How to Irritate People

How to Irritate People is a 1968 television broadcast written by John Cleese, Graham Chapman, Marty Feldman and Tim Brooke-Taylor. Cleese, Chapman, and Brooke-Taylor also feature in it, along with future Monty Python collaborators Michael Palin and Connie Booth.

In various sketches, Cleese demonstrates exactly what the title suggests—how to irritate people, although this is done in a much more conventional way than the absurdity of similar Monty Python sketches.

Notable sketches
Job Interview

The "Job Interview" sketch, starring Cleese as the interviewer and Brooke-Taylor as the interviewee, was later performed, almost unchanged, in the first season of Monty Python's Flying Circus with Chapman as the interviewee.

Egocentrism

The "Egocentrism" sketch, starring Cleese as the host/interviewer and Chapman as interviewee Dr. Rhomboid Goatcabin, features a discussion about freedom of speech in Great Britain, in which Cleese's character repeatedly reformulates the subject's main question ("Do you believe there is freedom of speech in this country?") in so many ways as to start a monologue and not let Chapman's character speak. This increasingly annoys the interviewee to the point where he is forced to murder the host in order to express his opinion on the matter, only to be interrupted again by his spirit. This sketch bears some resemblance to Anne Elk's Theory on Brontosauruses and was originally performed on At Last the 1948 Show.

Car Salesman

The "Car Salesman" sketch, in which Palin refuses to accept customer Chapman's claim that a car he sold is faulty, later inspired Python's Dead Parrot sketch in which the malfunctioning car is replaced by an expired parrot.

Quiz Show

The "Quiz Show" sketch, where Brooke-Taylor, as a Pepperpot, annoys Cleese, a quiz show host, while appearing as a contestant on a show, was later adapted into another Monty Python's Flying Circus sketch, "Take Your Pick" in episode 20, where Terry Jones plays the contestant attempting to win the prize of a "blow on the head."

Airline Pilots

The "Airline Pilots" sketch is set in the cockpit of a commercial airliner, with Cleese (as captain) and Chapman (as copilot). The airliner is on autopilot. Bored, they start making reassuring intercom messages to the passengers telling them there is nothing to worry about – at which point, of course, the passengers get worried – aided by the flight attendant (Palin). These messages get continually more incomprehensible or mutually contradictory until eventually all the passengers bail out. The Monty Python sketch "Bomb on Plane" in episode 35 alluded briefly to this sketch when pilot Michael Palin told passengers, "Our destination is Glasgow; there is no need to panic."

Pepperpots

The recurring characters of the "Pepperpots", the old British housewives that exist solely to annoy theater-goers and quiz show hosts, would go on to be a major part of Monty Python's Flying Circus, appearing in almost every episode of the show.

Release

This film was directed by Ian Fordyce who also directed At Last the 1948 Show, and was made in the UK for the American market in an attempt to introduce them to the new style of British humour. For this reason the recording is made to the NTSC colour standard. The idea for the show came from David Frost.

It appears the show was never broadcast in the UK, but was first broadcast in the United States on 21 January 1969. Contemporary reviews suggest a broadcast slot of 60 minutes, including commercials, which would make the version broadcast between 50 and 55 minutes, at least 10 minutes shorter than the current video release. In addition, reviews[1] refer to David Frost as appearing in the show, whereas he is absent from the video version. An audio track confirms that he originally introduced the show.[2] Michael Palin has also referred to the show being 'tightened up' for the video release.

The show has appeared on DVD, sometimes with "irritating" backward packaging and deliberately faulty navigation - an example of this is the 2002 Sanctuary Visual Entertainment release (Catalogue no. SDF2020); the sleeve has the front image on the back and vice versa - the menu in the disc changes every time an option is selected, and needs to be pressed several times.

References
  1. ""How to irritate people"". SOTCAA. Retrieved 22 February 2018.
  2. "Original introduction for How to irritate people". youtube. The Monty Python Museum. Retrieved 22 February 2018.
External links
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How to Irritate People

topic

How to Irritate People

How to Irritate People is a 1968 television broadcast written by John Cleese, Graham Chapman, Marty Feldman and Tim Brooke-Taylor. Cleese, Chapman, and Brooke-Taylor also feature in it, along with future Monty Python collaborators Michael Palin and Connie Booth. In various sketches, Cleese demonstrates exactly what the title suggests—how to irritate people, although this is done in a much more conventional way than the absurdity of similar Monty Python sketches. Notable sketches Job Interview The "Job Interview" sketch, starring Cleese as the interviewer and Brooke-Taylor as the interviewee, was later performed, almost unchanged, in the first season of Monty Python's Flying Circus with Chapman as the interviewee. Egocentrism The "Egocentrism" sketch, starring Cleese as the host/interviewer and Chapman as interviewee Dr. Rhomboid Goatcabin, features a discussion about freedom of speech in Great Britain, in which Cleese's character repeatedly reformulates the subject's main question ("Do you believe there ...more...

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How to Make Enemies and Irritate People

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How to Make Enemies and Irritate People

Professional ratings Review scores Source Rating Allmusic [2] How to Make Enemies and Irritate People is the seventh studio album by the Chicago-based punk rock band Screeching Weasel. Planned as the group's final album, it was released in August 1994 on CD, vinyl and cassette through Lookout Records. Shortly before recording the album, bassist/backing vocalist Dan Vapid left the band and, as a result, Green Day bassist Mike Dirnt was recruited to play on the album. Screeching Weasel broke up the day recording finished[3] and shut down their post office box soon after. During the break-up, vocalist Ben Weasel, Vapid and drummer Dan Panic went on to form the more Ramones-influenced band the Riverdales while guitarist John Jughead took time off from music to write and direct plays.[4] The band would reunite in 1996 with Vapid back on bass for the Bark Like a Dog album on Fat Wreck Chords. After the band removed its catalog from Lookout due to unpaid royalties, the album was re-released by Asian Man Rec ...more...

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Connie Booth

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Connie Booth

Constance Booth (born 1941[1][2] or 1944)[3] is an American-born writer, actress, comedian and psychotherapist based in Britain. She has appeared in several British television programmes and films, including her role as Polly Sherman on BBC2's Fawlty Towers, which she co-wrote with her then-husband John Cleese. For 30 years Booth declined to talk about Fawlty Towers until she agreed to participate in a documentary about the series for the digital channel Gold in 2009.[4] Early life Booth's father was a Wall Street stock broker and her mother an actress. They moved to New York State after Connie's birth in Indianapolis, Indiana.[3][5] Booth entered acting and worked as a Broadway understudy and waitress, meeting John Cleese while he was working in New York City.[5] She married Cleese on February 20, 1968.[6] Acting career Booth secured parts in episodes of Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969–74) and in the Python films And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) and Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1 ...more...

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Dead Parrot sketch

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Dead Parrot sketch

Mr Praline (John Cleese) (right) attempts to return his dead Norwegian Blue parrot to the shopkeeper (Michael Palin) The "Dead Parrot Sketch", alternatively and originally known as the "Pet Shop Sketch" or "Parrot Sketch", is a sketch from Monty Python's Flying Circus. It was written by John Cleese and Graham Chapman and initially performed in the show's first series, in the eighth episode ("Full Frontal Nudity", which first aired 7 December 1969).[1] The sketch portrays a conflict between disgruntled customer Mr Praline (played by Cleese) and a shopkeeper (Michael Palin), who argue whether or not a recently purchased "Norwegian Blue" parrot is dead. It pokes fun at the many euphemisms for death used in British culture. The "Dead Parrot" sketch was inspired by a "Car Salesman" sketch that Palin and Chapman had done in How to Irritate People. In it, Palin played a car salesman who repeatedly refused to admit that there was anything wrong with his customer's (Chapman) car, even as it fell apart in front of h ...more...

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Graham Chapman

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Graham Chapman

Graham Arthur Chapman (8 January 1941 – 4 October 1989) was an English comedian, writer, actor, author, and one of the six members of the British surreal comedy group Monty Python. He played authority figures such as the Colonel and the lead role in two Python films, Holy Grail (1975) and Life of Brian (1979). Chapman was born in Leicester and was raised in Melton Mowbray. He enjoyed science, acting, and comedy, and after graduating from Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and St Bartholomew's Medical College, he turned down a career as a doctor to be a comedian. Chapman eventually established a writing partnership with John Cleese, which reached its critical peak with Monty Python in the 1970s. He subsequently left Britain for Los Angeles, where he attempted to be a success on American television, speaking on the college circuit and producing the pirate film Yellowbeard (1983), before returning to Britain in the early 1980s. In his personal life, Chapman was openly homosexual and a strong supporter of gay rights, ...more...

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Michael Palin

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Michael Palin

Michael Edward Palin CBE FRGS (pronounced ; born 5 May 1943)[1] is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter. He was a member of the comedy group Monty Python and later made a number of travel documentaries. Palin wrote most of his comedic material with fellow Python member Terry Jones. Before Monty Python, they had worked on other shows such as the Ken Dodd Show, The Frost Report, and Do Not Adjust Your Set. Palin appeared in some of the most famous Python sketches, including "Argument Clinic", "Dead Parrot sketch", "The Lumberjack Song", "The Spanish Inquisition", "Bicycle Repair Man" and "The Fish-Slapping Dance". Palin continued to work with Jones after Python, co-writing Ripping Yarns. He has also appeared in several films directed by fellow Python Terry Gilliam and made notable appearances in other films such as A Fish Called Wanda (1988), for which he won the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role.[2] In a 2005 poll to find The Comedians' Comedian, he was voted the 30th fav ...more...

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Tim Brooke-Taylor

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Tim Brooke-Taylor

Timothy Julian Brooke-Taylor OBE (born 17 July 1940) is an English comic actor. He became active in performing in comedy sketches while at Cambridge University, and became President of the Footlights club, touring internationally with the Footlights revue in 1964. Becoming wider known to the public for his work on BBC Radio with I'm Sorry, I'll Read That Again, he moved into television with At Last the 1948 Show working together with old Cambridge friends John Cleese and Graham Chapman. He is most well known as a member of The Goodies, starring in the television series throughout the 1970s and picking up international recognition in Australia and New Zealand. He has also appeared as an actor in various sitcoms, and has been a panellist on I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue for over 40 years. Early life and education Brooke-Taylor was born in Buxton, Derbyshire, England, the grandson of Francis Pawson, a parson who played centre forward for the English football team in the 1880s.[1] His mother was an international l ...more...

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Jowett Javelin

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Jowett Javelin

The Jowett Javelin is an executive car which was produced from 1947 to 1953 by Jowett Cars Ltd of Idle, near Bradford in England. The model went through five variants coded PA to PE, each having a standard and "de luxe" option. The car was designed by Gerald Palmer during World War II and was intended to be a major leap forward from the relatively staid designs of pre-war Jowetts. Just over 23,000 units were produced. All steel and new right through The new Javelin, not yet in full production, made its first public appearance on Saturday 27 July 1946 in a cavalcade to celebrate 60 years of the British Motor Industry organised by the SMMT. Started by the King in Regent's Park the cavalcade passed through Marble Arch around London's West End and Piccadilly Circus and back up to Regent's Park.[5] Series production was not fully underway until November 1947.[6] In a 1949 road test report The Times' correspondent welcomed the Javelin's good performance and original design. The engine mounted ahead of the front a ...more...

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List of Monty Python's Flying Circus episodes

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List of Monty Python's Flying Circus episodes

This is a list of all 45 episodes from the television series Monty Python's Flying Circus: Series Episodes Originally aired First in the series Last in the series 1 13 5 October 1969 11 January 1970 2 13 15 September 1970 22 December 1970 3 13 19 October 1972 18 January 1973 4 6 31 October 1974 5 December 1974 The original air dates do not all apply to BBC Scotland, which took a different approach to airing the series. Series 1 was broadcast at the same time, except for the last two episodes, which were shown on 2 and 16 January 1970. Series 2 was broadcast on Sundays from 17 September to 16 January 1971 (not 10 or 17 October 1970). Series 3 was broadcast on Thursday evenings on BBC1 at 10:15. Series 4 was broadcast at the same time as the rest, on BBC2. Series 1 “ It's... ” 1. Whither Canada? (episode 1; aired 5 October 1969;[1] recorded 7 September 1969) It's Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Famous deaths Italian lesson Whizzo Butter A parody ...more...

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How Not to Be Seen

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How Not to Be Seen

"How Not to Be Seen" is a popular sketch from Monty Python's Flying Circus. It was first aired as the 11th episode of the second series of the show (also known as episode 24) on 8 December 1970. This filmed sketch purports to be a British government film (No. 42, PARA. 6.) presented for public service (in the manner of a public information film). In this sketch, the narrator, John Cleese, is trying to explain the importance of not being seen, but eventually takes enjoyment in having people and buildings blown up. Plot The film starts with a serene wide shot of a landscape in which there are supposedly 40 people, none of whom can be seen. The picture then changes to another serene wide shot of a different landscape. In it is Mr. E. R. Bradshaw of Napier Court, Black Lion Road, (London) SE 5, who cannot be seen. The narrator asks him to stand up. He complies and is immediately shot. According to the narrator, "This demonstrates the value of not being seen." There is a cut to another landscape wide shot. In ...more...

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Dick Vosburgh

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Dick Vosburgh

Richard Kennedy Vosburgh (27 August 1929 – 18 April 2007) was an American-born comedy writer and lyricist working chiefly in Britain. Vosburgh was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey. He persuaded his father to let him study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London (where he met his future wife, Beryl Roques) and won the Comedy Acting prize.[1] He was soon writing for BBC Radio, starting with scripts for Bernard Braden in 1953.[1] Often partnering with other writers including Garry Chambers and Barry Cryer he wrote television shows for Ronnie Corbett, David Frost, Roy Hudd, Bobby Davro, Frankie Howerd, Bob Monkhouse, Lenny Henry, Tommy Cooper, Freddie Starr and Bob Hope and material for the radio revival of the Marx Brothers show Flywheel, Shyster and Flywheel. He also helped write the scripts for the films Up Pompeii, Up the Chastity Belt, Carry On Nurse and Call Me Bwana[2] and the TV sitcom Tell It to the Marines. According to legend, he did much of his writing while continuously riding the Circle Line ...more...

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I spy

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I spy

I spy is a guessing game where the spy, or it, says "I spy with my little eye ..." and players have to guess the object the Spy saw. Rules About Parenting recommends the game for "doctor's offices, restaurants and other places where you sometimes have to wait with kids", but discourages its use in moving cars.[1] The way players choose who will be the Spy/It can range from the noncompetitive alternating of turns to a game of skill/chance such as rock, paper, scissors.[2] The Spy silently selects an object that is visible to all the players and does not reveal their choice.[3] They then say, "I spy with my little eye something beginning with ...", naming the letter the chosen object starts with (e.g. "I spy with my little eye something beginning with C" if the chosen object is a car).[4] An alternative version is substituting the initial letter for an adjective such as the colour of the object (e.g. "I spy with my little eye something blue"),[5] while another is to say "I Spy with my little eye something tha ...more...

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Carol Cleveland

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Carol Cleveland

Carol Cleveland (born 13 January 1942) is a British-American actress and comedian, most notable for her work with Monty Python. Early life Born in East Sheen, London, she moved to the United States with her mother and U.S. Air Force stepfather at an early age. She was brought up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Lubbock, Texas; and later Pasadena, California where she attended John Marshall Junior High School and Pasadena High School. She is a former Miss California Navy and appeared as Miss Teen Queen in MAD Magazine at age 15. Carol was Miss Teen in the August 1958 issue of Dig magazine. Cleveland returned with her family to London in 1960,[1] and studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Career A stage actress and model who had appeared as an extra in The Persuaders!, a secretary in The Saint, and other TV shows and films, she started to appear as an extra in BBC comedy productions, including The Two Ronnies, Morecambe and Wise and various vehicles for Spike Milligan. Monty Python This brought her ...more...

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Monty Python

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Monty Python

Monty Python (also collectively known as The Pythons)[2][3] were a British surreal comedy group who created their sketch comedy show Monty Python's Flying Circus, which first aired on the BBC in 1969. Forty-five episodes were made over four series. The Python phenomenon developed from the television series into something larger in scope and impact, including touring stage shows, films, numerous albums, several books, and musicals. The Pythons' influence on comedy has been compared to the Beatles' influence on music.[4][5][6] Their sketch show has been referred to as "not only one of the more enduring icons of 1970s British popular culture, but also an important moment in the evolution of television comedy."[7] Broadcast by the BBC between 1969 and 1974, Monty Python's Flying Circus was conceived, written, and performed by its members Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin. Loosely structured as a sketch show, but with an innovative stream-of-consciousness approa ...more...

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The Funniest Joke in the World

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The Funniest Joke in the World

"The Funniest Joke in the World" is the title most frequently used for written references to a Monty Python's Flying Circus comedy sketch, which is also known by two other phrases that appear within it, "Joke Warfare" and "Killer Joke", the latter being the most commonly spoken title used to refer to it. The premise of the sketch is that the joke is so funny that anyone who reads or hears it promptly dies from laughter. The sketch appeared in the first episode of the television show Monty Python's Flying Circus ("Whither Canada"), first shown on 5 October 1969.[1] The German translation of the joke in the sketch is made of various meaningless, German-sounding nonce words, and so it does not have an English translation. Summary The sketch is framed in a documentary style, and opens with Ernest Scribbler (Michael Palin), a British "writer of jokes", creating the funniest joke in the world only to die laughing. His mother (Eric Idle) finds what she believes to be a suicide note, reads it and also immediately ...more...

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John Cleese

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John Cleese

John Marwood Cleese (; born 27 October 1939) is an English actor, voice actor, comedian, screenwriter, and producer. He achieved success at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and as a scriptwriter and performer on The Frost Report. In the late 1960s, he co-founded Monty Python, the comedy troupe responsible for the sketch show Monty Python's Flying Circus and the four Monty Python films: And Now for Something Completely Different, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Life of Brian and The Meaning of Life. In the mid-1970s, Cleese and his first wife, Connie Booth, co-wrote and starred in the British sitcom Fawlty Towers, with Cleese receiving the 1980 BAFTA for Best Entertainment Performance. Later, he co-starred with Kevin Kline, Jamie Lee Curtis, and former Python colleague Michael Palin in A Fish Called Wanda and Fierce Creatures, both of which he also wrote. He also starred in Clockwise and has appeared in many other films, including two James Bond films as R and Q, two Harry Potter films, and the last three Shrek ...more...

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The Goodies

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The Goodies

The Goodies are a trio of British comedians: Tim Brooke-Taylor, Graeme Garden, and Bill Oddie. They wrote for and performed in their eponymous television comedy show during the 1970s and early 1980s, combining sketches and situation comedy. Beginnings The three actors met each other as undergraduates at Cambridge University, where Brooke-Taylor was studying law, Garden was studying medicine, and Oddie was studying English. Their contemporaries included Graham Chapman, John Cleese, and Eric Idle, who later became members of Monty Python, and with whom they became close friends. Brooke-Taylor and Cleese studied together and swapped lecture notes as they were both law students, but at different colleges within the university.[1] All three Goodies became members of the Cambridge University Footlights Club, with Brooke-Taylor becoming president in 1963, and Garden succeeding him as president in 1964.[1][2] Garden himself was succeeded as Footlights Club president in 1965 by Idle, who had initially become aware ...more...

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Sit on My Face

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Sit on My Face

"Sit on My Face" is a short song by the members of the comedy troupe Monty Python which originally appeared on the album Monty Python's Contractual Obligation Album and later appeared on the compilation Monty Python Sings. Written by Eric Idle, the song's lyrics are sung to the melody of "Sing As We Go" by Gracie Fields. The opening gives way to the voices of The Fred Tomlinson Singers singing "Sit on my face and tell me that you love me." The remaining lyrics contain numerous references to fellatio and cunnilingus, such as "when I'm between your thighs you blow me away" and "life can be fine if we both 69". The song opened the 1982 film Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl, where it was lip-synched by Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones dressed as waiters in a performance which, at the suggestion of Python touring member Neil Innes,[1] ended with them revealing their bare backsides. In 2002, a similar rendition was mimed by Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Terry Gilliam and Neil Innes at th ...more...

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Four Yorkshiremen sketch

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Four Yorkshiremen sketch

The "Four Yorkshiremen" sketch is a comedy sketch that parodies nostalgic conversations about humble beginnings or difficult childhoods. It features four men from Yorkshire who reminisce about their upbringing. As the conversation progresses they try to outdo one another, and their accounts of deprived childhoods become increasingly absurd. The sketch was written by Tim Brooke-Taylor, John Cleese, Graham Chapman and Marty Feldman and originally performed on their TV series At Last the 1948 Show in 1967. It later became associated with the comedy group Monty Python (which included Cleese and Chapman), who performed it in their live shows, including Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl. Performances At Last the 1948 Show The Four Yorkshiremen sketch was originally written and performed for the 1967 British television comedy series At Last the 1948 Show by the show's four writer-performers: Tim Brooke-Taylor, John Cleese, Graham Chapman and Marty Feldman.[1][2][3] Barry Cryer is the wine waiter in the orig ...more...

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List of films: H

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List of films: H

Alphabetically indexed lists of films  0-9   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H    I   J–K  L   M  N–O  P  Q–R  S   T  U-V-W X–Y–Z This is an alphabetical list of film articles (or sections within articles about films). It includes made for television films. See the talk page for the method of indexing used. H H (2002) H. G. Wells' The Shape of Things to Come (1979) H.G. Wells' The War of the Worlds (2005) H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941) H.M.S. Defiant (1962) The H-Man (1958) H.O.T.S. (1979) H2O: (1929 & 2004) Ha Hab-Han Hababam sinifi (1975) Habana Blues (2005) Habeas Corpus (1928) Hachi: A Dog's Tale (2009) Hackers (1995) Hacks: (1997 & 2002) Hacksaw Ridge (2016) Hadh Kar Di Aapne (2000) Hag in a Black Leather Jacket (1964) Haggard: The Movie (2003) Hagiga B'Snuker (1975) Haikara-san ga Tōru (1987) Haiku Tunnel (2001) Hail Caesar (1994) Hail the Conquering Hero (1944) Hail the Judge (1994) Hail the Woman (1921) Hail, Caesar! (2016) ...more...

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Ripping Yarns

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Ripping Yarns

Ripping Yarns is a British television adventure comedy anthology series. It was written by Michael Palin and Terry Jones of Monty Python fame. It was transmitted on BBC 2. Following an initial pilot episode in January 1976, it ran for two series — six episodes in September and October 1977 and three episodes in October 1979. Each episode had a different setting and characters, each looking at a different aspect of British culture and parodying pre-World War II literature aimed at schoolboys. In the title, "ripping" is a chiefly British slang meaning "excellent" or "fine", and "yarn" is a colloquialism for "story". Pilot episode In 1975, the BBC commissioned a pilot episode from Palin and Jones, envisaged to be a light entertainment comedy piece. The result was Tomkinson's Schooldays (a title loosely inspired by Tom Brown's Schooldays, and suggested by BBC director Terry Hughes). Palin and Jones both wrote and starred in multiple roles.[1] Episodes The nine episodes and their original airdates are: First ...more...

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David Paradine Productions

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David Paradine Productions

David Paradine Productions[1] is a television production company founded by David Frost as 'David Paradine Ltd' in 1966.[2] Notable productions At Last the 1948 Show (1967–68)[3] Warner Brothers/Seven Arts[4] The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer (1970) Associated-Rediffusion Television[5] Through the Keyhole (1987-2008) Yorkshire Television[6] Productions Frost on Sketch Shows (2013)[7] Frost on Interviews (2012)[8] Frost on Satire (2010)[9] The Frost Report Is Back (2008)[10] Frost Over the World (2006)[11] Frost Tonight (2006)[12] Inside Elton's World (2005)[13] Spitting Image: Down and Out in the White House (1986)[14] David Frost Interviews Richard Nixon (1977)[15] Leadbelly (1976)[16] David Frost Presents the Guinness Book of World Records (1975)[17] Who Killed Lamb? (1974)[18] Charley-One-Eye (1973)[19] Rentadick (1972)[20] Futtocks End (1970)[21] David Frost Presents: Frankie Howerd (1969)[22] David Frost Presents: How to Irritate People (1969)[23] Ref ...more...

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Monty Python's Contractual Obligation Album

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Monty Python's Contractual Obligation Album

Professional ratings Review scores Source Rating Allmusic [1] Monty Python's Contractual Obligation Album is the final studio album by Monty Python, released in 1980. As the title suggests, the album was put together to complete a contract with Charisma Records. Besides newly written songs and sketches, the sessions saw re-recordings of material that dated back to the 1960s pre-Python shows I'm Sorry I'll Read That Again, The Frost Report, At Last The 1948 Show and How To Irritate People. One track, "Bells", dates from the sessions for Monty Python's Previous Record, while further material was adapted from Eric Idle's post-Python series Rutland Weekend Television. The group also reworked material written but discarded from early drafts of Life Of Brian as well as the initial scripts for what would eventually become The Meaning Of Life. The group had not recorded an all-studio album since Matching Tie and Handkerchief in 1973 and were initially unenthusiastic about returning to the recording studio. Fr ...more...

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At Last the 1948 Show

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At Last the 1948 Show

At Last the 1948 Show is a satirical TV show made by David Frost's company, Paradine Productions (although it was not credited on the programmes), in association with Rediffusion London. Transmitted on Britain's ITV network in 1967, it brought Cambridge Footlights humour to a broader audience. The show starred Tim Brooke-Taylor, Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Marty Feldman and Aimi MacDonald. Cleese and Brooke-Taylor were also the programme editors. The director was Ian Fordyce. Chapman and Cleese would later go on to help form the Monty Python comedy troupe, and several of the sketches first performed in At Last the 1948 Show would later be performed by Monty Python in various formats. While only two episodes of the show initially survived, efforts to locate missing episodes have been fruitful, with seven episodes being accounted for by 2013. On 23 October 2014, two episodes were recovered by the British Film Institute from the David Frost collection, and a further two episodes were recovered the following y ...more...

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Monty Python filmography

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Monty Python filmography

The Monty Python comedy troupe branched off into a variety of different media after the success of their sketch comedy television series, Monty Python's Flying Circus. Television Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969–1974) Monty Python's Fliegender Zirkus (1972) Parrot Sketch Not Included – 20 Years of Monty Python (1989) Monty Python Live at Aspen (1998) Python Night – 30 Years of Monty Python (1999) Monty Python's Personal Best (2006) Films And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979) Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (1983) Books The following official Monty Python books authored by the team members have been published, mostly in large format: Monty Python's Big Red Book (1971) – Hardcover and paperback. Covers vary. The Brand New Monty Python Bok (1973) (Paperback edition issued as The Brand New Monty Python Papperbok) Monty Python and the Holy G ...more...

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Piranha Brothers

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Piranha Brothers

"Piranha Brothers" is a Monty Python sketch that was first seen in the first episode (titled "Face the Press") of the second series of Monty Python's Flying Circus. Originally transmitted on the television comedy on September 15, 1970, the premise is a BBC current affairs documentary program, inexplicably entitled Ethel the Frog, retrospectively covering the exploits of the fictional brothers Doug and Dinsdale Piranha. The sociopathic criminals employed a combination of "violence and sarcasm" to intimidate the London underworld and bring the city to its knees. Dinsdale is also described as being afraid of "Spiny Norman", a gigantic imaginary hedgehog whose reported size varied on Dinsdale's mood. During the end of the sketch, which also ends the episode, the creature is apparently revealed as real and appearing beside various English landmarks as the credits roll. Background and details The sketch constitutes a loose pastiche of the real-life story of the Kray twins, gangsters who maintained an underground ...more...

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List of recurring Monty Python's Flying Circus characters

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List of recurring Monty Python's Flying Circus characters

Very few characters of the BBC television series Monty Python's Flying Circus appeared in more than one episode, and when they did, it was usually to link sketches together. A few well-known characters are described below. Recurring Sketch Characters "It's" man Played by Michael Palin. Dressed in rags, and sporting a long beard, much like an island castaway, this character would start most of the early shows by struggling to cross a landscape of dangers until he got close enough to the camera to say "It's--", immediately followed by the opening credits and musical theme. In one episode, the character had his own talk show, featuring Ringo Starr and Lulu as guests, but was unable to get past his single word catch phrase before being interrupted by Monty Python's opening theme music. At the end of the program he is usually forced to go back across the same dangerous landscape. The Announcer Played by John Cleese. Often found in a farmer's field, or the back of a moving truck, this character was a BBC Announ ...more...

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Spam (Monty Python)

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Spam (Monty Python)

Terry Jones (behind counter), Eric Idle, Graham Chapman and the Vikings in the Monty Python sketch "Spam" “Spam” is a Monty Python sketch, first televised in 1970 and written by Terry Jones and Michael Palin. In the sketch, two customers are lowered by wires into a greasy spoon café and try to order a breakfast from a menu that includes Spam in almost every dish, much to the consternation of one of the customers. The televised sketch and several subsequent performances feature Terry Jones as the Waitress, Eric Idle as Mr. Bun and Graham Chapman as Mrs. Bun, who does not like Spam. The original sketch also featured John Cleese as The Hungarian and Michael Palin as a historian, but this part was left out of the audio version of the sketch recorded for the team's second album Another Monty Python Record in 1971. A year later this track was released as the Pythons' first 7" single. The term spam in the context of electronic communications is derived from this sketch.[1] Plot The three-and-a-half-minute sketc ...more...

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Aeta people

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Aeta people

Young Aeta girl from Mariveles, Bataan, in 1901. The Aeta (Ayta EYE-tə), or Agta, are an indigenous people who live in scattered, isolated mountainous parts of the island of Luzon, the Philippines. These people are considered to be Negritos, whose skin ranges from dark to very dark brown, and possessing features such as a small stature and frame; hair of a curly to kinky texture and a higher frequency of naturally lighter colour (blondism) relative to the general population, small nose, and dark brown eyes. They are thought to be among the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines, preceding the Austronesian migrations.[1] The Aeta were included in the group of people named "Negrito" during the Spanish Era. Various Aeta groups in northern Luzon are named Pugut or Pugot, an Ilocano term that also means "goblin" or "forest spirit",[2] and is the colloquial term for people with darker complexions. These names are mostly considered inappropriate or derogatory by fellow Aeta of northern Luzon. History Young ...more...

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The Seventh Python

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The Seventh Python

The Seventh Python is a 2008 musical documentary film about the career, music and philosophy of pop satirist and songwriter Neil Innes, who has been known as the "seventh" member of the six-man Monty Python comedy troupe. The film, however, shows how Innes' influence and experience goes far beyond that chapter, to include his work with the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, The Rutles and other work. The Frozen Pictures film had its premiere at the American Cinematheque's Mods & Rockers Film Festival at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood in June 2008. The film was directed by Burt Kearns, and written and produced by Kearns and Brett Hudson. The film features Innes in performance in Los Angeles, Sussex, England and Melbourne, Australia and features Pythons John Cleese, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin, as well as singer-songwriter Aimee Mann, Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons), and composer/arranger John Altman, among others. On 12 April 2009, the director and producer of The Seventh Python received th ...more...

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Monty Python sketches

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Monty Python sketches

This is a list of notable and recurring sketches from the comedy group, Monty Python, for their series Monty Python's Flying Circus and other projects. Albatross! Anne Elk's Theory on Brontosauruses Architects Sketch Argument Clinic The Bishop Cheese Shop sketch Colin "Bomber" Harris vs Colin "Bomber" Harris Crunchy Frog Dead Bishop Dead Parrot sketch The Dirty Fork Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook Election Night Special Fish Licence The Fish-Slapping Dance Four Yorkshiremen sketch The Funniest Joke in the World How Not to Be Seen Kilimanjaro Expedition Lifeboat sketch Marriage Guidance Counsellor The Ministry of Silly Walks The Mouse Problem Nudge Nudge Patient Abuse The Philosophers' Football Match Piranha Brothers Ron Obvious Sam Peckinpah's "Salad Days" Seduced Milkmen Self Defence Against Fresh Fruit Spam The Spanish Inquisition Undertakers Upper Class Twit of the Year Vocational Guidance Counsellor World Forum/Communist Quiz References ...more...

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Bruces sketch

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Bruces sketch

The Bruces sketch is a comedy sketch that originally appeared in a 1970 episode of the television show Monty Python's Flying Circus, episode 22, "How to Recognise Different Parts of the Body", and was subsequently performed on audio recordings and live on many occasions by the Monty Python team. In reference to the sketch, Iron Maiden singer Bruce Dickinson used the stage name "Bruce Bruce" while a member of the British hard rock band Samson.[1] Description The sketch involves a group of stereotypical "ocker" Australians of the period, who are all wearing khakis and cork hats. All are named Bruce, hence being known as the Bruces. The skit begins with a group of men named Bruce sitting at a table, as someone sings Waltzing Matilda in the background. The Bruces are revealed to be the Philosophy Department at the fictitious University of Woolloomooloo (see below). The department appears to be situated in nothing more than a simple wooden building apparently somewhere in the outback.[2] The Bruces all have a ...more...

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Terry Gilliam

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Terry Gilliam

Terrence Vance Gilliam (; born 22 November 1940)[2] is an American-born British screenwriter, film director, animator, actor, comedian and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. Gilliam has directed 12 feature films, including Time Bandits (1981), Brazil (1985), The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988), 12 Monkeys (1995), Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998), and The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2009). The only "Python" not born in Britain, he became a naturalised British subject in 1968 and formally renounced his American citizenship in 2006. Gilliam was born in Minnesota, but spent his high school and college years in Los Angeles. He started his career as an animator and strip cartoonist. He joined Monty Python as the animator of their works, but eventually became a full member and was given acting roles. He became a feature film director in the 1970s. Most of his films explore the theme of imagination and its importance to life, express his opposition to bureaucracy and authoritarianism, and fea ...more...

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Lyn Ashley

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Lyn Ashley

Lyn Ashley (born 18 March 1940 as Lynette Rumble) is an Australian actress who worked in the United Kingdom on television during the 1960s. She is the daughter of actress Madge Ryan. Her television credits include Danger Man, Compact, Doctor Who (in the serial Galaxy 4), The Saint and Monty Python's Flying Circus. She also acted in films such as I'll Never Forget What's'isname (1967) and Quest for Love (1971). She was also married to Monty Python member Eric Idle from 1969 until 1975; they have one son together, Carey, born in 1973. She was frequently credited on Monty Python's Flying Circus as 'Mrs Idle'. She was later a cast member on the early 1990s soap opera Families. External links Lyn Ashley on IMDb ...more...

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Rabbit of Caerbannog

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Rabbit of Caerbannog

The Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog is a fictional character in the Monty Python film Monty Python and the Holy Grail.[1] The scene in Holy Grail was written by Graham Chapman and John Cleese.[2] The rabbit is the antagonist in a major set piece battle, and makes a similar appearance in Spamalot, a musical inspired by the movie.[3] The iconic status of this scene was important in establishing the viability of the musical.[4] In the film The Cave of Caerbannog is the home of the Legendary Black Beast of Arrrghhh (named for the last utterance of anyone who ever saw it).[5] This is guarded by a monster which is initially unknown.[6] King Arthur (Graham Chapman) and his knights are led to the cave by Tim the Enchanter (John Cleese) and find that they must face its guardian beast. Tim verbally paints a picture of a terrible monster with "nasty, big, pointy teeth!", so terrifying that Sir Robin (Eric Idle) soils his armour at the mere description. When the guardian appears to be an innocuous white rabbit,[7] surround ...more...

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The Frost Report

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The Frost Report

The Frost Report was a satirical television show hosted by David Frost. It ran for 28 episodes on the BBC from 10 March 1966 to 26 December 1967. It introduced John Cleese, Ronnie Barker, and Ronnie Corbett to television, and launched the careers of other writers and performers. Cast and writers The main cast were Frost, Corbett, Cleese, Barker, Sheila Steafel, and Nicky Henson. Musical interludes were provided by Julie Felix, while Tom Lehrer also performed songs in a few episodes. Writers and performers on The Frost Report later worked on many other television shows. They included Bill Oddie and Tim Brooke-Taylor (of Goodies), Barry Cryer, Ronnie Barker, Ronnie Corbett, Dick Vosburgh, Spike Mullins (who would write Corbett's Two Ronnies monologues), Antony Jay (Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister), and future Python members Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin.[2][1] It was while working on The Frost Report that the future Pythons developed their writing style. The estab ...more...

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The Hastily Cobbled Together for a Fast Buck Album

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The Hastily Cobbled Together for a Fast Buck Album

Hastily Cobbled Together for a Fast Buck is the name of a bootleg of an unreleased album by Monty Python,[1] mostly made up of outtakes from the 1980 sessions for their Contractual Obligation Album. The album was compiled by producer Andre Jacquemin in 1987 but pulled from release in favour of a compilation of previously released material, The Final Rip Off. As with material that made the final cut of the Contractual Obligation Album, the outtakes include re-recordings of material which predates Monty Python. “Bunn, Wacket, Buzzard, Stubble and Boot”, the title of which was among the many rejected suggestions for the name of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, dates back to John Cleese’s college days. “Adventure” originates from The Frost Report, while At Last The 1948 Show was plundered for “Freelance Undertaker” and “Memory Training”, the latter featuring a newly written coda containing a list of the towns where Monty Python's Life of Brian was banned. Another sketch, “Indian Restaurant”, was revived from the TV ...more...

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Danielle Bregoli

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Danielle Bregoli

Danielle Bregoli (born March 26, 2003), known professionally as Bhad Bhabie (pronounced "bad baby"), is an American rapper and social media personality. She became known for the viral video meme and catch phrase "cash me outside, how 'bout dah?" after appearing on an episode of Dr. Phil in September 2016.[2] In 2017, Bregoli became the youngest female rapper ever to appear on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with her debut single "These Heaux".[3] She subsequently signed a record deal with Atlantic Records.[4] Early life Danielle Bregoli was born March 26, 2003.[1] Her parents, Ira Peskowitz and Barbara Ann Bregoli, dated for a year before Bregoli's mother became pregnant, later breaking up when she was an infant. Bregoli was raised primarily by her mother, and is estranged from her father, a deputy who works for the Palm Beach Police Department.[5][6] Career On September 14, 2016, Bregoli and her mother, Barbara Ann, were interviewed on Dr. Phil for the segment "I Want To Give Up My Car-Stealing, Knife-Wieldi ...more...

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Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook

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Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook

"Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook" is a Monty Python sketch. It first aired in 1970 on Monty Python's Flying Circus as part of Episode 25. An inspiration for the sketch may be English As She Is Spoke, a 19th century Portuguese–English phrase book regarded as a classic source of unintentional humour, as the given English translations are generally completely incoherent.[1] Plot A Hungarian (John Cleese) enters a tobacconist's shop[2] carrying a phrasebook and begins a dialogue with the tobacconist (Terry Jones); he wants to buy cigarettes, but his phrasebook's translations are wholly inaccurate and have no resemblance in the slightest to what he wants to say. Many of them are plainly bizarre (for example: "My hovercraft is full of eels."[2]) and become mildly sexual in nature as the skit progresses (for example: "Do you want to come back to my place, bouncy-bouncy?"[2]). After the customer used gestures to convey his desire, the tobacconist looks in the phrasebook to find a Hungarian translation for "six and six"[ ...more...

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Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (video game)

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Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (video game)

Monty Python's The Meaning of Life is an adventure game created by 7th Level in 1997 for Windows. The game is based on the 1983 film of the same name and was the third of three Monty Python games created by 7th Level. It was rated Mature by the ESRB in North America. ...more...

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A Liar's Autobiography: The Untrue Story of Monty Python's Graham Chapman

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A Liar's Autobiography: The Untrue Story of Monty Python's Graham Chapman

A Liar's Autobiography: The Untrue Story of Monty Python's Graham Chapman is a 2012 British adult animated comedy film that is a completely inaccurate portrayal of the life of Monty Python alumnus Graham Chapman. The film is loosely based on A Liar's Autobiography, a book written by Chapman and David Sherlock. It received a limited theatrical release on 2 November 2012 in the United States, and aired on the Epix TV channel on the same day. Cast Graham Chapman as himself Terry Gilliam as Graham's psychiatrist John Cleese as David Frost Michael Palin as Graham's father Terry Jones as Graham's mother Cameron Diaz as Sigmund Freud Philip Bulcock as David Sherlock Justin McDonald as young David Sherlock André Jacquemin as himself Margarita Doyle as Sylvia Kristel Various characters voiced by Palin, Jones, Cleese, Carol Cleveland, Stephen Fry. Production In June 2011, it was announced that Bill and Ben Productions were making A Liar's Autobiography, an animated 3D film based on the memoir. ...more...

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List of comedy television series

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List of comedy television series

A list of comedy television series by country of origin. Australia All Aussie Adventures (satire comedy) (2004–2005) All Together Now (sitcom) (1990–1993) Angry Boys (2011) Are You Being Served? (Australian version of the sitcom) (1980–1981) The Aunty Jack Show (satire/sketch comedy) (1972–1973) Australia You're Standing In It (sketch comedy) (1983–1984) Australia's Funniest Home Videos (1991–present) BackBerner (satire/sketch comedy) (1999–2002) Beached Az (animated short) (2009–2010) Big Girl's Blouse (comedy) (1994) The Chaser's War on Everything (2006–2009) CNNNN (The Chaser's satire/parody of CNN) (2002–2003) The Comedy Company (satire/sketch comedy) (1988–1990) Comedy Inc (2003–2007) The D-Generation (sketch comedy) (1986–1987) DAAS Kapital (satire/sketch comedy) (1991–1992) The Dave Allen Show in Australia (1975–1977) The Dingo Principle (satire) (1988) Doctor Down Under (1979) Double the Fist (satire with sketch elements) (2004–2008) Fast Forward (sketch c ...more...

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Nudge Nudge

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Nudge Nudge

"Candid Photography", better known as "Nudge Nudge", is a sketch from the third Monty Python's Flying Circus episode, "How to Recognise Different Types of Trees From Quite a Long Way Away" featuring Eric Idle (author of the sketch) and Terry Jones as two strangers who meet in a pub. Sketch description Idle (playing a character sometimes referred to as "Arthur Nudge") sits too close to an unassuming pub patron played by Terry Jones. Idle asks Jones a series of questions about his romantic relationships that seem odd and cryptic, but that are eventually revealed to be complex double entendres. Jones becomes irritated by the line of questioning and asks Idle, directly, what he is implying. Idle forwardly admits that he really wants to know whether Jones has ever "slept with a lady," and when directly answered "yes," curiously asks "What's it like?", making it one of the few Monty Python sketches to end on a clear punch line. In other Monty Python material The sketch appears in the 1971 spin-off feature film, ...more...

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The Ultimate Monty Python Rip Off

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The Ultimate Monty Python Rip Off

The Ultimate Monty Python Rip Off is a compilation album released by Monty Python in 1994 on the occasion of their 25th anniversary. The album contains no previously unreleased material and was released as a sampler for the simultaneous release of The Instant Monty Python CD Collection box set. Track listing Introduction Finland Travel Agent I Like Chinese French Taunter Australian Table Wines Spanish Inquisition (also contains Famous Person Quiz - not written on album track list) The Galaxy Song Every Sperm is Sacred Grim Reaper Sit on My Face Argument (also contains Cheese Shop - not written on album track list) Mary Queen of Scots Four Yorkshiremen Lumberjack Song Albatross Nudge Nudge Parrot Bruces/Philosophers' Song Fish Licence Eric the Half-a-Bee The Spam Song Big Nose Stoning Link 1 Welease Wodger Link 2 Always Look on the Bright Side of Life Spanish Inquisition (Ending)[1][2] Distribution information CD: (1994) Virgin Records, Ltd./Kay Gee Bee Music Ltd. CDV 2748 ...more...

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Irritation

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Irritation

Irritation, in biology and physiology, is a state of inflammation or painful reaction to allergy or cell-lining damage. A stimulus or agent which induces the state of irritation is an irritant. Irritants are typically thought of as chemical agents (for example phenol and capsaicin) but mechanical, thermal (heat), and radiative stimuli (for example ultraviolet light or ionising radiations) can also be irritants. Irritation also has non-clinical usages referring to bothersome physical or psychological pain or discomfort. Irritation can also be induced by some allergic response due to exposure of some allergens for example contact dermatitis, irritation of mucousal membranes and pruritus. Mucosal membrane is most common site of irritation because it contains secretory glands that release mucous which attracts the allergens due to its sticky nature. Chronic irritation is a medical term signifying that afflictive health conditions have been present for a while. There are many disorders that can cause chronic irr ...more...

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And Now for Something Completely Different

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And Now for Something Completely Different

And Now for Something Completely Different is a 1971 British sketch comedy film based on the television comedy series Monty Python's Flying Circus featuring sketches from the first two series. The title was taken from a catchphrase used in the television show. The film, released on 28 September 1971 in the United Kingdom,[1] consists of 90 minutes of sketches seen in the first two series of the television show. The sketches were remade on film without an audience, and were intended for an American audience which had not yet seen the series. The announcer (John Cleese) appears briefly between some sketches to deliver the line "and now for something completely different", in situations such as being roasted on a spit and lying on top of a desk in a small pink bikini. Background And Now for Something Completely Different is the Pythons' first feature film, composed of some well-known sketches from the first two series of the Flying Circus, including the "Dead Parrot" sketch, "The Lumberjack Song", "Upperclass ...more...

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Monty Python Live (Mostly)

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Monty Python Live (Mostly)

Monty Python Live (Mostly) (also billed as Monty Python Live (Mostly): One Down, Five to Go[1]) was a stage show by the Monty Python comedy group in The O₂ in London in July 2014. Planned as a single performance for July 1, it was expanded to 10 shows due to the high demand for tickets. It was their first live performance together in 34 years, the first without member Graham Chapman, who died in 1989, and to date it has been their last. Overview In 2013, the Pythons lost a legal case to Mark Forstater, the producer of their second film, Holy Grail, over royalties for its musical adaptation Spamalot. They owed a combined £800,000 ($994,600) in legal fees and back royalties to Forstater. To pay these, a reunion show was proposed.[2] It soon became apparent to the group that owing to his theatrical experience with the creation of Spamalot (and because his schedule was free), Eric Idle was best suited to supervise the production. He envisaged an extensive assembly of the best-known Python sketches; to facilitat ...more...

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Monty Python's Life of Brian

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Monty Python's Life of Brian

Monty Python's Life of Brian, also known as Life of Brian, is a 1979 British religious satire comedy film starring and written by the comedy group Monty Python (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin). It was also directed by Jones. The film tells the story of Brian Cohen (played by Chapman), a young Jewish man who is born on the same day as, and next door to, Jesus Christ, and is subsequently mistaken for the Messiah. Following the withdrawal of funding by EMI Films just days before production was scheduled to begin, long-time Monty Python fan and former member of the Beatles, George Harrison, arranged financing for Life of Brian through the formation of his company HandMade Films.[4] The film contains themes of religious satire that were controversial at the time of its release, drawing accusations of blasphemy, and protests from some religious groups. Thirty-nine local authorities in the United Kingdom either imposed an outright ban, or imposed an X (18 years ...more...

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Kid A

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Kid A

Kid A is the fourth studio album by the English rock band Radiohead, released on 2 October 2000 by Parlophone. After having suffered a mental breakdown promoting Radiohead's acclaimed 1997 album OK Computer, songwriter Thom Yorke envisioned a radical change in direction. The band replaced their guitar rock sound with synthesisers, drum machines, the ondes Martenot, string orchestras and brass instruments, and incorporated influences from electronic music, krautrock, jazz, and 20th-century classical music. They recorded Kid A with OK Computer producer Nigel Godrich in Paris, Copenhagen, Gloucestershire and their hometown Oxford, England. The sessions produced over 20 tracks, and Radiohead split the work into two albums: Kid A, and Amnesiac, released the following year. Radiohead released no singles or music videos to promote Kid A and conducted few interviews and photoshoots. Instead, they became one of the first major acts to use the internet as a promotional tool; the album was made available to stream and ...more...

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Monty Python's The Meaning of Life

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Monty Python's The Meaning of Life

Monty Python's The Meaning of Life, also known as The Meaning of Life, is a 1983 British musical sketch comedy film written and performed by the Monty Python troupe, directed by Terry Jones. It was the last film to feature all six Python members before Graham Chapman's death in 1989. Unlike Holy Grail and Life of Brian, the film's two predecessors, which each told a single, more-or-less coherent story,[2] The Meaning of Life returned to the sketch format of the troupe's original television series and their first film from twelve years earlier, And Now for Something Completely Different, loosely structured as a series of comic sketches about the various stages of life. It was accompanied by the short film The Crimson Permanent Assurance. Released on 23 June 1983 in the United Kingdom,[4] The Meaning of Life, although not as acclaimed as its predecessors, was still well received critically and was a minor box office success, grossing almost $15 million on a $9 million budget. It also screened at the 1983 Cann ...more...

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