Rabbit of Caerbannog

The Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog is a fictional character in the Monty Python film Monty Python and the Holy Grail.[1] The scene in Holy Grail was written by Graham Chapman and John Cleese.[2] The rabbit is the antagonist in a major set piece battle, and makes a similar appearance in Spamalot, a musical inspired by the movie.[3] The iconic status of this scene was important in establishing the viability of the musical.[4]

In the film

The Cave of Caerbannog is the home of the Legendary Black Beast of Arrrghhh (named for the last utterance of anyone who ever saw it).[5] This is guarded by a monster which is initially unknown.[6] King Arthur (Graham Chapman) and his knights are led to the cave by Tim the Enchanter (John Cleese) and find that they must face its guardian beast. Tim verbally paints a picture of a terrible monster with "nasty, big, pointy teeth!", so terrifying that Sir Robin (Eric Idle) soils his armour at the mere description. When the guardian appears to be an innocuous white rabbit,[7] surrounded by the bones of the fallen, Arthur and his knights no longer take it seriously. Ignoring Tim's warnings ("a vicious streak a mile wide!"), King Arthur orders Bors (Terry Gilliam) to chop the rabbit's head off. Bors confidently approaches it, sword drawn, and is immediately decapitated by the rabbit biting clean through his neck, to the sound of a can opener. Despite their initial shock, Sir Robin soiling his armor again, and Tim's loud scoffing, the knights attack in force. But the rabbit injures several of the knights and kills Gawain and Ector with ease. The knights themselves have no hope of killing or injuring the rabbit. Arthur panics and shouts for the knights to retreat ("Run away!"). Knowing they cannot risk attacking again, they try to find another way to defeat the beast. The Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch is ultimately used to kill the rabbit and allow the quest to proceed.[8]

Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch
The Sovereign's Orb of the United Kingdom, which The Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch satirises

The Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch is a visual satire of the Sovereign's Orb of the United Kingdom, and may refer to the mythical Holy Spear of Antioch. The Holy Hand Grenade is described as one of the "sacred relics" carried by Brother Maynard (Idle). Despite its ornate appearance and long-winded instructions, it functions much the same as any other hand grenade. At King Arthur's prompting, instructions for its use are read aloud (by Michael Palin) from the fictitious Book of Armaments, Chapter 2, verses 9–21, parodying the King James Bible and the Athanasian Creed:

...And Saint Attila raised the hand grenade up on high, saying, "O LORD, bless this Thy hand grenade that with it Thou mayest blow Thine enemies to tiny bits, in Thy mercy." And the LORD did grin and the people did feast upon the lambs and sloths and carp and anchovies and orangutans and breakfast cereals, and fruit bats and large chu... [At this point, the friar is urged by Brother Maynard to "skip a bit, brother"]... And the LORD spake, saying, "First shalt thou take out the Holy Pin, then shalt thou count to three, no more, no less. Three shall be the number thou shalt count, and the number of the counting shall be three. Four shalt thou not count, neither count thou two, excepting that thou then proceed to three. Five is right out. Once the number three, being the third number, be reached, then lobbest thou thy Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch towards thy foe, who, being naught in My sight, shall snuff it."[9]

Arthur then pulls the pin, holds up the Holy Hand Grenade and cries out "One! Two! Five!" Sir Galahad (Palin) corrects him: "Three, sir!" (Arthur's innumeracy is a running gag in the picture).[9] Arthur then yells "Three!" and hurls the grenade towards the rabbit. The grenade soars through the air – accompanied by a short bit of angelic choral music – bounces, and explodes. The killer rabbit is defeated, and the hapless knights errant continue on their quest. The noise also attracts policemen who were investigating the murder of a historian by a mounted knight earlier in the film.

Production

The rabbit scene was shot outside the Tomnadashan mine,[10] a cave 4 miles (6.5 km) from the Perthshire village of Killin. For the 25th anniversary DVD, Michael Palin and Terry Jones returned to be interviewed in front of the cave but they could not remember the location.[11][12]

The rabbit was portrayed in the movie by both a real rabbit and a prop.

Antecedents
The façade on Notre Dame that gave inspiration

The tale of the rabbit has a parallel in the early story of the Roman de Renart in which a foe takes hubristic pride in his defeat of a ferocious hare:[13]

Si li crachait en mi le vis
Et escopi par grant vertu[14]

The idea for the rabbit in the movie was taken from the façade of the cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris. This illustrates the weakness of cowardice by showing a knight fleeing from a rabbit.[15]

Merchandise

The rabbit has been reproduced in the form of merchandise associated with the movie or musical. Such items include plush toys,[16] slippers[17] and staplers.[18] The plush killer rabbit was rated the second geekiest plush toy of all time by Matt Blum of the GeekDad blog on Wired.com, coming second to the plush Cthulhu.[19]

Reception

The rabbit was declared the top movie bunny by David Cheal in The Daily Telegraph.[20] It also ranked high in an Easter 2008 poll to establish Britain's best movie rabbit, coming third to Roger Rabbit and Frank from Donnie Darko.[21]

Cultural impact

The rabbit is now used as a metaphor for something which seems ostensibly harmless but is, in fact, deadly.[22] Such hidden but real risks may even arise from similarly cuddly animals.[23] The humour of the scene comes from this inversion of the usual framework by which safety and danger are judged.[24] Four years after the release of the movie, Killer Rabbit was the term used widely by the press to describe the swamp rabbit that "attacked" the U.S. President Jimmy Carter while he was fishing on a farm pond.[25]

In Apple Inc.'s iOS system, Siri may say that the "Rabbit of Caerbannog" is its favorite animal when asked.[26][27]

Creatures & Treasures, a sourcebook for Iron Crown Enterprises' Rolemaster tabletop role-playing game, includes a "Killer Rabbit" monster entry. The creature's outlook is given as "Hostile", with a note that it "bounds for the throat, never for another part of the body." Another note in the description instructs the gamemaster to "treat 'exploding' attacks [made against the rabbit] as 'slaying' (H.H.G.O.A.)", a clear reference to the Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch.[28]

Both the Rabbit of Caerbannog and the Holy Hand Grenade appear in a rendition of the scene from the movie in Monty Python & the Quest for the Holy Grail, a PC CD-ROM adventure game created by 7th Level in 1996 for Windows.

The Holy Hand Grenade has made an appearance in many iterations of the Worms video game series, starting with Worms: The Director's Cut. It is a much-stronger (and somewhat different-acting) version of the "regular" hand grenades, and has the general appearance of the grenade from the film. As in the film, it has a three-second trigger and will usually only bounce once.

The Holy Hand grenade appears indirectly referenced in the game Team Fortress 2. It is in the Lumbricus Lid, a cosmetic item referencing the Worms series, replacing the Soldier's grenades with the Holy hand grenades from Worms, as well as adding a different helmet. Equipping the Lumbricus Lid will change the kill icon for the Kamikaze kill taunt to an image of the holy hand grenade.

One can also find a Holy Hand Grenade in the games Fallout 2 and Fallout: New Vegas, if the player has the Wild Wasteland Perk, the former having a special monster encounter also referencing the film, in which several Brotherhood of Steel Paladins in Power Armor are fighting an unusually powerful rat.

In Minecraft, there is a special rabbit that is white with red eyes. Minecraft rabbits are normally passive, but this follows and tries to kill the player character and when it does, the death message states: '[Playername] was slain by The Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog'. It can still be summoned using command blocks (an in-game scripting mechanic), but it no longer appears wild as of version 1.8 14w34a. [29]

In Ultimate Mortal Kombat 3, Kitana's Animality involves her transforming into a small rabbit and mauling the opponent, much like the Rabbit of Caerbannog.

In Dragon Age: Inquisition, one of the game locations is Caer Bronach, an alternate spelling of the cave in the film.

In Catacomb Armageddon, the level The Garden of Forgotten Souls features what at first appear to be innocuous rabbits, which then grow into vicious monsters.

In Shadow Warrior, there are rabbits throughout the game. A secret level that has a cave, similar to the film, with pieces of armor lying around and the Holy Grail. The 2013 Shadow Warrior remake also contains rabbits which can sometimes attack the player when provoked.

In Terraria, the Holy Hand Grenade appears as a craftable throwable. While it only appears in the Mobile and 3ds versions, it is credited with the highest base damage of any item in all versions of Terraria. [30]

In Arcanum: Of Steamworks and Magick Obscura, there is a quest in which the player is sent to investigate a rabbit which is in fact a giant monster.

In card game Munchkin, there is a monster which refers to "that rabbit from that movie", most probably the Rabbit of Caerbannog, due to the danger of the foe.

In the World of Warcraft MMORPG, the monthly Darkmoon Faire Island features a cave off the southern coast that is populated by a white rabbit of fearsome combat ability that requires an entire well orchestrated raid group to effectively attack and kill. Attackers have the chance to pick up their own "killer rabbit" pet as part of the loot.

In Dungeons of Dredmor players can find and use Holy Hand Grenades, with the description "O Lord, bless this, thy hand grenade."

In Divinity: Original Sin Enhanced Edition, a Holy Hand Grenade can be found or crafted. Its appearance similar to that of the one from the movie. The grenade heals allies within its radius of effect.[31]

In Dragon's Crown, the Killer Rabbit is the boss of the B Route of the Lost Woods stage, which also features a forest hermit that looks similar to Tim the Enchanter.

In The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, there is a hidden cave near Benek (location of quest "Hidden in the stars"), in whose entrance will be a pile of skulls, bodies, blood spatters, and a single snow hare.

In Divinity 2: Ego Draconis, a powerful level 22 killer rabbit will spawn after the player has killed a certain number of rabbits in the game, which can easily overwhelm low-level players.

In Warlock: Master of the Arcane, there is a lord you can obtain that is immune to physical damage with the appearance of a bunny with red eyes, named a cruel creature.[32]

Monsters known as "vorpal bunnies" are capable of instantly killing player characters with critical hits in the Wizardry series of role-playing games.

In The Madness of Little Emma, there is an item named Beast of Caerbannog, described on collection as having "A vicious streak a mile wide!" and via the in-game item list as "Summons a deadly beast on activation".[33]

In Margonem.pl there is a Titan called Killer Rabbit that has one of the best legendary secondary weapon on Mage "Holy Hand Grenade"

In Steve Moraff's game Moraff's World there is a Holy Hand Grenade weapon that can be found and then used to kill monsters.

In the film Ready Player One there is a Holy Hand Grenade weapon that is bought and later used by Parzival during the battle.

See also
References
  1. Steven Gale (1996). Encyclopedia of British Humorists: Geoffrey Chaucer to John Cleese. Taylor & Francis. p. 155. ISBN 0-8240-5990-5.
  2. Johnson, Kim Howard (1999). The First 200 Years of Monty Python. St Martin's. p. 200. ISBN 9780312033095.
  3. Ben Brantley (18 March 2005). "A Quest Beyond the Grail". The New York Times. Retrieved 2008-05-03.
  4. Eric Idle (2005). The Greedy Bastard Diary: A Comic Tour of America. New York: HarperEntertainment. p. 312. ISBN 0-06-075864-3. "Will there be a Killer Rabbit?" "Yes." "Then I'm coming," he said, and went off gleefully shouting, "Ni!" Mike Nichols looked shocked. And impressed.
  5. Chapman, Graham; Jones, Terry (1977). Monty Python and the Holy Grail (BOOK) / Monty Python's second film: a first draft. London: Methuen. p. 78. ISBN 0458929700.
  6. Derek Albert Pearsall; Derek Pearsall (2003). Arthurian Romance: A Short Introduction. Malden, MA: Blackwell Pub. p. 150. ISBN 0-631-23320-2.
  7. Brian Kaylor (2007). For God's Sake Shut Up!: Lessons for Christians on How to Speak. Macon, Ga.: Smyth & Helwys Pub. p. 22. ISBN 1-57312-485-0.
  8. Darl Larsen; William Proctor Williams (2003). Monty Python, Shakespeare and English Renaissance Drama. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. p. 69. ISBN 0-7864-1504-5.
  9. John Cleese, Graham Chapman, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin, Monty Python and the Holy Grail: The Screenplay, page 76, Methuen, 2003 (UK) ISBN 0-413-77394-9
  10. "Panoramio – Photo of Tomnadashan mine". panoramio.com.
  11. Charles Lavery (20 August 2000). "Monty Python & The Holey Grail". Sunday Mail. p. 29.
  12. "Python's Killer Rabbit Search is a Holy Farce", Alastair Dalton, Scotland on Sunday, 20 August 2000, Pg. 3
  13. J. R. Simpson (1996). Animal Body, Literary Corpus: The Old French "Roman de Renart". Rodopi. pp. 156–157. ISBN 90-5183-976-6.
  14. Le Roman de Renart, Ernest Martin, ed., vol. 2, Strasbourg: Trubner, 1887, p. 199
  15. Alan Parker; Mick O'Shea (2006). And Now for Something Completely Digital. New York: Disinformation. p. 66. ISBN 1-932857-31-1.
  16. "Killer Rabbit with Big Pointy Teeth". Toy Mania. Retrieved 2008-05-04.
  17. Lisa Traiger (9 June 2006). "Killer Bunnies and Comedy in King Arthur's Court". Washington Post.
  18. Mark Zaslove (November 2007). "Toy Sleuth: It's a Big, Big World Minis and Scary Staplers Fight for the Spotlight". Toy Directory.
  19. "The 10 Geekiest Plush Toys Money Can Buy". Wired. 22 September 2008.
  20. Cheal, David (5 October 2006). "Top five movie bunnies". London: The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 22 May 2010.
  21. Alba (24 March 2008). "The Diary". The Scotsman.
  22. William W. Betteridge; James F. Niss; Michael T. Pledge (1975). "Competition in Regulated Industries: Essays on Economic Issues". Center for Business and Economic Research, Western Illinois University.
  23. Holger Breithaupt (2003). "Fierce creatures". EMBO Reports. 4 (10): 921–924. doi:10.1038/sj.embor.embor949. PMC 1326407Freely accessible. PMID 14528257.
  24. R Simpson (September 1996). "Neither clear nor present: The social construction of safety and danger". Sociological Forum. Springer. 11 (3).
  25. Edward D. Berkowitz (2006). Something Happened: A Political and Cultural Overview of the Seventies. New York: Columbia Univ. Press. p. 115. ISBN 0-231-12494-5.
  26. @montypython (9 July 2015). "Has anyone ever asked Siri what's it's favourite animal is?!#killerrabbit #MontyPython" (Tweet). Retrieved 13 July 2017 – via Twitter.
  27. "These Are The Five Most Disturbing Responses Siri Has To Certain Questions". Sick Chirpse. 2017-01-24. Retrieved 2017-07-13.
  28. Charlton, S. Coleman; Short, Lee O.; et al. (1985). Creatures & Treasures. Charlottesville VA, USA: Iron Crown Enterprises. p. 30. ISBN 0915795302.
  29. Rabbit - Official Minecraft Wiki,
  30. Holy Hand Grenade - Official Terraria Wiki,
  31. Divinity: Original Sin Enhanced Edition Changelist
  32. "Cruel Creature". Retrieved 2016-08-11.
  33. "Beast of Caerbannog". Retrieved 2016-12-12.
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Rabbit of Caerbannog

topic

Rabbit of Caerbannog

The Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog is a fictional character in the Monty Python film Monty Python and the Holy Grail.[1] The scene in Holy Grail was written by Graham Chapman and John Cleese.[2] The rabbit is the antagonist in a major set piece battle, and makes a similar appearance in Spamalot, a musical inspired by the movie.[3] The iconic status of this scene was important in establishing the viability of the musical.[4] In the film The Cave of Caerbannog is the home of the Legendary Black Beast of Arrrghhh (named for the last utterance of anyone who ever saw it).[5] This is guarded by a monster which is initially unknown.[6] King Arthur (Graham Chapman) and his knights are led to the cave by Tim the Enchanter (John Cleese) and find that they must face its guardian beast. Tim verbally paints a picture of a terrible monster with "nasty, big, pointy teeth!", so terrifying that Sir Robin (Eric Idle) soils his armour at the mere description. When the guardian appears to be an innocuous white rabbit,[7] surround ...more...

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Killer rabbit

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Killer rabbit

Killer rabbit may refer to: Rabbit of Caerbannog, a fictional beast from the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail Jimmy Carter rabbit incident, a 1979 incident involving a swamp rabbit trying to board President Jimmy Carter's fishing boat The creatures from the 1972 horror film Night of the Lepus See also The Killer Rabbits, a 20th-century comedy rock band White Rabbit (comics), a fictional character who sometimes employs killer rabbits ...more...



Jimmy Carter rabbit incident

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Jimmy Carter rabbit incident

The rabbit swimming away from the President The Jimmy Carter rabbit incident, dubbed the "killer rabbit" attack by the press, involved a swamp rabbit that swam toward then–U.S. President Jimmy Carter's fishing boat on April 20, 1979. The incident caught the imagination of the media after Carter's press secretary mentioned the event to a correspondent months later. Background President Carter had gone on a solo fishing expedition in his hometown of Plains, Georgia. According to Carter, a rabbit being chased by hounds "jumped in the water and swam toward my boat. When he got almost there, I splashed some water with a paddle."[1] Upon returning to his office, Carter's staff did not believe his story, insisting that rabbits could not swim, or that they would never approach a person threateningly.[2] However, the incident was captured on footage taken by a White House photographer.[3] Media accounts and public perception Jody Powell, Carter's press secretary, mentioned the event to Associated Press correspo ...more...

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List of fictional rabbits and hares

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List of fictional rabbits and hares

Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter This is a list of fictional rabbits and hares. Fantasy hybrids such as Jackelopes are not listed. Literature Name Specie(s) Work Author Notes Babbitty Rabbitty Rabbit The Tales of Beedle the Bard J. K. Rowling While at first a human witch, Babbitty transforms herself into a rabbit.[1] Basil Stag Hare Hare Redwall & Mattimeo Brian Jacques Basil gave himself the middle name "Stag" because he greatly admired that animal. Basil is a bit eccentric, but an excellent fighter. Benjamin Bunny Rabbit The Tale of Benjamin Bunny, The Tale of The Flopsy Bunnies, The Tale of Mr. Tod Beatrix Potter Son of Old Mr. Bouncer, Peter Rabbit's cousin and eventually Flopsy's husband and father of six bunnies. Bigwig Rabbit Watership Down Richard Adams The largest, bravest rabbit of the group who escape destruction at the Sandleford warren, he is "bluff and tough."[2] While helping to defend the rabbits' new home at Watership Down from an invasion ...more...

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Monty Python and the Holy Grail

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Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a 1975 British slapstick comedy film concerning the Arthurian legend, written and performed by the Monty Python comedy group of Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin, and directed by Gilliam and Jones.[n 1] It was conceived during the hiatus between the third and fourth series of their BBC television series Monty Python's Flying Circus. In contrast to the group's first film, And Now for Something Completely Different, a compilation of sketches from the first two television series, Holy Grail draws on new material, parodying the legend of King Arthur's quest for the Holy Grail. Idle used the film as the basis for the musical Spamalot 30 years later. Monty Python and the Holy Grail grossed more than any British film exhibited in the US in 1975. It received a 97% "Fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[6] In the US, it was selected as the second best comedy of all time in the ABC special Best in Film: The Greatest Movies of Our Time. ...more...

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10 Funniest Movies of All Time

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Bors

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Bors

Galahad, Bors the Younger, and Percival achieve the Grail (Edward Burne-Jones C. 1895) Bors (; French: Bohort) is the name of two knights in the Arthurian legend, one the father of the other. Bors the Elder is the King of Gaunnes or Gaul during the early period of King Arthur's reign, and is the brother of King Ban of Benoic. The two first appear in the 13th-century Lancelot-Grail cycle. Bors the Younger later becomes one of the best Knights of the Round Table, and even achieves the Holy Grail. King Bors the Elder As Ban's brother, King Bors is Lancelot's and Hector de Maris' uncle. He marries Evaine, the sister of Ban's wife Elaine, and has two sons, Bors the Younger and Lionel. Ban and Bors become Arthur's early allies in his fight against eleven rebel kings in Britain, including Lot, Urien, and Caradoc, and he vows to help them against their enemy Claudas, who has been threatening their lands. Arthur is late on his promise, however, and Claudas succeeds in his invasion, resulting in both kings' deaths. ...more...

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Killin

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Killin

Killin (; from Cill Fhinn 'the White [or Fair] Church' in Gaelic) is a village situated at the western head of Loch Tay in Stirling (formerly Perthshire), Scotland. The west end of the village is magnificently sited around the scenic Falls of Dochart, the main street leading down towards the Loch at the confluence of the rivers Dochart and Lochay. The falls are crossed by a narrow, multi-arched stone bridge carrying the main A827 road into Killin. Killin railway station was on the Killin Railway. The railway station was officially closed on 1 November 1965. Killin has a small primary school with 56 pupils. For secondary education pupils travel to Callander 21 miles (34 km) miles to the south. The nearest Gaelic medium primary is in Stirling, 37 miles (60 km)miles to the south. History The MacNab Clan were once dominant here, and have long been associated with Killin. Their ancient burial ground is on Inchbuie in the River Dochart, just below the falls, and is visible from the bridge. Kinnell House was t ...more...

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Monty Python

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Monty Python

Monty Python (also collectively known as The Pythons)[2][3] were a British surreal comedy group who created their sketch comedy show Monty Python's Flying Circus, which first aired on the BBC in 1969. Forty-five episodes were made over four series. The Python phenomenon developed from the television series into something larger in scope and impact, including touring stage shows, films, numerous albums, several books, and musicals. The Pythons' influence on comedy has been compared to the Beatles' influence on music.[4][5][6] Their sketch show has been referred to as "not only one of the more enduring icons of 1970s British popular culture, but also an important moment in the evolution of television comedy."[7] Broadcast by the BBC between 1969 and 1974, Monty Python's Flying Circus was conceived, written, and performed by its members Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin. Loosely structured as a sketch show, but with an innovative stream-of-consciousness approa ...more...

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Stereotypes of animals

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Stereotypes of animals

A "wise old owl" in a 1940s poster from the War Production Board When anthropomorphising an animal there are stereotypical traits which commonly tend to be associated with particular species. Often these are simply exaggerations of real aspects or behaviours of the creature in question, while other times the stereotype is taken from mythology and replaces any observation-based judgment of that animal's behavior. Some are popularised or solidified by a single particularly notable appearance in media. For example, Disney's 1942 film Bambi portrays the titular deer as an innocent, fragile animal.[1] In any case, once they have entered the culture as widely recognized stereotypes of animals, they tend to be used both in conversation and media as a kind of shorthand for expressing particular qualities. While some authors make use of these animal stereotypes "as is", others undermine reader expectations by reversing them, developing the animal character in contrasting ways to foil expectations or create amusemen ...more...

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Spamalot

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Spamalot

Monty Python's Spamalot is a musical comedy adapted from the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Like the motion picture, it is a highly irreverent parody of the Arthurian legend, but it differs from the film in many ways. The original 2005 Broadway production, directed by Mike Nichols, received 14 Tony Awards nominations, winning in three categories, including Best Musical. During its initial run of over 1,500 performances, it was seen by more than two million people and grossed over $175 million.[1] Synopsis Before the show A recording encourages members of the audience to "let your cellphones and pagers ring willy-nilly," and comments that they should "be aware there are heavily armed knights on stage that may drag you on stage and impale you." This was recorded by Eric Idle. Act I A historian narrates a brief overview of medieval England. In a miscommunication between the actors and the narrator, the actors sing an introductory song about Finland ("Fisch Schlapping Song"). The Historian returns ...more...

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Sit on My Face

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Sit on My Face

"Sit on My Face" is a short song by the members of the comedy troupe Monty Python which originally appeared on the album Monty Python's Contractual Obligation Album and later appeared on the compilation Monty Python Sings. Written by Eric Idle, the song's lyrics are sung to the melody of "Sing As We Go" by Gracie Fields. The opening gives way to the voices of The Fred Tomlinson Singers singing "Sit on my face and tell me that you love me." The remaining lyrics contain numerous references to fellatio and cunnilingus, such as "when I'm between your thighs you blow me away" and "life can be fine if we both 69". The song opened the 1982 film Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl, where it was lip-synched by Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones dressed as waiters in a performance which, at the suggestion of Python touring member Neil Innes,[1] ended with them revealing their bare backsides. In 2002, a similar rendition was mimed by Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Terry Gilliam and Neil Innes at th ...more...

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Holy Flying Circus

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Holy Flying Circus

Holy Flying Circus (2011) is a 90-minute BBC television comedy film first broadcast in 2011, written by Tony Roche and directed by Owen Harris. The film is a "Pythonesque" dramatisation of events following the completion of Monty Python's Life of Brian, culminating in the televised debate about the film broadcast in 1979. Plot At a meeting in the offices of their film distributor, the members of Monty Python discuss allowing the film Life of Brian to be released in America first because of America's first amendment. John Cleese voices his support for the idea, and says that he loves Americans. We then see American reporters at a screening of the movie where a near riot is taking place, with the protesters condemning the film as "blasphemous". The Pythons review a disheartening statement made by a religious leader, implying that the film causes violence. Cleese misinterprets this (possibly deliberately) and goes off on a tangent about little kids carrying out copycat crucifixions on their friends. Their dis ...more...

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Sir Eglamour of Artois

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Sir Eglamour of Artois

A griffin appeared above the rock where the boat had come ashore, and carried Christabel's baby off to a distant land. Sir Eglamour of Artois is a Middle English verse romance that was written sometime around 1350.[1] It is a narrative poem of about 1300 lines, a tail-rhyme romance that was quite popular in its day, judging from the number of copies that have survived – four manuscripts from the 15th century or earlier and a manuscript and five printed editions from the 16th century. The poem tells a story that is constructed from a large number of elements found in other medieval romances and modern scholarly opinion has been critical of it because of this, describing it as unimaginative and of poor quality.[2] Medieval romance as a genre, however, concerns the reworking of "the archetypal images of romance"[3] and if this poem is viewed from a 15th-century perspective as well as from a modern standpoint[4] – and it was obviously once very popular, even being adapted into a play in 1444 – one might find a ...more...

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