Topics matching The Interesting life of James Packer


Jon Gruden

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Jon Gruden

Jon David Gruden (born August 17, 1963) is an American football coach who is the head coach of the Las Vegas Raiders of the National Football League (NFL). He first served as the Raiders' head coach from 1998 to 2001 and rejoined the team in 2018. In between his tenure with the Raiders, he was the head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers from 2002 to 2008, where he led the team to the franchise's first Super Bowl title in XXXVII. At the time, Gruden, aged 39 years, 5 months and 9 days, was the youngest head coach to win a Super Bowl. Gruden also served as an analyst for ESPN and Monday Night Football before he returned to coaching. Early life Gruden was born on August 17, 1963, in Sandusky, Ohio, and is of Slovene descent.[1] His father, Jim, later served as a professional football regional scout, quarter backs coach, and director of player personnel for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[2] His brother, Jay, played and coached in the Arena Football League, and was most recently the head coach of the Washington Redski

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Mike Emrick

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Mike Emrick

Michael "Doc" Emrick (born August 1, 1946) is an American network television play-by-play sportscaster and commentator noted mostly for his work in ice hockey. Emrick is currently the lead announcer for NHL national telecasts on both NBC and NBCSN. Among the many awards he has received is the NHL's Lester Patrick Award in 2004, making him the first of only five to have received the award for media work, and the Foster Hewitt Memorial Award by the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2008. He has also won six national Emmy Awards for excellence in sports broadcasting, the only hockey broadcaster to be honored with even one. On December 12, 2011, Emrick became the first member of the media to be inducted into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame.[1] Biography Background Emrick earned a B.Sc. in speech from Manchester University in 1968 and a M.A. in radio/television from Miami University in 1969. He then received a Ph.D. in Communications (radio/television/film) from Bowling Green State University in 1976, hence his nickn

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Tallahassee (The Office)

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Tallahassee (The Office)

"Tallahassee" is the fifteenth episode of the eighth season of the American comedy television series The Office and the show's 167th episode overall. The episode aired on NBC in the United States on February 16, 2012. "Tallahassee" was written by co-executive producer Daniel Chun and directed by series cinematographer Matt Sohn. The episode guest stars David Koechner and Wally Amos. The series—presented as if it were a real documentary—depicts the everyday lives of office employees in the Scranton, Pennsylvania, branch of the fictional Dunder Mifflin Paper Company. In this episode, Dwight returns to Tallahassee to meet with the president of Sabre's special projects, Nellie Bertram (Catherine Tate). Meanwhile, in Scranton, Andy fills in for reception and thoroughly enjoys himself. "Tallahassee" saw the reappearance of Tate as Nellie Bertram. Tate had previously appeared in the seventh season finale, "Search Committee". The episode received mostly positive reviews from critics, with many reviewers noting that

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Herbert Bullmore

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Herbert Bullmore

Herbert Henry Bullmore MB ChB Edin MRCPE FRACP (12 July 1874 – 28 December 1937) was a rugby union player who represented Scotland, a leading physician and the grandfather of Australian media magnate Kerry Packer. Life history Bullmore was born in Ipswich, Queensland in 1874,[1] the only son, along with five daughters,[2] of grazier and unsuccessful political candidate Edward Augustus Bullmore, Esq[3] and Caroline Frederica Bullmore,[4] and was educated at Ipswich Grammar School, Queensland. While in Australia, Bullmore made a name for himself as a sportsman, going as far as being chosen to represent Queensland at rugby union.[5] Bullmore spent three years studying law, before deciding to undertake medical studies at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, graduating in 1902.[5] During this time Bullmore continued to indulge his sporting nature, gaining a blue in football and rowing[6] and starring as a sturdy second-rower for the university rugby union team. From 1901 to 1902 Bullmore was President of Edi

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New Frontier Hotel and Casino

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New Frontier Hotel and Casino

The New Frontier (formerly Last Frontier and The Frontier) was a hotel and casino on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada. It was the second resort that opened on the Las Vegas Strip and operated continuously from October 30, 1942 until it closed on July 16, 2007.[1] The building was demolished on November 13, 2007.[2][3] Wynn Resorts currently owns the land. The resort had the distinction of hosting Elvis Presley's first Vegas appearance in 1956, and the final performance of The Supremes with Diana Ross as lead singer on January 14, 1970. History Name changes (1930–1940s) Late 1940s view The property started as a nightclub called Pair-O-Dice[4] that opened in 1930, then The Ambassador Night Club in 1936 and was renamed the 91 Club in 1939 for its location on US-91.[4] It was subsequently rebuilt and renamed the Hotel Last Frontier in 1942. On April 4, 1955, it was renamed the New Frontier, following a modernization of the resort. Changes in ownerships (1950s–1990s) In the 1950s and the early 1960s,

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Jim Otto

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Jim Otto

James Edwin Otto (born January 5, 1938) is an American former professional football player who was a center for the Oakland Raiders of the American Football League (AFL) and National Football League (NFL). Early years Otto played high school football at Wisconsin's Wausau High School, under coach Win Brockmeyer. He then went on to play collegiate football at the University of Miami, where he joined the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. In addition to playing offensive center at UM, he also played linebacker on defense. Professional career No National Football League team showed interest in the undersized center. Otto was drafted by the proposed Minneapolis franchise of the new American Football League. When the Minneapolis contingent reneged to accept an NFL franchise, Otto's rights defaulted to the AFL's Oakland Raiders. He then signed with the Raiders and played for the entire ten years of the league's existence and five years beyond. He was issued jersey number 50 for the AFL's inaugural season, 1960, but sw

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Brook Farm

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Brook Farm

Brook Farm, also called the Brook Farm Institute of Agriculture and Education[4] or the Brook Farm Association for Industry and Education,[5] was a utopian experiment in communal living in the United States in the 1840s. It was founded by former Unitarian minister George Ripley and his wife Sophia Ripley at the Ellis Farm in West Roxbury, Massachusetts (9 miles outside of downtown Boston) in 1841 and was inspired in part by the ideals of Transcendentalism, a religious and cultural philosophy based in New England. Founded as a joint stock company, it promised its participants a portion of the profits from the farm in exchange for performing an equal share of the work. Brook Farmers believed that by sharing the workload, ample time would be available for leisure activities and intellectual pursuits. Life on Brook Farm was based on balancing labor and leisure while working together for the benefit of the greater community. Each member could choose to do whatever work they found most appealing and all were paid

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Lovie Smith

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Lovie Smith

Lovie Lee Smith (born May 8, 1958) is an American football coach who serves as the head coach of the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign Fighting Illini football team. He was previously the head coach of the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL) from 2004 to 2012, and the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers from 2014 to 2015. Smith has been to the Super Bowl twice, as the defensive coordinator for the St. Louis Rams and as the head coach for the Bears in 2006. Earlier life Lovie Smith was born in Gladewater and raised in Big Sandy, Texas.[1] He was named after his great aunt, Lavana.[2] Playing career High school During Smith's high school career at Big Sandy, he earned all-state honors for three years as a defensive end and linebacker. His team won three consecutive state championships from 1973 to 1975, including a 0–0 tie in 1974 versus G. A. Moore's Celina. In 1975, Big Sandy had one of the most dominant seasons in high school football history, as the defense allowed only 15 points (11 shu

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List of Lost in Space episodes

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List of Lost in Space episodes

This article provides a list of episodes of the television series Lost in Space. Series overview Season Episodes Originally aired First aired Last aired Pilot 1 Unaired 1 29 September 15, 1965 April 27, 1966 2 30 September 14, 1966 April 26, 1967 3 24 September 6, 1967 March 6, 1968 Original pilot Title Directed by Written by Original air date "No Place to Hide" Irwin Allen T : Shimon Wincelberg; S/T : Irwin Allen Unaired In the year 1997, the Robinson family leaves Earth in the Gemini 12 spaceship and sets out on a journey to be the first humans to colonize Alpha Centauri. Disaster strikes when their ship encounters a meteor storm, veers off course and crash-lands on an alien planet. By December 2001, after a delayed revival from suspended animation, the family has settled in over a six-month period and made the planet their home, but a severe winter is coming and they must journey south. Traveling in their all-terrain "chariot," the family encounters

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The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis

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The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis

The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis (also known as simply Dobie Gillis or Max Shulman's Dobie Gillis in later seasons and in syndication) is an American sitcom that aired on CBS from September 29, 1959, to June 5, 1963. The series and several episode scripts were adapted from the "Dobie Gillis" short stories written by Max Shulman since 1945, and first collected in 1951 under the same title as the subsequent TV series. Shulman also wrote a feature film adaptation of his "Dobie Gillis" stories for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1953, entitled The Affairs of Dobie Gillis which featured Bobby Van in the title role. Dobie Gillis is significant as the first American television program produced for a major network to feature teenagers as leading characters. In other series, such as Father Knows Best and Leave It to Beaver, teenagers were portrayed as supporting characters in a family story. An even earlier 1954 series, Meet Corliss Archer, featured teenagers in leading roles and aired in syndication.[1][2] Dobie Gillis broke g

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Greg Packer

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Greg Packer

Gregory F. Packer (born December 18, 1963), is a retired[1] American highway maintenance worker from Huntington, New York, best known for frequently being quoted as a "man on the street" in newspapers, magazines and television broadcasts from 1995 to the present. He has been quoted in more than 100 articles and television broadcasts as a member of the public (that is, a "man on the street" rather than a newsmaker or expert). According to the Nexis database, from 1994 through 2004 Packer was quoted or photographed at least 16 separate times by the Associated Press, 14 times by Newsday, 13 times by the New York Daily News, and 12 times by the New York Post.[2] Although he always gives his real name, he has admitted to making things up to get into the paper.[3][4] Packer's status as a frequent interviewee is mostly due to his hobby of attending public appearances of celebrities and other media events and being first in line on such occasions, leading to him being dubbed a professional line sitter.[5] He has con

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James Bond

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James Bond

The James Bond series focuses on a fictional British Secret Service agent created in 1953 by writer Ian Fleming, who featured him in twelve novels and two short-story collections. Since Fleming's death in 1964, eight other authors have written authorised Bond novels or novelizations: Kingsley Amis, Christopher Wood, John Gardner, Raymond Benson, Sebastian Faulks, Jeffery Deaver, William Boyd and Anthony Horowitz. The latest novel is Forever and a Day by Anthony Horowitz, published in May 2018. Additionally Charlie Higson wrote a series on a young James Bond, and Kate Westbrook wrote three novels based on the diaries of a recurring series character, Moneypenny. The character has also been adapted for television, radio, comic strip, video games and film. The films are the longest continually running film series of all time and have grossed over US$7.040 billion in total, making it the sixth-highest-grossing film series to date, which started in 1962 with Dr. No, starring Sean Connery as Bond. As of 2020, there

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Datone Jones

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Datone Jones

Datone Wayne Jones (born July 24, 1990) is an American football defensive end who is a free agent. Jones played college football at UCLA from 2008 to 2012 as a defensive end and defensive tackle. In 2008, he was named to the Rivals.com All-Pac-10 freshman team. In 2009, he earned sophomore All-America honorable mention honors from College Football News after finishing the season with 4 sacks and 11 tackles. He missed the entire 2010 season after suffering an injury to his right foot during fall camp. In 2012, he was named second-team All-Pac-12. Jones was selected by the Green Bay Packers in the first round of the 2013 NFL Draft. In his first season, he was one of four rookies to appear in all 16 games. At the end of the 2014 season, he became the first defensive player in Packers history to register a blocked field goal and a fumble recovery in a playoff game. He was converted to outside linebacker during the 2015 season, and continued to play the position in the 2016 season. In 2017, Jones left the Packers

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Jay Cutler (American football)

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Jay Cutler (American football)

Jay Christopher Cutler (born April 29, 1983) is a former American football quarterback who played 12 seasons in the National Football League. He played college football at Vanderbilt and was drafted by the Denver Broncos in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft, for whom he played for three seasons. In 2009, he was traded to the Chicago Bears, where he played for eight seasons. Following the 2016 season, Cutler announced his retirement and his intention to become a sportscaster for NFL on Fox's television broadcasts. However, following a season-ending injury to Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill in August 2017, Cutler came out of retirement and signed a one-year deal with the team. Early years Jay Cutler was born in Santa Claus, Indiana, in 1983. Cutler attended Heritage Hills High School in Lincoln City, Indiana.[1] He started three years at quarterback for the Patriots football team, amassing a combined 26–1 record in his junior and senior years, including a perfect 15–0 during his senior year. C

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To Sirloin with Love

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To Sirloin with Love

"To Sirloin with Love" is the twentieth episode of the thirteenth season of the American animated television series King of the Hill. It is the 259th episode of the series overall. It originally aired on Fox on September 13, 2009. "To Sirloin with Love" was written by Jim Dauterive, Tony Gama-Lobo, Rebecca May, and Christy Stratton. "To Sirloin with Love" received a 9/10 rating among adults 18-49 and received positive reviews from critics and fans alike. Although this is the final episode of the series, it was not the final episode to air. Four previous episodes from the thirteenth season originally premiered in syndication nightly from May 3 to May 6, 2010. The title of this episode is possibly a reference to To Sir, with Love a British Sitcom as well as a Motion Picture. Plot Hank finds himself left alone with Bobby when Peggy decides to spend an evening with the other women of the neighborhood. The two have an uneasy dinner at a steakhouse, during which Bobby surprises Hank by accurately pointing out t

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Rupert Murdoch

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Rupert Murdoch

Keith Rupert Murdoch, AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian-born American media mogul who founded News Corp.[3] Murdoch's father, Sir Keith Murdoch, was a reporter and editor who became a senior executive of The Herald and Weekly Times publishing company, covering all Australian states except New South Wales.[4] After his father's death in 1952, Murdoch declined to join his late father's registered media public company and created his own private company, News Limited. In the 1950s and 1960s, Murdoch acquired a number of newspapers in Australia and New Zealand before expanding into the United Kingdom in 1969, taking over the News of the World, followed closely by The Sun. In 1974, Murdoch moved to New York City, to expand into the U.S. market; however, he retained interests in Australia and Britain. In 1981, Murdoch bought The Times, his first British broadsheet and, in 1985, became a naturalized U.S. citizen, giving up his Australian citizenship, to satisfy the legal requirement for U.S. televisio

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Big Spring, Texas

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Big Spring, Texas

Big Spring is a city in and the county seat of Howard County, Texas, United States, at the crossroads of U.S. Highway 87 and Interstate 20. With a population of 27,282 as of the 2010 census,[1] it is the largest city between Midland to the west, Abilene to the east, Lubbock to the north, and San Angelo to the south. Big Spring was established as the county seat of Howard County in 1882; it is the largest community in the county. The city got its name from the single, large spring that issued into a small gorge between the base of Scenic Mountain and a neighboring hill in the southwestern part of the city limits. Although the name is sometimes still mistakenly pluralized, it is officially singular. "To the native or established residents who may wince at the plural in Big Spring, it should be explained that until about 1916, when for some unexplained reason the name dropped the final 's', the official name of the town was indeed Big Springs."[3] History Signal Peak located 10 mi (16 km) to the southeast

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The Office (American season 8)

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The Office (American season 8)

The eighth season of the American television comedy The Office commenced airing on NBC in the United States on September 22, 2011, and concluded on May 10, 2012, consisting of 24 episodes. The series is an American adaptation of the British comedy series of the same name, and is presented in a mockumentary format, portraying the daily lives of office employees in the Scranton, Pennsylvania branch of the fictitious Dunder Mifflin Paper Company. The eighth season of The Office aired on Thursdays at 9:00 p.m. (Eastern) in the United States as part of the "Comedy Night Done Right" television block. It stars Rainn Wilson, John Krasinski, Jenna Fischer, B. J. Novak, Ed Helms, and James Spader, with supporting performances from Catherine Tate, Leslie David Baker, Brian Baumgartner, Creed Bratton, Kate Flannery, Mindy Kaling, Ellie Kemper, Angela Kinsey, Paul Lieberstein, Oscar Nunez, Craig Robinson, Phyllis Smith, and Zach Woods. This was the first season without Steve Carell as Michael Scott in the lead role and th

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Jones Very

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Jones Very

Jones Very (August 28, 1813 – May 8, 1880) was an American poet, essayist, clergyman, and mystic associated with the American Transcendentalism movement. He was known as a scholar of William Shakespeare and many of his poems were Shakespearean sonnets. He was well-known and respected amongst the Transcendentalists, though he had a mental breakdown early in his career. Born in Salem, Massachusetts to two unwed first cousins, Jones Very became associated with Harvard University, first as an undergraduate, then as a student in the Harvard Divinity School and as a tutor of Greek. He heavily studied epic poetry and was invited to lecture on the topic in his home town, which drew the attention of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Soon after, Very asserted that he was the Second Coming of Christ, which resulted in his dismissal from Harvard and his eventual institutionalization in an insane asylum. When he was released, Emerson helped him issue a collection called Essays and Poems in 1839. Very lived the majority of his life as

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John Owen (theologian)

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John Owen (theologian)

John Owen (1616 – 24 August 1683) was an English Nonconformist church leader, theologian, and academic administrator at the University of Oxford. He was briefly a member of parliament for the University, sitting in the First Protectorate Parliament of 1654 to 1655. Early life Of Welsh descent, Owen was born at Stadhampton in Oxfordshire, and was educated at Queen's College, Oxford (B.A. 1632, M.A. 1635); at the time the college was noted, according to Thomas Fuller, for its metaphysicians. A Puritan by upbringing, in 1637 Owen was driven from Oxford by Laud's new statutes, and became chaplain and tutor in the family of Sir Robert Dormer and then in that of Lord Lovelace. At the outbreak of the English Civil War he sided with the parliament, and thus lost both his place and the prospects of succeeding to his Welsh Royalist uncle's fortune. For a while he lived in Charterhouse Yard, troubled by religious questions. His doubts were removed by a sermon preached by a stranger in the church of St Mary Aldermanbu

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The Razor's Edge (1984 film)

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The Razor's Edge (1984 film)

The Razor's Edge is a drama film starring Bill Murray. The film is an adaptation of W. Somerset Maugham's 1944 novel The Razor's Edge. Theresa Russell, Catherine Hicks, Denholm Elliott, Brian Doyle-Murray and James Keach also star in the film. John Byrum directed the film, which was co-written by Murray and Byrum. This marked Murray's first starring role in a dramatic film, though Murray did inject some of his dry wit into the script. The book's epigraph is dramatized as advice from the Katha Upanishad: "The path to salvation is narrow and as difficult to walk as a razor's edge." Plot In Illinois in 1917, just before the United States joins World War I, a fair has been planned to raise money to support Gray Maturin and Larry Darrell, who are joining the war in Europe as ambulance drivers. Larry looks forward to returning home to marry his longtime sweetheart Isabel. Larry shares a final night with Isabel watching the fireworks along with Gray, their close friend Sophie, and her husband Bob. At the front,

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Daddles

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Daddles

Daddles, also known as Daddles the duck, is the name of an animated duck who was first introduced in 1977, used in the television coverage of cricket by Channel 9 in Australia.[1] When a batsman is dismissed without scoring, usually referred to as a "duck", an animation of Daddles,[2] dressed as a batsman, is shown using on-screen graphics, crying, tucking his bat under his wing and walking across the screen accompanying the coverage of the departing batsman on his way back to the pavilion. According to Cricinfo, this adds "to the departing batsman's shame" at being dismissed without troubling the scorers.[3] Origins In 1977, Australian media tycoon Kerry Packer organised a break-away professional cricket tournament called World Series Cricket, despite never having played cricket himself.[4] He ensured that Daddles was one of a number of innovations introduced at the new tournament, along with additional cameras placed around the ground, greater usage of slow-motion replays, day-night matches, coloured cos

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Anne E. Pusey

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Anne E. Pusey

Anne Elizabeth Pusey is director of the Jane Goodall Institute Research Center and [1] a professor of evolutionary anthropology at Duke University.[2] Since the early 1990s, Pusey has been archiving the data collected from the Gombe chimpanzee project. The collection housed at Duke University consists of a computerized database that Pusey oversees. In addition to archiving Jane Goodall’s research from Gombe, she is involved in field study and advising students at Gombe .[2] Education and early life Pusey graduated from Oxford University in 1970 with a degree in zoology and became a field assistant to Jane Goodall at the Gombe research facility in Tanzania in August 1970. Dr. Pusey and another researcher, Craig Packer, left Gombe in 1975 after the kidnapping of some of their fellow researchers. Pusey did not return to Gombe until 1982, after receiving her doctorate in ethology from Stanford University. She did her doctoral research at the Serengeti Wildlife Research Institute.[2] Pusey became a professor at

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Warren Sapp

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Warren Sapp

Warren Carlos Sapp (born December 19, 1972) is a former American football defensive tackle. A Hall of Famer, Sapp played college football for the University of Miami, where he was recognized as a consensus All-American and won multiple awards. Sapp played in the National Football League (NFL) from 1995 to 2007 for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Oakland Raiders, making the Pro Bowl seven times. Following Sapp's NFL career, he was an analyst on NFL Network until 2015. Sapp was drafted by the Buccaneers in the 1995 NFL Draft as the 12th overall pick. In his nine seasons with the Buccaneers, he earned seven trips to the Pro Bowl and a Super Bowl ring in 2002. He moved to the Raiders in 2004. His 96.5 career sacks (100 with playoffs included) are the second-highest career sacks for a defensive tackle and the 28th-highest overall for a defensive lineman. His 77 sacks with the Buccaneers are the second-most in the team's history to Lee Roy Selmon's 78.5. His career was checkered by controversy from his hard-hitting

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Richard Holbrooke

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Richard Holbrooke

Richard Charles Albert Holbrooke (April 24, 1941 – December 13, 2010) was an American diplomat and author. He was the only person to have held the position of Assistant Secretary of State for two different regions of the world (Asia from 1977 to 1981 and Europe from 1994 to 1996). From 1993 to 1994, he was U.S. Ambassador to Germany. Long well known in diplomatic and journalistic circles, Holbrooke achieved great public prominence when he, together with former Swedish prime minister Carl Bildt, brokered a peace agreement among the warring factions in Bosnia that led to the signing of the Dayton Peace Accords, in 1995. Holbrooke was a leading contender to succeed the retiring Warren Christopher as Secretary of State but was passed over in 1996 as President Bill Clinton chose Madeleine Albright instead. From 1999 to 2001, Holbrooke served as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. He was an adviser to the Presidential campaign of Senator John Kerry in 2004. Holbrooke then joined the Presidential campaign of Se

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Nick Offerman

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Nick Offerman

Nicholas Offerman (born June 26, 1970) is an American actor, writer, comedian, producer and woodworker. He is best known for his role as Ron Swanson in the NBC sitcom Parks and Recreation, for which he received the Television Critics Association Award for Individual Achievement in Comedy and was twice nominated for the Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series. Offerman is also known for his role in The Founder, in which he portrays Richard McDonald, one of the brothers who developed the fast food chain McDonald's. His first major television role since the end of Parks and Recreation was as Karl Weathers in the FX series Fargo, for which he received a Critics' Choice Television Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor in a Movie/Miniseries. Early life Offerman was born in Joliet, Illinois and grew up in nearby Minooka.[1] He is the son of Cathy (née Roberts), a nurse, and Ric Offerman, who taught social studies at a junior high school in nearby Channahon.[2][3] Offerman

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Germaine Greer

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Germaine Greer

Germaine Greer (born 29 January 1939) is an Australian writer and public intellectual, regarded as one of the major voices of the second-wave feminist movement in the later half of the 20th century.[1] Specializing in English and women's literature, she has held academic positions in England at the University of Warwick and Newnham College, Cambridge, and in the United States at the University of Tulsa. Based in England since 1964, she has divided her time since the 1990s between Australia and her home in Essex.[2] Greer's ideas have created controversy ever since her first book, The Female Eunuch (1970), made her a household name.[3] An international bestseller and a watershed text in the feminist movement, the book offered a systematic deconstruction of ideas such as womanhood and femininity, arguing that women are forced to assume submissive roles in society to fulfil male fantasies of what being a woman entails.[4][5] Her work since then has focused on literature, feminism and the environment. She has w

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Being Human novels

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Being Human novels

The Being Human novels are a series of three fantasy novels written by Simon Guerrier, Mark Michalowski and James Goss. The novels are based on the British television series Being Human, created by Toby Whithouse.[1] General information There are three novels which deal with the characters of the British Being Human series. The first novel is The Road written by Simon Guerrier. The second novel Chasers is written by Mark Michalowski and the final novel Bad Blood is written by James Goss.[2] All three authors have already written novels for the British television series Doctor Who.[3] Since the story line goes on throughout all three books the books should be read in the right order, starting with the Road, followed by Chasers and finishing with Bad Blood.[4] The Being Human novels follow the story line of the second series of Being Human. They take place between episode 2x02 and episode 2x03.[4] Annie is invisible and has left the pub. Nina has left George and the vampires of Bristol are without a leader,

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List of Lehigh University buildings

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List of Lehigh University buildings

Lehigh University has many buildings, old and new, on its three campuses. When the university was founded in 1865, it took over several buildings from the surrounding property. One which remains today is Christmas Hall, now part of Christmas-Saucon Hall.[1] Building Codes Code Name CO Coppee Hall CU Chandler Ullmann Bldg CX Coxe Hall DR Drown Hall FM Fairchild-Martindale Lib FR Fritz Lab GR Grace Hall IA Iacocca Hall IL IMBT Lab LA Lamberton Hall LI Linderman Library LL Lewis Lab MG Maginnes Hall MO Mohler Building MU Mudd Building NV Neville Hall PA Packard Lab PH Philosophy Building PR Price Hall RB Rauch Business Center SI Sinclair Lab ST STEPS* TA Taylor Gym UC University Center WB Wilbur Workshop WH Whitaker Lab WI Williams Hall XS Christmas Saucon Hall ZA Zoellner Arts Center Asa Packer Campus The original campus contains most of Lehigh's academic and residential buildings and sits on the north slope of Sout

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Tom Horn

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Tom Horn

Thomas Horn Jr. (November 21, 1860 – November 20, 1903) was an American scout, cowboy, soldier, range detective, and Pinkerton agent in the 19th-century and early 20th-century American Old West. Believed to have committed 17 killings as a hired gunman throughout the West,[2] Horn was convicted in 1902 of the murder of 14-year-old Willie Nickell near Iron Mountain, Wyoming. Willie was the son of sheep rancher Kels Nickell, who had been involved in a range feud with neighbor and cattle rancher Jim Miller. On the day before his 43rd birthday, Horn was executed by hanging in Cheyenne, Wyoming. While in jail he wrote his autobiography, Life of Tom Horn: Government Scout and Interpreter,[3] which was published posthumously in 1904. Numerous editions have been published in the late 20th century. Horn has since become a larger-than-life figure of western folklore, and debate continues as to whether he was actually guilty of Nickell's murder. Early life Thomas Horn, Jr., known as "Tom", was born in 1860 to Thomas S

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James Goldsmith

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James Goldsmith

Sir James Michael Goldsmith (26 February 1933 – 18 July 1997) was a French-British [1] financier, tycoon[2] and politician who was a member of the prominent Goldsmith family. In 1994 he was elected to represent a French constituency as a Member of the European Parliament. He founded the short-lived Eurosceptic Referendum Party in the United Kingdom, and was one of the key power-brokers in British political circles that initiated party political opposition to the country's membership of the European Union. Goldsmith was allegedly the inspiration for the fictional character of the corporate raider "Sir Larry Wildman" in the 1987 American film Wall Street.[3] Margaret Thatcher said of him: "Jimmy Goldsmith was one of the most powerful and dynamic personalities that this generation has seen. He was enormously generous, and fiercely loyal to the causes he espoused".[4] Early life His father Frank Goldsmith changed the family name from the German Goldschmidt to the English Goldsmith. The Goldschmidts, neighbou

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Don Shula

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Don Shula

Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930) is a former American football coach. The winningest coach in National Football League (NFL) history, Shula is best known for his time being the longtime head coach of the Miami Dolphins, leading them to two Super Bowl victories, as well as the only perfect season in NFL history. He was previously the head coach of the Baltimore Colts, with whom he won the 1968 NFL Championship. Shula was drafted out of John Carroll University in the 1951 NFL Draft, and he played professionally as a defensive back for the Cleveland Browns, Baltimore Colts, and Washington Redskins. Shula was named 1993 Sportsman of the Year by Sports Illustrated. He had only two losing seasons in his 33-year career as a head coach in the NFL. He led his teams to six Super Bowls. In Super Bowl III, his first, the Colts set the record for the longest period to be shut out, not scoring until 3:19 remained in the game, which was later broken in Super Bowl VII. At his next Super Bowl, the Dolphins set the

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Cameron Mitchell (actor)

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Cameron Mitchell (actor)

Cameron Mitchell (born Cameron McDowell Mitzell; November 4, 1918 – July 6, 1994) was an American film, television, and stage actor. He began his career on Broadway before transitioning into feature films in the 1950s, appearing in several major motion pictures. He later became known for his roles in numerous exploitation films in the 1970s and 1980s. A native of Pennsylvania, Mitchell began acting on Broadway in the late 1930s before signing a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, after which he appeared in several films with Lana Turner and Clark Gable, such as Cass Timberlane (1945) and Homecoming (1948). He subsequently originated the role of Happy Loman in the Broadway production of Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman (1949), a role he reprised in the 1951 film adaptation. He subsequently signed a contract with 20th Century Fox, which cast in him in lead roles in Les Misérables (1952) and How to Marry a Millionaire (1953), opposite Lauren Bacall and Marilyn Monroe. He then co-starred opposite Doris Day and

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Communication studies

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Communication studies

Communication studies or communication sciences is an academic discipline that deals with processes of human communication and behavior, patterns of communication in interpersonal relationships, social interactions and communication in different cultures.[1] Communication is commonly defined as giving, receiving or exchanging ideas, information, signals or messages through appropriate media, enabling individuals or groups to persuade, to seek information, to give information or to express emotions effectively.[2][3] Communication studies is a social science that uses various methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis to develop a body of knowledge that encompasses a range of topics, from face-to-face conversation at a level of individual agency and interaction to social and cultural communication systems at a macro level.[4][5] Scholarly communication theorists focus primarily on refining the theoretical understanding of communication, examining statistics in order to help substantiate claims.

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Newcastle Waters Station

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Newcastle Waters Station

Newcastle Waters Station Location in Northern Territory Newcastle Waters ca. 1900 Newcastle Waters Camping Ground ca.1900 Newcastle Waters Station homestead 1930 Stockman with Newcastle Waters steers at No.7 dip Newcastle Waters Station is a pastoral lease between Alice Springs and Darwin, supporting about 45,000 cattle in a notably well-watered area of 10,353 square kilometres. Kerry Packer was once a partner in the station, and sent his son James to work there for a year. Description It is located about 777 kilometres (483 mi) north of Alice Springs and 705 kilometres (438 mi) south of Darwin in the Northern Territory. The nearest settlement is Elliot which is approximately 24 kilometres (15 mi) south east of the station. Occupying an area of 10,353 square kilometres (3,997 sq mi) of open plains, floodplain and wooded sandhills the property carries about 45,000 head of cattle including about 20,000 brahman breeders, and annually turn off about 13,000 for export to Indonesia.[1] History Jo

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University Park, Pennsylvania

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University Park, Pennsylvania

University Park is the name given to the Pennsylvania State University's largest campus, and University Park, Pennsylvania is the postal address used by Penn State. The University Park campus is located in State College and adjacent College Township, Pennsylvania. The campus post office was designated "University Park, Pennsylvania" in 1953 by Penn State president Milton Eisenhower, after what was then Pennsylvania State College was upgraded to university status. History Old Main c. 1855 The school that later became Penn State University was founded as a degree-granting institution on February 22, 1855, by act P.L. 46, No. 50 of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as the Farmers' High School of Pennsylvania. Centre County, Pennsylvania, became the home of the new school when James Irvin of Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, donated 200 acres (80.9 ha) of land – the first of 10,101 acres (4,088 ha) the school would eventually acquire. In 1862, the school's name was changed to the Agricultural

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Elon University

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Elon University

Elon University is a private university in Elon, North Carolina. Founded in 1889 as Elon College, Elon is organized into six schools, most of which offer bachelor's degrees and several of which offer master's degrees or professional doctorate degrees. Located in North Carolina's Piedmont region, Elon is situated on a 656-acre suburban campus between the cities of Greensboro and Raleigh. Fewer than twenty percent of Elon's undergraduates are native to the state of North Carolina. Elon's intercollegiate athletic teams compete in NCAA Division I athletics as a member of the Colonial Athletic Association. History Presidents of Elon President From To William S. Long 1889 1894 William Wesley Staley 1894 1905 Emmett Leonidas Moffitt 1905 1911 William Allen Harper 1911 1931 Leon Edgar Smith 1931 1957 James Earl Danieley 1957 1973 James Fred Young 1973 1998 Leo Michael Lambert 1999 2018 Connie Ledoux Book 2018 Elon College was founded by the Christian Connec

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Andrew Forrest

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Andrew Forrest

John Andrew Henry Forrest AO (born 1961), nicknamed Twiggy, is an Australian businessman. He is best known as the former CEO (and current non-executive chairman) of Fortescue Metals Group (FMG), but also has interests elsewhere in the mining industry and in cattle stations. With an assessed net worth of A$6.84 billion according to the 2017 Financial Review Rich List, Forrest was ranked within the top ten richest Australians.[2] He was the richest person in Australia in 2008.[4][5] In 2013, Forrest and his wife, Nicola, were the first Australians to pledge the majority of their wealth to charity in their lifetimes.[6] He had earlier stepped down as CEO of Fortescue Metals in 2011 in order to spend more time on philanthropic pursuits.[7] Much of his philanthropy has been through either the Minderoo Foundation (focusing on education and Indigenous Australians) or the Walk Free Foundation (focusing on ending modern slavery), both of which he established. In 2014, Forrest and his wife, Nicola, pledged $65 million

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Amazon Publishing

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Amazon Publishing

Amazon Publishing (simply APub) is Amazon's book publishing unit launched in 2009. It is composed of 15 imprints including AmazonEncore, AmazonCrossing, Montlake Romance, Thomas & Mercer, 47North, and TOPPLE Books.[1] Amazon publishes e-books via its Kindle Direct Publishing subsidiary. History In May 2009, Amazon launched AmazonEncore, the inaugural flagship general imprint.[2][3] It publishes titles that have gone out-of-print or self-published books with sales potential. The first book published under this imprint was Cayla Kluver's Legacy in August 2009.[2] Other early books published by AmazonEncore include Mercury Falls by Robert Kroese, Shaken by J.A. Konrath, The Grove by John Rector and A Scattered Life by Karen McQuestion.[4] AmazonCrossing was announced in May 2010,[5][6] for translated works into English. The first translated books were the French-language novel The King of Kahel and the German-language novel The Hangman's Daughter which were released in November and December 2010, respec

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Australians in American football

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Australians in American football

Former Australian rules footballer Saverio Rocca on the field prior to a game against the San Francisco 49ers on 12 October 2008 Australians in American football include not just a number of successful football code converts, but also a number of players with high profiles either before or as a result of their switching codes. In Australia, there is an almost equal fascination, among the media and general public, of players linked to the National Football League (NFL) as there is for the Irish experiment. Although Australians have participated at the highest level of American football, since the success of Darren Bennett as a punter and more recently Ben Graham, several athletes from Australian rules football, rugby league and rugby union have been linked to potential NFL careers. The punting specialist position requires similar skills to those used in Australian Rules football. Salaries are up to five times higher and the position lends itself to longevity: Australian football players generally retire at

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San Francisco 49ers

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San Francisco 49ers

The San Francisco 49ers are a professional American football team based in the San Francisco Bay Area. They compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) West division. The team plays its home games at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California, located 38 miles (61 km) southeast of San Francisco in the heart of Silicon Valley. Since 1988, the 49ers have been headquartered in Santa Clara. The team was founded in 1946 as a charter member of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) and joined the NFL in 1949 when the leagues merged. The 49ers were the first major league professional sports franchise based in San Francisco and is the 10th oldest franchise in the NFL. The name "49ers" comes from the prospectors who arrived in Northern California in the 1849 Gold Rush.[24] The team is legally and corporately registered as San Francisco Forty Niners.[25] The team began play at Kezar Stadium in San Francisco before moving across town to Candlestick Par

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Jay Cutler

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Jay Cutler

Jay Christopher Cutler (born April 29, 1983) is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League for 12 seasons, primarily with the Chicago Bears. He played college football at Vanderbilt and was drafted by the Denver Broncos in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft, for whom he played for three seasons. In 2009, he was traded to the Bears, where he played for eight seasons. After being released by Chicago in 2017, Cutler initially retired to become a sportscaster for NFL on Fox's television broadcasts, but returned for one more season with the Miami Dolphins when quarterback Ryan Tannehill suffered a season-ending injury. He retired a second time following the 2017 season. Early years Jay Cutler was born in Santa Claus, Indiana, in 1983. Cutler attended Heritage Hills High School in Lincoln City, Indiana.[1] He started three years at quarterback for the Patriots football team, amassing a combined 26–1 record in his junior and senior years, including a perfect 15–0 during

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List of LGBT slang terms

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List of LGBT slang terms

This is a list of slang terms used for LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) people. List For lesbians A member of the Dykes on Bikes motorcycle club Bean flicker – "Likening the clitoris to a bean"[1] Butch, butch-broad[2] Carpet muncher (or rug muncher)[3] Celesbian[4] Dyke (variations: bull dyke, bull dagger (alternatively bulldagger, bulldicker,[5] from 1920s black American slang))[6][7][8] Diesel dyke[9][10] Drag dyke[11] Gillette Blade, a 1950s era term for bisexual women, whose sexuality cut both ways[12] Kiki, a term used primarily from the 1940s until the 1960s to indicate a lesbian who was not butch or femme and did not have a preference for either butch or femme partners[13] Kitty puncher or pussy puncher with both kitty and pussy referring to a woman's vagina and puncher a variation on various derogatory terms for gay men like donut puncher et al.[14] Lezzie/Lesbo/Leso/Les/Leb (also lezzer/lesser) (abbreviation for lesbian)[15] Muff Diver[16] The Game of Fl

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List of black quarterbacks

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List of black quarterbacks

Fritz Pollard became the NFL's first black quarterback in 1923. This list of black quarterbacks includes black and African-American gridiron football players who have played the quarterback position in a professional regular-season or post-season game. The quarterback is the leader of a team's offense, directing other players on the field.[1][2] "Quarterbacks run the show."[1] Historically, black players have been excluded from playing quarterback because of a perceived lack of intelligence, dependability, composure, character, charisma, or the belief that white players would not follow their leadership.[3][4] Promising black quarterbacks at the high school and college levels were often transitioned at the professional level to other positions, such as running back or wide receiver.[5][6] In the United States, the quarterback position was among the last to be desegregated.[2] Black quarterbacks and other quarterbacks of color "come in all shapes, sizes and styles of play."[3] However, racial stereotyping pe

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Mayberry

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Mayberry

Mayberry, North Carolina is a fictional community that was the setting for two popular American television sitcoms, The Andy Griffith Show and Mayberry R.F.D. Mayberry was also the setting for a 1986 reunion television movie titled Return to Mayberry. Mayberry is said to be based on Andy Griffith's hometown of Mount Airy, North Carolina. Mount Airy is also known as Mayberry and called by both names by its residents. The name "Mayberry" According to show episodes, the community of Mayberry was named for fictional founder Lord Mayberry. Purportedly, Andy Griffith himself chose the name of the fictional community. Griffith, however, told Larry King in 2003 that Artie Stander is the person who thought of the name Mayberry; Stander was one of the show's creators and writers.[1] "Mayberry" is mentioned many times in television shows such as Cheers, House, M.D., Criminal Minds, Supernatural, How I Met Your Mother, and Scrubs. According to the episode "The Battle of Mayberry", the town was almost named Taylortown

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History of the Detroit Lions

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History of the Detroit Lions

The history of the Detroit Lions, a professional American football franchise based in Detroit, Michigan, dates back to 1928 when they played in Portsmouth, Ohio as the Portsmouth Spartans. In 2020, they will begin their 92nd season, continuing to be one of the National Football League's oldest franchises. Portsmouth Spartans (1928–1933) Move to Detroit and early success (1934–1938) In 1934, George A. Richards, a radio executive who owned WJR, a radio affiliate of the NBC Blue Network (the forerunner to today's ABC), purchased the Portsmouth Spartans for $8,000 and moved the team to Detroit, renaming them the Detroit Lions.[1] In their inaugural season in Detroit several months later, the Lions started off with a 10-game win streak that included seven shutouts. However, they lost the last three games of the season to the Green Bay Packers and Chicago Bears and finished in second place behind the Bears in the Western Division, once again coming up short to their rivals.[2][3] That same year, Richards negotia

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David Zucker (director)

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David Zucker (director)

David S. Zucker (born October 16, 1947) is an American film director, producer, and screenwriter. Associated mostly with parody comedies, Zucker is recognized as the director and writer of the critically successful 1980 film Airplane! as well as being the creator of The Naked Gun franchise and for directing Scary Movie 3 and Scary Movie 4. Personal life Zucker was born to a Jewish family[1] in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the son of Charlotte A. (Lefstein) and Burton C. Zucker, who was a real estate developer.[2][3] He graduated from Shorewood High School.[4] In 1997, Zucker married Dr. Danielle (Ardolino) Zucker, with whom he has two children, Charles and Sarah.[5] He and Danielle were divorced in 2019, though they had been separated for ten years before that.[6] His younger brother, Jerry, is his filmmaking partner. The Zucker brothers have a sister, Susan Breslau. When asked in a September 2014 interview by the BBC if he believes in God, Zucker replied: Oh yeah, I believe in God. I think there's much more ev

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Union Stock Yards

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Union Stock Yards

Union Stock Yards, Chicago, 1947 The Union Stock Yard & Transit Co., or The Yards, was the meatpacking district in Chicago for more than a century, starting in 1865. The district was operated by a group of railroad companies that acquired marshland and turned it into a centralized processing area. By the 1890s, the railroad money behind the Union Stockyards was Vanderbilt money.[1] The Union Stockyards operated in the New City community area for 106 years,[2] helping Chicago become known as "hog butcher for the world" and the center of the American meatpacking industry for decades.[3] The stockyards became the focal point of the rise of some of the earliest international companies. These companies refined novel industrial innovations and influenced financial markets. Both the rise and fall of the district owe their fortunes to the evolution of transportation services and technology in America. The stockyards have become an integral part of the popular culture of Chicago's history. From the Civil War u

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Livingston Taylor

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Livingston Taylor

Livingston Taylor (born November 21, 1950) is an American singer-songwriter and folk musician. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, and raised in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, he is the brother of singer-songwriter James Taylor, singer-songwriter Kate Taylor, singer Alex Taylor (d. 1993), and innkeeper and singer Hugh Taylor.[1] Taylor is most notable for his Billboard hits “I Will Be In Love With You”, “First Time Love”, and “I’ll Come Running”.[2] He continues to perform nationally and internationally, and has collaborated with Linda Ronstadt, Jimmy Buffett, and Jethro Tull. He has been a faculty member at Berklee College of Music since 1989.[1] Early life Taylor was born to parents Isaac M. "Ike" Taylor and Gertrude "Trudy" Taylor in Boston, Massachusetts. He grew up in North Carolina when his father, a physician, accepted a position at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.[3] His mother had been a student at the Music Conservatory in Boston.[4] He was the fourth of five children, his siblings being

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Roots (2016 miniseries)

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Roots (2016 miniseries)

Roots is a 2016 American miniseries and a remake of the 1977 miniseries with the same name, based on Alex Haley's 1976 novel, Roots: The Saga of an American Family. It first aired on May 30, 2016 and stars Malachi Kirby, Forest Whitaker, Anna Paquin, Laurence Fishburne, Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Anika Noni Rose, T.I. and South African actress Nokuthula Ledwaba. It was produced on a budget of $50 million.[1] Plot Part 1 In the 1760s, Kunta Kinte (Malachi Kirby) is a Mandinka warrior from Jufureh in The Gambia, in West Africa. Kunta's family is loyal to the Mandinka king and are resistant to the Europeans. This, however, means the Kinte family faces the danger of reprisal from the rival Koro family, who trade African slaves for English guns. One day, Kunta is taken off into the jungle with other young boys for man-hood training. During a test in which Kunta must run through the jungle in a certain amount of time, he sees a man's dead body in a canoe. Kunta then sees the Koros in a separate boat, hunting for vuln

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