The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer

The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer is a 1970 British satirical film starring Peter Cook, and co-written by Cook, John Cleese, Graham Chapman, and Kevin Billington, who directed the film. The film was devised and produced by David Frost under the pseudonym "David Paradine".

The film satirised the growing influence of PR, spin and opinion polls in British politics,[1] as well as parodying political figures of the time such as Harold Wilson and Enoch Powell. Cook admitted later that he had partly based his portrayal of the Rimmer character on David Frost, who provided funding for the film[2] and took an executive producer credit.

Plot

The mysterious Michael Rimmer (Cook) appears at a small and ailing British advertising agency, where the employees assume he is working on a time and motion study. However, he quickly begins to assert a de facto authority over the firm’s mostly ineffectual staff and soon acquires control of the business from the incompetent boss Ferret (Arthur Lowe). Rimmer then succeeds in establishing the newly invigorated firm as the country’s leading polling agency, and begins to make regular TV appearances as a polling expert. He subsequently moves into politics, acting as an adviser to the leader of the Tory opposition, and then becomes an MP himself, for the constituency of Budleigh Moor (a reference to Cook's frequent collaborator, Dudley Moore), along the way acquiring a trophy wife (Vanessa Howard).

Relying on a combination of charisma and deception—and murder—he then rapidly works his way up the political ladder to become prime minister (after throwing his predecessor off an oil rig). Rimmer then gains ultimate control by requiring the populace to engage in endless postal voting on trivial matters. At last, exhausted, they acquiesce in one final vote which passes dictatorial power to him. Ferret attempts to assassinate Rimmer as he and his wife ride through the capital in an open-topped convertible, but fails and falls to his death.

Cast
Production

The concept of the film was devised by David Frost in 1967, and the first draft of the screenplay was then co-written by Cleese and Chapman, during a three-month sabbatical in Ibiza. Cook was lined up to star, but it took another two years before funding could be secured. It was the third of three films Cook was contracted to make for Columbia, the previous two being The Wrong Box and A Dandy in Aspic.[3]

Cook, Cleese, Chapman and director Kevin Billington jointly reworked the script prior to filming, and Cook reportedly made a strong contribution to the final script. It was produced during 1969, and the team hoped it would maximise its topicality with a release prior to the forthcoming UK general elections (the result of which it in fact predicted). However the studio feared that it might become a source of controversy, so the film was held back until November 1970, almost a year after the election, thus losing most of its topical 'punch'.[4]

Cook's performance was panned by critics, and both he and John Cleese subsequently acknowledged that he did not perform well. The commercial and critical failure of the movie, which did not receive an American release, effectively dashed Cook's hopes of establishing himself as a solo screen star - although he appeared in many more film and TV projects, he only co-starred (with Dudley Moore) in one other film, and Rimmer proved to be his only solo starring film role.[5][6]

The film is also notable for its distinguished cast of well-known British comedy and character actors, including Cleese and Chapman, Denholm Elliott, Arthur Lowe, Dennis Price, Ronald Fraser, Michael Trubshawe, Julian Glover, Michael Bates, and cameos by Ronnie Corbett and renowned stage and screenwriter Harold Pinter. The film also reunited Corbett, Cleese, Chapman and Frost, all of whom had worked extensively together during the 1960s on That Was The Week That Was and The Frost Report (although only Cleese appears with Corbett on screen).

The story satirises many well-known British political figures including Harold Wilson, Harold Macmillan, and Enoch Powell, and although the resemblances were played down at the time of the film's release, Cook later admitted that the title character of Rimmer was heavily based on David Frost himself. Like Frost, Rimmer effectively appears from nowhere, "rises without trace" (the famous phrase coined by Jonathan Miller to describe Frost's ascent to prominence) and becomes one of the most influential people in the country. The imitation even extended to Cook copying Frost's standard greeting of the time, "Super to see you", and the coincidental fact that the set of Rimmer's living room was almost identical to Frost's real living room, even though the designer had never seen it.[7]

Alongside the more overt satire and parodies of prominent public figures, the movie also includes numerous hidden jokes and visual gags. For example, in the scene in which Arthur Lowe gropes his secretary's legs as she stands in front of a shelf, the spine of one of the folders on the shelf is clearly marked with a swastika. In Harold Pinter's cameo appearance as fictional TV host Steven Hench, the initials of the his show's title, "Steven Hench is Talking To You" spell S-H-I-T-T-Y.

References
  1. Cook, William (30 June 2007). "Unfunny, peculiar". The Guardian. Retrieved 2009-10-14.
  2. Thompson, Harry (1997). Peter Cook: A Biography. Sceptre. pp. 259–262. ISBN 0-340-64969-0.
  3. William Cook, One Leg Too Few: The Adventures of Peter Cook and Dudley Moore (Random House, 2014), pp. 298-302
  4. William Cook, One Leg Too Few: The Adventures of Peter Cook and Dudley Moore (Random House, 2014), pp. 298-302
  5. William Cook, "Unfunny, peculiar", The Guardian, 30 June 2007
  6. William Cook, One Leg Too Few: The Adventures of Peter Cook and Dudley Moore (Random House, 2014), pp. 298-302
  7. William Cook, One Leg Too Few: The Adventures of Peter Cook and Dudley Moore (Random House, 2014), pp. 298-302
External links
Continue Reading...
Content from Wikipedia Licensed under CC-BY-SA.

The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer

topic

The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer

The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer is a 1970 British satirical film starring Peter Cook, and co-written by Cook, John Cleese, Graham Chapman, and Kevin Billington, who directed the film. The film was devised and produced by David Frost under the pseudonym "David Paradine". The film satirised the growing influence of PR, spin and opinion polls in British politics,[1] as well as parodying political figures of the time such as Harold Wilson and Enoch Powell. Cook admitted later that he had partly based his portrayal of the Rimmer character on David Frost, who provided funding for the film[2] and took an executive producer credit. Plot The mysterious Michael Rimmer (Cook) appears at a small and ailing British advertising agency, where the employees assume he is working on a time and motion study. However, he quickly begins to assert a de facto authority over the firm’s mostly ineffectual staff and soon acquires control of the business from the incompetent boss Ferret (Arthur Lowe). Rimmer then succeeds in est ...more...

Member feedback about The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer:

British satirical films

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Rimmer

topic

Rimmer

Rimmer is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: Eve Rimmer (1937–1996), New Zealand athlete Jimmy Rimmer, English footballer Jodie Rimmer (born 1974), New Zealand voice and performer actress John Rimmer (1878–1962), British athlete Lasse Rimmer (born 1972), Danish entertainer Marie Rimmer, British Labour Party politician, Member of Parliament (MP) for St Helens South and Whiston May 2015 Michael Rimmer (born 1986), English middle distance runner Richard Rimmer, director, California Department of Corrections, 2004 Robert Rimmer, author of The Harrad Experiment Simon Rimmer (born 1962), English Celebrity chef and television presenter Shane Rimmer (born 1932), Canadian actor William Rimmer, English-born American artist William Rimmer (music), English composer of brass band music Fictional characters: Arnold Rimmer, a fictional character in the BBC sitcom Red Dwarf Michael Rimmer, fictional anti-hero of the film The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer See also Gla ...more...



Rise of the Guardians

topic

Rise of the Guardians

Rise of the Guardians is a 2012 American 3D computer-animated fantasy film based on William Joyce's The Guardians of Childhood book series and The Man in the Moon short film by Joyce and Reel FX Creative Studios. Peter Ramsey directed the film, while Joyce and Guillermo del Toro were executive producers with voice acting by Chris Pine, Alec Baldwin, Hugh Jackman, Isla Fisher, and Jude Law. Produced by DreamWorks Animation and distributed by Paramount Pictures,1 it was released on November 21, 2012. Set about 300 years after the book series, the film tells a story about Guardians Santa Claus, the Tooth Fairy, the Easter Bunny, and the Sandman, who enlist Jack Frost to stop Pitch Black from engulfing the world in darkness. The film was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Animated Feature Film.[5] This was the last DreamWorks Animation film to be distributed by Paramount Pictures.[6] Plot Jack Frost awakens from a frozen pond with amnesia. Upon realizing no one can see or hear him, he disappears. Th ...more...

Member feedback about Rise of the Guardians:

2010s fantasy films

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Rise of the Zombies

topic

Rise of the Zombies

Rise of the Zombies, also known as Dead Walking, is a 2012 American zombie horror film from The Asylum and directed by Nick Lyon.[1] Written by Keith Allan and Delondra Williams, the film was initially titled Dead Walking, but was eventually changed to Rise of the Zombies.[2] The film stars Mariel Hemingway, Chad Lindberg, LeVar Burton, and Heather Hemmens, and first aired on Syfy on October 27, 2012.[3][4][5] Plot A water-borne virus has led to a widespread outbreak of zombies in San Francisco. A group of survivors, including Dr. Lynn Snyder (Mariel Hemingway) and others, create a refuge on Alcatraz Island. Snyder receives communications from Dr. Arnold (French Stewart), a scientist conducting experiments to create a cure for the virus. Meanwhile, Dr. Dan Halpern (LeVar Burton), another of the refugees, is studying parts culled from the bodies of the zombies, but he is unable to make much headway because he only has access to 'dead' zombies. His research is further hindered when Caspian (Danny Trejo) and ot ...more...

Member feedback about Rise of the Zombies:

Zombie films

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Valerie Leon

topic

Valerie Leon

Valerie Leon (born 12 November 1943) is an English actress who had roles in a number of high-profile British film productions, including the Carry On series. Early life Her father was a director of a textile company, and her mother, who trained at RADA, ended her acting career to become a full-time mother. Valerie is the eldest of four privately educated children. After leaving school, she became a trainee fashion buyer at Harrods, before playing truant one day to go to an audition which led to her becoming a chorus girl, and then appearing with Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl at the Prince of Wales Theatre in London's West End. Film appearances Leon appeared in several of the Carry On films and has been a Bond girl twice: in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Never Say Never Again (1983). Other supporting appearances include Revenge of the Pink Panther, The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer (as the secretary Tanya), a hotel receptionist in The Italian Job, and a callgirl in No Sex Please, We're British, along ...more...

Member feedback about Valerie Leon:

20th-century English actresses

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Michael Barrington

topic

Michael Barrington

Michael Barrington (3 July 1924 – 5 June 1988) was a British actor best known for his television work. His best remembered role is as the ineffectual Governor Venables in the popular sitcom Porridge which featured Ronnie Barker in the lead role. Early life and career Born in Shropshire, both his parents died when he was 16. His plans to train as a veterinarian were interrupted by Second World War service in a munitions factory and the Royal Engineers. After the war he decided to become an actor and trained at the Birmingham School of Drama. He then appeared in repertory theatres and at the Vaudeville Theatre in Salad Days.[1] Television appearances In addition to Porridge Barrington also appeared in; Z-Cars, The Avengers, Private Schulz, Adam Adamant Lives!, and in the Doctor Who story The Seeds of Doom, as Sir Colin Thackeray. He was cast as Sir Robert Peel in the 1975 English miniseries King Edward VII. (In the USA this miniseries was renamed Edward the King.) [2] Personal life and death He was marrie ...more...

Member feedback about Michael Barrington:

Male actors from London

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Graham Chapman

topic

Graham Chapman

Graham Arthur Chapman (8 January 1941 – 4 October 1989) was an English comedian, writer, actor, author, and one of the six members of the British surreal comedy group Monty Python. He played authority figures such as the Colonel and the lead role in two Python films, Holy Grail (1975) and Life of Brian (1979). Chapman was born in Leicester and was raised in Melton Mowbray. He enjoyed science, acting, and comedy, and after graduating from Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and St Bartholomew's Medical College, he turned down a career as a doctor to be a comedian. Chapman eventually established a writing partnership with John Cleese, which reached its critical peak with Monty Python in the 1970s. He subsequently left Britain for Los Angeles, where he attempted to be a success on American television, speaking on the college circuit and producing the pirate film Yellowbeard (1983), before returning to Britain in the early 1980s. In his personal life, Chapman was openly homosexual and a strong supporter of gay rights, ...more...

Member feedback about Graham Chapman:

LGBT rights activists from England

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Michael Trubshawe

topic

Michael Trubshawe

Michael Trubshawe (7 December 1905 – 21 March 1985)[1] was a British actor and former officer in the Highland Light Infantry Regiment of the British Army. Trubshawe was very close friends with fellow British actor David Niven, serving with him at Malta and Dover. He was best man for both of Niven's weddings, and is constantly referred to in Niven's memoirs The Moon's a Balloon, where Niven refers to finding out he would be working with him in The Guns of Navarone as 'A lovely bonus for me.' Partial filmography They Were Not Divided (1950) - Major Bushey Noble Dance Hall (1950) - Colonel The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) - British Ambassador Encore (1951) - Ascot Man (segment "The Ant and the Grasshopper") The Magic Box (1951) - Sitter in Bath Studio The Card (1952) - Yeomanry Officer (uncredited) Brandy for the Parson (1952) - Redworth Something Money Can't Buy (1952) - Willy Meet Me Tonight (1952) - Professor 'Chaps' Chapsworth: Ways and Means The Titfield Thunderbolt (1953) - Ruddock The ...more...

Member feedback about Michael Trubshawe:

British Army personnel of World War II

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Kevin Billington

topic

Kevin Billington

Kevin Billington (born 12 June 1934) is an English film director, who has worked in the theatre, film and television since the 1960s. The son of a factory worker,[1] and educated at Bryanston School and Queens' College, Cambridge,[2] early in his career he worked for the BBC as a radio producer in Leeds (1959–60) and then for television in Manchester (1960–61) before working on the early evening Tonight and on documentaries for the BBC and ATV until 1967.[3] Billington's films include The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer (1970), which stars Peter Cook, while his theatre work includes several productions of plays by Harold Pinter, his brother-in-law. Billington's television work includes Henry VIII (1979) for the BBC Television Shakespeare project, one of the best received productions in the series.[4] The Good Soldier (Granada 1981), based on the novel by Ford Madox Ford and A Time to Dance (BBC 1992), adapted by Melvyn Bragg from his own work of fiction.[5] He is married to Lady Rachel Billington, having m ...more...

Member feedback about Kevin Billington:

English film directors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Michael Bates (actor)

topic

Michael Bates (actor)

Michael Hammond Bates[1] (4 December 1920 – 11 January 1978)[2] was an Anglo-Indian actor. He was best known for playing the chief prison guard who processes (and strip-searches) Alex (Malcolm McDowell) in A Clockwork Orange, Cyril Blamire in Last of the Summer Wine (1973–75), and Rangi Ram in It Ain't Half Hot Mum (1974–77). Early life Bates was born in Jhansi, United Provinces, India,[2] to Sarah (née Clarke) (1896–1982, daughter of William Hammond Walker of Congleton, Cheshire),[3] and Anglo-Indian civil servant Harry Stuart Bates[4] CSI (1893–1985, son of Albert Bates, of Congleton, Cheshire).[3][5] He was educated at Uppingham School and St Catharine's College, Cambridge. Bates served in Burma as a Major with the Brigade of Gurkhas before his discharge at the end of the Second World War.[4] Career In 1953, while an ensemble member with the Stratford Festival in Stratford, Ontario, Canada, Bates appeared in Richard III and All's Well That Ends Well. Bates appeared in Hotel Paradiso, which starred Ale ...more...

Member feedback about Michael Bates (actor):

Cancer deaths in England

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


John Cameron (musician)

topic

John Cameron (musician)

John Cameron (born 20 March 1944, Woodford, Essex, England)[1] is a British composer, arranger, conductor and musician. He is well known for his many film, TV and stage credits, and for his contributions to "pop" recordings, notably those by Donovan, Cilla Black and the group Hot Chocolate. Cameron's instrumental version of Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love", became a hit for his group Collective Consciousness Society and, for many years, a version of Cameron's arrangement was used as the theme music for the BBC TV show, Top of the Pops. Biography Cameron's career in music began at Cambridge University, where he was Vice-President of the Cambridge Footlights comedy club and performed on the local jazz scene. After leaving Cambridge, Cameron began working as an arranger for folk-pop artist Donovan; his credits include Donovan's number-1 U.S. hit "Sunshine Superman" (co-arranged with Spike Heatley). He became Donovan's music director, touring with him and arranging hit singles "Jennifer Juniper" and "Epistle t ...more...

Member feedback about John Cameron (musician):

British film score composers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Zakes Mokae

topic

Zakes Mokae

Zakes Makgona Mokae[1] (5 August 1934 – 11 September 2009) was a South African-born American actor. Life and career Mokae was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, moved to Great Britain in 1961, and to the United States in 1969.[2] He turned to acting at the same time as playwright Athol Fugard was emerging. The two worked together on Fugard's first international success, The Blood Knot, from 1961, a two-hander set in South Africa about brothers with the same mother but different fathers; Zach (played by Mokae) is dark skinned and Morris (played by Fugard) is fair skinned. Later Mokae worked with Fugard on another major international success "Master Harold"...and the Boys, for which Mokae won the 1982 Tony Award for Featured Actor in a Play. The play was filmed for television in 1985 with Mokae and Matthew Broderick. In 1993 Mokae was nominated for a second Tony Award for Featured Actor in a Play for The Song of Jacob Zulu by Tug Yourgrau. His early film roles included Darling (1965) as a guest at a wild pa ...more...

Member feedback about Zakes Mokae:

American male television actors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Percy Edwards

topic

Percy Edwards

Percy Edwards, MBE (1 June 1908 – 7 June 1996) was an English animal impersonator,[1] ornithologist, and entertainer. Biography As a child, Edwards was fascinated by the wildlife he found in his local area, and by the age of 12 was accomplished enough at imitating many of them that this became his "party piece". In 1930 he debuted on the BBC radio series Vaudeville, the start of a career that would last the best part of 60 years. During World War II, Edwards worked at Ransomes, Sims & Jefferies in Ipswich.[2] Edwards became a household name after his animal imitations in the radio shows Ray's a Laugh with Ted Ray, and playing Psyche the dog in the radio series A Life of Bliss. It was said that at the height of his career he could accurately imitate over 600 birds, as well as many other animals. Among other things, he provided the voices for the killer whales in Orca (1977), the Reindeer in Santa Claus: The Movie (1985), sheep and bird sounds on Kate Bush's song The Dreaming, and the alien in the film ...more...

Member feedback about Percy Edwards:

People from Ipswich

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Elspeth March

topic

Elspeth March

Elspeth March (5 March 1911 – 29 April 1999) was an English actress.[1][2] Early years March was born as Jean Elspeth Mackenzie in Kensington, London, England, the daughter of Harry Malcolm and Elfreda Mackenzie. She studied speech and drama under Elsie Fogerty at the Central School of Speech and Drama, then based at the Royal Albert Hall, London.[3] She led a long stage, film and television career as a respected character actress, making her professional debut in Jonah and the Whale at London's Westminster Theatre in 1932. She met and married actor Stewart Granger in 1938. As his film career blossomed, the marriage faltered and the couple divorced in 1948. They had a son, Jamie and a daughter, the theatrical agent Lindsey Granger, who died in 2011.[4] She resumed her career in 1944 and she continued to play strong supporting roles in plays, films and television into her eighties. She appeared with the National Theatre in 1977, playing roles in The Madras House and Don Juan Comes Back From The War and in ...more...

Member feedback about Elspeth March:

English voice actresses

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


RISE – Scotland's Left Alliance

topic

RISE – Scotland's Left Alliance

RISE – Scotland's Left Alliance is a left-wing electoral alliance created ahead of the 2016 Scottish Parliament general election. The name is a contrived acronym standing for Respect, Independence, Socialism and Environmentalism. The alliance was formally established at a conference in Glasgow on 29 August 2015. The Scottish Socialist Party affiliated to the alliance for the 2016 election,[2] in which RISE fielded candidates on the regional list in all electoral regions, but none were elected. History Shortly after the Scottish independence referendum, the Scottish Left Project was launched online in October 2014 as a "grassroots forum for left-wing ideas and talent".[3] Its website contained an "opening statement" signed by 22 activists, which others on the left were encouraged to sign. The initial signatories included members of the International Socialist Group, a splinter from the Socialist Workers Party (SWP) whose figureheads, Cat Boyd and Jonathon Shafi, emerged as the SLP's principal spokesper ...more...

Member feedback about RISE – Scotland's Left Alliance:

Started in 2014 in Scotland

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Robert Raglan

topic

Robert Raglan

Robert Raglan (7 April 1909 – 18 July 1985) was a British actor best known for his semi-regular role in Dad's Army as Colonel Pritchard. He also starred in a number of other television series and films such as Fabian of the Yard (1954–56) and The Haunted House of Horror (1969). He also appeared in Danger Man with Patrick McGoohan.[1] Partial filmography The Courtneys of Curzon Street (1947) - (uncredited) Circus Boy (1947) - Trevor Night Beat (1947) - Det. Sgt (uncredited) The Ringer (1952) - (uncredited) The Broken Horseshoe (1953) - (uncredited) Recoil (1953) - Sgt Perkins The Good Beginning (1953) - Shelley (uncredited) Gilbert Harding Speaking of Murder (1953) - Inspector McKay (uncredited) Child's Play (1954) - Police Superintendent Confession (1955) - Superintendent Beckman Portrait of Alison (1955) - (uncredited) Handcuffs, London (1955) - Det. Sgt Wyatt Private's Progress (1956) - General Tomlinson 23 Paces to Baker Street (1956) - Police Inspector (uncredited) Morning ...more...

Member feedback about Robert Raglan:

20th-century English male actors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Monty Python filmography

topic

Monty Python filmography

The Monty Python comedy troupe branched off into a variety of different media after the success of their sketch comedy television series, Monty Python's Flying Circus. Television Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969–1974) Monty Python's Fliegender Zirkus (1972) Parrot Sketch Not Included – 20 Years of Monty Python (1989) Monty Python Live at Aspen (1998) Python Night – 30 Years of Monty Python (1999) Monty Python's Personal Best (2006) Films And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979) Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (1983) Books The following official Monty Python books authored by the team members have been published, mostly in large format: Monty Python's Big Red Book (1971) – Hardcover and paperback. Covers vary. The Brand New Monty Python Bok (1973) (Paperback edition issued as The Brand New Monty Python Papperbok) Monty Python and the Holy G ...more...

Member feedback about Monty Python filmography:

Monty Python

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Vanessa Howard

topic

Vanessa Howard

Vanessa Howard (born Vanessa Tolhurst, 10 October 1948, Shoreham-by-Sea, United Kingdom[1] – 23 November 2010), later known as Vanessa Chartoff, was a British film actress and professional backup singer. Howard starred primarily in exploitation and horror films. She is perhaps best known for her starring roles in The Blood Beast Terror and Mumsy, Nanny, Sonny and Girly; the latter has since become a cult movie. The box-office failure of her later projects resulted in her decision to give up acting. Howard married film producer Robert Chartoff in July 1970; the pair divorced some time prior to 1992. Following her divorce, she worked with California programs dedicated to helping recently divorced homemakers reintegrate into the workforce, including the Mission Valley Regional Occupation Center in Fremont. She died in Los Angeles on 23 November 2010, of complications from COPD.[2] Howard's abrupt departure from cinema, coupled with her low public profile, led to years of speculation as to what had happened to ...more...

Member feedback about Vanessa Howard:

English film actresses

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Norman Bird

topic

Norman Bird

John George Norman Bird (30 October 1924 – 22 April 2005) was an English character actor.[2] Early life Bird was born in Coalville, Leicestershire, England.[3] A RADA graduate, he made his West End debut in Peter Brook's production of The Winter's Tale at the Phoenix Theatre in 1951.[4] He was also a member of the BBC's Radio Drama Company.[5] His first film appearance was as the foreman in An Inspector Calls (1954).[6] Film career He was a familiar face to British cinema audiences of the 1950s and 1960s, appearing in nearly 50 films such as The Angry Silence (1960), The League of Gentlemen (1960), Whistle Down the Wind (1961), Victim (1961) and Term of Trial (1962) with Laurence Olivier.[7] Television appearances He had over 200 television appearances, notably as Mr Braithwaite in Worzel Gummidge (1979–81) and Mr Arrad in the Fawlty Towers episode "Waldorf Salad" (1979).[8][9] His long list of credits include Steptoe and Son, Till Death Us Do Part, Rising Damp, Ever Decreasing Circles, Yes Minister, To ...more...

Member feedback about Norman Bird:

Cancer deaths in England

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


James Cossins

topic

James Cossins

James Cossins (4 December 1933 – 12 February 1997) was an English character actor. Born in Beckenham, Kent, he became widely recognised as the abrupt, bewildered Mr Walt in the Fawlty Towers episode "The Hotel Inspectors"[1] and as Mr Watson the frustrated Public Relations training course instructor in an episode of Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em.[2] Early life He was born in Beckenham and educated at the City of London School. After serving in the Royal Air Force, he trained at RADA where he won the silver medal in 1952. Career He first appeared in repertory theatre[3] and at the Nottingham Playhouse. He played a wide range of characters throughout his colourful and extensive career on television and stage, often portraying blustering, pompous, crusty and cantankerous characters. Cossins appeared in Charley's Aunt at the Apollo Theatre in 1971 with Tom Courtenay, David Horovitch, Garth Forwood, Joanna McCallum, and Celia Bannerman. He appeared in more than forty films,[4] including The Anniversary (recreating ...more...

Member feedback about James Cossins:

Alumni of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Martin Boddey

topic

Martin Boddey

Albert Martin Boddey (16 April 1907 – 24 October 1975) was a British film and television actor.[1] He was a founder member of the Lord's Taverners charity. Boddey started acting well into middle age often portraying irritable authority figures such as police officers or magistrates.[2][3] Selected filmography A Song for Tomorrow (1948) - Major The Third Man (1949) - Russian Military Policeman (uncredited) Landfall (1949) - Civilian (uncredited) The Twenty Questions Murder Mystery (1950) 2nd Plainclothesman (uncredited) Cairo Road (1950) - Maj. Ahmed Mustafa State Secret (1950) - Clubman The Dancing Years - Minor Role (uncredited) Seven Days to Noon (1950) - Gen. Willoughby Cage of Gold (1950) - Adams The Franchise Affair (1951) - Insp. Hallam The Adventurers (1951) - Chief Engineer Laughter in Paradise (1951) - Store Shopwalker Cloudburst (1951) - Desk Sergeant Valley of Eagles (1951) - Chief of the Lost Valley Appointment with Venus (1951) - Sgt. Vogel The Magic Box (1951) ...more...

Member feedback about Martin Boddey:

20th-century Scottish male actors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Richard Caldicot

topic

Richard Caldicot

Richard Caldicot (7 October 1908 in London – 16 October 1995) was an English actor famed for his role of Commander (later Captain) Povey in the BBC radio series The Navy Lark.[1] He also appeared often on television, memorably as the obstetrician delivering Betty Spencer's baby in Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em. [2] His father was a civil servant and he attended Dulwich College. He then appeared in repertory theatre and on the West End stage (in the original production of Journey's End) from 1928.[3] He found success in 1947 when he appeared in a stage production of Edward, My Son. His film debut was in The Million Pound Note (1954).[4] Caldicot's television appearances include The Four Just Men, The Prisoner: "Many Happy Returns", Steptoe and Son, Vanity Fair, and Coronation Street. He was also seen in the United States on The Beverly Hillbillies.[5] Caldicot worked virtually right up till his death in October 1995.[5] Filmography Calling Bulldog Drummond (1951) – Judge (uncredited) The Million Pound Note ...more...

Member feedback about Richard Caldicot:

People educated at Dulwich College

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Julian Glover

topic

Julian Glover

Julian Wyatt Glover CBE (born 27 March 1935) is a Laurence Olivier Award-winning English classical actor, with many stage, television and film roles since commencing his career in the 1950s. Glover has performed many times for the Royal Shakespeare Company. His film roles have included General Maximilian Veers in The Empire Strikes Back, Aristotle Kristatos in the James Bond film For Your Eyes Only, Walter Donovan in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, and Brian Harcourt-Smith in The Fourth Protocol. He also voiced the giant spider Aragog in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Glover has also appeared frequently on television, especially in Britain, including guest appearances in cult series such as The Avengers, The Saint, Doctor Who, Blake's 7 and Remington Steele. From 2011 to 2016, he played the recurring supporting role of Grand Maester Pycelle in HBO's Game of Thrones, and in January 2013, appeared as General Beauvilliers in the BBC drama Spies of Warsaw. Personal life Glover was born in Hampste ...more...

Member feedback about Julian Glover:

20th-century English male actors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


George A. Cooper

topic

George A. Cooper

George Alphonsus Cooper (born 7 March 1925), credited as George A. Cooper, is a retired English actor and voice artist.[1] Career Cooper played Geoffrey Fisher, the stern father of the eponymous antihero Billy Liar, in both the original West End stage version (1960) and the later sitcom (1973–74).[2] He also had a recurring role in Coronation Street as Willie Piggott, between 1964 and 1971.[3] One of his other regular roles was as the caretaker Mr. Griffiths in the long-running children's TV series Grange Hill.[4] Among Cooper's other television credits are roles in Danger Man, Z-Cars, Dixon of Dock Green, No Hiding Place, Doctor Who (in the serial The Smugglers), Softly, Softly, The Avengers, The Saint, Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased), The Troubleshooters, Steptoe and Son, Doomwatch, Public Eye, Budgie, Bless This House, Sykes, Rising Damp, The New Avengers, Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em, All Creatures Great and Small, Juliet Bravo, When the Boat Comes In, Terry and June, Taggart, Casualty and Heartbeat.[5] Co ...more...

Member feedback about George A. Cooper:

English male stage actors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Ronnie Corbett

topic

Ronnie Corbett

Ronald Balfour Corbett, CBE (4 December 1930 – 31 March 2016) was a Scottish stand-up comedian, actor, writer, and broadcaster, best known for his long association with Ronnie Barker in the BBC television comedy sketch show The Two Ronnies. He achieved prominence in David Frost's 1960s satirical comedy programme The Frost Report (with Barker) and subsequently starred in sitcoms such as No – That's Me Over Here!, Now Look Here, and Sorry! Early life Corbett was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of William Balfour Corbett (1898–1974), a master baker, and his London-born wife Annie Elizabeth Corbett (née Main; 1900–1991).[2] He had a brother about six years younger, and a sister about ten years younger than he.[3] Corbett was educated at James Gillespie's High School and the Royal High School in the city, but did not attend university.[4] After leaving school, he decided he wanted to be an actor while performing in amateur theatricals at a church youth club.[5] His first job, however, was with the Ministry ...more...

Member feedback about Ronnie Corbett:

Scottish male film actors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Graham Crowden

topic

Graham Crowden

Clement Graham Crowden (30 November 1922 – 19 October 2010)[1][2] was a Scottish actor. He was best known for his many appearances in television comedy dramas and films, often playing eccentric "offbeat" scientist, teacher and doctor characters. Early life Graham Crowden was born in Edinburgh, the son of Anne Margaret (née Paterson) and Harry Graham Crowden.[3] He was educated at Clifton Hall School and the Edinburgh Academy before serving briefly in the Royal Scots Youth Battalion of the army until he was injured in a bizarre accident. During arms drill he was shot by his platoon sergeant, when the sergeant's rifle discharged.[4] The sergeant reportedly enquired "What is it now, Crowden?", to which Crowden replied "I think you've shot me, sergeant." He later found work in a tannery. Acting career Crowden had a long and distinguished theatrical career, most notably at Laurence Olivier's National Theatre where he performed as The Player King in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, the play by Tom Stoppar ...more...

Member feedback about Graham Crowden:

Scottish male film actors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Diana Coupland

topic

Diana Coupland

Betty Diana Coupland (5 March 1928[1]– 10 November 2006), billed as Diana Coupland was an English actress and singer best remembered for her role as Jean Abbott on sitcom Bless This House, which she played from 1971 to 1976. Early life Coupland was born in Leeds, West Riding of Yorkshire in 1928, the only child of Elsie (née Beck) and Denis Coupland. She originally wanted to be a ballet dancer, but could not fulfill this ambition due to a horse-riding accident. Her music career began at the age of 11. Barney Colehan, a BBC producer, heard Coupland sing and invited her onto one of his radio shows.[2] By the time she reached 14, she was singing full-time at the Mecca Locarno in Leeds, and the following year, moved to London with her parents, where she became a resident singer at Mecca's Tottenham Court Road ballroom. During the 1940s and 1950s, she became a leading singer of the day, singing at the Dorchester Hotel and the Savoy Hotel. Coupland also dubbed the singing voices of actresses who could not sing, n ...more...

Member feedback about Diana Coupland:

English voice actresses

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Arthur Lowe

topic

Arthur Lowe

Arthur Lowe (22 September 1915 – 15 April 1982) was an English actor. His career spanned over thirty years, including starring roles in numerous theatre and television productions. He played Captain Mainwaring (pron. 'Mannering') in the British sitcom Dad's Army from 1968 until 1977, was nominated for seven BAFTAs and became one of the most recognised faces on television. Lowe began his working life shortly before the Second World War (1939–1945) and he featured in many theatrical performances. It was not until he landed the part of Leonard Swindley in the British television soap Coronation Street that he became a household name. He played the character until 1966, while continuing film work. In 1968 he took up his most famous role, in Dad's Army, written by Jimmy Perry and David Croft. His success as this character led to considerable television and theatrical work, which put pressure on his health. Lowe's final years were dominated by alcoholism and illness and he died from a stroke on 15 April 1982, aged ...more...

Member feedback about Arthur Lowe:

Best Supporting Actor BAFTA Award winners

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Guy Middleton

topic

Guy Middleton

Guy Middleton Powell (14 December 1907 – 30 July 1973), better known as Guy Middleton, was an English film character actor. Biography Guy Middleton was born in Hove, Sussex, and originally worked in the London Stock Exchange, before turning to acting in the 1930s. In his earlier films he often portrayed amiable idiots, scoundrels and rakish bon vivants, but many of his later roles were military officers in the British Army, RAF or Royal Navy. He died in 1973, following a heart attack, aged 65. Selected filmography Jimmy Boy (1935) .... The Count Two Hearts in Harmony (1935) .... Mario Trust the Navy (1935) .... Lieutenant Richmond Under Proof (1936) .... Bruce Fame (1936) .... Lester Cordwell A Woman Alone (1936) .... Alioshka The Gay Adventure (1936) .... Aram Take a Chance (1937) .... Richard Carfax Keep Fit (1937) .... Hector Kent Break the News (1938) .... Englishman The Mysterious Mr. Davis (1939) .... Milton Goodbye Mr Chips (1939) .... McCulloch (uncredited) French Withou ...more...

Member feedback about Guy Middleton:

20th-century English male actors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Denholm Elliott

topic

Denholm Elliott

Denholm Mitchell Elliott, CBE (31 May 1922 – 6 October 1992) was an English actor, with more than 120 film and television credits.[1] Some of his well-known roles include the Abortionist in Alfie (1966), Marcus Brody in Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), Coleman in Trading Places (1983), and Mr. Emerson in A Room with a View (1985). Elliott earned critical acclaim in his later career. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in A Room with a View, and won the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role in three consecutive years in the 1980s, becoming the only actor ever to have achieved this. The American film critic Roger Ebert described him as "the most dependable of all British character actors".[2] The New York Times called him "a star among supporting players" and "an accomplished scene-stealer".[3] Early life Elliott was born in London, the son of Nina (née Mitchell) and Myles Laymen Farr Elliott. Myles was a ...more...

Member feedback about Denholm Elliott:

British World War II prisoners of war

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Frank Thornton

topic

Frank Thornton

Frank Thornton Ball (15 January 1921 – 16 March 2013) professionally known as Frank Thornton, was an English actor. He was known for playing Captain Peacock in Are You Being Served? and its sequel Grace & Favour (Are You Being Served? Again!) and as Truly in Last of the Summer Wine. Early life Frank Thornton Ball was born in Dulwich, London, the son of Rosina Mary (née Thornton) and William Ernest Ball.[1] His father was an organist at St Stephen's Church, Sydenham Hill,[2] where Frank learned to play the organ for a short while. Music proved too difficult for him, however, and he wanted to act from an early age. His father, who worked in a bank, wanted him to get a "proper" job, so he began working in insurance after leaving Alleyn's School.[3] He soon enrolled at a small acting school, the London School of Dramatic Art, and took evening classes. After two years working at the insurance company he was invited to become a day student at the acting school and persuaded his father to finance his studies. ...more...

Member feedback about Frank Thornton:

Royal Air Force airmen

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Ronald Fraser (actor)

topic

Ronald Fraser (actor)

Ronald Fraser (11 April 1930 – 13 March 1997) was an English-born Scottish character actor, who appeared in numerous British plays, films and television shows from the 1950s to the 1990s.[1] An unusual appearance and unique delivery made him a natural comedic actor. Fraser was a familiar figure in West End clubs during the sixties, and despite a long-standing reputation as one of the hardest drinking of British actors he was still working in his last years. He was perhaps best known as Basil "Badger" Allenby-Johnson in the 1970s television series The Misfit. Background Ronald Fraser was born in Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire, the son of an interior decorator and builder from Scotland. He attended Ashton Grammar School. He was educated in Scotland and did national service as a lieutenant in the Seaforth Highlanders. While serving in Benghazi in North Africa, he appeared in the comic play French Without Tears by Terence Rattigan. He trained as an actor at RADA until 1953 and soon appeared at Glasgow's Citizens ...more...

Member feedback about Ronald Fraser (actor):

English people of Scottish descent

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Warner Bros.-Seven Arts

topic

Warner Bros.-Seven Arts

Warner Bros.-Seven Arts, Inc. was an American entertainment company active from 1967 until 1970. History Warner Bros.-Seven Arts started when Seven Arts Productions acquired Jack L. Warner's controlling interest in Warner Bros. for $32 million[1][2][3] and merged with it. The acquisition included the black and white Looney Tunes (plus the non-Harman and Ising Merrie Melodies) library, Warner Bros. Records (which was renamed Warner Bros.-Seven Arts Records), and Reprise Records. Later that same year, Warner Bros.-Seven Arts purchased Atlantic Records. Those record labels were combined in 1970 with two other acquisitions (Elektra Records and its sister label Nonesuch Records) in a new holding company, Warner-Elektra-Atlantic, under the direction of Mo Ostin [4] and Joe Smith. The head of production was Kenneth Hyman, son of Seven Arts co-founder Eliot Hyman. After Wait Until Dark their first film was Camelot. Acquisition by Kinney Warner Bros.-Seven Arts was acquired in 1969 by Kinney National Company, wh ...more...

Member feedback about Warner Bros.-Seven Arts:

Companies based in Burbank, California

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


List of fictional Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom

topic

List of fictional Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom

Fictional stories featuring the political scene in Westminster or Whitehall in the United Kingdom, often feature fictional Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom – invented characters with the position of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Such characters may be complete inventions, or they may be based on a particular Prime Minister or politician, or on a broad stereotype of party politicians. Prime Ministers are listed alphabetically by surname. Also provided is information (where relevant and provided) about actors who portrayed the character. Named fictional characters A Lord Alloway Prime Minister in the Hercule Poirot short story "The Submarine Plans" by Agatha Christie Lord Appin former Prime Minister in A Lodge in the Wilderness by John Buchan Herbert Attwell Prime Minister who Jim Hacker serves under (in "Yes, Minister"), and eventually succeeds (in "Yes, Prime Minister"). Both were written by Jonathan Lynn and Antony Jay. B Baldrick Played by: Tony Robins ...more...

Member feedback about List of fictional Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom:

Lists of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Roger Maxwell (actor)

topic

Roger Maxwell (actor)

Roger Maxwell (1 January 1900 – 24 November 1971) was an English actor.[1] In 1959, he was a member of the jury at the Venice Film Festival.[2] Maxwell was born in London, England and died in London also. Filmography Year Title Role Notes 1927 The Battles of Coronel and Falkland Islands 1938 Save a Little Sunshine Hector Stanley 1949 Badger's Green Sir John 1949 Stop Press Girl Director Uncredited 1950 Ha'penny Breeze Mr. Simmonds 1951 Mister Drake's Duck Col. Maitland 1951 Night Was Our Friend Colonel 1952 Song of Paris Weldon 1952 Treasure Hunt Military-Looking Man Uncredited 1952 Girdle of Gold Chairman of the Bench 1953 Deadly Nightshade Col. Smythe 1953 The Steel Key 1953 Glad Tidings Uncredited 1954 John Wesley General Holt 1955 No Smoking Major 1956 Keep It Clean General Ponsonby-Goreham 1956 Reach for the Sky Pantiles Uncredited 1959 The Captain's Table Fred Uncredited 1960 A Touch of Larceny Club Member #2 1960 The ...more...

Member feedback about Roger Maxwell (actor):

Male actors from London

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Peter Cook

topic

Peter Cook

Peter Edward Cook (17 November 1937 – 9 January 1995) was an English actor, satirist, writer and comedian. Cook is widely regarded as the leading light of the British satire boom of the 1960s. He was closely associated with the anti-establishment comedy that emerged in the United Kingdom and United States in the late 1950s. Called "the father of modern satire" by The Guardian, in 2005, Cook was ranked number one in the Comedians' Comedian, a poll of over 300 comics, comedy writers, producers, and directors throughout the English-speaking world.[1][2] Early life Cook was born at his parents' house, "Shearbridge", in Middle Warberry Road, Torquay, Devon. He was the only son and eldest of the three children of Alexander Edward "Alec" Cook (1906–1984), a colonial civil servant (serving as political officer and later district officer in Nigeria, then as financial secretary to the colony of Gibraltar, followed by a return to Nigeria as Permanent Secretary of the Eastern Region, based at Enugu)[3][4], and his wif ...more...

Member feedback about Peter Cook:

English satirists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Jonathan Cecil

topic

Jonathan Cecil

Jonathan Hugh Gascoyne-Cecil (22 February 1939 – 22 September 2011), more commonly known as Jonathan Cecil, was an English theatre, film and television actor. Early life Cecil was born in London, England, the son of Lord David Cecil and the grandson of The 4th Marquess of Salisbury.[1] His other grandfather was the literary critic Sir Desmond MacCarthy. He was the great-grandson of former Conservative Prime Minister The 3rd Marquess of Salisbury. Brought up at Oxford, where his father was Goldsmith Professor of English, he was educated at Eton, where he played small parts in school plays and at New College, Oxford, where he read modern languages, specialising in French and continued with amateur dramatics.[2][3] At Oxford, his friends included Dudley Moore and Alan Bennett.[4] In a production of Ben Jonson's Bartholomew Fair, he played a lunatic called Troubadour and a woman who sells pigs.[3] Of his early acting at Oxford, Cecil said I was still stiff and awkward, but this was rather effective for come ...more...

Member feedback about Jonathan Cecil:

People educated at The Dragon School

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Richard Pearson (actor)

topic

Richard Pearson (actor)

Richard de Pearsall Pearson (1 August 1918 – 2 August 2011), was an English character actor, who appeared in numerous film, television and stage productions over a period of 65 years. He was born and brought up in Monmouth.[1] He was educated at Aymestrey Court, Worcester, and at Monmouth School, where his father taught French. Career Notable films of his career included Brian Desmond Hurst's Scrooge (1951) as well as a brief appearance in John Schlesinger's Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) and cameo roles in three films by Roman Polanski: Macbeth (1971), Tess (1979) and Pirates (1986). Pearson made his stage debut at age 18 at London's Collins's Music Hall, but did not make his film debut until the age of 32, when he played a Sergeant in the motion picture The Girl is Mine (1950). This was followed a year later by his performance as Mr Tupper in Scrooge. In later years, he is perhaps best known for his role as Mole in Cosgrove Hall's The Wind in the Willows (1983), its subsequent television series, which led o ...more...

Member feedback about Richard Pearson (actor):

British male film actors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


David Paradine Productions

topic

David Paradine Productions

David Paradine Productions[1] is a television production company founded by David Frost as 'David Paradine Ltd' in 1966.[2] Notable productions At Last the 1948 Show (1967–68)[3] Warner Brothers/Seven Arts[4] The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer (1970) Associated-Rediffusion Television[5] Through the Keyhole (1987-2008) Yorkshire Television[6] Productions Frost on Sketch Shows (2013)[7] Frost on Interviews (2012)[8] Frost on Satire (2010)[9] The Frost Report Is Back (2008)[10] Frost Over the World (2006)[11] Frost Tonight (2006)[12] Inside Elton's World (2005)[13] Spitting Image: Down and Out in the White House (1986)[14] David Frost Interviews Richard Nixon (1977)[15] Leadbelly (1976)[16] David Frost Presents the Guinness Book of World Records (1975)[17] Who Killed Lamb? (1974)[18] Charley-One-Eye (1973)[19] Rentadick (1972)[20] Futtocks End (1970)[21] David Frost Presents: Frankie Howerd (1969)[22] David Frost Presents: How to Irritate People (1969)[23] Ref ...more...

Member feedback about David Paradine Productions:

Television production companies of the United K...

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Arthur Lovegrove

topic

Arthur Lovegrove

Arthur Lovegrove (15 July 1913 – 7 November 1981) was a British actor and playwright.[1][2] Filmography Noose (1948) - Drummer (uncredited) Passport to Pimlico (1949) - Tough Man on Underground Train (uncredited) Meet Simon Cherry (1949) - Charlie Banks The Adventures of PC 49: Investigating the Case of the Guardian Angel (1949) - Bill (uncredited) Night and the City (1950) - Thug (uncredited) Waterfront (1950) - Stoker (uncredited) The Galloping Major (1951) - Punter (uncredited) Emergency Call (1952) - Gunner Terry The Ringer (1952) - Workman Installing Window Bars (uncredited) Escape Route (1952) - Phillips (uncredited) Three Steps to the Gallows (1953) - Tommy - coach Genevieve (1953) - Hotel Doorman (uncredited) The Steel Key (1953) - Gilchrist Murder at 3am (1953) - Inspector Cobb The Runaway Bus (1954) - 2nd Crook Devil on Horseback (1954) - Valet The Lyons in Paris (1955) - Fred (uncredited) Break in the Circle (1955) - Bert Passage Home (1955) - 1st Stoker A ...more...

Member feedback about Arthur Lovegrove:

English dramatists and playwrights

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Ronald Baddiley

topic

Ronald Baddiley

Ronald Baddiley (31 August 1922 – 29 November 1986) was an English actor. He was best known for his roles in the early days of the long-running British radio drama The Archers, and as Under-Secretary, Sir Gregory Pitkin, CBE in the BBC comedy The Men from the Ministry. Baddiley was born on 31 August 1922, in Doncaster in Yorkshire, England, UK.[1] In December 1950 he married Noreen Richards – she later performed alongside him in several episodes of radio serial The Archers.[2][3] Career Baddiley voiced the character of Percy Hood in BBC radio drama The Archers[4] and first appeared on television in April 1956 playing the orchestra conductor in the TV short The Cobbler's Belle.[5] In the same year he played Mr. Hepton in dramatist David Turner's Fresh as Paint[6] and the policeman in One Fight More by David Campton and Stephen Joseph.[7] The following year he played PC Sanders in 4 episodes of The Other Man,[8] and in 1958 Baddiley appeared in two BBC radio productions of Shakespeare, playing the parts of ...more...

Member feedback about Ronald Baddiley:

British actors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Alpetragius (crater)

topic

Alpetragius (crater)

Oblique view from Apollo 12 Alpetragius is a lunar impact crater located on the eastern edge of Mare Nubium, to the southwest of the much larger crater Alphonsus. In the southeast is the prominent crater Arzachel, and to the west lies the flooded Lassell. The most notable feature of this crater is the disproportionately large central peak, which forms a rounded rise that occupies almost the entire crater floor—one-third the crater diameter—and rises to a height of 2.0 km. There is evidence that this peak has been enlarged through volcanic eruptions, and there appears to be an eroded vent at its summit. The rim has fine terraces that slope down to near the edge of the central rise along the south and east sides. This outer wall is nearly round, with slight protrusions on the north and west sides. Oblique view from Apollo 16 The outer rim is joined to the southwest rim of Alphonsus by a rise in the surface. An arc of craterous depressions from the south rim of Alphonsus curves to the west, dividing Alpe ...more...

Member feedback about Alpetragius (crater):

LQ19 quadrangle

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Norman Rossington

topic

Norman Rossington

Norman Rossington (24 December 1928 – 21 May 1999) was an English actor best remembered for his roles in The Army Game, the Carry On films and the Beatles' film A Hard Day's Night. Early life Born in Liverpool, Lancashire, the son of a publican, Rossington was educated at Sefton Park Elementary School and Liverpool Technical College. He left education at the age of 14. After that he lived a rather aimless adolescent life as messenger, office boy at Liverpool Docks and apprentice joiner. He did his national service in the RAF. Later, he went to night school and studied industrial design at technical college to become a draughtsman. His interest in acting led him to the David Lewis Theatre, a local theatre group where he began his acting career. Here he played Shakespeare and in The Critic under the direction of Thomas G Reed. Rossington went on to train at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School city's Theatre Royal, by the mid-1950s appearing on the stage in plays such as a London Old Vic tour of the USA in A Mi ...more...

Member feedback about Norman Rossington:

Male actors from Liverpool

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


List of British comedy films

topic

List of British comedy films

This film-related list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. This is a list of British comedy films. 1930s Boots! Boots! (1934) Radio Parade of 1935 (1934) Those Were the Days (1934) Boys Will Be Boys (1935) Dandy Dick (1935) The Ghost Goes West (1935) No Limit (1935) Off the Dole (1935) So You Won't Talk (1935) Captain Bill (1936) Cheer Up (1936) Educated Evans (1936 Excuse My Glove (1936) The Interrupted Honeymoon (1936) It's Love Again (1936) Jack of All Trades (1936) Keep Your Seats, Please (1936) Laburnum Grove (1936) Love at Sea (1936) Love in Exile (1936) The Man in the Mirror (1936) The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936) Not So Dusty (1936) Pot Luck (1936) Public Nuisance No. 1 (1936) Queen of Hearts (1936) Radio Lover (1936) Southern Roses (1936) Where There's a Will (1936) Windbag the Sailor (1936) Aren't Men Beasts! (1937) Boys Will Be Girls (1937) Cotton Queen (1937) The Dominant Sex (1937) Feather Your Nest (1937) ...more...

Member feedback about List of British comedy films:

British comedy films

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Dudley Foster

topic

Dudley Foster

Dudley Foster (7 August 1924 – 8 January 1973) was an English actor most notable on TV. Foster was born in Brighouse, West Riding of Yorkshire. His family had long links with the theatre and a brother and sister also appeared on the stage. They were the children of Frank Geden Foster, a civil engineer, who was to die exactly a week before his son. Educated at Pocklington School, Dudley Foster after service as a navigator in the RAF studied chemistry at the University of Leeds. In 1948 he joined the recently-formed Bradford Civic Playhouse Theatre School and after turning professional spent several successful years with northern repertory companies. From the later 1950s into the 1960s he was a member of Joan Littlewood's ground-breaking Theatre Workshop. In her autobiography Joan's Book Littlewood later recalled that Foster had a wealthy father who financed some of the troupe's productions.[1] On television he appeared in such series as Danger Man, The Saint, The Avengers - notably in "The Hour That Never Wa ...more...

Member feedback about Dudley Foster:

Male actors who committed suicide

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Dennis Price filmography

topic

Dennis Price filmography

Dennis Price (1915–1973) was an English actor. He made his professional debut at the Queen's Theatre in September 1937 alongside John Gielgud in Richard II. He appeared in several films produced by Ealing Studios and the Boulting brothers. Between 1965 and 1967 he appeared in the BBC television series The World of Wooster, where his performance as Jeeves was described in The Times as "an outstanding success".[1][2] Filmography No Parking (1938) as Extra (uncredited) A Canterbury Tale (1944) as Peter Gibbs A Place of One's Own (1945) as Dr. Selbie The Echo Murders (1945) as Dick Warren Caravan (1946) as Sir Francis Castleton The Magic Bow (1946) as Paul de la Rochelle Hungry Hill (1947) as Greyhound John Dear Murderer (1947) as Richard Fenton Holiday Camp (1947) as Sq. Ldr. Hardwick Jassy (1947) as Christopher Hatton Master of Bankdam (1947) as Joshua Crowther The White Unicorn (1947) as Richard Glover Easy Money (1948) as Joe Henty Snowbound (1948) as Neil Blair Good-Time Girl ...more...

Member feedback about Dennis Price filmography:

Actor filmographies

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


John Cleese

topic

John Cleese

John Marwood Cleese (; born 27 October 1939) is an English actor, voice actor, comedian, screenwriter, and producer. He achieved success at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and as a scriptwriter and performer on The Frost Report. In the late 1960s, he co-founded Monty Python, the comedy troupe responsible for the sketch show Monty Python's Flying Circus and the four Monty Python films: And Now for Something Completely Different, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Life of Brian and The Meaning of Life. In the mid-1970s, Cleese and his first wife, Connie Booth, co-wrote and starred in the British sitcom Fawlty Towers, with Cleese receiving the 1980 BAFTA for Best Entertainment Performance. Later, he co-starred with Kevin Kline, Jamie Lee Curtis, and former Python colleague Michael Palin in A Fish Called Wanda and Fierce Creatures, both of which he also wrote. He also starred in Clockwise and has appeared in many other films, including two James Bond films as R and Q, two Harry Potter films, and the last three Shrek ...more...

Member feedback about John Cleese:

Primetime Emmy Award winners

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Digital Classics DVD

topic

Digital Classics DVD

Digital Classics DVD Limited is a UK-based DVD label which releases titles in the UK and worldwide across a range of genres: music, arts, documentaries, dramas and classic British comedy. Digital Classics DVD is part of DCD Media, one of Europe’s leading independent TV production and distribution groups. On 14 March 2008, Digital Classics launched its classical music video download service from www.digitalclassics.co.uk. with videos such as The Peony Pavilion, Peter Greenaway's A TV Dante, Arias with Christine Schäfer, Anne Sofie von Otter, Paul Groves, David Daniels, Thomas Hampson, Felicity Lott and more. Comedy titles include Futtocks End starring Ronnie Barker and Michael Hordern (1969) Sir Henry at Rawlinson End written by Vivian Stanshall and starring Trevor Howard (1980) The Golden Coach a film by Jean Renoir starring Anna Magnani (1953) San Ferry Ann starring Barbara Windsor, Joan Sims, David Lodge and Wilfrid Brambell (1966) Simon, Simon starring Graham Stark, John Junkin and Norman Ross ...more...

Member feedback about Digital Classics DVD:

Media companies of the United Kingdom

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Alex Thomson (cinematographer)

topic

Alex Thomson (cinematographer)

Alexander Thomson BSC (12 January 1929 – 14 June 2007) was a British cinematographer. Biography Born in London, England, he was first offered a job by Bert Easey (1901-1973), who was head of cameras at Denham and Pinewood Studios. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Cinematography for Excalibur (1981). His other films included Year of the Dragon (1985), Legend (1985),[1] Labyrinth (1986), The Krays (1990), Alien 3 (1992), Cliffhanger (1993), Demolition Man (1993), Executive Decision (1996) and two of Kenneth Branagh's Shakespeare adaptations, Hamlet (1996) and Love's Labour's Lost (2000). After beginning his film career in the late 1940s, he went on to serve as a camera operator under cinematographer Nicolas Roeg on twelve films between 1961 and 1966. In 1998 he shot the Royal Premiered CinemaScope short "The Troop" (dir: Marcus Dillistone) An interview with Alex Thomson appears in a new book Conversations with Cinematographers by David A Ellis, published by Scarecrow Press. Thomson died on 1 ...more...

Member feedback about Alex Thomson (cinematographer):

British cinematographers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


David Frost

topic

David Frost

Sir David Paradine Frost OBE (7 April 1939 – 31 August 2013) was an English television host, media personality, journalist, comedian, and writer. After graduating from Cambridge University, Frost rose to prominence in the UK when he was chosen to host the satirical programme That Was the Week That Was in 1962. His success on this show led to work as a host on US television. He became known for his television interviews with senior political figures, among them the Nixon Interviews with former United States President Richard Nixon in 1977, which were adapted into a stage play and film. Frost was one of the "Famous Five" who were behind the launch of ITV breakfast station TV-am in 1983. For the BBC, he hosted the Sunday morning interview programme Breakfast with Frost from 1993 to 2005. He spent two decades as host of Through the Keyhole. From 2006 to 2012 he hosted the weekly programme Frost Over the World on Al Jazeera English and from 2012, the weekly programme The Frost Interview. Frost died on 31 August ...more...

Member feedback about David Frost:

Primetime Emmy Award winners

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User



Next Page
Javascript Version
Revolvy Server https://www.revolvy.com
Revolvy Site Map