardware, software, or electronic data, as well as from the disruption or misdirection of the services they provide. The field is becoming more important due to increased reliance on computer systems, the Internet[2] and wireless network standards such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and due to the growth of "smart" devices, including smartphones, televisions, and the various devices that constitute the "Internet of things". Owing to its complexity, both in terms of politics and technology, cybersecurity is also one of the major challenges in the contemporary world.[3] Vulnerabilities and attacks A vulnerability is a weakness in design, imp

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Dacia Sandero

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Dacia Sandero

The Dacia Sandero is a subcompact car produced jointly by the French manufacturer Renault and its Romanian subsidiary Dacia since 2007, currently at its second generation. It is also marketed as the Renault Sandero in certain markets, such as Russia, Egypt, South Africa, Mexico, and South America.[1] It was introduced in September 2007, and is based on the Logan platform. It is also produced in Iran by Pars Khodro and marketed as Renault Sandero. Sandero I (2007–2012) 2009 Dacia Sandero rear view Facelifted Renault Sandero (Colombia) With a slightly shorter wheelbase than the sedan from which it derives, the Sandero was developed at Renault's Technocentre near Paris, France, in conjunction with the regional engineering centers based in Brazil and Romania.[7][8] It was revealed for the first time at the 2007 Frankfurt Motor Show,[9] and made its formal market debut in Brazil, as a Renault model, in December 2007, being the first Renault model to debut outside Europe.[8] It was launched subsequently in

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List of words having different meanings in American and British English (A–L)

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List of words having different meanings in American and British English (A–L)

This is the List of words having different meanings in British and American English: A–L. For the second portion of the list, see List of words having different meanings in British and American English: M–Z. Asterisked (*) meanings, though found chiefly in the specified region, also have some currency in the other dialect; other definitions may be recognised by the other as Briticisms or Americanisms respectively. Additional usage notes are provided when useful. A Word British English meanings Meanings common to British and American English American English meanings AA The Automobile Association (US: AAA) Alcoholics Anonymous American Airlines A&E the accident and emergency (casualty) department of a hospital (US: emergency room, ER)[1]   Arts & Entertainment (name of a television network)[1] accumulator rechargeable battery [2] (technical)a type of bet [3] (US: parlay) one that accumulates, as a type of computer processor register or a hydraulic accumulator[2]  

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