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May 19 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

May 18 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - May 20

All fixed commemorations below celebrated on June 1 by Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar.[note 1]

For May 19th, Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar commemorate the Saints listed on May 6.

Saints
  • Hieromartyrs Patricius (Patrick), Bishop of Prusa, and with him the Presbyters Acacius, Menander, and Polyenos (c. 100[1] or c. 362[2] )[3] [4] [note 2]
  • Martyrs Calocerus and Parthenius, brothers (250)[6] [7] [8] [note 3]
  • Martyr Philoterus of Nicomedia (303)[7] [10]
  • Martyr Acoluthus of the Thebaid (303)[11] [note 4]
  • Martyr Cyriaca (Kyriake) and the six holy virgin-martyrs in Nicomedia (307)[7] [12]
  • Martyr Theotima of Nicomedia (c. 311)[13] [1]
  • Saint John, Bishop of the Goths in Crimea (787)[1] [2]
Pre-Schism Western Saints
Post-Schism Orthodox Saints
  • Monk-martyrs and Confessors of the Monastery of Panagia of Kantara, on Cyprus, who suffered under the Latins (1231):[1] [21]
  • Right-Believing Great Prince Dmitry Donskoy, Great Prince of Moscow (1389)[1] [2] [22] [23] [note 5]
  • Venerable Sinaites of Serbia (from Ravanica) (14th century):[25] [note 6]
  • Saint Cornelius of Paleostrov, Abbot (1420)[1] [26]
  • Saint John (Ignatius), Prince of Uglich, tonsured as Ignatius in Vologda (1522)[1] [27]
  • Venerable Cornelius of Komel (Vologda), Abbot and Wonderworker (1537)[1] [28]
  • Saint Sergius of Shukhtov (Shukhtom), monk (1609)[1] [29]
New Martyrs and Confessors
  • Hieromartyr Matthew Voznesensky (1919)[22] [30]
  • Hieromartyr Innocent (Letayev), Archbishop of Kharkiv (1937)[9]
  • Hieromartyr Victor Karakulin (1937)[2] [22]
  • Hieromartyr Onuphrius (Gagaliuk), Archbishop of Kursk and Oboyansk (1938),[1] [22] [31] (see also June 1) and:
  • New Hieromartyr Valentine Lukyanov (1940)[2] [22]
  • All New Hieromartyrs of Slobozhanschyna (Slobodskaya) Ukraine (1937,1938,1940,1941)[9] [32] [note 7] [note 8]
Other commemorations
Icon Gallery
Notes
  1. The notation Old Style or (OS) is sometimes used to indicate a date in the Julian Calendar (which is used by churches on the "Old Calendar"). The notation New Style or (NS), indicates a date in the Revised Julian calendar (which is used by churches on the "New Calendar").
  2. The Greek Orthodox Arab-speaking Community of the town Zdeinde in north Israel, at the district of Acre, has a Holy Church in honour of St. Patrick, Bishop of Prusa.[5] Name days celebrated today include:
    • Patrick (Πατρίκιος).
  3. He is the patron of Galicia, and his relics are enshrined at Zhovkva.[9]
  4. The term "Akolouthos" also refers to a Byzantine military office.
  5. The Great Synaxaristes also has an entry for Saint Dmitry Donskoy on May 9th as well.[24]
  6. These are commemorated on May 6 in the Slavonic Menaion.
  7. The Great Synaxaristes also includes a brief entry on May 9 for the New Martyrs of Slobozhanschyna (Slobodskaya) Ukraine.[33]
  8. The Great Synaxaristes for May 19 includes a list of names (in Greek) of 27 Hieromartyrs of Slobozhanschyna (Slobodskaya), Ukraine, as follows:
References
  1. May 19/June 1. Orthodox Calendar (PRAVOSLAVIE.RU).
  2. June 1 / May 19. HOLY TRINITY RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH (A parish of the Patriarchate of Moscow).
  3. Ὁ Ἅγιος Πατρίκιος ὁ Ἱερομάρτυρας καὶ οἱ σὺν αὐτῷ Ἀκάκιος, Μένανδρος καὶ Πολύαινος οἱ Μάρτυρες. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  4. Hieromonk Makarios of Simonos Petra (Ed.). THE SYNAXARION: The Lives of the Saints of the Orthodox Church: VOLUME FIVE - May, June. Transl. from the French by Mother Maria (Rule) and Mother Joanna (Burton). Holy Convent of the Annunciation of Our Lady, Ormylia (Chalkidike), 2005. pp. 203-204.
  5. PASTORAL VISIT OF HIS BEATITUDE THE PATRIARCH OF JERUSALEM IN ZDEINDE. Jerusalem Patriarchate: Official News Gate. 10/06/2017. Retrieved: 12 June, 2017.
  6. Οἱ Ἅγιοι Καλοκέριος καὶ Παρθένιος οἱ Μάρτυρες. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  7. May 19. The Roman Martyrology.
  8. May 19. Latin Saints of the Orthodox Patriarchate of Rome.
  9. Dr. Alexander Roman. May. Calendar of Ukrainian Orthodox Saints (Ukrainian Orthodoxy - Українське Православ'я).
  10. Ὁ Ἅγιος Φιλότερος ὁ Μάρτυρας. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  11. Ὁ Ἅγιος Ἀκόλουθος ὁ Μάρτυρας. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  12. Ἡ Ἁγία Κυριακὴ ἡ Μάρτυς καὶ οἱ σὺν αὐτῇ. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  13. Ἡ Ἁγία Θεοτίμη ἡ Μάρτυς. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  14. Ὁ Ἅγιος Πούδης ὁ Μάρτυρας. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  15. Ἡ Ἁγία Πουδενδιάνα ἡ Μάρτυς. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  16. Rev. Alban Butler (1711–73). St. Pudentiana, Virgin. The Lives of the Saints, Volume V: May. 1866. (Bartleby.com)
  17. Ὁ Ἅγιος Κύριλλος Ἐπίσκοπος Τρεβήρων. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  18. Ὁ Ἅγιος Ἀδοῦλφος. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  19. Ὁ Ἅγιος Δουνστάνος Ἀρχιεπίσκοπος Καντουαρίας. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  20. Rev. Alban Butler (1711–73). May 19 - St. Dunstan, Archbishop of Canterbury, Confessor. The Lives of the Saints, Volume V: May. 1866. (Bartleby.com)
  21. Οἱ Ἅγιοι Βαρνάβας, Γεννάδιος, Γεράσιμος, Γερμανός, Θεόγνωστος, Θεόκτιστος, Ἱερεμίας, Ἰωάννης, Ἰωσήφ, Κόνων, Κύριλλος, Μάξιμος καὶ Μάρκος οἱ Ὁσιομάρτυρες. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  22. (in Russian) 19 мая (ст.ст.) 1 июня 2013 (нов. ст.). Русская Православная Церковь Отдел внешних церковных связей. (DECR).
  23. Ὁ Ἅγιος Δημήτριος ὁ μεγάλος Πρίγκιπας. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  24. Ὁ Ἅγιος Δημήτριος ὁ μεγάλος πρίγκιπας τῆς Μόσχας. 9 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  25. Οἱ Ὅσιοι Ρωμύλος, Ρωμανός, Νέστωρ, Σισώης, Γρηγόριος, Νικόδημος καὶ Κύριλλος οἱ Σιναΐτες. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  26. Ὁ Ὅσιος Κορνήλιος. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  27. Ὁ Ὅσιος Ἰγνάτιος. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  28. Ὁ Ὅσιος Κορνήλιος ὁ Θαυματουργός. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  29. Ὁ Ὅσιος Σέργιος τῆς Σουχτόμα. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  30. The Autonomous Orthodox Metropolia of Western Europe and the Americas (ROCOR). St. Hilarion Calendar of Saints for the year of our Lord 2004. St. Hilarion Press (Austin, TX). p.37.
  31. Ὁ Ἅγιος Ὀνούφριος ὁ Ἱερομάρτυρας. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  32. Οἱ Ἅγιοι Νεομάρτυρες ἐν Σλομπόντσκαγια Οὐκρανίας. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  33. Οἱ Ἅγιοι Νεομάρτυρες τῆς Σλομπόντσκαγια Οὐκρανίας. 9 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  34. Μνήμη Εἰσόδου τῆς Ἁγίας Νίνας τῆς Ἰσαποστόλου στὴν Γεωργία. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  35. Ἀνακομιδὴ Τιμίων Λειψάνων Ἁγίων Ἰουλίου Πρεσβυτέρου καὶ Ἰουλιανοῦ Διακόνου. 19 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  36. May 6/19. Orthodox Calendar (PRAVOSLAVIE.RU).
Sources
  • May 19/June 1. Orthodox Calendar (PRAVOSLAVIE.RU).
  • June 1 / May 19. HOLY TRINITY RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH (A parish of the Patriarchate of Moscow).
  • Dr. Alexander Roman. May. Calendar of Ukrainian Orthodox Saints (Ukrainian Orthodoxy - Українське Православ'я).
  • May 19. Latin Saints of the Orthodox Patriarchate of Rome.
  • May 19. The Roman Martyrology.

Greek Sources

  • Great Synaxaristes: (in Greek) 19 ΜΑΪΟΥ. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  • (in Greek) Συναξαριστής. 19 Μαΐου. ECCLESIA.GR. (H ΕΚΚΛΗΣΙΑ ΤΗΣ ΕΛΛΑΔΟΣ).

Russian Sources

  • (in Russian) 1 июня (19 мая). Православная Энциклопедия под редакцией Патриарха Московского и всея Руси Кирилла (электронная версия). (Orthodox Encyclopedia - Pravenc.ru).
  • (in Russian) 19 мая (ст.ст.) 1 июня 2013 (нов. ст.). Русская Православная Церковь Отдел внешних церковных связей. (DECR).
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Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem

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The Eastern Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem (Greek: Πατριαρχεῖον Ἱεροσολύμων, Patriarcheîon Hierosolýmōn) or Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem (Arabic: كنيسة الروم الأرثوذكس في القدس‎‎ Kanisatt Ar-rum al-Urtudoks fi al-Quds, literally Rûm/Roman Orthodox Church of Jerusalem), and officially called simply the Patriarchate of Jerusalem, is an autocephalous Church within the wider communion of Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Headed by the Patriarch of Jerusalem, it is regarded by Eastern Orthodox Christians as the mother church of all of Christendom. Christians believe that it was in Jerusalem that the Church was established on the day of Pentecost with the descent of the Holy Spirit on the disciples of Jesus Christ (Acts 2:1-41) and that the Gospel of Christ spread from Jerusalem. The Church celebrates its liturgy in the Byzantine Rite, whose original language is Koine Greek, the original language of the New Testament, and follows its own calendar of feasts, preserving the Julian calendar (that is thirt



March 4 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

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March 3 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - March 5 All fixed commemorations below are observed on March 17 by Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar . For March 4th, Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar commemorate the Saints listed on February 19 ( February 20 on leap years) . Saints Saint Julian of Alexandria , Bishop of Alexandria (189) Martyrs Paul and his sister Juliana , and Quadratus, Acacius, and Stratonicus, at Ptolemais in Egypt (273) Venerable Gerasimus of Jordan (475) Saint Gregory of Constantius in Cyprus , Bishop. Saint James the Faster, of Phoenicia (Syria) (6th century) Pre-Schism Western Saints Saint Lucius I , succeeded St Cornelius as Pope of Rome in 253, and was at once sent into exile. Martyrs of Rome, a group of nine hundred martyrs buried in the Catacombs of Callistus on the Appian Way in Rome (260) Saint Leonard of Avranches, Bishop of Avranches (ca. 614) Saint Owen (Owin), a monk at Lastingham in England with St Chad , then settled at a monastery near Lichfield (ca. 680) Saint



Georgian Orthodox Church

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The Georgian Apostolic Autocephalous Orthodox Church (Georgian: საქართველოს სამოციქულო ავტოკეფალური მართლმადიდებელი ეკლესია, sakartvelos samotsikulo avt’ok’epaluri martlmadidebeli ek’lesia) is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Church in full communion with the other churches of Eastern Orthodoxy. It is Georgia's dominant religious institution, and a majority of Georgian people are members. It asserts apostolic foundation, and its historical roots can be traced to the Christianization of Iberia by Saint Nino in the 4th century AD. As in similar autocephalous Orthodox churches, the Church's highest governing body is the Holy Synod of bishops. The church is headed by the Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia, currently Ilia II, who was elected in 1977. Orthodox Christianity was the state religion throughout most of Georgian history until 1921, when it was conquered by the Russian Red Army during the Russian-Georgian War and became part of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.).[4] The current Constitu



Icon

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The Ladder of Divine Ascent icon showing monks ascending to Jesus in Heaven, top right. 12th century, Saint Catherine's Monastery Russian icon of Holy Trinity The icon of St Nicolas carved in stone. Between the 12 and 15th cc. Radomysl Castle, Ukraine[1] An icon (from Greek εἰκών eikōn "image") is a religious work of art, most commonly a painting, from the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, and certain Eastern Catholic churches. The most common subjects include Christ, Mary, saints and/or angels. Though especially associated with "portrait" style images concentrating on one or two main figures, the term also covers most religious images in a variety of artistic media produced by Eastern Christianity, including narrative scenes. Icons may also be cast in metal, carved in stone, embroidered on cloth, painted on wood, done in mosaic or fresco work, printed on paper or metal, etc. Comparable images from Western Christianity are generally not described as "icons", although "iconic



Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria

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The Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria is an Oriental Orthodox Christian church in Egypt, Northeast Africa and the Middle East.[a] The head of the Church and the See of Alexandria is the Patriarch of Alexandria on the Holy See of Saint Mark, who also carries the title of Coptic Pope. The See of Alexandria is titular, and today the Coptic Pope presides from Saint Mark's Coptic Orthodox Cathedral in the Abbassia District in Cairo. With 18–22 million members worldwide, whereof about 20 million are in Egypt, it is the country's largest church. The Coptic Orthodox Church belongs to the Oriental Orthodox family of Churches, which has been a distinct Christian body since the schism following the Council of Chalcedon in AD 451, when it took a different position over Christology from that of the rest of the Christian Church (which would split 600 years later into the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church). The precise Christological differences that caused the split with the Coptic Christians are st



History of Eastern Orthodox Christian theology

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The history of Eastern Orthodox Christian theology begins with the life of Jesus and the forming of the Christian Church . Major events include the Chalcedonian schism with the Oriental Orthodox miaphysites , the Iconoclast controversy , the Photian schism , the Great Schism between East and West , and the Hesychast controversy . The period after the Second World War saw a re-engagement with the Greek, and more recently Syriac, Fathers that included a rediscovery of the theological works of St. Gregory Palamas , which has resulted in a renewal of Orthodox theology in the 20th and 21st centuries. Tradition Icon depicting the Emperor Constantine (centre) and the bishops of the First Council of Nicaea (325) holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381 . The Orthodox Church considers itself to be the original church started by Christ and his apostles. For the early years of the church, much of what was conveyed to its members was in the form of oral teachings. Within a very short period of time traditions w



July 20 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

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July 19 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - July 21 2005 Fasting day 5th Wednesday after Pentecost Romans 15:7-16 Matthew 12:38-45 Fixed commemorations All fixed commemorations below are observed on August 2 by Old Calendarists Saints Holy and glorious Prophet Elijah (9th century BC) Saint Elias of Jerusalem , Patriarch and confessor Saint Flavius of Antioch , Patriarch and confessor Saint Abramius of Galich near Chukhloma Lake , disciple of Saint Sergius of Radonezh (1375) Russian New martyrs Lydia with soldiers Alexei and Cyril (1928) Russian New martyrs Philosoph Ornatsky and those with him (1918) Russian New martyr Juvenal, deacon Martyr Ilia Chavchavadze of Georgia (1907) Righteous Martyr Maria Skobtsova (1945) Priestmartyr Dimitri Klepinin (1945) Other commemorations Uncovering of the relics of martyr Athanasius of Brest-Litovsk at Brest Litovsk (1679) Repose of righteous priest Valentine Amphiteatrov (1908) References Orthodox Church of America, Feasts and Saints Protection of the Mother of God Church



Orthodox Ohrid Archbishopric

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The Orthodox Ohrid Archbishopric ( Serbian , Macedonian : Православна Охридска Архиепископија , Pravoslavna Ohridska Arhiepiskopija) is an autonomous Eastern Orthodox Archbishopric with canonical jurisdiction over the territory of the Republic of Macedonia . It is the only canonical Eastern Orthodox Church in the Republic of Macedonia and is in full communion with all other Eastern Orthodox Churches . The Orthodox Ohrid Archbishopric has been refused registration by the Macedonian State Religion Commission on the grounds that one group may be registered for each confession and that the name was not sufficiently distinct from that of the Macedonian Orthodox Church (MOC) . MOC is recognized by the State Religion Commission but not by any other Orthodox churches , which consider its unilateral 1967 declaration of autocephaly a breach of canon law . The Archbishopric claims inheritance from the Ohrid Archbishopric of Justiniana prima and all Bulgaria ( Bulgarian : Охридска Архиепископиия на Юстинияна първа и цял



Eastern Christian monasticism

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Eastern Christian Monasticism is the life followed by monks and nuns of the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Church of the East and Eastern Catholicism. Some authors will use the term "Basilian" to describe Eastern monks; however, this is incorrect, since the Eastern Church does not have religious orders, as in the West, nor does Eastern monasticism have monastic Rules, as in the West. History Monasticism began in the East, and it is in the East that it continues to this day to have the strongest influence on the daily life of the local Christian communities. The Early Church The mystical and other-worldly nature of the Christian message very early laid the groundwork for the ascetical life. The example of the Old Testament Prophets, of John the Baptist and of Jesus himself, going into the wilderness to pray and fast set the example that was readily followed by the devout. In the early Christian literature evidence is found of individuals who embraced lives of celibacy and mortification



July 18 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

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July 17 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - July 19 2005 5th Monday after Pentecost Romans 12:4,5,15-21 Matthew 12:9-13 Fixed commemorations All fixed commemorations below are celebrated on July 31 by Old Calendarists Saints Martyr Hyacinth of Amastris (4th century) Martyr Emilian of Silistria in Bulgaria ( 362 ) Saint John of Kiev Caves , the Long-suffering ( 1160 ) Saint Pambo , hermit of Egypt (4th century) Venerable Pambo the Recluse of the Kiev Far Caves ( 1241 ) Saint Leontius of Karikhov in Novgorod , abbot ( 1429 ) Saint Frederick of Utrecht , bishop Martyr Marcel Martyrs Dasius and Maron Saint Stephen of Constantinople , archbishop Saint John of Chalcedon , metropolitan Other commemorations Icon of the Most Holy Theotokos "Tolga" References Orthodox Church of America, Feasts and Saints Protection of the Mother of God Church, List of Saints July 17 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - July 19 2005 5th Monday after Pentecost Romans 12:4,5,15-21 Matthew 12:9-13 Fixed commemorations All fixed commemorat



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July 19 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

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July 18 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - July 20 2005 5th Tuesday after Pentecost Romans 14:9-18 Matthew 12:14-16,22-30 Fixed commemorations All fixed commemorations below are celebrated on August 1 by Old Calendarists Saints Venerable Macrina the Younger , sister of Saint Basil the Great ( 380 ) Venerable Dius of Antioch , abbot ( 430 ) Blessed Romanus of Ryazan , prince ( 1270 ) Blessed King Stefan Lazarević of Serbia, and his mother Saint Princess Milica of Serbia ( 1427 ) Saint Paisius of Kiev Caves ( 14th century ) Russian New martyr Victor of Glazov , bishop ( 1934 ) Other commemorations Uncovering of the relics of Venerable Seraphim of Sarov , Wonderworker ( 1903 ) Repose of Blessed Abbot Nilus ( 1870 ) Repose of Elder John of St. Nilus of Sora Monastery (1903) Repose of Hiero-schema monk Anthony of Valaam ( 1862 ) July 18 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - July 20 2005 5th Tuesday after Pentecost Romans 14:9-18 Matthew 12:14-16,22-30 Fixed commemorations All fixed commemorations below are celebr



Orthodox-Catholic Church of America

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The Seal of the OCCA The Orthodox-Catholic Church of America (OCCA) is an independent and self-governing Orthodox jurisdiction based in the United States, with clergy also in Mexico. As of July 2010, the denomination's online directory listed 27 affiliated parishes or missions, and two religious communities. The Church celebrates predominantly a version of the Western Liturgy ( Roman Rite ) though some priests also celebrate the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom ( Byzantine Rite ) or the Liturgy of Addai and Mari ( East Syrian Rite ). The OCCA is not associated with any mainstream Orthodox church. The denomination is governed by a synod of diocesan bishops (currently seven) and a metropolitan archbishop. The current metropolitan is Robert Zahrt, known as Archbishop Peter. The ecclesial purpose of the OCCA is the worship of God in the Holy Trinity; the proclamation and continuing of the Orthodox faith as taught in holy scripture, the apostolic tradition and the seven ecumenical councils of the undivided



March 21 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

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March 20 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - March 22 All fixed commemorations below are observed on April 3 by Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar . For March 21st, Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar commemorate the Saints listed on March 8 . Saints Martyrs Philemon and Domninus of Thessalonica , in Italy. (see also: March 26 ) Saint Maria the Martyr, in Perge . Saint Serapion, Bishop of Thmuis , Egypt (c. 358) Venerable Serapion the Sindonite, monk of Egypt (4th century) (see also: May 14 - Slavonic) Saint Sophronius, Abbot of the Monastery of St. Theodosius , in Palestine (542) Saint Thomas , Patriarch of Constantinople (610) Venerable James the Confessor (Jacob the Confessor), Bishop, of the Studion (late 8th century) Pre-Schism Western Saints Saint Beryllus , Bishop of Catania (c. 90) (in Slavonic and Georgian calendars erroneously named as Cyril Saint Lupicinus of Lyon , desert-dweller of the Jura Mountains , Gaul (480) Saint Enda of Aran , Abbot of Arranmore, monk, earliest leader of Iri



Eastern Orthodox opposition to papal supremacy

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The Eastern Orthodox Church is opposed to the Roman Catholic doctrine of papal supremacy . While not denying that some form of primacy could exist for Rome's bishop, Orthodox Christians argue that the tradition of Rome's primacy in the early Church was not equivalent to the current doctrine of supremacy. Orthodox understanding of Catholicity The test of authentic catholicity is adherence to the authority of the Church's Holy Tradition, and then to the witness of Sacred " Scripture ", which is itself a product of the Church's aforementioned Holy Tradition. It is not defined by adherence to any particular See. It is the position of the Orthodox Church that it has never accepted the pope as de jure leader of the entire church. All bishops are equal "as Peter", therefore every church under every bishop (consecrated in apostolic succession) is fully complete (the original meaning of catholic). Referring to Ignatius of Antioch, Carlton says Contrary to popular opinion, the word catholic does not mean "universal";



Liturgy

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Liturgy is the customary public worship performed by a religious group, according to its beliefs, customs and traditions. As a religious phenomenon, liturgy is a communal response to and participation in, the sacred through activity reflecting praise, thanksgiving, supplication or repentance. Ritualization may be associated with life events such as birth, coming of age , marriage, sex and death. It thus forms the basis for establishing a relationship with a divine agency, as well as with other participants in the liturgy. Methods of dress, preparation of food, application of cosmetics or other hygienic practices are all considered liturgical activities. Technically speaking, liturgy is a subset of ritual. When ritual is undertaken to participate in a divine act or assist a divine action, it is liturgy. If the ritual does not have this purpose it is not liturgy but only ritual. Thus, the word, sometimes rendered by its English translation "Service or Divine Service", refers to a formal ritual, which may or may



Russian Old-Orthodox Church

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The Russian Old Orthodox Church ( Russian : Русская Древлеправославная Церковь ) is an Eastern Orthodox Church of the Old Believers tradition, born of a schism within the Russian Orthodox Church ( raskol ) during the 17th century (Old Believers). This jurisdiction incorporated those Old Believer groups which refused to accept the authority of Belokrinitskaya Hierarchy , est. 1846 (see Russian Orthodox Old-Rite Church ). It was also known as Novozybkov Hierarchy (by the name of the city where its chief hierarch resided in 1963–2000). It is considered to be independent of the Eastern Orthodox Communion i.e. it is not recognised by the Patriarch of Constantinople , nor by any of the Orthodox churches in communion with the Patriarch. From 1963 until 2002, the official title of its chief hierarch was Archbishop of Novozybkov, Moscow and all Russia. In 2000, with the move of the Archbishop's residence to Moscow , the toponym Novozybkov was dropped from the title. Since March 2003, the official title of the church l



Latin liturgical rites

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Roman Catholic church in Stupava (Slovakia). Latin liturgical rites, or Western liturgical rites, are the Catholic liturgical rites used within the Latin Church, that part of Catholic Church originating in the area where the Latin language once dominated. The Latin rites were for many centuries no less numerous than the liturgical rites of the Eastern autonomous particular Churches. Their number is now much reduced. In the aftermath of the Council of Trent, in 1568 and 1570 Pope Pius V suppressed the Breviaries and Missals that could not be shown to have an antiquity of at least two centuries (see Tridentine Mass and Roman Missal). Many local rites that remained legitimate even after this decree were abandoned voluntarily, especially in the 19th century. In the second half of the 20th century, most of the religious orders that had a distinct liturgical rite chose to adopt in its place the Roman Rite as revised in accordance with the decrees of the Second Vatican Council (see Mass of Paul VI). A few suc



Orthodox cross

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The Orthodox , Byzantine or Russian (Orthodox) cross , also known as the Suppedaneum cross , is a variation of the Christian cross , commonly found in the Eastern Orthodox Church , as well as the Eastern Catholic Churches of the Byzantine Rite , and used widely by groups to connote the Byzantine Rite. The cross has three horizontal crossbeams—the top one represents the plate which in the older Greek tradition is inscribed with a phrase based on John's Gospel "The King of Glory", but in later images it represents INRI , and the bottom one, a footrest. In many depictions, the side to Christ's right is higher. This is because the footrest slants upward toward the penitent thief St. Dismas , who was (according to tradition) crucified on Jesus' right, and downward toward impenitent thief Gestas . It is also a common perception that the foot-rest points up, toward Heaven, on Christ’s right hand-side, and downward, to Hades, on Christ’s left. One of the Orthodox Church’s Friday prayers clearly explains the meanin



July 6 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

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July 5 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - July 7 All fixed commemorations below celebrated on July 19 by Old Calendarists Saints Venerable Sisoes the Great of Egypt ( 429 ) Virgin - martyrs Lucy, Rixius, and with them martyrs Anthony, Lucian, Isidore, Dion, Diodorus, Cutonius, Arnosus, Capicus, and Satyrus at Rome ( 301 ) Martyr Quintus of Phrygia ( 283 ) Martyrs Marinus, Martha, Audifax, Abbacum (Habakkuk), Cyrinus, Valentine , and Asterius the Presbyter in Macedonia ( 269 ) Martyrs Isaurus the deacon, Innocent, Felix, Hermias, Basil, Peregrinus, Rufus, and Rufinus of Apollonia in Macedonia Saint Sisoes , Schemamonk of the Kiev Caves New-Martyr Bishop Simon of Ufa ( 1921 ) Pre-Schism Western Saints St. Monenna , foundress of a number of monasteries in Scotland and England . St. Saxburgh of East Anglia , foundress of the abbey at Minster-in-Sheppey , and later Abbess of Ely . References Hutchison-Hall, John (Ellsworth) (2014). Orthodox Saints of the British Isles - Volume III (1 ed.). New York: St. Eadfrith



Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Kyivan Patriarchate

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Ukrainian Orthodox Church – Kyiv Patriarchate (Ukrainian: Українська Православна Церква Київського Патрiархату, Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Kyivan Patriarchate, UOC-KP) is one of the three major Orthodox churches in Ukraine, alongside the Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Moscow Patriarchate), and the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church.[1] The church is currently unrecognized by canonical Eastern Orthodox churches, although now the Ecumenical Patriarchate who is the Mother Church, and alone can only grant canonical status and autocephaly is examining the request and petition of the Ukrainian Government and its people to be officially recognised.[2] The UOC-KP's Mother Church is in the St. Volodymyr's Cathedral in Kiev, the capital of Ukraine. The head of the church is Patriarch Filaret (Denysenko), who was enthroned in 1995. Patriarch Filaret was excommunicated by the Russian Orthodox Church in 1997,[3] but the Synod and Sobor of the UOC-KP do not recognize this action. Formation The church originate



Macedonian Orthodox Church – Ohrid Archbishopric

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The Macedonian Orthodox Church – Ohrid Archbishopric (abbreviated: MOC-OA) or simply the Macedonian Orthodox Church ( Macedonian : Македонска Православна Црква - Охридска Архиепископија ; transliteration : Makedonska Pravoslavna Crkva - Ohridska Arhiepiskopija) is the body of Christians who are united under the Archbishop of Ohrid and Macedonia , exercising jurisdiction over Macedonian Orthodox Christians in the Republic of Macedonia and in exarchates in the Macedonian diaspora . In 1959, the Holy Synod of the Serbian Orthodox Church afforded autonomy to the Orthodox Church in the-then Socialist Republic of Macedonia as the restoration of the historic Archbishopric of Ohrid , and it remained in canonical unity with the Serbian Church under their Patriarch. In 1967, on the bicentennial anniversary of the abolition of the Archbishopric of Ohrid, the Macedonian Church unilaterally announced its autocephaly and independence from the Serbian Orthodox Church. The Serbian Holy Synod denounced the decision and conde



Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church

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The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church (Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ:ኦርቶዶክስ:ተዋሕዶ:ቤተ:ክርስቲያን? ; transliterated Amharic: Yäityop'ya ortodoks täwahedo bétäkrestyan) is the largest of the Oriental Orthodox Christian Churches. One of the few pre-colonial Christian Churches in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church has a membership of between 45 and 50 million people,[1] the majority of whom live in Ethiopia.[2] It is a founding member of the World Council of Churches.[3] The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church is in communion with the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria having gained autocephaly in 1959. The Ethiopian Church was administratively part of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria from the first half of the 4th century until 1959, when it was granted its own Patriarch by the Coptic Orthodox Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of All Africa, Cyril VI. As one of the oldest Christian churches and a non-Chalcedonian Church, is not in communion with the Ethiopian Catholic Church. Ethiopia is the seco



March 3 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

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March 2 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - March 4 All fixed commemorations below are observed on March 16 by Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar . For March 3rd, Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar commemorate the Saints listed on February 17 ( February 18 on leap years) . Saints Martyrs Eutropius and Cleonicus of Amasea , and Basiliscus of Comana (308) Venerable Piama, virgin (337) Hieromartyr Theodoretus, Bishop, of Antioch, by beheading (361-363) Venerable Alexandra of Alexandria (4th century) Venerable Saints Zenon and Zoilus. Venerable Shio Mgvime, monk, of Georgia (6th century) Saint John IV (Chrysostom), Catholicos of Georgia (1001) Saint John V (Chrysostom), Catholicos of Georgia (1048) Pre-Schism Western Saints Martyrs Hemeterius and Cheledonius , believed to have been soldiers, suffered in Calahorra in Old Castile (ca. 298) Saint Camilla, born in Civitavecchia, she became a disciple of St Germanus of Auxerre in France, where she lived as an anchoress (ca. 437) Martyrs Felix, Luciolus, Fortuna



Vestment

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Clergy of various ranks in vestments celebrating Mass according to the Neo-Gallican Rite of Versailles Elevation of the chalice . Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religion, especially among the Eastern Orthodox , Catholics ( Latin Church and others), Anglicans , and Lutherans . Many other groups also make use of liturgical garments; this was a point of controversy in the Protestant Reformation and sometimes since, in particular during the Ritualist controversies in England in the 19th century. For other garments worn by clergy, see also clerical clothing . Rubrics for vesting The rubrics (regulations) for the type of vestments to be worn vary between the various communions and denominations. In some, clergy are directed to wear special clerical clothing in public at all, most, or some times. This generally consists of a clerical collar , clergy shirt, and (on certain occasions) a cassock . In the case of members of religious orders , non-liturgical wear in



August 15 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

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Aug. 14 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - Aug. 16 All fixed commemorations below are observed on August 28 by Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar . For August 15, Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar commemorate the saints listed on August 2 . Feasts The Dormition of Our Most Holy Lady the Theotokos and Ever-Virgin Mary . Pre-Schism Western saints Martyr Tarcisius , at Rome, seized by a heathen mob and preferred to die rather than expose the sacred mysteries to profanation (c. 253-260) (see also: August 14 - Greek) Saint Alypius of Thagaste , Bishop of Tagaste in North Africa (c. 430) Saint Altfrid , Bishop of Hildesheim , was devoted to the Mother of God (874) Saint Arduinus, a priest in Rimini in Italy who lived as a hermit and ended his days in the monastery of San Gudenzio (1009) Post-Schism Orthodox saints Venerable Macarius the Roman, Abbot (1550) Saint Chariton of Novgorod (16th century), disciple of St. Macarius the Roman. New Hieromartyr Christos, Hieromonk, of Ioannina (c. 1770) Saint Stephen,



March 2 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

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March 1 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - March 3 All fixed commemorations below are observed on March 15 by Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar . For March 2nd, Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar commemorate the Saints listed on February 17 ( February 18 on leap years) . Saints Hieromartyrs Nestor the Bishop, and Tribiminus the Deacon, at Perge in Pamphylia (ca. 250) Martyr Troadius of Neo-Caesarea, and those with him (251) Virgin-martyr Euthalia of Sicily (252) St. Cointus of Phrygia (Quintus of Phrygia), Confessor and Wonderworker (283) Martyr Hesychius the Senator (the Palatine ), of Antioch (ca. 304) (see also: May 10 ) Hiero-Confessor Theodotus, Bishop of Cyrenia in Cyprus (ca. 326) Venerable Saints Andronicus and the Athanasia (5th century) (see also: October 9 ) Saint Agathon of Egypt, monk (5th century) Pre-Schism Western Saints Martyrs of Rome, a large number of martyrs martyred in Rome under Alexander Severus and the prefect Ulpian (219) Saints Jovinus and Basileus, two martyrs who suffered



Eastern Orthodox teaching regarding the Filioque

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William La Due describes modern Orthodox theological scholarship as split between a group of scholars that hold to a "strict traditionalism going back to Photius" and other scholars that are "not so adamantly opposed (to the filioque)". Vladimir Lossky asserted that any notion of a double procession of the Holy Spirit from both the Father and the Son was incompatible with Orthodox theology. Orthodox scholars who share Lossky's view include Dumitru Stăniloae , John Romanides and Michael Pomazansky . Sergius Bulgakov , however, was of the opinion that the filioque did not represent an insurmountable obstacle to reunion of the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches. The Eastern Orthodox interpretation of the Trinity is that the Holy Spirit originates, has his cause for existence or being (manner of existence) from the Father alone as "One God, One Father". That the filioque confuses the theology as it was defined at the councils at both Nicene and Constantinople. The position that having the creed say



August 26 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

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Aug. 25 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - Aug. 27 All fixed commemorations below are observed on September 8 by Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar . For August 26, Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar commemorate the Saints listed on August 13 . Saints Martyrs Adrian and Natalia of Nicomedia , and 23 companions (306) Martyrs Atticus and Sissinius, by the sword. Martyr Adrian, son of Roman Emperor Probus , at Nicomedia (320) Saint Gelasius. Saint Maximus, Archbishop of Jerusalem (347) Venerable Tithoes of the Thebaid (4th century), disciple of St. Pachomius the Great. Monk Ioasaph , Prince of India (4th century) (see also: November 19 ) Venerable Ibestion the Confessor , Egyptian ascetic (c. 450) Pre-Schism Western saints Saint Zephyrinus , Pope of Rome from 199 to 217, who defended Orthodox Christology against heresies (217) Martyrs Irenaeus and Abundius (258) (see also: August 13 ) Saint Secundus, a soldier of the Theban Legion martyred near Ventimiglia in Italy (3rd century) Saint Alexander of Bergam



Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America

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The Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America , headquartered in New York City, is an eparchy of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople . Its current primate is Archbishop Demetrios of America . The Orthodox Church The Orthodox Church today, numbering over 250 million worldwide, is a communion of self-governing churches, each administratively independent of the other, but united by a common faith and spirituality. Their underlying unity is based on identity of doctrines, sacramental life and worship, which distinguishes Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Current Archbishop As of 2013 Archbishop Demetrios served the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America. He served as: Primate of the Greek Orthodox Church in America Exarch of the Ecumenical Patriarchate President of the Holy Eparchial Synod Convener and Chairman of the Episcopal Assembly of Canonical Orthodox Hierarchs in North and Central America Chairman of the Standing Conference of Canonical Orthodox Bishops in the Americas Episcopal details include: Consecr



Archdiocese of Russian Orthodox churches in Western Europe

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The Archdiocese of Russian Orthodox churches in Western Europe (officially the Patriarchal Exarchate for Orthodox Parishes of the Russian Tradition in Western Europe ) is a patriarchal exarchate of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople , following the Russian Orthodox tradition, based in Paris, and having parishes throughout Europe, mainly centered in France. The Exarchate is sometimes known as Rue Daru from the street in Paris where its cathedral is located. History After the onset of the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917, Russian Orthodox Christians based outside Russia and those who fled there from the communist regime found themselves in a difficult situation. A solution intended as temporary was the formation of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia (ROCOR), in which during the early 1920s the vast majority of Russian Orthodox abroad participated, united by their opposition to the Soviet government. The Russian bishop of Paris at the time was Metropolitan Evlogy (Georgievsky) , who had been appo



Feast of the Transfiguration

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Icon of the Transfiguration by Theophanes the Greek , 15th century The Feast of the Transfiguration of Jesus is celebrated by various Christian communities. The origins of the feast are less than certain and may have derived from the dedication of three basilicas on Mount Tabor . The feast was present in various forms by the 9th century, and in the Western Church was made a universal feast on 6 August by Pope Callixtus III to commemorate the raising of the Siege of Belgrade (1456) . In the Syriac Orthodox , Indian Orthodox , Revised Julian calendars within Eastern Orthodoxy , Roman Catholic , Old Catholic , and Anglican churches, the Feast of the Transfiguration is observed on 6 August. In those Orthodox churches which continue to follow the Julian Calendar , August 6 falls on August 19 of the Gregorian Calendar . The Transfiguration is considered a major feast, numbered among the twelve Great Feasts in Orthodoxy. In all these churches, if the feast falls on a Sunday, its liturgy is not combined with the Sun



Gospel Book

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The Gospel Book , Evangelion , or Book of the Gospels ( Greek : Εὐαγγέλιον , Evangélion) is a codex or bound volume containing one or more of the four Gospels of the Christian New Testament — normally all four. The term is also used of the liturgical book , also called the Evangeliary , from which are read the portions of the Gospels used in the Mass and other services, arranged according to the order of the liturgical calendar . Liturgical use in churches of a distinct Gospel book remains normal, often compulsory, in Eastern Christianity , and very common in Roman Catholicism and some parts of Anglicanism . Protestant churches normally just use a complete Bible . History Folio 72 verso of the Codex Aureus of Lorsch . Christ in Majesty In the early Middle Ages , the production of copies of the Bible in its entirety was rare, if only because of the huge expense of the parchment required. Individual books or collections of books were produced for specific purposes. From the 4th century Gospel Books were produce



Bulgarian Orthodox Church

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The Bulgarian Orthodox Church (Bulgarian: Българска православна църква, Balgarska pravoslavna tsarkva) is the oldest Slavic Orthodox Church with some 6.5 million members in the Republic of Bulgaria and between 1.5 and 2.0 million members in a number of European countries, the Americas and Australia. It was recognized as an independent Church by the Patriarchate of Constantinople in 927 AD. Canonical status and organization The Bulgarian Orthodox Church considers itself an inseparable member of the one, holy, synodal and apostolic church and is organized as a self-governing body under the name of Patriarchate. It is divided into thirteen dioceses within the boundaries of the Republic of Bulgaria and has jurisdiction over additional two dioceses for Bulgarians in Western and Central Europe, the Americas, Canada and Australia. The dioceses of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church are divided into 58 church counties, which, in turn, are subdivided into some 2,600 parishes. The supreme clerical, judicial and administrati



Flabellum

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Ancient Egyptian flabella (top center) and lotus motifs. 1868, NYPL picture collection A flabellum (plural flabella ), in Christian liturgical use, is a fan made of metal, leather, silk, parchment or feathers, intended to keep away insects from the consecrated Body and Blood of Christ and from the priest, as well as to show honour. The ceremonial use of such fans dates back to Ancient Egypt , and an example was found in the tomb of Tutankhamun . A flabellum is also a fan-shaped structure on the fifth legs of horseshoe crabs (Xiphosura). History Flabella were in use in both pagan rituals and in the Christian Church from very early days. The Apostolic Constitutions , a work of the fourth century, state (VIII, 12): "Let two of the deacons , on each side of the altar , hold a fan, made up of thin membranes, or of the feathers of the peacock , or of fine cloth, and let them silently drive away the small animals that fly about, that they may not come near to the cups ". Western Christianity A 19th-century painting



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