Richard A. Whiting

Richard Armstrong Whiting (November 12, 1891 – February 19, 1938)[1] was an American composer of popular songs, including the standards "Hooray for Hollywood", "Ain't We Got Fun?" and "On the Good Ship Lollipop". He also wrote lyrics occasionally, and film scores most notably for the standard "She's Funny That Way".

He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1936 for "When Did You Leave Heaven" from the movie Sing, Baby Sing.

Biography

Richard Whiting was born in Peoria, Illinois, into a musical family. His father, Frank Whiting, was a real estate agent and gifted violinist; his mother Blossom was a piano teacher. Together they instilled a love of music in their son and worked towards nurturing his natural gift of piano playing. He attended the Harvard Military School in Los Angeles. Upon his graduation, Whiting started a vaudeville act with his college friend Marshall Neilan. The pair briefly toured the U.S. writing songs, singing, and playing the piano. Unfortunately neither one had the stage presence or singing talent to become full-time performers. They broke up the duo and went their separate ways: Neilan to Hollywood, where he would go on to be a very successful film director and actor, and Whiting to Detroit to try to jump-start a career as a professional songwriter. In 1913 Whiting began his career as a song plugger for Jerome H. Remick publishing company. Within a year he was the manager of the Detroit office, being paid US$25 per week. As an occasional talent scout, Whiting nurtured the careers of several songwriters from the day, most notably George Gershwin; Whiting heard Gershwin playing one day and gave him a job as a song plugger for Remick company. This act of kindness resulted in a lifelong friendship between the two powerhouse composers. To supplement his income at the time, Whiting worked with a local hotel's Hawaiian band, playing piano in light blackface, earning him an extra $10 a week.

In 1914 Whiting had his first two hit songs: "I Wonder Where My Lovin' Man Has Gone" and "It's Tulip Time in Holland." The latter song became a massive hit, selling over a million copies. Whiting received none of the royalties, however, having sold off the publishing rights to Remick in exchange for a Steinway Grand. During his time at Remick Whiting had a substantial output, mostly with former bank-clerk Ray Egan, including the beloved 1918 classic, "Till We Meet Again". The song quickly became the largest sheet music seller of all time, even today: at last count the song was said to have sold over 11 million copies. Other hit songs written by Whiting during his time at Remick include "Where the Black-Eyed Susans Grow" (1917), "The Japanese Sandman" (1920), "Bimini Bay" (1921, lyrics by Egan and Gus Kahn), "Ain't We Got Fun?" (1921, lyrics by Egan and Kahn) and "Ukulele Lady" (1925, lyrics by Kahn).

In 1929 Whiting moved to Hollywood, where there were more opportunities for songwriters during the Depression. In Hollywood he wrote a number of film scores and classic songs. With Johnny Mercer he wrote the theme song of Tinseltown, "Hooray for Hollywood", shortly before his death. During his career, Whiting collaborated with such songwriting giants as BG DeSylva, Johnny Mercer, Neil Moret, Leo Robin, Ralph Rainger, Gus Kahn, Oscar Hammerstein II, Haven Gillespie, Seymour Simons, Nacio Herb Brown, Harry Akst, Walter Donaldson, Ray Egan, and Sidney Clare, to produce a number of hits (listed below). He also wrote a number of scores for Broadway plays.

In the film, Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round (1932), a song performed by The Boswell Sisters, titled "Rock and Roll", written by Richard A. Whiting and Sidney Clare, is sometimes credited as the first use of that term.

Whiting died from a heart attack in 1938 at the age of 46, at the height of his career. He was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame as part of the inaugural class in 1970. A tribute to Whiting's music, along with a medley of his best-known songs, formed part of the 1980 Broadway musical A Day in Hollywood / A Night in the Ukraine. His Steinway grand piano was donated to the Great American Songbook Foundation by his granddaughter Debbi and can be seen on display.

Whiting was married to the former Eleanor Youngblood, a manager whose clients included Sophie Tucker. He was the father of singer/actress Margaret Whiting and actress Barbara Whiting Smith, and the grandson of Rep. Richard H. Whiting.

Film scores
Broadway show scores
  • Toot Sweet
  • George White's Scandals of 1919
  • Take a Chance which featured two major hits with music by Whiting "You're an Old Smoothie," and "Eadie Was a Lady"
Selected songs
  • 1916 "Coaling Up in Colon Town". L: Raymond Egan[2]
  • 1917 "Bravest Heart of All". L: Raymond Egan[2]
  • 1917 "I Wonder Where My Buddies Are To-Night". L: Raymond Egan and Billy Rose[2]
  • 1918 "Dress Up Your Dollars in Khaki (And Help Win Democracy's Fight)". L: Lister R. Alwood[2]
  • 1918 "I'll Love You More for Losing You a While". L: Raymond Egan[2]
  • 1919 "Eyes of the Army". L: Raymond Egan[2]
  • 1919 "Hand in Hand Again". L: Raymond Egan[2]
Free for All

Original Music by Richard A. Whiting, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II

Act 1 consists of

  • "I Love Him, the Rat" sung by Anita Allen and Joe Butler (Perpetual Student at Leland Stanford)
  • "Free For All" sung by Michael Byrne (a Radical Poet) and The Gang
  • "The Girl Next Door" sung by Anita Allen and Steve Potter, Jr. (Son of Stephen, Sr.)
  • "Living in Sin" sung by Gracie Maynard, Joan Summer (Youngest of the Gang), Joe Butler (Perpetual Student at Leland Stanford) and Andy Bradford
  • "Just Eighteen" sung by Joan Summer (Youngest of the Gang) and Andy Bradford
  • "Not That I Care" sung by Anita Allen and Steve Potter, Jr. (Son of Stephen, Sr.)
  • "Slumber Song" Sung by Marishka Tarasov and Michael Byrne (a Radical Poet)

Act 2 consists of

  • "When Your Boy Becomes a Man" sung by Silver Dollar Kate and Anita Allen
  • "Tonight" sung by Marishka Tarasov and Anita Allen
  • "Nevada Moonlight" sung by Joe Butler (Perpetual Student at Leland Stanford), Gracie Maynard and Ensemble

Richard Whiting was also referenced in the 1980 Broadway show a Day in Hollywood/ a Night in the Ukraine where a medley of his songs are performed in the first act. One of the actors comically portrays him during the song It All Comes Out of the Piano.

Hit songs
Notable Recordings

Frank Sinatra recorded Whiting's "Too Marvelous for Words" on his album Songs for Swingin' Lovers!. Sinatra also recorded Whiting's "She's Funny That Way" on his album Nice 'n' Easy, and other songs such as "My Ideal".

Tony Bennett recorded many of Whiting's songs, such as "My Ideal" on his album Here's to the Ladies, "True Blue Lou" and "She's Funny That Way."

Margaret Whiting (his daughter) recorded and made famous several Whiting hits including "Guilty", "Too Marvelous for Words" and "Ain't We Got Fun?"

Other notable artists to record Whiting songs:

Modern Day Usage

In 2006 the film A Good Year starring Russel Crow and Marion Cotillard featured the song "Breezin' Along with the Breeze" with music by Whiting and lyrics by Haven Gillespie and Seymour Simons

In 2009 Renee Olstead used the song "Ain't We Got Fun" written by Whiting, Raymond B. Egan and Gus Kahn for her album Skylark

In 2010 the show Boardwalk Empire used the music from Whiting's "The Japanese Sandman" in the first 5 episodes of the show. A version with lyrics by Raymond B. Egan appeared in the show on October 24, 2010.

In 2010 Enrique Iglesias used a segment of "On the Good Ship Lollipop" written by Whiting and Sidney Clare for Bright Eyes in his YouTube video for the song "Tonight (I'm Lovin' You)"

In 2011 Diet Coke used Whiting's music to the song "Hooray for Hollywood" in their Oscar commercial which played nationwide in movie theaters.

References
  1. "Richard Whiting, Writer of Popular Songs, Dies at 46". The Milwaukee Sentinel. 1938-02-19. Retrieved 2015-09-13.
  2. Parker, Bernard S. (2007). World War I Sheet Music (Volume 1). Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. pp. 59, 77, 117, 127, 209, 263, 277. ISBN 0-7864-2798-1.
  3. "Horses / words and music by Byron Gay and Richard A. Whiting. [music] / - Version details - Trove". Trove.nla.gov.au. Retrieved 2013-12-27.
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Richard A. Whiting

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Richard A. Whiting

Richard Armstrong Whiting (November 12, 1891 – February 19, 1938)[1] was an American composer of popular songs, including the standards "Hooray for Hollywood", "Ain't We Got Fun?" and "On the Good Ship Lollipop". He also wrote lyrics occasionally, and film scores most notably for the standard "She's Funny That Way". He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1936 for "When Did You Leave Heaven" from the movie Sing, Baby Sing. Biography Richard Whiting was born in Peoria, Illinois, into a musical family. His father, Frank Whiting, was a real estate agent and gifted violinist; his mother Blossom was a piano teacher. Together they instilled a love of music in their son and worked towards nurturing his natural gift of piano playing. He attended the Harvard Military School in Los Angeles. Upon his graduation, Whiting started a vaudeville act with his college friend Marshall Neilan. The pair briefly toured the U.S. writing songs, singing, and playing the piano. Unfortunately neither one had ...more...

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The History Of Birthdays

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Richard Whiting

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Richard Whiting

Richard Whiting may refer to: Richard Whiting (abbot) (died 1539), last Abbot of Glastonbury Abbey before the Dissolution of the Monasteries Richard A. Whiting (1891–1938), writer of popular songs, father of singer Margaret Whiting and actress Barbara Whiting Smith Richard H. Whiting (1826–1888), U.S. Representative from Illinois Richard Whiting (rugby league) (born 1984), English rugby league player ...more...



Richard Whiting (abbot)

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Richard Whiting (abbot)

Blessed Richard Whiting (1461 – 15 November 1539) was an English clergyman and the last Abbot of Glastonbury. Whiting presided over Glastonbury Abbey at the time of the Dissolution of the Monasteries (1536–1541) under King Henry VIII of England. The king had him executed after his conviction for treason for remaining loyal to Rome. He is considered a martyr by the Roman Catholic Church, which beatified him on 13 May 1895. Early life Whiting attended the University of Cambridge, graduating with an MA in 1483.[1] Career View of Glastonbury Abbey from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. Whiting was ordained deacon in 1500 and priest in 1501.[1] After the death of the Abbot of Glastonbury, Richard Beere, in February 1525, the community elected his successor per formam compromissi, which elevates the selection to a higher ranking personage – in this case Cardinal Thomas Wolsey. Wolsey obtained King Henry's permission to act and chose Richard Whiting. The first ten year ...more...

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Whiting (surname)

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Whiting (surname)

The surname Whiting is of Saxon origin meaning 'the white or fair offspring'.[1] The Saxon suffix "-ing" denotes 'son of' or 'offspring'. It is a patronymic name from the Old English pre-7th Century 'Hwita' meaning 'the white' or 'fair one'. The surname first appears in documentation from the late 11th Century and has a number of variant forms ranging from 'Whiteing', and 'Whitting' to 'Witting'.[2] However, the name was first found in Devon where it was seated both before and after the Norman Conquest.[3] Persons In Great Britain, there are an estimated 3,169 with the surname Whiting.[4] According to the 1990 U.S. Census, Whiting is the 2,565th most popular surname in the United States, carried by 0.005% of the population. Alan Whiting, British screenwriter Andrea Whiting, fictional character on the American soap opera Search for Tomorrow Ant Whiting, writer/producer signed to Sony/ATV Music Publishing Arthur Batelle Whiting (1861–1936), American teacher, pianist, composer, and writer on music ...more...



Ain't We Got Fun

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Ain't We Got Fun

Wikisource has full lyrics and sheet music: Ain't We Got Fun "Ain't We Got Fun" is a popular foxtrot published in 1921 with music by Richard A. Whiting, lyrics by Raymond B. Egan and Gus Kahn. It was first performed in 1920 in the Fanchon and Marco revue Satires of 1920, then moved into vaudeville and recordings. "Ain't We Got Fun?" and its jaunty response to poverty and its promise of fun ("Every morning / Every evening," and "In the meantime, / In between time") have become symbolic of the Roaring Twenties, and it appears in some of the major literature of the decade, including The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and in Dorothy Parker's award-winning short story of 1929, "Big Blonde." The song also contains variations on the phrase "The rich get richer and the poor get poorer" (substituting, e.g., "children" for "poorer"); though this phrase predates the song, its use increased with the song's popularity. Composition "Ain't We Got Fun" follows the structure of a foxtrot.[1] The melody uses mainly q ...more...

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Richard Whiting (rugby league)

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Richard Whiting (rugby league)

Richard Whiting is an English professional rugby league footballer who plays for the Toronto Wolfpack in the Kingstone Press Championship. Able to play in a variety of positions, he is considered a utility player.[2][3] Previously playing in the Championship for Featherstone Rovers, and the Leigh Centurions, he spent most of his professional career in Super League with Hull F.C., with whom he won the 2005 Challenge Cup, and was named Super League's Young Player of the Year in 2005. Early life Whiting was born in Featherstone, West Yorkshire, he was a promising association football player as a youngster and was signed to a scholarship with Barnsley as a 16-year-old before deciding to pursue a career in rugby league.[5] Playing career Featherstone Rovers Whiting began his career with Featherstone Rovers in National League One, being named the league's Young Player of the Year in 2003, before moving to Super League club Hull. Hull Whiting playing for Hull FC Whiting joined Hull F.C. in 2004. In 2005 he ...more...

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The Cider House Rules (film)

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The Cider House Rules (film)

The Cider House Rules is a 1999 American drama film directed by Lasse Hallström, based on John Irving's novel of the same name. The film had its world premiere at the 56th Venice Film Festival. The film tells of the coming-of-age of Homer Wells, who lives in a World War II-era Maine orphanage run by a doctor who performs illegal abortions. The film won two Academy Awards: Irving won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, while Michael Caine won his second Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture, along with four other nominations at the 72nd Academy Awards. Irving documented his involvement in bringing the novel to the screen in his book, My Movie Business. Plot Homer Wells, an orphan, grows up in a Maine orphanage directed by kindly, avuncular Dr. Wilbur Larch. Homer is returned twice by foster parents; his first foster parents thought he was too quiet and the second parents beat him. Dr. Larch is addicted to ether and also secretly performs ...more...

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Guilty (Richard Whiting, Harry Akst and Gus Kahn song)

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Guilty (Richard Whiting, Harry Akst and Gus Kahn song)

"Guilty" is a popular song published in 1931. The music was written by Richard A. Whiting and Harry Akst. The lyrics were written by Gus Kahn. The song was popularized by Margaret Whiting (Richard Whiting's daughter) and by Johnny Desmond in 1946. The Whiting recording was made on October 9, 1946, and released by Capitol Records (catalog number 324). It reached No. 4 on the Billboard chart. The Desmond recording was made on December 6, 1946, and released by RCA Victor (catalog number 20-2109). It reached No. 12 on the Billboard chart. An early version was featured on the soundtrack of Jean-Pierre Jeunet's 2001 film, Amélie, a Decca recording made on December 2, 1931 by Al Bowlly, a popular British singer of the thirties, accompanied by Roy Fox and his Orchestra.[1][2] Al Bowlly also recorded the song on several other occasions. Other recordings were made by: Bing Crosby on November 7, 1931, recorded on radio, for Cremo Cigars Ruth Etting on September 1, 1931, originally issued on Columbia 2529-D (Matr ...more...

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Leonard Whiting

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Leonard Whiting

Leonard Whiting (born 30 June 1950) is an English actor and singer who is best known for his role as Romeo in the 1968 Zeffirelli film version of Romeo and Juliet opposite Olivia Hussey's Juliet, a role which earned him the Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year – Actor. Early life Whiting was born in the Wood Green area of London, England, the only son of Peggy Joyce (O'Sullivan) and Arthur Leonard Whiting. He has English, Irish and some Romani/Gypsy ancestry. Whiting attended the St. Richard of Chichester School, Camden Town, leaving just a week or two before beginning work on Romeo and Juliet (1968). Career Whiting was spotted by an agent at the Connaught Rooms where he was performing at a Jewish wedding at the age of 12. He only sang one song ("Summertime") which he had rehearsed as a one-off song with the group Teal Lewis and the Fourtunes, who were the entertainment for the evening. This was set up by his father to get him noticed. After hearing him sing, the agent suggested he try out for Lion ...more...

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Too Marvelous for Words

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Too Marvelous for Words

"Too Marvelous for Words" is a popular song written in 1937. Johnny Mercer wrote the lyrics for music composed by Richard Whiting. It was featured in the 1937 Warner Brothers film Ready, Willing and Able, as well as a production number in a musical revue on Broadway. The song has become a pop standard and has been recorded by many artists. Overview The song was used as the love theme for the characters played by Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart in the 1947 film noir Dark Passage, directed by Delmer Daves. It was introduced in a version sung by Jo Stafford, then recurred as an instrumental at important points in the story. Harry James recorded a version in 1947 on Columbia 37851. Alec Wilder has praised the song as a "model of pop song writing, musically and lyrically".[1] He cited its surprising shifts in rhythm and key. The lyrics have won praise as sophisticated and perfectly synchronized with the tune. In the opinion of at least one critic, Mercer borrowed some of the lyric techniques and wordplay fro ...more...

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Breezin' Along with the Breeze

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Breezin' Along with the Breeze

"Breezin' Along with the Breeze" is a popular song. It was written by Haven Gillespie, Seymour Simons, and Richard Whiting and published in 1926. Popular versions in 1926 and 1927 were by Johnny Marvin, Abe Lyman, The Revelers and Hoosier Hot Shots.[1] The song was used as a signature tune by Fred Waring.[2] Film appearances Shine on Harvest Moon (1944) where it was sung by Dennis Morgan and Ann Sheridan (dubbed by Lynn Martin). The Jazz Singer (1952)[3] It was used as the theme song for the hit 1953 MGM film The Long, Long Trailer. The Helen Morgan Story aka Both Ends of the Candle (1957) – sung by Ann Blyth (dubbed by Gogi Grant) "Friendly Neighbors" 1940 film Republic Pictures entry in Weaver Bros and Elviry series of rural comedies. Sung by Cliff (Ukelele Ike) Edwards (the voice of Jiminie Crickett in Walt Disney's "Pinocchio". Other notable recordings Bing Crosby – recorded the song in 1956[4] for use on his radio show and it was subsequently included in the box set The Bing Crosby CBS ...more...

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Louise (Maurice Chevalier song)

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Louise (Maurice Chevalier song)

"Louise" is a song written by Leo Robin & Richard A. Whiting for the 1929 film Innocents of Paris, where it was performed by Maurice Chevalier.[2][3] The song was Chevalier's first hit in the United States, and was among the best selling records for 10 weeks in the summer of 1929.[4] Chevalier recorded the song again in 1946 with Henri René's Orchestra - RCA VICTOR-25-0093-A.[5] Other recordings Bing Crosby also recorded the song in 1929.[4] The Crosby version was recorded on March 15, 1929 with Paul Whiteman and his orchestra[6] and was also a hit in the summer of 1929.[4] Crosby also recorded a comedy version with The Rhythm Boys on April 10, 1929. Ben Pollack & His Central Park Orchestra, vocal Charles Roberts, (recorded March 1, 1929 for Victor Records - catalog No. 21941A).[7] Frankie Trumbauer, (recorded April 17, 1929 for Okeh Records, catalog No. 41231).[8] Benny Goodman (recorded December 12, 1938 for Victor Records, catalog No. 26125).[9] Dean Martin also recorded the song a ...more...

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The Dance of Life

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The Dance of Life

The Dance of Life The Dance of Life (1929) is the first of three film adaptations of the popular Broadway play Burlesque, the others being Swing High, Swing Low (1937) and When My Baby Smiles at Me (1948). The Dance of Life was shot at Paramount's Astoria Studios in Astoria, Queens, and included Technicolor sequences, directed by John Cromwell and A. Edward Sutherland. In 1957, the film entered the public domain (in the USA) due to the claimants failure to renew its copyright registration in the 28th year after publication.[1] Cast Hal Skelly as "Skid" Johnson Nancy Carroll as Bonny King Dorothy Revier as Sylvia Marco Ralph Theodore as Harvey Howell Charles D. Brown as Lefty Al St. John as Bozo May Boley as Gussie Oscar Levant as Jerry Marjorie Kane (uncredited) Plot Burlesque comic Ralph "Skid" Johnson (Skelly), and specialty dancer Bonny Lee King (Carroll), end up together on a cold, rainy night at a train station, after she fails an audition and he complains about her treatment by ...more...

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Raymond B. Egan

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Raymond B. Egan

Raymond Blanning Egan (November 14, 1890 – October 13, 1952) was a songwriter. Egan was born in Windsor, Ontario. He moved to the United States in 1892 and settled in Michigan where he attended the University of Michigan. His first job was a bank clerk, but he soon moved on to be a staff writer for Ginnells Music Co. in Detroit. He wrote songs for Broadway acts such as Robinson Crusoe, Jr., Silks and Satins, Holka Polka and Earl Carroll’s Sketch Book of 1935. He also wrote a number of songs for films such as Paramount on Parade, Red-Headed Woman, and The Prizefighter and the Lady. He later went on to writing songs with Walter Donaldson, Ted Fiorito, Harry Tierney, Richard A. Whiting. and Gus Kahn. Wikisource has original works written by or about:Raymond B. Egan Some of his songs are: "Coaling Up in Colon Town" (1916). m: Richard A. Whiting[1] "Bravest Heart of All" (1917). m: Richard A. Whiting[1] "I Wonder Where My Buddies Are To-Night" (1917). m: Richard A. Whiting[1] "So Long, Mother" (1917) ...more...

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Till We Meet Again (1918 song)

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Till We Meet Again (1918 song)

Till We Meet Again A 1919 performance of Till We Meet Again by the Nicholas Orlandos Orchestra Problems playing this file? See media help. "Till We Meet Again" is an American popular song. The music was written by Richard A. Whiting, the lyrics by Raymond B. Egan in 1918. Written during the Great War, the song tells of the parting of a soldier and his sweetheart. The title comes from the final line of the chorus: Smile the while you kiss me sad adieu, When the clouds roll by I'll come to you, Then the skies will seem more blue, Down in lovers lane my dearie, Wedding bells will ring so merrily, Every tear will be a memory, So wait and pray each night for me, Till we meet again. As Whiting's daughter Margaret tells it, the song was intended for a 1918 contest at a Detroit theater. Dissatisfied with the result, Whiting threw the manuscript in the trash. His secretary retrieved it and showed it to their boss, publisher Jerome Remick, who submitted it in the contest, where it won top honors. The so ...more...

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Richard H. Whiting

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Richard H. Whiting

Richard Henry Whiting (January 17, 1826 – May 24, 1888) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois. He was the uncle of Rep. Ira Clifton Copley, and the grandfather of composer Richard A. Whiting. Born in West Hartford, Connecticut, Whiting attended the common schools. He moved to Altona, Illinois, in 1850, thence to Galesburg, Illinois, in 1860, where he built a gas works. During the Civil War he served in the Union Army as paymaster of Volunteers 1862-1866. He was appointed assessor of internal revenue for the fifth district of Illinois in February 1870, serving until May 20, 1873, when the office was abolished. He was appointed collector of internal revenue for the same district May 20, 1873, with office at Peoria, Illinois, and served until his resignation on March 4, 1875, having been elected to Congress. Whiting was elected as a Republican to the Forty-fourth Congress (March 4, 1875 - March 3, 1877). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1876. He served as delegate to the Republican National Convent ...more...

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Oscar Hammerstein II

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Oscar Hammerstein II

Oscar Greeley Clendenning Hammerstein II (; July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was an American librettist, theatrical producer, and (usually uncredited) theatre director of musicals for almost forty years. Hammerstein won eight Tony Awards and two Academy Awards for Best Original Song. Many of his songs are standard repertoire for vocalists and jazz musicians. He co-wrote 850 songs. Hammerstein was the lyricist and playwright in his partnerships; his collaborators wrote the music. Hammerstein collaborated with numerous composers, such as Jerome Kern, with whom he wrote Show Boat, Vincent Youmans, Rudolf Friml, Richard A. Whiting and Sigmund Romberg; but he is best known for his collaborations with Richard Rodgers, as the duo Rodgers and Hammerstein which include Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I, and The Sound of Music. Early life Oscar Greeley Clendenning Hammerstein II was born in New York City, the son of Alice Hammerstein (née Nimmo) and theatrical manager William Hammerstein.[1] His gran ...more...

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Great Songwriting Partners

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Blonde Venus

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Blonde Venus

Blonde Venus is a 1932 American pre-Code drama film starring Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall and Cary Grant. The film was produced and directed by Josef von Sternberg from a screenplay by Jules Furthman, and S. K. Lauren adapted from a story by Furthman and von Sternberg. The original story "Mother Love" was written by Dietrich herself. The musical score was by W. Franke Harling, John Leipold, Paul Marquardt and Oscar Potoker, with cinematography by Bert Glennon. It was distributed by Paramount Pictures. Dietrich performs three musical numbers in this film, including the now-obscure "You Little So-and-So" (music and lyrics by Sam Coslow and Leo Robin) and "I Couldn't Be Annoyed" (music and lyrics by Leo Robin and Richard A. Whiting). The highlight is the infamous "Hot Voodoo" (music by Ralph Rainger, lyrics by Sam Coslow), which is nearly 8 minutes in length and mostly instrumental, featuring jazz trumpet and drums. Dietrich sings the lyrics toward the end of this sequence, which takes place in a nightclu ...more...

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Barbara Whiting Smith

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Barbara Whiting Smith

The Whiting sisters in 1955; Barbara is the brunette and Margaret is the blonde. Barbara Whiting Smith (May 19, 1931 – June 9, 2004) was an actress in movies and on radio and television, primarily in the 1940s and 1950s. She received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Background Barbara was born in Los Angeles to Richard and Eleanor Whiting. Her father was a composer who wrote classics such as "Hooray for Hollywood," "Too Marvelous for Words," "On the Good Ship Lollipop," "Ain't We Got Fun?," and "Till We Meet Again".[1] Career Her movie career began with the 1945 film, Junior Miss, a movie based on her popular radio show by the same name.[1] This was followed by nine other starring roles until she married Gail Smith and retired. On television, she co-starred with her sister, Margaret in Those Whiting Girls on CBS. The program debuted July 4, 1955, as a summer replacement for I Love Lucy.[2] Select film credits Centennial Summer (1946) Home, Sweet Homicide (1946) Carnival in Costa Rica (1947) ...more...

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Hooray for Hollywood

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Hooray for Hollywood

"Hooray for Hollywood" is a song first featured in the 1937 movie Hollywood Hotel, and which has since become (together with "That's Entertainment" and "Another Op'nin', Another Show") the staple soundtrack element of any Academy Awards ceremony. It is even frequently played during non-American movie ceremonies, e.g. the French César Awards. The popularity of the song is notably due to the lyrics by Johnny Mercer, which reference the American movie industry and satirize the illusory desire of many people to become famous as actors. Composition The music was composed by Richard A. Whiting. In the original movie it was sung by Johnnie Davis and Frances Langford, accompanied by Benny Goodman and his orchestra. Lyrics can be difficult to fully understand today, as they refer to people (e.g. Aimee Semple) or cultural elements (e.g. rotos) which have since been forgotten. The lyrics have also evolved over the years. Notably, the line "where any shopgirl can be a top girl, if she pleases the tired businessman" va ...more...

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On the Good Ship Lollipop

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On the Good Ship Lollipop

"On the Good Ship Lollipop" was the signature song of child actress Shirley Temple.[1][2] Temple first sang it in the 1934 movie Bright Eyes.[3] The song was composed by Richard A. Whiting and the lyrics were supplied by Sidney Clare. In the song, the "Good Ship Lollipop" travels to a candy land. The "ship" referred to in the song is an aircraft; the scene in Bright Eyes, where the song appears, takes place on a taxiing American Airlines Douglas DC-2.[4][5] 400,000 copies of the sheet music, published by Sam Fox Publishing Company were sold,[5] and a recording by Mae Questel (the cartoon voice of Betty Boop and Olive Oyl) reputedly sold more than two million copies.[6] In 2004 it finished at #69 in AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema. Other recordings 1935 Rudy Vallee and His Connecticut Yankees, recorded for Victor on December 24, 1934 (catalog No. 24838).[7] This was very popular in 1935.[8] 1935 Ted Fio Rito - recorded for Brunswick Records (catalog No. 7364) on Augus ...more...

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Beyond the Blue Horizon (song)

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Beyond the Blue Horizon (song)

"Beyond the Blue Horizon" is a 1930 song composed by Leo Robin, Richard A. Whiting, and W. Franke Harling. Jeanette MacDonald introduced the song in the 1930 film Monte Carlo. Her version reached #9 in the United States.[1] Cover versions George Olsen and His Orchestra released a version in 1930. The song reached #5 in the United States.[2] Phil Spitalny and His Orchestra released a version in 1930. The song reached #18 in the United States.[3] Clifford Jordan released a version on his 1957 album Cliff Jordan. Jack Pleis, His Piano, Chorus and Orchestra released a version in 1957 on his album Strings and Things. Jane Morgan - from her album Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue (1958).[4] Frankie Laine - included in his album Call of the Wild (1962).[5] Johnny Mathis released a version on his 1964 album The Wonderful World of Make Believe.[6] Michael Nesmith released a version on his 1970 album Magnetic South and featured on his 1993 album Complete First Natio ...more...

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Ukulele Lady

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Ukulele Lady

"Ukulele Lady" is a popular standard, an old evergreen song by Gus Kahn and Richard A. Whiting. Published in 1925, the song was first made famous by Vaughn De Leath.[1] It has been recorded by the Paul Whiteman Orchestra with vocals by the Southern Fall Colored Quartet on June 3, 1925 (catalog No. 19690B);[2] Frank Crumit recorded June 10, 1925 for Victor Records (catalog No. 19701);[3] Lee Morse in 1925; Peter Sellers with The Temperance Seven, produced by George Martin, in 1960 (for the album Peter and Sophia);[4] Jim Kweskin and the Jug Band in 1965; Arlo Guthrie on his 1972 album Hobo's Lullaby; and was performed by Kermit the Frog and Miss Piggy in the second season of The Muppet Show. Bing Crosby recorded the song for his radio show in 1960[5] and it was subsequently released on the CD Return to Paradise Islands (2010).[6] Bette Midler first performed the song live in the 1997 TV special "Diva Las Vegas" as a tribute to her native Hawaii. Midler later recorded the song for her album Bathhouse Betty. ...more...

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Sing, Baby, Sing

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Sing, Baby, Sing

Sing, Baby, Sing is a 1936 American film. Richard A. Whiting and Walter Bullock received an Academy Award nomination in Best Original Song at the 9th Academy Awards for their song "When Did You Leave Heaven". Plot After Joan Warren (Alice Faye) is fired from her singing job at the Ritz Club, where she performs with the Ritz Brothers, she seeks help from theatrical agent, Nicky Alexander (Gregory Ratoff). Nicky, however, is in the process of being evicted from his office suite, so he tells her to find another agent. When she insists that he represent her, he takes her to Mr. Brewster (Paul Stanton), president of the Federal Broadcasting Company, and Joan auditions, but Brewster refuses to hire her because she is not of the upper class. Back at the club, Joan packs her bags, while in the street, a crowd gathers around drunken actor Bruce Farraday (Adolphe Menjou). Nicky leads Farraday into the club, where Farraday orders a huge feast and hears Joan perform her last song. After more wine, Farraday passes out, ...more...

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Bright Eyes (1934 film)

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Bright Eyes (1934 film)

Bright Eyes is a 1934 American comedy drama film directed by David Butler. The screenplay by William Conselman is based on a story by David Butler and Edwin Burke, and focuses on the relationship between bachelor aviator James "Loop" Merritt (James Dunn) and his orphaned godchild, Shirley Blake (Shirley Temple). Merritt becomes involved in a custody battle for her with a rich, elderly gentleman. The film featured one musical number, "On the Good Ship Lollipop". Bright Eyes was the first film to be written and developed specifically for Temple,[2] and the first in which her name was raised above the title.[1] In February 1935, she received a special Academy Award for her 1934 contributions to film, particularly Little Miss Marker and Bright Eyes. In 2009, the film was available on VHS and DVD in both black-and-white and colorized versions. Plot 5 year-old Shirley Blake (Shirley Temple) and her mother, Mary (Lois Wilson), a maid, live in the home of her employers, the rich and mean-spirited Smythe family, Ani ...more...

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Cafe Hon

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Cafe Hon

Cafe Hon is a restaurant in the Hampden area of Baltimore, Maryland, and the site of the annual HonFest every June. History Opened by Denise Whiting in 1992, Cafe Hon takes its name from a common term of endearment ("hon" - an abbreviated version of the word "honey") used by Baltimore residents for years. In 2010, Whiting announced the opening of HONtown, a gift shop across the street from the restaurant. In 2014, the gift shop relocated to a smaller space next door to the restaurant. On February 24, 2012, Cafe Hon was featured in an episode of the Fox network's Kitchen Nightmares with Gordon Ramsay.[1] Flamingo In 2002, the distinct flamingo sculpture was introduced above the restaurant.[2] The original flamingo was made of wire and cloth.[3] In October 2009, the city of Baltimore announced the Cafe Hon had to either get a permit for the flamingo at a cost of $1300 for the first year and $800 each year thereafter or to take it down.[4] The issue was that the flamingo protruded into the public right-of- ...more...

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The Japanese Sandman

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The Japanese Sandman

"The Japanese Sandman" is a song from 1920, composed by Richard A. Whiting and with lyrics by Raymond B. Egan. Content The song is about a sandman from Japan, who exchanges yesterdays for tomorrows. The number has a very Oriental atmosphere, and is similar to many other songs from the interwar period who sing about a dreamy, exotic setting. Nora Bayes made a popular recording of the song in 1920. The song was Paul Whiteman's first record and sold over two million copies. It has been subsequently performed by several musical artists like Art Hickman, Benny Goodman, Bix Beiderbecke, Artie Shaw, Earl Hines, Paul Young, Django Reinhardt, the Andrews Sisters, Freddy Gardner, Freddy Sunder, and in 2010, a high-fidelity recording of Whiteman's historic arrangement, by Vince Giordano and his Nighthawks Orchestra. Additionally, the song was recorded by the Nazi German propaganda band Charlie and his Orchestra. For propaganda reasons, the lyrics were changed through references to the Japanese Empire. In popular cu ...more...

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I Can't Escape from You

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I Can't Escape from You

"I Can't Escape from You" is a song written by Leo Robin and Richard A. Whiting for the 1936 Paramount Film "Rhythm on the Range", and first introduced in the film when Bing Crosby sang it to Frances Farmer. Crosby recorded it for Decca Records that same year with the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra[1] and it was in the hit parade for 11 weeks reaching a peak position of No. 7.[2] Crosby recorded the song again in 1954 for his album Bing: A Musical Autobiography. Other notable recordings 1936 Bunny Berigan and the Rhythm Makers (vocal: Peggy Lawson) recorded July 20, 1936. [3] 1936 Erskine Hawkins and his 'Bama State Collegians - recorded for Vocalion on July 20, 1936 (catalog No. 3280).[4] 1936 Eddy Duchin and His Orchestra (vocal: Jerry Cooper) - recorded for Victor on May 29, 1936, catalog 25347.[5] 1936 Jimmie Lunceford and His Orchestra - recorded for Decca October 14, 1936.[6] 1944 Benny Carter and His Orchestra - recorded May 21, 1944 for Capitol (40048).[7] 1945 Artie Shaw recorded July 28, 1945 f ...more...

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Take a Chance (musical)

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Take a Chance (musical)

Take a Chance (1932) is a musical with lyrics by B. G. De Sylva and music by Nacio Herb Brown and Richard A. Whiting, with additional songs by Vincent Youmans, and book by De Sylva and Laurence Schwab. Background Take a Chance started as a musical titled Humpty Dumpty written by DeSylva and Schwab, which flopped immediately during out-of town tryouts in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where it had opened on September 26, 1932. The musical was extensively rewritten, and composer Vincent Youmans was brought in to contribute to the score. After further tryouts in Philadelphia, Wilmington, Delaware, and Newark, New Jersey, the musical was renamed, and the book, music, and cast had changed, leaving only Ethel Merman.[1] Composer Richard Whiting subsequently left the production.[2][3] Production The musical opened on Broadway at the Apollo Theatre on November 26, 1932 and closed on July 1, 1933 after 243 performances. Directed by Edgar MacGregor with choreography by Bobby Connolly, the show starred Ethel Merman as Wand ...more...

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A Day in Hollywood / A Night in the Ukraine

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A Day in Hollywood / A Night in the Ukraine

A Day in Hollywood/A Night in the Ukraine is a musical comedy consisting of two essentially independent one-act plays, with a book and lyrics by Dick Vosburgh and music by Frank Lazarus. Additionally, songs by other composers are incorporated into the score. The musical premiered in the West End and then ran on Broadway. Plot overview The first act, A Day in Hollywood, is a revue of classic Hollywood songs of the 1930s performed by singers and dancers representing ushers from Grauman's Chinese Theatre. The second, A Night in the Ukraine, is loosely based on Anton Chekhov's one-act play The Bear, and is presented in the style of a Marx Brothers movie. In a review of a regional production the reviewer from The New York Times commented that the musical "...has a hybrid score that lists music by Frank Lazarus, with book and lyrics by Dick Vosburgh, additional songs composed by Jerry Herman and a solid midsection medley devoted to the prolific composer of popular movie music, Richard A. Whiting. We are treated ...more...

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Close Harmony (1929 film)

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Close Harmony (1929 film)

Close Harmony (1929) is an American Pre-Code comedy-drama musical film released by Paramount Pictures. Plot A musically talented young woman named Marjorie who is part of a stage show, meets a warehouse clerk named Al West who has put together an unusual jazz band. She becomes interested in him and his work and so manages to use her influence to get him into the program for one of the shows at her theatre company. The manager, Max Mindel has a dislike towards Marjorie so after discovering her affection towards Al, he gives the band notice and hires harmony singers Barney and Bey as a replacement. Marjorie makes up to both men and soon breaks up the duo, getting rid of the competition. Al learns of her scheme, and makes her confess to the singers of her deeds. Barney and Bey make up, and Max gives Al and his band one more chance. Al is a sensation, and Max offers him a contract for $1,000 a week. Cast Charles 'Buddy' Rogers - Al West Nancy Carroll - Marjorie Merwin Harry Green - Max Mindel Jack Oa ...more...

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Bobby Short

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Bobby Short

Robert Waltrip Short (September 15, 1924 – March 21, 2005) was an American cabaret singer and pianist, best known for his interpretations of songs by popular composers of the first half of the 20th century such as Rodgers and Hart, Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, Harold Arlen, Richard A. Whiting, Vernon Duke, Noël Coward and George and Ira Gershwin. He also championed African-American composers of the same period such as Eubie Blake, James P. Johnson, Andy Razaf, Fats Waller, Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn, presenting their work not in a polemical way, but as simply the obvious equal of that of their white contemporaries. His dedication to his great love – what he called the "Great American Song" – left him equally adept at performing the witty lyrics of Bessie Smith's "Gimme a Pigfoot (And a Bottle of Beer)" or Gershwin and Duke's "I Can't Get Started". Short stated his favorite songwriters were Ellington, Arlen and Kern, and he was instrumental in spearheading the construction of the Ellington Memorial in N ...more...

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Let's Go Native

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Let's Go Native

Let's Go Native is a 1930 American pre-Code black-and-white musical comedy film, directed by Leo McCarey and released by Paramount Pictures. Jerry comments on being the only man on an island populated by women, "It was one of the Virgin Islands, but it drifted." The tagline was: "Paramount's wild, merry, mad hilarious farce!" Cast Jack Oakie - Voltaire McGinnis Jeanette MacDonald - Joan Wood Richard "Skeets" Gallagher - Jerry, King of the Island James Hall - Wally Wendell William Austin - Basil Pistol Kay Francis - Constance Cook David Newell - Chief Officer Williams Charles Sellon - Wallace Wendell Sr. Eugene Pallette - Deputy Sheriff 'Careful' Cuthbert Iris Adrian - Chorus Girl Virginia Bruce - Chorus Girl Soundtrack "It Seems To Be Spring" Lyrics by George Marion Jr. Music by Richard A. Whiting Copyright 1930 by Famous Music Corp. "Let's Go Native" Lyrics by George Marion Jr. Music by Richard A. Whiting Copyright 1930 by Famous Music Corp. "My Mad Moment" Lyrics by Geor ...more...

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Whiting, Indiana

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Whiting, Indiana

Demographics (2010)[9] White Black Asian 76.3% 3.5% 0.7% Islander Native Other Hispanic(any race) 0.0% 0.7% 18.8% 40.7% Whiting is a city located in the Chicago Metropolitan Area in Lake County, Indiana, which was founded in 1889. The city is located on the southern shore of Lake Michigan. It is roughly 16 miles from the Chicago Loop and two miles from Chicago's South Side. Whiting is home to Whiting Refinery, the largest oil refinery in the Midwest. The population was 4,997 at the 2010 census. History A post office was first established at Whiting in 1871.[10] Whiting was incorporated in 1895.[11] The Hoosier Theater Building and Whiting Memorial Community House are listed in the National Register of Historic Places.[12] Geography According to the 2010 census, Whiting has a total area of 3.229 square miles (8.36 km2), of which 1.8 square miles (4.66 km2) (or 55.74%) is land and 1.429 square miles (3.70 km2) (or 44.26%) is water.[13] The Whiting post office (46394) serves ...more...

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Margaret Young

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Margaret Young

Margaret Youngblood (February 23, 1891 – May 3, 1969) better known by her stage name Margaret Young, was an American singer and comedian who was popular in the 1920s. Young is best known for her songs "Hard Hearted Hannah", "Lovin' Sam The Sheik Of Alabam'", "Way Down Yonder In New Orleans", and "Oh By Jingo!". Biography She was born in Detroit, Michigan on February 23, 1891. She had four sisters; three older and one younger. Young began her professional career in Detroit, Michigan. She sang at theaters, dinner clubs, and on Vaudeville. Young first recorded commercially for the Victor Talking Machine Company in 1920. She recorded a series of records for Brunswick from 1922 through 1925 which sold well. She continued as a popular entertainer until the end of the decade. Young came out of retirement to record for Capitol Records in 1949. Her sister was married to composer Richard A. Whiting, some of whose songs she introduced, and her niece Margaret Whiting also would become a popular singer throughout the ...more...

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Innocents of Paris

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Innocents of Paris

Innocents of Paris is a 1929 black and white American musical film. Directed by Richard Wallace and is based on the play Flea Market, the film was the first musical production by Paramount Pictures. Cast Maurice Chevalier - Maurice Marney Sylvia Beecher - Louise Leval Russell Simpson - Emile Leval George Fawcett - Monsieur Marny John Miljan - Monsieur Renard Margaret Livingston - Madame Renard Jack Luden - Jules Johnnie Morris - Musician Soundtrack "It's A Habit Of Mine" Words by Leo Robin Music by Richard A. Whiting Copyright 1929 by Famous Music Corp. "Wait 'Til You See Ma Cherie" Words by Leo Robin Music by Richard A. Whiting Copyright 1929 by Famous Music Corp. "On Top Of The World, Alone" Words by Leo Robin Music by Richard A. Whiting Copyright 1929 by Famous Music Corp. "Louise"[1] Words by Leo Robin Music by Richard A. Whiting Sung by Maurice Chevalier Copyright 1929 by Famous Music Corp. References http://new.music.yahoo.com/maurice-chevalier/tracks/louis ...more...

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Johnny Mercer

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Johnny Mercer

John Herndon Mercer (November 18, 1909 – June 25, 1976) was an American lyricist, songwriter and singer. He was also a record label executive, who co-founded Capitol Records with music industry businessman Buddy DeSylva and Glenn E. Wallichs.[1] He is best known as a tin pan alley lyricist, but he also composed music. He was also a popular singer who recorded his own songs as well as those written by others. From the mid-1930s through the mid-1950s, many of the songs Mercer wrote and performed were among the most popular hits of the time. He wrote the lyrics to more than fifteen hundred songs, including compositions for movies and Broadway shows. He received nineteen Academy Award nominations, and won four Best Original Song Oscars. Early life Mercer was born in Savannah, Georgia. His father, George Anderson Mercer, was a prominent attorney and real estate developer, and his mother, Lillian Elizabeth (née Ciucevich), George Mercer's secretary and then second wife, was the daughter of a Croatian immigrant f ...more...

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William F. Whiting

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William F. Whiting

William Fairfield Whiting (July 20, 1864 – August 31, 1936) was United States Secretary of Commerce from August 22, 1928 to March 4, 1929, during the last months of the administration of Calvin Coolidge. Early life and career Whiting was born on July 20, 1864, in Holyoke, Massachusetts. He was the son of Massachusetts politician and businessman William Whiting and his wife Anna Morgan (née Fairfield).[2] He attended Amherst College and graduated in the class of 1896 alongside future Secretary of State Robert Lansing.[2] When Whiting's father, who organized the Whiting Paper Company, became president of that business, William Fairfield Whiting became treasurer.[3] When his father died, Whiting became president of the Whiting Paper Company and his brother Samuel Raynor Whiting became treasurer.[3] He became a lifelong friend of future President Coolidge when Coolidge was mayor of Northampton, Massachusetts.[4] Later, Whiting and Frank Stearns were the first two "Coolidge Men" who advocated their friend as a ...more...

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Great American Songbook

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Great American Songbook

The Great American Songbook, also known as "American Standards", is the canon of the most important and influential American popular songs and jazz standards from the early 20th century. Although several collections of music have been published under the title, it does not refer to any actual book or specific list of songs, but to a loosely defined set including the most popular and enduring songs from the 1920s to the 1950s that were created for Broadway theatre, musical theatre, and Hollywood musical film. They have been recorded and performed by a large number and wide range of singers, instrumental bands, and jazz musicians. The Great American Songbook comprises standards by George Gershwin, Cole Porter, and Irving Berlin, and also Jerome Kern, Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer, Richard Rodgers, and others.[1][2][3][4][5] Although the songs have never gone out of style among traditional and jazz singers and musicians, a renewed popular interest in the Great American Songbook beginning in the 1970s has led a gr ...more...

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Wendy Moten

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Wendy Moten

Wendy Moten (born November 22, 1965, Memphis, Tennessee) is an American singer, best known for the single "Come In Out of the Rain", which was a No. 8 hit in the UK in February 1994.[1] Early life and career Born in Memphis, Moten sang in church choirs as a child. Wendy attended Overton High School in Memphis, TN and sang in the nationally known Overton Choir under the direction of the late Lulah M. Hedgeman. She got her first break singing with Michael Bolton at a benefit concert; after signing with EMI, in 1992 she released her self-titled debut album and opened for Bolton on tour.[2] Moten's biggest hit single was "Come in Out of the Rain", which, although a minor hit in 1993 on the Billboard Hot 100, was a No. 5 adult contemporary hit, and also reached the Top 10 in the UK Singles Chart, where it peaked at No. 8 in 1994. A follow up single, "So Close to Love", reached No. 35 in the UK Top 40. In 2006, Moten sang back-up vocals on the Soul2Soul II Tour with Tim McGraw and Faith Hill. She contributed bac ...more...

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Miss Brown to You

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Miss Brown to You

"Miss Brown to You" is a song with music composed by Richard A. Whiting and Ralph Rainger, and lyrics written by Leo Robin. It was first recorded on July 25, 1935 by Billie Holiday accompanied by Teddy Wilson and his orchestra. This version is featured on Lady Day: The Complete Billie Holiday on Columbia 1933–1944. A live favourite, Holiday recorded the song many times, most notably in June, 1949 for the FRS radio broadcast, Just Jazz in Los Angeles with Neal Hefti on trumpet, Herbie Harper on trombone, Herbie Steward on clarinet and tenor saxophone, Jimmy Rowles on piano, Robert "Iggy" Shevak on bass, and Blinkie Garner on drums, at the Storyville Club in Boston on October 31, 1951 accompanied by Buster Harding on piano, John Field on bass, and Marquis Foster on drums, and at the Carnegie Hall, New York City, on November 10, 1956 with Her Orchestra formed by Roy Eldridge on trumpet, Coleman Hawkins on tenor saxophone, Carl Drinkard on piano, Kenny Burrell on guitar, Carson Smith on bass, and Chico Hamilton o ...more...

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Whiting Awards

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Whiting Awards

The Whiting Award is an American award presented annually to ten emerging writers in fiction, nonfiction, poetry and plays. The award is sponsored by the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation and has been presented since 1985. As of 2007, winners receive US$50,000.[1][2] The nominees are chosen through a juried process, and the final winners are selected by a committee of writers, scholars, and editors, selected each year by the Foundation. Writers cannot apply for the prize themselves, and the Foundation does not accept unsolicited nominations.[3] Year Recipients 2018 Anne Boyer, nonfiction, poetry Patty Yumi Cottrell, fiction Nathan Alan Davis, drama Hansol Yung, drama Rickey Laurentiis, poetry Antoinette Nwandu, drama Tommy Pico, poetry Brontez Purnell, fiction Esmé Weijun Wang, nonfiction Weike Wang, fiction 2017[4] Clare Barron, drama Jen Beagin, fiction Francisco Cantú, nonfiction Clarence Coo, drama Kaitlyn Greenidge, fiction Lisa Halliday, fiction James Ijames, drama Tony Tulathimut ...more...

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Hypnotique

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Hypnotique

Professional ratings Review scores Source Rating Allmusic [1] Hypnotique (LST-7102) was the fifth album by Martin Denny. Released on Liberty Records in 1959, it was recorded in 1958 at the Kamehameha Schools auditorium and at the Liberty Studios in Hollywood. Track listing Side A 1. "Jungle Madness" – 3:30 2. "On a Little Street in Singapore" (Peter DeRose, Billy Hill) – 2:30 3. "Voodoo Dreams" (Les Baxter) – 2:25 4. "Chinese Lullaby" (R. H. Bowers) – 2:52 5. "Hypnotique" (David M.) – 3:10 6. "St. Louis Blues" (W. C. Handy) – 2:39 Side B 1. "We Kiss in a Shadow" (Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein) – 3:00 2. "Summertime" (George Gershwin, DuBose Heyward) – 2:52 3. "Scimitar" (Les Baxter) – 2:30 4. "American in Bali" (Martin Denny) – 2:24 5. "Japanese Sandman" (Richard A. Whiting, Raymond B. Egan) – 1:30 Personnel Musicians and singers Martin Denny – piano, celeste, arranger, composer Augie Colon – bongos, congas, percussion, bird calls Julius Wechter – vibes, marimba, percussion Harvey Rag ...more...

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Why Bring That Up?

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Why Bring That Up?

Why Bring That Up? is a 1929 American Pre-Code black-and-white musical film starring minstrel show comedians Charles Mack and George Moran, as blackface team Two Black Crows.[1] The title of the film was part of the "vernacular of the day".[2] It was the duo's first talking comedy film.[3] Plot George's partner in vaudeville quits their act, claiming that Betty has broken his heart. George then teams up with Charlie, a stranded trouper, and Irving becomes their manager. Later, in New York, the "Two Black Crows" star in their own revue and save money to build their own theater on Broadway. Betty comes to the theater with her lover, who poses as a cousin and induces George to hire her. He showers her with jewels and money. She tries to persuade George to invest in oil stock her lover is selling, and though their act is a success, Charlie fires Betty. When Charlie and Betty's lover quarrel, Charlie is injured. Cast Charles Mack - Mack George Moran - Moran Evelyn Brent - Betty Harry Green - Irving Be ...more...

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Heaven Earth & Beyond

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Heaven Earth & Beyond

Heaven, Earth & Beyond is an album by the Swedish singer Lisa Ekdahl, released in 2002. Track listing "Rivers Of Love" (Salvadore Poe) "Open Door" (Salvadore Poe) "Deep Inside Your Dreams" (Salvadore Poe) "When Did You Leave Heaven?" (Richard A. Whiting, Walter Bullock) "All I Really Want Is Love" (Salvadore Poe) "It's Oh So Quiet" (Hans Lang, Erich Meder) "Daybreak" (Salvadore Poe) "Cry Me a River" (Arthur Hamilton) "Now Or Never" (Curtis Reginald Lewis, Billie Holiday) "My Heart Belongs To Daddy" (Cole Porter) "The Color Of You" (Salvadore Poe) "Nature Boy" (Eden Ahbez) "Sunny Weather" (Salvadore Poe) "I Can't Get Started" (Vernon Duke / Lyrics: Ira Gershwin) "But Not For Me" (George Gershwin / Lyrics: Ira Gershwin) "Stranger On Earth" (Sid Feller, Rick Ward) "Open Door" (Salvadore Poe) ...more...

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The Big Broadcast of 1936

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The Big Broadcast of 1936

The Big Broadcast of 1936 is a 1935 American comedy film directed by Norman Taurog, and is the second in the series of Big Broadcast movies.[1] The musical comedy starred Jack Oakie, Bing Crosby, George Burns, Gracie Allen, Ethel Merman, The Nicholas Brothers, Lyda Roberti, Wendy Barrie, Mary Boland, Charlie Ruggles, Akim Tamiroff, Amos 'n' Andy (Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll), Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, and Argentine tango singer Carlos Gardel.[2] The film featured an early appearance by Dorothy Dandridge (as one of the Dandridge Sisters). Uncredited roles include Jack Mulhall. Glenn Miller appears as part of the Ray Noble Orchestra. In Glenn Miller and His Orchestra (1974), George Thomas Simon noted that Glenn Miller was paid extra by Ray Noble "for working on The Big Broadcast of 1936, so that Glenn's total weekly pay" was $356.[3] The screen appearance of the Ray Noble orchestra was edited down to a very brief scene on the "televisor". The screenplay was by Walter DeLeon, Francis Martin, Ralph Spe ...more...

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Varsity Show (film)

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Varsity Show (film)

Varsity Show is a 1937 American musical film released by Warner Bros.. The film was directed by William Keighley from a script by Jerry Wald, Richard Macaulay, Warren Duff and Sig Herzig. The movie features songs by Richard A. Whiting and many others. The finale was directed by Busby Berkeley. Plot The film follows a group of students at fictional Winfield College who butt heads with their faculty advisor while producing an annual stage show. They decide to enlist help from a former student Chuck Daly (Dick Powell), who is now a big Broadway producer, to direct their show. What they don't know is that Daly's last three shows were big flops. Inevitably, Daly and students clash with the stodgy professor. After some turn of events and plot twists, the production is finally mounted in New York City with great success. Daly's reputation is rehabilitated. Cast Dick Powell as Charles 'Chuck' Daly Fred Waring and His Pennsylvanians as Fred Waring Orchestra Ted Healy as William Williams Rosemary Lane as Ba ...more...

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Haven Gillespie

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Haven Gillespie

James Lamont Gillespie (February 6, 1888 – March 14, 1975) pen name Haven Gillespie, was an American Tin Pan Alley composer and lyricist. He was the writer of "You Go to My Head", "Honey", "By the Sycamore Tree", "That Lucky Old Sun", "Breezin' Along With The Breeze", "Right or Wrong," "Beautiful Love", "Drifting and Dreaming", and "Louisiana Fairy Tale"([1]Fat's Waller's recording of which was used as the first theme song in the PBS Production of This Old House), each song in collaboration with other people such as Beasley Smith, Ervin R. Schmidt, Richard A. Whiting, Wayne King, and Loyal Curtis. He also wrote the seasonal "Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town" Life and career Gillespie was one of nine children of Anna (Reilley) and William F. Gillespie.[2] The family was poor and lived in the basement of a house on Third Street between Madison Avenue and Russell Street in Covington, Kentucky. Gillespie dropped out of school in the fourth grade and could not find a job. His older sister, Lillian, had married John ...more...

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1888 births

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Honey (Rudy Vallée song)

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Honey (Rudy Vallée song)

"Honey" Recorded by Rudy Vallée & His Connecticut Yankees in 1929 Problems playing this file? See media help. "Honey" is a popular song written by Seymour Simons, Haven Gillespie and Richard A. Whiting. The song was a 1929 hit for Rudy Vallée & his Connecticut Yankees when it charted for eight weeks at number one.[1] It was also featured in the 1945 film Her Highness and the Bellboy. References CD liner notes: Chart-Toppers of the Twenties, 1998 ASV Ltd. ...more...

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Songs with music by Richard A. Whiting

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Hollywood Hotel (film)

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Hollywood Hotel (film)

Hollywood Hotel is a 1937 American romantic musical comedy film, directed by Busby Berkeley, starring Dick Powell, Rosemary Lane, Lola Lane, Hugh Herbert, Ted Healy, Glenda Farrell and Johnnie Davis, featuring Alan Mowbray and Alan Todd, and with Allyn Joslyn, Grant Mitchell and Edgar Kennedy. The film was based on the popular Hollywood Hotel radio show created by gossip columnist Louella Parsons, where Hollywood stars recreated scenes from their latest movies. It was broadcast weekly from the hotel of that name,[1] The film's recreation of the program features Louella Parsons, Frances Langford, Raymond Paige and His Orchestra, Jerry Cooper, the announcer Ken Niles, Duane Thompson and Benny Goodman and His Orchestra. Hollywood Hotel, the film, is now best remembered for the featured song and opening number "Hooray for Hollywood" by Johnny Mercer and Richard A. Whiting, sung in the film by Davis and Langford, accompanied by Goodman and his orchestra. The song has become a standard part of the soundtrack to m ...more...

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First National Pictures films

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