List of Carnegie libraries in Florida

The following list of Carnegie libraries in Florida provides detailed information on United States Carnegie libraries in Florida, where 10 public libraries were built from 10 grants (totaling $198,000) awarded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York from 1901 to 1917. In addition, academic libraries were built at 4 institutions (totaling $76,500).

Key

  Building still operating as a library  Building standing, but now serving another purpose  Building no longer standing  Building listed on the National Register of Historic Places  Building contributes to a historic district on the National Register of Historic Places

Carnegie libraries
Library City or town Image Date granted[1] Grant amount[1] Notes
1 Bartow Bartow Mar 18, 1911 $8,000 Demolished in 1998
2 Bradenton Bradenton Bradenton FL Carnegie Library01.jpg Feb 3, 1917 $10,000
3 Clearwater Clearwater Mar 16, 1915 $10,000 Demolished about 2000
4 Gainesville Gainesville Mar 31, 1916 $10,000 Demolished in 1954
5 Jacksonville Jacksonville Jax FL Old Free Public Library02.jpg Feb 13, 1902 $55,000
6 Ocala Ocala Ocala-Carnegie.jpg Feb 21, 1907 $10,000 Demolished in 1968
7 Palmetto Palmetto Palmetto FL HD Hist Park Carnegie Lib01.jpg Jan 14, 1914 $10,000
8 St. Petersburg St. Petersburg St. Pete Mirror Lake Library02.jpg Jul 9, 1913 $17,500
9 Tampa Tampa Tampa Free Public Library01.jpg Dec 30, 1901 $50,000
10 West Tampa West Tampa West Tampa Free Public Library.jpg Jan 2, 1913 $17,500
Academic libraries
Institution Locality Image Year granted Grant amount Notes
1 Fessenden Academy Martin Mar 15, 1905 $6,500
2 State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students, today Florida A&M University Tallahassee CarnegieLibraryTLH.JPG Jul 18, 1905 $10,000 Now houses the Southeastern Regional Black Archives Research Center and Museum. Carnegie built his library at the negro college after the city of Tallahassee refused it, because under Carnegie's rules it would have to have served all (i.e., black) patrons.
3 John B. Stetson University DeLand Stetson Univ - Sampson Hall2.jpg Mar 12, 1906 $40,000 Now Sampson Hall
4 Rollins College Winter Park Jun 22, 1905 $20,000
Carnegie Hall Library at Rollins College

One of the Florida libraries funded by Andrew Carnegie was on the campus of Rollins College in Winter Park. According to Cohen (2006), Carnegie's "donation of 108 libraries to colleges in the first two decades of the twentieth century assisted 10 percent of the institutions of higher learning in the United States. Carnegie had a preference for colleges and universities that served African-American students, which Rollins College president William Fremont Blackman noted the school did in a letter to Carnegie appealing for a library in 1904:[2]

The fact that it is the only college in the country, North or South, in which the grandchildren of abolitionists and confederate soldiers, in about equal numbers, sit together in the same class-room and play together on the same athletic field, and learn thus to understand, respect and love one another;

Blackman's request consisted of $35,000 in total: "$20,000 for a fireproof building, $3,000 for books, and $12,000 as an endowment for the continued purchase of books" (Cohen). Blackman received a response from Carnegie's secretary James Bertram that noted the request was too general for consideration, and that Carnegie would need a profile of the university before consideration. Little progress was made for over a year, when Blackman again wrote to Carnegie, noting the university's need for a library. Trustees and friends of the university wrote to Carnegie on Blackman's behalf, including W.W. Cummer, a trustee from Jacksonville who served on the board of the city's new Carnegie Library. A letter dated 22 June 1905 and written from Carnegie's home in Scotland brought the welcome news of the offer of a library. Carnegie offered $20,000 for the construction of a library provided that the same amount would be raised for the library's upkeep. While grateful for Carnegie's proposal, Blackman was uneasy with its terms because the amount of funding required to match Carnegie's offer would put a strain on those who had donated to start the college's endowment fund ($200,000) as well as paid a debt ($30,000). In correspondence to Bertram dated July 11, 1905 Blackman wrote (according to Cohen):

Our college is in the poorest of States, remote from all centers of wealth and population, and our friends have strained themselves to the uttermost, in the effort to raise $230,000 in two years. I am by no means sure that we can meet Mr. Carnegie's conditions.

In a January 1906 letter Blackman wrote to Carnegie expressing concern about meeting the conditions for the gift, noting that the college had a large debt that took "considerable self-sacrifice on the part of our friends." That summer, another Florida college, Stetson University, was awarded $40,000 for a library from Carnegie. Upon learning this Blackman again wrote to Carnegie, seeking to amend the original terms of the agreement to match the amount that Stetson was awarded. He was turned down, but a year later was able to notify Carnegie that the school's trustees had been able to match the $20,000 necessary for the gift to be awarded. Bertram wrote to Blackman to inform him that Carnegie had "authorized his Cashier…to arrange payments on Library Building, as work progresses, to the extent of Twenty Thousand Dollars." The library, to be named Carnegie Hall, was dedicated on February 18, 1909.

The building had over 8,000 square feet of space, and was the school's first dedicated library building. It served as so from 1909 until 1951. In addition to its function as a library, Carnegie Hall also served as the school's post office. Since the library was moved from Carnegie to the newly built Mills Memorial Library, it has also housed a bookstore, admissions office, faculty offices, and human resources.[3]

Carnegie Library at Stetson University

Sampson Hall, Stetson University's Carnegie library was opened in 1908. The Carnegie donation was matched with funds donated by John B. Stetson's wife, Elizabeth S. Stetson, and the library later was named Sampson Library in honor of C.T. Sampson, one of the university's foremost trustees. Of the academic libraries that Carnegie helped to fund, Stetson's Sampson library received funds greatly exceeding those received by others in the state. The funding was given on March 12, 1906. Two years later, the resulting Sampson Library was a gorgeous structure which housed the university's library for fifty-six years before a lack of space led to changes. The structure was designed by Henry John Klutho, the first Floridian Architect to be inducted to the American Institute of Architects, and reflects the neoclassical style many Carnegie libraries adopted. The library's edifice is emblazoned with "Education is Power" in Roman style lettering and all around the building are the names of persons influential to academia, such as Chaucer, Tennyson, and Longfellow.[4] When Sampson Library was relocated to the DuPont-Ball Library in 1964, the entire university- students, faculty, and staff- helped to move the books by hand from one building to the other. Students we asked to give an hour of their time to move the resources, but many worked even longer helping to move the materials whose numbers exceed 100,000. Sampson Hall is still used by Stetson University and is a prominent structure along the palm court at the heart of the university. Today its space is divided into classrooms and faculty offices used by the Art, modern language, and American Studies departments; and also is home to student art studio spaces. It'd place as the library's former home and a building of great architectural importance on campus is still prominent.[5]

Notes
  1. At various times, Bobinski and Jones disagree on these numbers. In these cases, Jones' numbers have been used due to both a more recent publication date and a more detailed gazetteer of branch libraries, which are often where the discrepancies occur.
  2. Cohen, D.K. (2000). Andrew Carnegie and Academic Library Philanthropy: The Case of Rollins College, Winter Park, Florida. Libraries & Culture, 35(3), 389-408. JSTOR 25548838
  3. Rollins Olin Library. (2012). History of the Rollins Library-Library Buildings. Retrieved from http://www.rollins.edu/library/about/history2.html
  4. https://www.google.com/maps/@29.0346766,-81.302794,3a,75y,176.02h,138.06t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sNqZQBuwrA3qBkslp78_luw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
  5. http://www.stetson.edu/other/about/history.php/
References
  • Anderson, Florence (1963). Carnegie Corporation Library Program 1911–1961. New York: Carnegie Corporation. OCLC 1282382.
  • Bobinski, George S. (1969). Carnegie Libraries: Their History and Impact on American Public Library Development. Chicago: American Library Association. ISBN 0-8389-0022-4.
  • Jones, Theodore (1997). Carnegie Libraries Across America. New York: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 0-471-14422-3.
  • Miller, Durand R. (1943). Carnegie Grants for Library Buildings, 1890–1917. New York: Carnegie Corporation of New York. OCLC 2603611.

Note: The above references, while all authoritative, are not entirely mutually consistent. Some details of this list may have been drawn from one of the references (usually Jones) without support from the others. Reader discretion is advised.

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Hemet Public Library

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Hemet Public Library

The Hemet Public Library is a public library in Hemet, California, United States which opened its current new library in July 2003. History The library can trace its history back to 1906 when members of the Hemet Woman's Club wanted a place to gather and read literature, so they opened a reading room on the second floor of a bank on the Bothin Block. After the city's incorporation in 1910, citizens voted for their own library, and the new city took over the operation of its library facility. Soon, the upstairs reading room opened by the Woman's Club quickly outgrew itself. Woman's Club members—along with many other community organizations campaigned to get a public building built to house a permanent library collection. The late Mrs. E. A. Davis then composed a letter to Andrew Carnegie asking for the funds to help the community build a new facility. Mr. Carnegie responded by sending a check for $7,500. However, Carnegie placed a contingency on his donation: the City of Hemet had to contribute the remainder ...more...

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Clearwater, Florida

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Clearwater, Florida

A figure skater pictured at the Clearwater Ice Arena Clearwater is a city located in Pinellas County, Florida, United States, northwest of Tampa and St. Petersburg. To the west of Clearwater lies the Gulf of Mexico and to the southeast lies Tampa Bay. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 107,685.[5] Clearwater is the county seat of Pinellas County[6] and is the smallest of the three principal cities in the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater metropolitan area, most commonly referred to as the Tampa Bay Area. Cleveland Street is one of the city's historic avenues, and the city includes Spectrum Field and Coachman Park. The city is separated by the Intracoastal Waterway from Clearwater Beach. Clearwater is the home of Clearwater Marine Aquarium, where bottlenose dolphins Winter and Hope live. Clearwater is the worldwide headquarters for the Church of Scientology.[7] History Clearwater at daybreak, as seen from Clearwater Beach Present-day Clearwater was originally the home of the Tocobaga ...more...

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List of Encyclopædia Britannica Films titles

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List of Encyclopædia Britannica Films titles

Encyclopædia Britannica Films was an educational film production company in the 20th century owned by Encyclopædia Britannica Inc. See also Encyclopædia Britannica Films and the animated cartoon television series Britannica's Tales Around the World. A Title Major credits black & white or color (& running time) year / copyright date Notes Abraham Lincoln (Emerson Film Corp.); J. G. Randall bw-18m © August 10, 1951 Famous Men and Women of the World Abraham Lincoln Scott Craig; Kathy Tallon bw-23m 1982 Acid (History of LSD) Art Ciocco (producer) c-26m © April 23, 1971 video [1] Adaptive Radiation: The Mollusks John Walker (producer) c-11m © December 6, 1961 Biology program, unit 3: Animal life; video [2] Adolescent Responsibilities: Craig and Mark Rose M. Somerville c-28m © August 15, 1973 Adoration of the Magi (Visual Images); David W. Powell, Cherill Anson & Richard McLanathan c-7m 1973 Adventure in Venice John Barnes c-25m © April 19, 1974 (completed '72) video [3] Ad ...more...

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List of autobiographies

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List of autobiographies

The following is a list of notable autobiographies: By profession Author Title of book Year Anthropology Margaret Mead Blackberry Winter: My Earlier Years 1972 Archaeology Margaret Murray My First Hundred Years with Ammu 1963 Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright Autobiography 1943 Art Salvador Dali The Secret Life of Salvador Dalí 1942 Claude Monet An Interview 1900 Gwen Raverat Period Piece 1952 Business Andrew Carnegie Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie: with Illustrations 1920 Richard DeVos Simply Rich: Life and Lessons from the Cofounder of Amway: A Memoir 2014 Andrew S. Grove A Memoir: Swimming Across 2001 Comedy Bill Cosby Fatherhood 1986 Gilda Radner It's Always Something 1989 Richard Pryor Pryor Convictions 1995 Damon Wayans Bootleg 1996 Stephen Fry Moab Is My Washpot 1997 Jenny McCarthy Jen-X: My Open Book 1997 Chris Rock Rock This 1997 Sandra Bernhard Confessions of a Pretty Lady 1998 Alan Thicke How Men Have Babies: a New Father's Survival Guide 2003 Ro ...more...

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Public library

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Public library

Patrons studying and reading at the New York Public Library Main Branch. A public library is a library that is accessible by the general public and is generally funded from public sources, such as taxes. It is operated by librarians and library paraprofessionals, who are also civil servants. There are five fundamental characteristics shared by public libraries. The first is that they are generally supported by taxes (usually local, though any level of government can and may contribute); they are governed by a board to serve the public interest; they are open to all, and every community member can access the collection; they are entirely voluntary in that no one is ever forced to use the services provided; and they provide basic services without charge.[1] Public libraries exist in many countries across the world and are often considered an essential part of having an educated and literate population. Public libraries are distinct from research libraries, school libraries, and other special libraries in th ...more...

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List of largest houses in the United States

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List of largest houses in the United States

The following is a list of the largest extant and historic houses in the United States, ordered by square footage of the main house. This list includes houses that have been demolished or are currently under construction. Largest houses Rank Square footage Name Location Built for Owner Year completed Architectural style Architect Image 1 135,280[1] Biltmore Estate Asheville, North Carolina George Washington Vanderbilt II William A.V. Cecil Jr. 1895 Châteauesque Richard Morris Hunt 2 109,000 [2] Oheka Castle Huntington, New York Otto Hermann Kahn Gary Melius 1919 Châteauesque Delano and Aldrich 3 100,000 Whitemarsh Hall Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania Edward T. Stotesbury (demolished in 1980) 1917 Georgian Horace Trumbauer 4 97,188[3] Arden House Harriman, New York Edward Henry Harriman Research Center on Natural Conservation 1909 Châteauesque Carrère and Hastings 5 96,582 Winterthur Winterthur, Delaware Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library 1932 Georgian Revival Henry Francis ...more...

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University of Central Florida College of Engineering and Computer Science

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University of Central Florida College of Engineering and Computer Science

The University of Central Florida College of Engineering and Computer Science is an academic college of the University of Central Florida located in Orlando, Florida, United States. The college offers degrees in engineering, computer science and management systems, and houses UCF's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The dean of the college is Michael Georgiopoulos, Ph.D.[2] UCF is listed as a university with "very high research activity" by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.[3] With an enrollment of over 7,500 undergraduate and graduate students as of Fall 2012, the college is one of the premier engineering schools in the United States. The college is recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation's best Engineering schools,[4] and as one of the world's best in the ARWU rankings.[5] The university has made noted research contributions to modeling and simulation, digital media, and engineering and computer science.[6] History The College of Engi ...more...

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List of atheists in science and technology

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List of atheists in science and technology

This is a list of atheists in science and technology. Per wikipedia policy WP:BLPCAT, persons in this list are people (living or not) who have publicly identified themselves as atheists or have been historically known to be atheists and whose atheism is relevant to their notable activities or public life. A mere statement by a person that he or she does not believe in God does not meet the criteria for inclusion on this list. Their atheism must be relevant to their notable activities or public life in order to be included on this list. Science and technology Zhores Alferov Philip Warren Anderson Svante Arrhenius Hans Bethe Niels Bohr Percy Williams Bridgman Paul Broca Frank Macfarlane Burnet Sean Carroll James Chadwick William Kingdon Clifford Jerry Coyne Francis Crick Pierre Curie Jean le Rond d'Alembert Richard Dawkins David Deutsch Paul Dirac Paul Ehrenfest Richard Feynm ...more...

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List of group-0 ISBN publisher codes

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List of group-0 ISBN publisher codes

A list of publisher codes for (978) International Standard Book Numbers with a group code of zero. The group-0 publisher codes are assigned as follows: Publisher number Item number Group identifier Total possible books From To Number of possible publisher codes Books per publisher 2 digits 6 digits 0-00-xxxxxx-x 0-19-xxxxxx-x 20 1,000,000 20,000,000 3 digits 5 digits 0-200-xxxxx-x 0-699-xxxxx-x 500 100,000 50,000,000 4 digits 4 digits 0-7000-xxxx-x 0-8499-xxxx-x 1,500 10,000 15,000,000 5 digits 3 digits 0-85000-xxx-x 0-89999-xxx-x 5,000 1,000 5,000,000 6 digits 2 digits 0-900000-xx-x 0-949999-xx-x 50,000 100 5,000,000 7 digits 1 digit 0-9500000-x-x 0-9999999-x-x 500,000 10 5,000,000 Total Possible Group-0 Codes: 557,020 -- 100,000,000 2-digit publisher codes (00–19) Publisher code Publisher Additional imprints Notes 00 William Collins; HarperCollins Fontana; Flamingo; Flamingo Original; Science Fiction & Fantasy; Voyager; Angelus Media 01 ... not yet assigned 02 Collier ...more...

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Cape Canaveral

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Cape Canaveral

Cape Canaveral, from the Spanish Cabo Cañaveral, is a cape in Brevard County, Florida, United States, near the center of the state's Atlantic coast. Known as Cape Kennedy from 1963 to 1973, it lies east of Merritt Island, separated from it by the Banana River. It was discovered by the Spanish conquistador Juan Ponce de León in 1513. It is part of a region known as the Space Coast, and is the site of the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Since many U.S. spacecraft have been launched from both the station and the Kennedy Space Center on adjacent Merritt Island, the two are sometimes conflated with each other. In homage to its spacefaring heritage, the Florida Public Service Commission allocated area code 321 (as in a launch countdown) to the Cape Canaveral area.[2] Other features of the cape include the Cape Canaveral lighthouse and Port Canaveral, one of the busiest cruise ports in the world. The city of Cape Canaveral lies just south of the Port Canaveral District.[3] Mosquito Lagoon, the Indian River, Merr ...more...

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List of autodidacts

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List of autodidacts

This is a list of notable autodidacts which includes people who have been partially or wholly self-taught. Historical education levels Because of the large increase in years of education since 1800, especially during the early 20th century, it is difficult to define autodidactism and to compare autodidacts during different time periods. Artists and authors Tony Silva, an American expert on parrots Charlotte Perkins Gilman was a feminist writer, lecturer, and thinker at the turn of the 20th century Suzanne Valadon, self-taught artist of Bohemian Paris Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, self-taught scholar and poet of New Spain Benjamin Kidd (1858–1916), British sociologist, was not given a formal education.[1] As a working adult, he attended some evening classes and he read incessantly.[2] Kidd gained worldwide fame by the publication of Social Evolution in 1894.[1] Jorge Luis Borges was an Argentine writer, essayist, and poet. Winner of the Jerusalem Prize. Machado de Assis, often described as the gr ...more...

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Florida Symphony Youth Orchestras

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Florida Symphony Youth Orchestras

The Florida Symphony Youth Orchestras (FSYO) is a music education program consisting of six ensembles of nearly 300 student musicians. The organization is under the musical direction of Hanrich Claassen. FSYO is the oldest youth symphony in the state of Florida and believed to be the 3rd oldest in the southeastern United States. The youth orchestra was originally affiliated with the now-defunct Florida Symphony Orchestra. History FSYO was founded in 1957 by Alphonse Carlo,[1] who was both an associate professor of music at Rollins College and the concertmaster of the professional Florida Symphony Orchestra. The first rehearsals were held at Rollins College. From the very beginning through the late 1970s, the youth orchestra was jointly supported and sponsored by both the (now-defunct) Florida Symphony Orchestra (through its Women’s Committee) and the Rollins College School of Creative Arts. On November 29, 1959, the youth orchestra had its first In public concert in Eustis, FL with 59 students. In 1962, the ...more...

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Harry Potter

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Harry Potter

Harry Potter is a series of fantasy novels written by British author J. K. Rowling. The novels chronicle the life of a young wizard, Harry Potter, and his friends Hermione Granger and Ron Weasley, all of whom are students at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. The main story arc concerns Harry's struggle against Lord Voldemort, a dark wizard who intends to become immortal, overthrow the wizard governing body known as the Ministry of Magic, and subjugate all wizards and muggles (non-magical people). Since the release of the first novel, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, on 26 June 1997, the books have found immense popularity, critical acclaim, and commercial success worldwide. They have attracted a wide adult audience as well as younger readers, and are often considered cornerstones of modern young adult literature.[2] The series has also had its share of criticism, including concern about the increasingly dark tone as the series progressed, as well as the often gruesome and graphic violence ...more...

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Jeff Bezos

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Jeff Bezos

Jeffrey Preston Bezos (;[a] born Jorgensen; January 12, 1964) is an American technology entrepreneur, investor, and philanthropist, who is best known as the founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Amazon, the world's largest online retailer. Bezos was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico and raised in Houston, Texas. He graduated from Princeton University in 1986 with degrees in electrical engineering and computer science. He worked on Wall Street in a variety of related fields from 1986 to early 1994. He founded Amazon in late 1994 on a cross-country road trip from New York City to Seattle. The company began as an online bookstore and has expanded to a variety of products and services, including video and audio streaming. It is currently the world's largest Internet sales online company, as well as the world's largest provider of cloud infrastructure services via its Amazon Web Services arm. Bezos added to his business interests when he founded aerospace company Blue Origin in 2000. A Blue Origin test ...more...

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Jacksonville Symphony

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Jacksonville Symphony

The Jacksonville Symphony is an orchestra based in Jacksonville, Florida. Concert hall As one of a handful of American orchestras with its own dedicated concert hall, the Jacksonville Symphony performs the majority of its programs in the Robert E. Jacoby Symphony Hall at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts. The Robert E. Jacoby Symphony Hall is a concert hall primarily used for orchestral performances. The hall is modeled after the Wiener Musikverein in Vienna, Austria.[1] It is designed in a shoebox shaped, similar to many European venues. It is known as a pure concert hall, providing an intimate setting with no stage curtains, orchestra pit, fly space or backstage wings. It houses The Bryan Concert Organ, which is a rebuilt Casavant Frères pipe organ. It is the home to the Jacksonville Symphony and the Jacksonville Symphony Youth Orchestra. Seating over 1,700 guests, it also used as an intimate concert venue. Artistic background Founded in 1949, Jacksonville's symphony is one of Florida's longe ...more...

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List of group-1 ISBN publisher codes

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List of group-1 ISBN publisher codes

A list of publisher codes for (978) International Standard Book Numbers with a group code of one. (Data from published items by these publishers.) The group-1 publisher codes are assigned as follows: Publisher number Item number Group identifier Total possible books From To Number of possible publisher codes Books per publisher 2 digits 6 digits 1-00-xxxxxx-x 1-09-xxxxxx-x 10 1,000,000 10,000,000 3 digits 5 digits 1-100-xxxxx-x 1-399-xxxxx-x 300 100,000 30,000,000 4 digits 4 digits 1-4000-xxxx-x 1-5499-xxxx-x 1,500 10,000 15,000,000 5 digits 3 digits 1-55000-xxx-x 1-86979-xxx-x 31,980 1,000 31,980,000 6 digits 2 digits 1-869800-xx-x 1-998999-xx-x 129,200 100 12,920,000 7 digits 1 digit 1-9990000-x-x 1-9999999-x-x 10,000 10 100,000 Total Possible Group-1 Codes: 172,990 -- 100,000,000 2-digit publisher codes (00-09) Publisher code Publisher Additional imprints Notes 01 Pyramid Books e.g. ISBN 1-01-502772-5 02 Berkley Publishing e.g. ISBN 1-02-541870-0 04 Popular Library e.g. I ...more...

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Florida Institute of Technology

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Florida Institute of Technology

The Florida Institute of Technology (Florida Tech or FIT) is a private nonprofit doctoral/research university in Melbourne, Florida.[5] Florida Tech has seven main academic divisions with emphases on science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM), and aviation.[6] The university's 130-acre primary residential campus is located near the Orlando Melbourne International Airport and the Florida Tech Research Park.[7] It is about 50 miles (80 km) from the Kennedy Space Center and 75 miles (121 km) from Orlando. The university was founded in 1958 as Brevard Engineering College and has been known by its present name since 1966.[8] In 2013, Florida Tech had an on-campus student body of 4,633, almost equally divided between graduate- and undergraduate-level students with the majority of them focusing their studies on engineering and the sciences.[3] History Miller Building One of the oldest buildings on campus: a schoolhouse built in 1883. Florida Institute of Technology was founded as Brevard Engi ...more...

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Oklahoma

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Oklahoma

Oklahoma ( ( listen);[26] Pawnee: Uukuhuúwa,[27] Cayuga: Gahnawiyoˀgeh)[28] is a state in the South Central region of the United States.[29] It is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the fifty United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people".[30] It is also known informally by its nickname, "The Sooner State", in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on land before the official opening date of lands in the western Oklahoma Territory or before the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which dramatically increased European-American settlement in the eastern Indian Territory. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged into the State of Oklahoma when it became the 46th state to enter the union on November 16, 1907. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City. A major producer of natural gas, oil, and agricultural products, Oklahoma relies on an economic base of aviatio ...more...

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List of Phi Beta Kappa members by year of admission

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List of Phi Beta Kappa members by year of admission

This is a list of notable members of the Phi Beta Kappa Society who have Wikipedia biographies. . Robert F. Schilling, MD. University of Wisconsin Notable members elected as undergraduates Name College or University Year Bushrod Washington College of William & Mary 1778 John Heath College of William & Mary 1779 Richard Bland Lee College of William & Mary 1780 John Marshall College of William & Mary 1780 James Kent Yale College 1781 Stephen Van Rensselaer[1] Harvard University 1782 John Quincy Adams Harvard University 1787 Eli Whitney Yale College 1792 David Sherman Boardman Yale College 1792 Joseph Story Harvard University 1798 Oliver Ellsworth Yale College 1799 Daniel Webster Dartmouth College 1801 John Calhoun Yale College 1804 Levi Woodbury Dartmouth College 1809 Samuel Morse Yale College 1810 William H. Prescott Harvard University 1814 Joseph Tracy Dartmouth College 1814 William H. Seward Union College 1819 Rufus Choate Dartmouth College 1819 ...more...

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (commonly shortened to Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll.[1] It tells of a girl named Alice falling through a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. The tale plays with logic, giving the story lasting popularity with adults as well as with children.[2] It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre.[2][3] Its narrative course and structure, characters and imagery have been enormously influential[3] in both popular culture and literature, especially in the fantasy genre. Background Page from the original manuscript copy of Alice's Adventures Under Ground, 1864 Alice was published in 1865, three years after Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat, on 4 July 1862[4] (this popular date of the "golden afternoon"[5] might be a confusion or even another Alice-tale, for that part ...more...

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Union Bank (Tallahassee, Florida)

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Union Bank (Tallahassee, Florida)

Union Bank of Tallahassee The Union Bank of Tallahassee was established around 1830 and is the state's oldest surviving bank building. It is located at Apalachee Parkway and Calhoun Street. On February 24, 1971, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. History The Union Bank was completed in 1841 as Tallahassee's first bank by William Williams when Florida was still a territory. Chartered to help finance local cotton plantations, it ultimately closed in 1843 due to the Seminole Wars, unsound banking practices, and the Panic of 1837. In 1847, the bank was purchased by cotton plantation owners William Bailey and Isaac Mitchell. After the Civil War, the bank reopened as the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company in 1868 for emancipated slaves.[2] It later served as a church, feed store, art house, coffee house, dance studio, locksmith's shop, beauty shop, and shoe factory. In 1971, the bank was moved from its original site on the west side of Adams Street between College Avenue and Park ...more...

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University museums in Florida

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Lester Brickman

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Lester Brickman

Lester Brickman is an emeritus professor at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law of the Yeshiva University and a legal scholar. He is one of the founding faculty members of the Cardozo, recruited by Yeshiva University in 1976 from the University of Toledo College of Law.[1] On May 31, 2016, Professor Brickman received the Monrad Paulsen Award of the Cardozo School, upon his retirement from teaching.[2] He taught contracts, legal ethics and Land Use and Zoning at the Cardozo School of Law. He is the author of a book, Lawyer Barons: What Their Contingency Fees Really Cost America (Cambridge University Press, 2011), a detailed critique of perceived abuses and excessive costs of the American tort system, with proposals for reform. Brickman is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University. He holds a juris doctor degree from the University of Florida and an LLM degree from Yale Law School. Professor Brickman has written on asbestos litigation and tort reform. Brickman, with co-authors Jeffrey O'Connell and Michael Ho ...more...

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Pittsburgh

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Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh ( PITS-burg) is a city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the United States, and is the county seat of Allegheny County. As of 2017, a population of 305,704 lives within the city limits, making it the 63rd-largest city in the U.S.[2][5] The metropolitan population of 2,353,045 is the largest in both the Ohio Valley and Appalachia, the second-largest in Pennsylvania (behind Philadelphia), and the 26th-largest in the U.S. Located at the confluence of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio rivers, Pittsburgh is known both as "the Steel City" for its more than 300 steel-related businesses and as the "City of Bridges" for its 446 bridges.[6] The city features 30 skyscrapers, two inclined railways, a pre-revolutionary fortification and the Point State Park at the confluence of the rivers. The city developed as a vital link of the Atlantic coast and Midwest, as the mineral-rich Allegheny Mountains made the area coveted by the French and British empires, Virginians, Whiskey Rebels, and Civil War raiders ...more...

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Some of the great cities of the world

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Inland port cities and towns of the United States

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World Travel Trivia

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University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

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University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (also known as U of I, Illinois, or colloquially as the University of Illinois or UIUC)[7][8] is a public research university in the U.S. state of Illinois. Founded in 1867 as a land-grant institution in the twin cities of Champaign and Urbana, it is the flagship campus of the University of Illinois system and a founding member of the Big Ten Conference. The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign is a member of the Association of American Universities and is classified as a R1 Doctoral Research University under the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, which denotes the highest research activity.[9] In fiscal year 2015, research expenditures at Illinois totaled $640 million.[10] The campus library system possesses the second-largest university library in the United States after Harvard University.[11] The university also hosts the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and is home to the fastest supercomputer on a unive ...more...

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PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES EMILY PILEO

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List of science centers in the United States

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List of science centers in the United States

This is a List of science centers in the United States. AAM and ASTC member centers are granted institutional benefits and may offer benefits to individuals through purchased or granted individual memberships as well. ASTC offers a "passport" that allows for free general entry at all other participating ASTC member centers outside of a 90-mile radius of home.[1] AAM offers a similar program that offers benefits to individuals.[2] AAM accredited museums have obtained a seal of approval from the AAM Accreditation Program that ensures a museum's "commitment to excellence, accountability, high professional standards and continued institutional improvement."[3] This is a comprehensive list of ASTC centers, but it is not comprehensive for AAM museums. Any type of museum can be associated with AAM, whereas ASTC associates specifically with science centers and technology-based collections. Name City State AAM[4] Accredited AAM[5] Member ASTC[6] Member ASTC[6] Passport A.C. Gilbert's Discovery Village Salem Ore ...more...

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History of public library advocacy

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History of public library advocacy

Public libraries in the American Colonies can be traced back to 1656, when a Boston merchant named Captain Robert Keayne willed his collection of books to the town.[1] Church collections of books used by the public served as early versions of libraries in New England around the 18th century. One such example is the Kings Chapel Library in Boston, which was founded in 1698 with book donations from the Bishop of London.[1] Reverend Thomas Bray was instrumental in the establishment of libraries for public use. This Anglican clergyman had sponsored several parish libraries in England, and from 1695-1704 he managed to establish 70 libraries in the American Colonies. These included five provincial libraries located in the major cities of time, 39 parochial libraries at Anglican parishes, and 35 layman libraries where ministers were allowed to loan the materials to their local residents. Bray's provincial libraries in Maryland and South Carolina were both the beneficiaries of the first laws passed by the local leg ...more...

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Alpha Kappa Psi (sorority)

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Alpha Kappa Psi (sorority)

Alpha Kappa Psi (ΑΚΨ) sorority operated in the United States from 1900 to approximately 1920. Early history In 1900, Alpha Kappa Psi was founded as the first Greek letter sorority on the campus of Saint Mary's School in Raleigh, North Carolina. Rev. Theodore DuBose Bratton, eventual bishop of Mississippi (1903), assisted his students with the creation. The purpose was to "foster the highest ideals of Christian womanhood" (Saint Mary's Archives). The first initiation was held in 1901. Two Greek lettered literary societies were also founded on campus in 1900: Epsilon Alpha Pi, Sigma Lambda. Going National In 1904,[1] AKP was incorporated as a national sorority. Soon, other chapters were chartered. Beta chapter was chartered at Virginia Female Institute (Stuart Hall) in Staunton, Virginia. The next eight years were the "heyday" of the sorority. Chapters were chartered at schools in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Washington DC, and Pennsylvania. The Alpha chapter disbanded in 1911, when rector Dr. George W. ...more...

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Hispanic and Latino Americans

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Hispanic and Latino Americans

Hispanic Americans and Latino Americans (Spanish: Estadounidenses hispanos; ) are people in the United States who are descendants of people from countries of Latin America and Spain.[6][7][8] The United States has the largest population of Latinos and Hispanics outside of Latin America. More generally, it includes all persons in the United States who self-identify as Hispanic or Latino, whether of full or partial ancestry.[9][10][11][12] For the 2010 United States Census, people counted as "Hispanic" or "Latino" were those who identified as one of the specific Hispanic or Latino categories listed on the census questionnaire ("Mexican", "Puerto Rican" or "Cuban") as well as those who indicated that they were "other Spanish, Hispanic, or Latino." The national origins classified as Hispanic or Latino by the United States Census Bureau are the following: Argentine, Cuban, Colombian, Puerto Rican, Spaniards, Dominican, Mexican, Costa Rican, Guatemalan, Honduran, Nicaraguan, Panamanian, Salvadoran, Bolivian, Spanis ...more...

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Fred J. James

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Fred J. James

El Centro Español of West Tampa LeClaire Apartments Tampa Free Library Fred J. James was an American architect born in Canada. He came to Florida some time around 1885. He had an office in the Citizens Bank Building in Tampa, Florida.[1] He designed El Centro Español of West Tampa.[2] James designed a Carnegie Library, the Tampa Free Library, constructed in 1915-17, that was Tampa's main library until 1968. It includes a T-plan, masonry, brown and yellow brick atop a rusticated granite basement, and is topped by a barrel tile roof. It has been known as the Old Tampa Free Public Library, the Exceptional Children Education Center is now being used for Tampa's Business and Community Services Department. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1991.[3] James designed the R.O. Richards building (1923), also known as the Pythian Building, in Fort Myers, Florida in 1923 at 1615 Hendry Street for R. O. Richards, President of the state pharmacy board and a key figure in getting C ...more...

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List of songs about New York City

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List of songs about New York City

This article lists songs about New York City, set there, or named after a location or feature of the city. It is not intended to include songs where New York is simply "name-checked" along with various other cities. 0–9 "11:11" by Rufus Wainwright "11:35" by Aesop Rock "11th Street" by Ravens & Chimes "11th Street Kids" by Hanoi Rocks "100 South of Broadway" by Philadelphia Society "105th & Park" by Kenny "Dope" Gonzalez "110th Street and Fifth Avenue" by Tito Puente "116th and Lenox" by Jackie McLean "12th Street" by Thick As Thieves "121 Bank Street" by George Russell "124 East 107th Street" by William Ortiz-Alvarado "125th St. And 7th Ave." by Richard Holmes (organist) "125th Street Congress" by Weather Report "125th Street Shuffle" by Jah Thomas "127th Street March" by Jonah Jones Quartet "13 I 73 5:35-6:14:03 PM NYC" by La Monte Young "1394 St. Johns Place" by Dean Fraser "14th Street" by Rufus Wainwright "14th Street Beat" by Sylvain Sylvain "14th St ...more...

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National Register of Historic Places listings in Columbiana County, Ohio

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National Register of Historic Places listings in Columbiana County, Ohio

Location of Columbiana County in Ohio This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Columbiana County, Ohio. This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Columbiana County, Ohio, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in a Google map.[1] There are 44 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 1 National Historic Landmark. This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 25, 2018.[2] Current listings [3] Name on the Register[4] Image Date listed[5] Location City or town Description 1 Beginning Point of the U.S. Public Land Survey October 15, 1966(#66000606) On the Ohio/Pennsylvania border, east of East Liverpool40°38′33″N 80°31′10″W / 40.6425°N 80.519444°W East Liverpool Point from which the Publi ...more...

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Richard Adams

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Richard Adams

Richard George Adams (9 May 1920 – 24 December 2016)[2] was an English novelist who is best known as the author of Watership Down, Shardik and The Plague Dogs. He studied modern history at university before serving in the British Army during World War II. Afterwards, he completed his studies, and then joined the British Civil Service. In 1974, two years after Watership Down was published, Adams became a full-time author.[3][4] Early life Adams was born on 9 May 1920 in Wash Common, near Newbury, Berkshire, England, the son of Lilian Rosa (Button) and Evelyn George Beadon Adams, a doctor.[5] He attended Horris Hill School from 1926 to 1933, and then Bradfield College from 1933 to 1938. In 1938, he went to Worcester College, Oxford, to read Modern History. In July 1940, Adams was called up to join the British Army. He was posted to the Royal Army Service Corps and was selected for the Airborne Company, where he worked as a brigade liaison. He served in Palestine, Europe and the Far East but saw no direct actio ...more...

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Association of Research Libraries

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Association of Research Libraries

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 125 research libraries at comprehensive, research institutions in the United States and Canada that share similar missions, aspirations, and achievements. The Association’s importance and distinction are born from the ARL membership and the nature of the institutions represented. ARL member libraries make up a large portion of the academic and research library marketplace, spending more than $1.4 billion every year on information resources and actively engaging in the development of new models of scholarly communications.[3] ARL co-founded an affiliate organization, the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), in 1990. CNI is a joint program of ARL and EDUCAUSE, a nonprofit association whose mission is to advance higher education by promoting the intelligent use of information technology. CNI is dedicated to supporting the transformative promise of digital information technology for the advancement of scholarly communication and the ...more...

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List of current and historical women's universities and colleges in the United States

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List of current and historical women's universities and colleges in the United States

The following is a series of lists of women's colleges in the United States. These are institutions of higher education in the United States whose student populations are composed exclusively or almost exclusively of women. They are often liberal arts colleges. There are approximately sixty active women's colleges inbar the U.S. Current women's colleges are listed in bold text. Colleges that are closing or transitioning to coeducation are listed in italics. Former women's colleges that are now coeducational or have closed are listed in plain text. Alphabetical by state Alabama Alabama Central Female College, Tuscaloosa August 22, 1923 the main building burned down and became a park in the 1930s. No mention of the school after this date. Alabama Conference Female College, Tuskegee (originally Tuskegee Female College)[1] From 1854-1909 college was in Tuskegee, then moved to Montgomery. Co-ed in 1934, then renamed Huntingdon College in 1935. Auburn (Masonic) Female College, Auburn (offered college courses 1 ...more...

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List of people from Baltimore

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List of people from Baltimore

This is a list of famous or notable people who were born in or lived in Baltimore, Maryland. A Horace Abbott (1806–87), born in Sudbury, Massachusetts, moved to Baltimore in 1836, iron manufacturer, supplied the armor for USS Monitor Arunah Shepherdson Abell (1806–1888), born in East Providence, Rhode Island, founder of the Baltimore Sun[1] David T. Abercrombie (1867–1931), born in and raised in Baltimore, founder of Abercrombie & Fitch Don Abney (1923–2000), jazz pianist Rosalie Silber Abrams (1916–2009), first female and Jewish majority leader in Maryland State Senate[2] Henry Adams (1858 Germany–1929 Baltimore), prominent mechanical engineer, co-founder of ASHVE Otto Eugene Adams (1889–1968), architect Charles Adler, Jr. (1899–1980), inventor Larry Adler (1914–2001), harmonica player Spiro T. Agnew (1918–1996), born in Baltimore County; Governor of Maryland and Vice-President of the United States under Richard Nixon John W. Albaugh (1837–1909), actor Franklin A. Alberger ...more...

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Lists of people by city in the United States

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Timeline of abolition of slavery and serfdom

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Timeline of abolition of slavery and serfdom

Proclamation of the Abolition of Slavery in the French Colonies 1849, by François Auguste Biard. Versailles Palace The abolition of slavery occurred at different times in different countries. It frequently occurred sequentially in more than one stage - for example, as abolition of the trade in slaves in a specific country, and then as abolition of slavery throughout empires. Each step was usually the result of a separate law or action. This timeline shows abolition laws or actions listed chronologically. It also covers the abolition of serfdom. Although slavery is now abolished de jure in all countries, some practices akin to it continue today in many places throughout the world. Ancient times Date Jurisdiction Description Early sixth century BC Polis of Athens The Athenian lawgiver Solon abolishes debt slavery and frees all Athenian citizens who had formerly been enslaved.[1][2] 326 BC Roman Republic Lex Poetelia Papiria abolishes debt bondage. 3rd century BC Maurya Empire Ashoka abol ...more...

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Slavery in the United States

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Slavery in the United States

An animation showing when United States territories and states forbade or allowed slavery, 1789–1861 Slave auction block, Green Hill Plantation, Campbell County, Virginia, Historic American Buildings Survey Slavery in the United States was the legal institution of human chattel enslavement, primarily of Africans and African Americans, that existed in the United States of America in the 18th and 19th centuries. Slavery had been practiced in British America from early colonial days, and was legal in all Thirteen Colonies at the time of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. It lasted in some states until its abolition through the American Civil War (1861–1865). As an economic system, slavery was largely replaced by sharecropping. By the time of the American Revolution (1775–1783), the status of slave had been institutionalized as a racial caste associated with African ancestry.[1] When the United States Constitution was ratified (1789), a relatively small number of free people of color were among th ...more...

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Baptist History

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Project LISTEN

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Project LISTEN

Project LISTEN (Literacy Innovation that Speech Technology ENables) was a 25-year research project at Carnegie Mellon University to improve children's reading skills. Project LISTEN. The project created a computer-based Reading Tutor that listens to a child reading aloud, corrects errors, helps when the child is stuck or encounters a hard word, provides hints, assesses progress, and presents more advanced text when the child is ready. The Reading Tutor has been used daily by hundreds of children in field tests at schools in the United States, Canada, Ghana, and India. Thousands of hours of usage logged at multiple levels of detail, including millions of words read aloud, have been stored in a database that has been mined to improve the Tutor's interactions with students. An extensive list of publications (with abstracts) can be found at Carnegie Mellon University.[1] Project LISTEN’s Reading Tutor is now being transformed into "RoboTutor" by Carnegie Mellon’s team competing in the Global Learning XPRIZE.[2] ...more...

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Jean Kennedy Smith

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Jean Kennedy Smith

Jean Ann Kennedy Smith (born February 20, 1928) is an American diplomat who served as United States Ambassador to Ireland from 1993 to 1998. She is the eighth of nine children born to Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. and Rose Fitzgerald, and is their longest-lived and last surviving child. Her siblings include President John F. Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, Senator Ted Kennedy, and Special Olympics founder Eunice Kennedy Shriver. Smith is the founder of Very Special Arts (VSA), an internationally recognized non-profit dedicated to creating a society where people with disabilities can engage with the arts. In 2011, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, by President Barack Obama for her work with VSA and people with disabilities. As Ambassador to Ireland, Smith was instrumental in the Northern Ireland peace process as President Bill Clinton's representative in Dublin. She was heavily criticized after advocating for the U.S. government to grant a visa to Sinn Féin P ...more...

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List of datasets for machine learning research

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List of datasets for machine learning research

These datasets are used for machine-learning research and have been cited in peer-reviewed academic journals. Datasets are an integral part of the field of machine learning. Major advances in this field can result from advances in learning algorithms (such as deep learning), computer hardware, and, less-intuitively, the availability of high-quality training datasets.[1] High-quality labeled training datasets for supervised and semi-supervised machine learning algorithms are usually difficult and expensive to produce because of the large amount of time needed to label the data. Although they do not need to be labeled, high-quality datasets for unsupervised learning can also be difficult and costly to produce.[2][3][4][5] Data Building/Annotation Tools In Machine Learning , different kind of datasets [ image classification, bounding box, polygon bounding, segmentation to name a few] require different kind of annotation tools. There are some open tool which helps in building those datasets: DataTurks Free li ...more...

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Jim Crow laws

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Jim Crow laws

Jim Crow laws were state and local laws that enforced racial segregation in the Southern United States. Enacted by white Democratic-dominated state legislatures in the late 19th century after the Reconstruction period, these laws continued to be enforced until 1965. They mandated racial segregation in all public facilities in the states of the former Confederate States of America, starting in the 1870s and 1880s, and upheld by the United States Supreme Court's "separate but equal" doctrine for African Americans. Public education had essentially been segregated since its establishment in most of the South after the Civil War. This principle was extended to public facilities and transportation, including segregated cars on interstate trains and, later, buses. Facilities for African Americans were consistently inferior and underfunded compared to those which were then available to white Americans; sometimes they did not exist at all. This body of law institutionalized a number of economic, educational, and socia ...more...

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List of foreign recipients of the Légion d'Honneur

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List of foreign recipients of the Légion d'Honneur

The Order of Légion d'Honneur is the highest decoration in France and is divided into five degrees: Chevalier (Knight), Officier (Officer), Commandeur (Commander), Grand Officier (Grand Officer) and Grand Croix (Grand Cross). Membership in the Légion d'Honneur is restricted to French nationals.[1] Foreign nationals who have served France or the ideals it upholds[2] may, however, receive a distinction of the Légion, which is nearly the same thing as membership in the Légion. Foreign nationals who live in France are submitted to the same requirements as Frenchmen. Foreign nationals who live abroad may be awarded a distinction of any rank or dignity in the Légion. A complete, chronological list of the members of the Legion of Honour nominated from the very first ceremony in 1803 to now does not exist. The number is estimated at one million. Among them about 3 000 were decorated with the Grand Cross (including 1 200 French).[3] Albania Ismail Kadare (2016) appointed Commandeur, a writer Fatos Kongoli (201 ...more...

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E. L. Konigsburg

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E. L. Konigsburg

Elaine Lobl Konigsburg (February 10, 1930 – April 19, 2013) was an American writer and illustrator of children's books and young adult fiction. She is one of six writers to win two Newbery Medals, the venerable American Library Association award for the year's "most distinguished contribution to American children's literature."[1] Konigsburg submitted her first two manuscripts to editor Jean Karl at Atheneum Publishers in 1966, and both were published in 1967: Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth and From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.[2][3] They made her the only person to be Newbery Medal winner and one of the runners-up in one year.[a] She won again for The View from Saturday in 1997, 29 years later, the longest span between two Newberys awarded to one author.[1] For her contribution as a children's writer Konigsburg was U.S. nominee in 2006 for the biennial, international Hans Christian Andersen Award, the highest international recognition available to creator ...more...

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Syracuse University

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Syracuse University

Crouse College, a Romanesque building completed in 1889, housed the first College of Fine Arts in the United States. It is now the home of the university's College of Visual and Performing Arts and the Setnor School of Music. Syracuse University (commonly referred to as Syracuse, 'Cuse, or SU[7]) is a private research university in Syracuse, New York, United States. The institution's roots can be traced to the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary (later becoming Genesee College), founded in 1831 by the Methodist Episcopal Church in Lima, New York. After several years of debate over relocating the college to Syracuse, the university was established in 1870, independent of the college. Since 1920, the university has identified itself as nonsectarian,[8][9][10][11] The campus is in the University Hill neighborhood of Syracuse, east and southeast of downtown, on one of the larger hills. Its large campus features an eclectic mix of buildings, ranging from nineteenth-century Romanesque Revival structures to contemporary bu ...more...

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List of brutalist structures

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List of brutalist structures

Huygens & Tappe, design. 110 Congdon St Providence RI, built between 1970-1974. Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. The following list provides numerous examples of this architectural style worldwide. List of notable brutalist structures The list is organised in chronological order with name of structure, location, architect(s), and year(s) constructed. 1930s Hilversum Town Hall, Hilversum, The Netherlands (Dudok, 1931) 1950s Secretariat Building, Chandigarh, India Torre Velasca, Milan, Italy Unité d'Habitation de Marseille (Cité Radieuse), Marseille, France (Le Corbusier, 1952) Embassy of the United States, Havana, Cuba (1953) Secretariat Building, Chandigarh, India (Le Corbusier, 1953) Smithdon High School (formerly Hunstanton Secondary Modern School), Norfolk, England (Peter and Alison Smithson, 1954) Tel Aviv-Yafo City Hall, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel (Menachem Cohen, ...more...

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Largest organisms

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Largest organisms

Although it appears to be multiple trees, Pando is a clonal colony of an individual quaking aspen with an interconnected root system. It is widely held to be the world's most massive single organism. The largest organisms found on Earth can be determined according to various aspects of an organism's size, such as: mass, volume, area, length, height, or even genome size. Some organisms group together to form a superorganism (such as ants or bees), but such are not classed as single large organisms. The Great Barrier Reef is the world's largest structure composed of living entities, stretching 2,000 km (1,200 mi), but contains many organisms of many types of species. This article lists the largest species for various types of organisms, and mostly considers extant species. The organism sizes listed are frequently considered "outsized" and are not in the normal size range for the respective group. If considered singular entities, the largest organisms are clonal colonies which can spread over large areas. Pa ...more...

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Earth

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List of Jewish actors

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List of Jewish actors

This is a list of notable Jewish actors. Born in the 1990s–2000s Name Years Nationality Prominent roles References Asher Angel 2002– American Andi Mack [1] Ariela Barer 1998– American One Day at a Time, Runaways [2] Sofia Black D'Elia 1991– American Skins [3] Jonah Bobo 1997– American Zathura [4][5] Cameron Boyce 1999– American Jessie, Gamer's Guide to Pretty Much Everything, Descendants [6] Max Burkholder 1997– American Parenthood [7] Carly Chaikin 1990– American Suburgatory, Mr. Robot Timothée Chalamet 1995– American Homeland, Interstellar, Call Me by Your Name, Lady Bird [8] Emory Cohen 1990– American The Place Beyond the Pines, Brooklyn [9] Flora Cross 1993– American Bee Season [10] Spencer Daniels 1992– American [11] Zoey Deutch 1994– American Vampire Academy [12] Ansel Elgort 1994– American The Fault in Our Stars, Baby Driver [13] Beanie Feldstein 1993– American Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising, Lady Bird Brandon Flynn 1993- American 13 Reasons Why [14] ...more...

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Hannah Tompkins (artist)

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Hannah Tompkins (artist)

Hannah Tompkins (January 17, 1920 - October 25, 1995) was an American artist primarily known for her large body of artwork based on the writings of William Shakespeare. A catalog listing of her Shakespeare themed oil paintings appears in Shakespeare in American Painting : A Catalogue from the Late Eighteenth Century to the Present by Richard Studing.[1] She began painting in earnest in the mid-1960s while teaching art at Ramapo Community College, Rockland County, New York. In 1979 she opened the Shambles Gallery in Santa Cruz, California and in 1984 opened the Shakespeare Art Museum in Ashland, Oregon.[2] Background Born in the Williamsburg slum in Brooklyn, New York to Russian and Polish Jewish immigrants, third youngest of eight children, Tompkins found her love of Shakespeare as an adolescent while residing in various foster homes after being placed as a baby in the Brooklyn Hebrew Orphan Asylum. In 1937 she graduated Girls Commercial High School in NYC with an Art Diploma. She became active in the progr ...more...

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List of Ghost Hunters episodes

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List of Ghost Hunters episodes

This is a list of episodes of the paranormal reality television series, Ghost Hunters. Series overview Season Episodes Originally aired DVD and Blu-ray Disc release date Season premiere Season finale Region 1 1 10 October 6, 2004 December 15, 2004 October 18, 2005 (complete set) 2 22 July 27, 2005 May 31, 2006 September 19, 2006 (part 1 & 2) 3 18 October 11, 2006 November 7, 2007 October 9, 2007 (part 1) February 26, 2008 (part 2) 4 27 March 5, 2008 December 10, 2008 October 7, 2008 (part 1) March 17, 2009 (part 2) 5 25 March 11, 2009 December 16, 2009 February 23, 2010 (part 1) April 27, 2010 (part 2) 6 25 March 3, 2010 December 8, 2010 September 13, 2011 (part 1) October 11, 2011 (part 2) 7 25 February 23, 2011 December 7, 2011 August 7, 2012 (part 1) October 2, 2012 (part 2) 8 26 January 11, 2012 December 5, 2012 March 19, 2013 (part 1) June 11, 2013 (part 2) 9 26 January 16, 2013 October 29, 2014 August 14, 2014 (part 1) October 21, 2014 (part 2) 10 13 August 26,  ...more...

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Lists of American non-fiction television series...

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List of submarine museums

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List of submarine museums

This is a list of museums that include submarines that can either be toured or viewed on display. Australia The composite of midget submarines M-14 & M-21 at the Australian War Memorial in 2007 Name Location City / Town Nationality Class Launch Year Remarks HMAS Otway Holbrook Submarine Museum Holbrook Australia Oberon-class 1966 HMAS Ovens Western Australian Maritime Museum Fremantle Australia Oberon-class 1967 HMAS Onslow Australian National Maritime Museum Sydney Australia Oberon-class 1968 M-21 Royal Australian Navy Heritage Centre Sydney Empire of Japan Type A Kō-hyōteki-class 1940 Conning Tower M-14 and M-21 Australian War Memorial Campbell Empire of Japan Type A Kō-hyōteki-class 1940 Composite Submarine Belgium B-821 (sometimes called B-143) – Seafront Zeebrugge, Zeebrugge, Belgium – Foxtrot-class sub. Launched 1960. Brazil Riachuelo (S22) – Navy Cultural Centre in Rio de Janeiro – Oberon-class, Launched in 1975, decommissioned 1997. Canada Name Lo ...more...

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Submarines

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