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Haliastur sphenurus

The whistling kite (Haliastur sphenurus) is a medium-sized diurnal raptor found throughout Australia (including coastal islands), New Caledonia and much of New Guinea (excluding the central mountains and the northwest).[2] Also called the whistling eagle or whistling hawk,[3] it is named for its loud whistling call, which it often gives in flight. Some authorities put this species in the genus Milvus,[4] despite marked differences in behaviour, voice and plumage between this species and other members of that genus.[2]

Description
Flying in Victoria, Australia

The whistling kite ranges in size from 50–60 cm (20–24 in), with a wingspan between 123–146 cm (48–57 in).[2] Weights range from 380–1,050 g (13–37 oz) an average of 600g-750g for males and 750g-1000g for females.[2] As with most raptors, females are larger and heavier than males; though there is considerable overlap between the sexes, females can be up to 21% larger and 42% heavier.[3] Southern birds are also larger than those found in the tropics.[2] Male and female plumages are the same. Adult birds are a pale buff on the head, breast and tail, with browner wings and black flight feathers. Immature birds are a heavily streaked reddish-brown with prominent pale spots on the wings. Throughout their lives, whistling kites have bone-colored legs and feet, which are unfeathered. Overall, the whistling kite looks small-headed and long-tailed, with wingtips falling well short of the tail tip when the bird is perched. Though its legs are short, the bird walks easily on the ground.[3] Whistling kites soar on slightly bowed wings, with their long flight feathers often well-splayed. The striking pattern on their underwings is distinctive.

Voice

This is a noisy species, calling regularly in flight and while perched—even while at the nest. Its most common call is a clear descending whistle, often followed (less often preceded) by a rapid series of rising notes.[5] Intriguingly, field research carried out in Taunton Scientific National Park, Central Queensland by Fiona Randall from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland has shown that spotted bowerbirds (Chlamydera maculata) in that park regularly mimic the calls of whistling kites, with the frequency of mimicry increasing as the breeding season progresses.[6] The function of this mimicry is unknown.

Habitat

A species of open or lightly wooded areas, whistling kites are typically found near water, at elevations ranging from sea level to 1400 meters.[3] Though the species as a whole is generally sedentary, some Australian birds are known to be nomadic, wandering to coastal areas in northern Australia during the dry season; some south Australian birds migrate to the south in the autumn.[5] There is some evidence that the species is declining locally in southern Australia due to the drainage of wetlands and an accompanying decline in food supplies.[2]

Behaviour

Whistling kites tend to be found singly or in pairs, but sometimes gather in larger groups, particularly during nomadic movements, at roost sites and at sources of plentiful food.[3]

Feeding
WhistlingKite.jpg

Whistling kites are truly catholic in their tastes, taking small mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, crustaceans, insects and carrion.[2] [5] Those in Australia tend to take primarily live prey (except in the winter, when they subsist largely on carrion), while those in New Guinea are principally scavengers.[5] Most food items are taken either from the ground or from the water surface, though insects are sometimes hawked directly from the air.[3] Whistling kites are also known to pirate meals from ibises and herons[5] and from other raptors,[2] and to force large waterbirds to regurgitate their catches.[3] They regularly patrol roads in search of roadkill, and hover over the edges of grass fires in search of potential prey fleeing the flames. When food is scarce they will almost entirely rely on finding carrion.[3]

Breeding

The whistling kite's nest is a bulky platform made of sticks and lined with green leaves, placed in an upright fork of a tall tree—often a eucalypt or pine in a riparian area. Pairs often re-use the same nest year after year, annually adding material until the platform becomes quite large. Females normally lay 2–3 bluish-white eggs, which are sometimes covered with reddish-brown blotches; clutches of 1–4 eggs have been recorded.[3] Eggs are incubated for 35–40 days,[3] and the species is reported to have a 60% hatching success.[2] Chicks, which are covered with cream- or buff-colored down feathers, spend 44–54 days in the nest before fledging, and are dependent on their parents for a further 6–8 weeks after leaving the nest.[2] [3] In Australia, the birds generally breed between June and October in the south, and between February and May in the north, though they may nest at any time after rain providing there are adequate food supplies.[5]

File:Whistling Kite GC95.ogv
References
  1. BirdLife International (2012). "Haliastur sphenurus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.
  2. Josep del Hoyo, ed. (1994). Handbook of the Birds of the World, volume 2. Andrew Elliott, Jordi Sargatal. Barcelona: Lynx Edicions. ISBN 84-87334-15-6.
  3. Ferguson-Lees, James; David A. Christie (2001). Raptors of the World. London: Christopher Helm. ISBN 0-7136-8026-1.
  4. Slater, Peter; Pat Slater; Raoul Slater (1986). The Slater Field Guide to Australian Birds. Sydney: Reed New Holland. ISBN 1-877069-00-0.
  5. Pizzey, Graham; Frank Knight (1997). Birds of Australia. London: HarperCollins. ISBN 0-00-220132-1.
  6. Randall, Fiona (2002). "Vocal Mimicry in Spotted Bowerbirds" (PDF). Retrieved 2007-04-24.
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Whistling kite

topic

The whistling kite (Haliastur sphenurus) is a medium-sized diurnal raptor found throughout Australia (including coastal islands ), New Caledonia and much of New Guinea (excluding the central mountains and the northwest). Also called the whistling eagle or whistling hawk , it is named for its loud whistling call, which it often gives in flight . Some authorities put this species in the genus Milvus , despite marked differences in behaviour, voice and plumage between this species and other members of that genus. Description Flying in Victoria, Australia The whistling kite ranges in size from 50–60 cm (20–24 in), with a wingspan between 123–146 cm (48–57 in). Weights range from 380–1,050 g (13–37 oz) an average of 600g-750g for males and 750g-1000g for females. As with most raptors, females are larger and heavier than males ; though there is considerable overlap between the sexes, females can be up to 21% larger and 42% heavier. Southern birds are also larger than those found in the tropics. Male and fema ...more...



Haliastur

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Haliastur is a genus of medium-sized diurnal birds of prey . It consists of two species of kites which form part of the subfamily Milvinae ; some authorities place these species in the genus Milvus , despite clear differences in behaviour, voice and plumage . Species list Both of the species found in this genus are large for kites; both are relatively small-headed and have rounded tail tips. Brahminy kite , H. indus Whistling kite , H. sphenurus References Slater, Peter; Pat Slater; Raoul Slater (1986). The Slater Field Guide to Australian Birds. Sydney: Reed New Holland. ISBN   1-877069-00-0 . Josep del Hoyo, ed. (1994). Handbook of the Birds of the World, volume 2. Andrew Elliott, Jordi Sargatal. Barcelona: Lynx Edicions. ISBN   84-87334-15-6 . Ferguson-Lees, James; David A. Christie (2001). Raptors of the World. London: Christopher Helm. ISBN   0-7136-8026-1 . Media related to Haliastur at Wikimedia Commons Wikimedia Commons has media related to Haliastur . Haliastur is a genus of medium-sized diurnal bir ...more...



Milvinae

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The Milvinae kites are found in the family Accipitridae . Many taxonomic authorities have the subfamily under revision. Genus Harpagus Double-toothed kite , Harpagus bidentatus Rufous-thighed kite , Harpagus diodon Genus Ictinia Mississippi kite , Ictinia mississippiensis Plumbeous kite , Ictinia plumbea Genus Rostrhamus Snail kite , Rostrhamus sociabilis Genus Helicolestes Slender-billed kite , Helicolestes hamatus Genus Lophoictinia Square-tailed kite , Lophoictinia isura Genus Hamirostra Black-breasted buzzard , Hamirostra melanosternon Genus Haliastur Brahminy kite , Haliastur indus Whistling kite , Haliastur sphenurus Genus Milvus Red kite , Milvus milvus Black kite ,'Milvus migrans Yellow-billed kite , Milvus aegyptius References The Milvinae kites are found in the family Accipitridae . Many taxonomic authorities have the subfamily under revision. Genus Harpagus Double-toothed kite , Harpagus bidentatus Rufous-thighed kite , Harpagus diodon Genus Ictinia Mississippi kite , Ictinia mississippiensis Plumb ...more...



Kite (bird)

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Black kite Kite is a common name for certain birds of prey in the family Accipitridae , particularly in subfamilies Milvinae, Elaninae, and Perninae. Some authors use the terms "hovering kite" and "soaring kite" to distinguish between Elanus and the milvine kites, respectively. The groups may also be differentiated by size, referring to milvine kites as "large kites", and elanine kites as "small kites". Species Subfamily Elaninae Genus Elanus Black-winged kite , Elanus caeruleus Black-shouldered kite , Elanus axillaris White-tailed kite , Elanus leucurus Letter-winged kite , Elanus scriptus Genus Chelictinia Scissor-tailed kite , Chelictinia riocourii Genus Gampsonyx Pearl kite , Gampsonyx swainsonii Subfamily Harpiinae Genus Machaerhamphus Bat hawk , Machaerhamphus alcinus – traditionally Elaninae or Falconinae Subfamily Elaninae or Perninae Genus Elanoides – often classified in Perninae Swallow-tailed kite , Elanoides forficatus Subfamily Milvinae Genus Haliastur Whistling kite , Haliastur sphenurus Brahmin ...more...



Tuart forest

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Tuart forest is an open forest in which the dominant overstorey tree is Eucalyptus gomphocephala (tuart). This form of vegetation occurs only in the Southwest Botanical Province of Western Australia . Tuart being predominantly a coastal tree, tuart forest occurs only in a narrow belt along the coast. Logging history and conservation Coastal land in the southwest of Western Australia has been in high demand ever since British settlement of the Swan River Colony , initially for grazing, and more recently for housing. Tuart was also a prized timber. It is light in colour, similar to honey oak, and unusually hard. It was particularly useful where a very hard wood was needed, and most old-style butchers had a tuart "round" as a durable chopping block. As a result of its value as a timber and as grazing land, most of the tuart forest has now been cleared. The only remaining tall tuart forest is the Ludlow Tuart Forest now protected by the Tuart Forest National Park . Other tuart forest occurs in the Maiden Tuart Fo ...more...



Moorooduc Quarry Flora and Fauna Reserve

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The Moorooduc Quarry Flora and Fauna Reserve is located in Mount Eliza , Victoria , Australia and occupies approximately 27 hectares of land. There are entrances to the reserve located on Allison Road, Canadian Bay Road, Two Bays Road and Station Street near the Moorooduc Railway Station. History Rock was quarried using explosives, loaded into dobbin carts and taken to a steam powered crusher. The resulting crushed stone was loaded into larger carts and transported to the Mornington railway line via a spur-line. 1887 - The Moorooduc quarry was established by David Munro. 1888 - A spur-line was built from the quarry to the site which is now Moorooduc station to transport stone and ballast for the construction of a branch line between Baxter and Mornington. 1923 - The Frankston - Hastings Shire Council purchased the site. Stone from the quarry continued to be used for ballasting railway lines and other uses including building, road construction and repairs to the Mornington Reservoir . 1927 - Electricity was i ...more...



Birds of Boigu, Saibai and Dauan Islands (Torres Strait)

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The Birds of Boigu , Saibai and Dauan Islands (the Top Western group of Torres Strait ), are of particular interest to Australian birders because the islands are home to, and visited by, birds which are essentially New Guinea species not found, or only occasionally seen as vagrants, elsewhere on Australian territory. The islands lie only a few kilometres from the mainland of New Guinea, though they are politically part of the state of Queensland, Australia . Boigu and Saibai are low-lying alluvial islands of swampland and mangroves , subject to periodic flooding, while Dauan is a smaller but higher granite island. From an Australian birder's perspective, local bird specialities include grey-headed goshawk , Gurney's eagle , rufous-bellied kookaburra , collared imperial-pigeon , orange-bellied fruit-dove , Papuan needletail , red-capped flowerpecker , streak-headed mannikin and singing starling . Access Access to these islands is not easy. Permission to visit is required from the island councils. The few birde ...more...



Fogg Dam Conservation Reserve

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The Fogg Dam Conservation Reserve is a protected area consisting of a wetland area approximately 70 km (43 mi) east of Darwin in the Northern Territory of Australia . It lies within the Adelaide and Mary River Floodplains , which is an Important Bird Area . It attracts a wide range of local and migratory water birds and other wildlife including one of the largest populations of snakes within Australia (including the Water Python and Death Adder ), and includes a several raised observation platforms. Saltwater Crocodiles ( Crocodylus porosus ) and Freshwater Crocodiles ( Crocodylus johnstoni ) can be seen at Fogg Dam all year around. Fogg Dam is open 24/7/365. Birds of Banks and Sky Birds of the Banks and Sky see Photo above Type Common name Scientific name Finches Crimson Finch Neochmia phaeton Marshbirds White-browed Crake Amaurornis cinerea or Porzana cinerea Raptors White bellied Sea Eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster Raptors Whistling Kite Haliastur sphenurus Seabirds Wiskered Tern Chlidonias hybrida or Chlidon ...more...



Sibley-Monroe checklist 8

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The Sibley-Monroe checklist was a landmark document in the study of birds . It drew on extensive DNA-DNA hybridisation studies to reassess the relationships between modern birds. Ciconiiformes (continued) Chionididae Chionis alba ( snowy sheathbill ) Chionis minor ( black-faced sheathbill ) Pluvianellidae Pluvianellus socialis ( Magellanic plover ) Burhinidae Burhinus oedicnemus ( stone curlew ) Burhinus senegalensis ( Senegal thick-knee ) Burhinus vermiculatus ( water thick-knee ) Burhinus capensis ( spotted thick-knee ) Burhinus bistriatus ( double-striped thick-knee ) Burhinus superciliaris ( Peruvian thick-knee ) Burhinus grallarius ( bush thick-knee ) Burhinus recurvirostris ( great thick-knee ) Burhinus giganteus ( beach thick-knee ) Charadriidae Haematopus ostralegus ( Eurasian oystercatcher ) Haematopus meadewaldoi ( Canary Islands oystercatcher ) Haematopus moquini ( African oystercatcher ) Haematopus finschi ( South Island oystercatcher ) Haematopus bachmani ( American black oystercatcher ) Haematop ...more...



List of birds of Western Australia

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The following is a List of birds sighted in Western Australia . Common name Family Scientific name Notes Image American golden plover Charadriidae Pluvialis dominica Antarctic prion Procellariidae Pachyptila desolata Antarctic tern Laridae Sterna vittata Arctic jaeger Stercorariidae Stercorarius parasiticus Arctic tern Laridae Sterna paradisaea Arctic warbler Phylloscopidae Phylloscopus borealis Asian dowitcher Scolopacidae Limnodromus semipalmatus Australasian bittern Ardeidae Botaurus poiciloptilus a.k.a. brown bittern Australasian darter Anhingidae Anhinga novaehollandiae Australasian figbird Oriolidae Sphecotheres vieilloti Australasian gannet Sulidae Morus serrator or Sula bassana a.k.a. Australian gannet Australasian grebe Podicipedidae Tachybaptus novaehollandiae Australasian shoveler Anatidae Spatula rhynchotis Australasian swamphen Rallidae Porphyrio melanotus a.k.a. purple gallinule Yellow oriole Oriolidae Oriolus flavocinctus Australian bustard Otididae Ardeotis australis a.k.a. bush turkey Austral ...more...



List of birds of the world

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This list is based on the taxonomy of the HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World by Josep del Hoyo and Nigel J. Collar also used by HBW , BirdLife International and IUCN and also includes historically extinct species and the presumed date of extinction Summary of 2006 IUCN Red List categories. Conservation status - IUCN Red List of Threatened Species : CR - critically endangered, EN - endangered, VU - vulnerable NT - near threatened, LC - least concern DD - data deficient, NE - not evaluated (v. 2013.2, the data is current as of March 5, 2014 Struthioniformes Families:1 Genera:1 Species:2 Struthionidae Struthio Struthio camelus common ostrich LC Struthio molybdophanes Somali ostrich VU Rheiformes Families:1 Genera: Species:3 Rheidae Rhea Rhea americana greater rhea NT Rhea pennata lesser rhea LC Rhea tarapacensis puna rhea NT Tinamiformes Families:1 Genera:9 Species:48 Tinamidae Nothocercus Nothocercus julius tawny-breasted tinamou LC Nothocercus bonapartei highland tin ...more...



List of birds of Australia

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This is a list of the wild birds found in Australia including its outlying islands and territories, but excluding the Australian Antarctic Territory . The outlying islands covered include: Christmas , Cocos (Keeling) , Ashmore , Torres Strait , Coral Sea , Lord Howe , Norfolk , Macquarie and Heard/McDonald . The list includes introduced species , common vagrants and recently extinct species. It excludes extirpated introductions (e.g. ostrich ), some very rare vagrants (seen once) and species only present in captivity. Eight hundred and forty-two extant species are listed. There have been three comprehensive accounts: the first was John Goulds Birds of Australia , the second Gregory Mathews , and third was the Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic Birds (1990-2006). The taxonomy followed is from Christidis and Boles, 2008. Their system has been developed over nearly two decades and has strong local support, but deviates in important ways from more generally accepted schemes. Non-passerines Casso ...more...



List of birds of Queensland

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Queensland is the second-largest state in Australia but has the greatest biodiversity, with over 630 species of bird recorded (more than closest-rivals New South Wales or West Australia with both around 550). The sum total for continental Australia (including Tasmania) is currently estimated to be 815 species. The high avian biodiversity is probably a reflection of the wide variety of habitats, from deserts to rainforests and mangroves to mulga , which make Queensland a birders paradise. This list is based on the 1996 classification by Sibley and Monroe (though there has been a recent (2008) extensive revision of Australian birds by Christidis and Boles ) which has resulted in some lumping and splitting . Those species labelled "endemic" are endemic to mainland Australia. There are 22 species that are only found in Queensland, these are annotated with an asterisk ( * ). Struthioniformes Casuariidae (cassowaries, emu) Southern cassowary , Casuarius casuarius - vulnerable Emu , Dromaius novaehollandiae - endemi ...more...



Cane toad

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The cane toad (Rhinella marina), also known as the giant neotropical toad or marine toad , is a large, terrestrial true toad which is native to South and mainland Central America , but has been introduced to various islands throughout Oceania and the Caribbean , as well as Northern Australia . It is a member of the genus Rhinella , but was formerly in the genus Bufo , which includes many different true toad species found throughout Central and South America. The cane toad is a prolific breeder; females lay single-clump spawns with thousands of eggs . Its reproductive success is partly because of opportunistic feeding: it has a diet, unusual among anurans , of both dead and living matter. Adults average 10–15 cm (3.9–5.9 in) in length; the largest recorded specimen had a snout-vent length of 24 cm (9.4 in). The cane toad is an old species. A fossil toad (specimen UCMP 41159) from the La Venta fauna of the late Miocene of Colombia is indistinguishable from modern cane toads from northern South America. It was ...more...



List of birds of India

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This is a list of the bird species of India and includes extant and recently extinct species recorded within the political limits of the Republic of India as defined by the Indian government are known to have around 1266 species as of 2016, of which sixty-one are endemic to the country, one has been introduced by humans and twenty-five are rare or accidental. Two species are suspected have been extirpated in India and eighty-two species are globally threatened. The Indian peacock (Pavo cristatus) is the national bird of India. This list does not cover species in Indian jurisdiction areas such as Dakshin Gangothri and oceanic species are delineated by an arbitrary cutoff distance. The list does not include fossil bird species or escapes from captivity. Two of the most recently discovered birds of India are the Himalayan forest thrush and Bugun liocichla both discovered in Arunachal Pradesh in 2016 and 2006. Also, a few birds considered to be extinct, such as the Jerdon's courser , have been rediscovered. Se ...more...



List of birds of Australia, New Zealand and Antarctica

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This list is based on the Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic Birds list, May 2002 update , with the doubtfuls omitted. It includes the birds of Australia , New Zealand , Antarctica , and the surrounding ocean and subantarctic islands. Australian call-ups are based on the List of Australian birds . New Zealand call-ups are based on the List of New Zealand birds . Struthioniiformes Casuariidae Emu , Dromaius novaehollandiae - Aus King Island emu , Dromaius ater - Aus, extinct Kangaroo Island emu , Dromaius baudinianus - Aus, extinct Southern cassowary , Casuarius casuarius - Aus Apterygidae Brown kiwi , Apteryx australis - NZ Little spotted kiwi , Apteryx owenii - NZ Great spotted kiwi , Apteryx haastii - NZ Podicipediformes Podicipedidae Australasian grebe , Tachybaptus novaehollandiae - Aus, NZ Hoary-headed grebe , Poliocephalus poliocephalus - Aus, NZ New Zealand dabchick , Poliocephalus rufopectus - NZ Great crested grebe , Podiceps cristatus - Aus, NZ Sphenisciformes Spheniscidae King pengui ...more...



List of birds of Victoria, Australia

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This is a list of birds of Victoria, Australia . Victoria is Australia 's second-smallest state but has high biodiversity , with 516 bird species recorded — around 54% of Australia's total of 959 bird species in just 3% of Australia's land area. Birds are present in high concentrations in some areas, including the Western Treatment Plant at Werribee in Melbourne 's suburbs, which is a haven for tens of thousands of birds, due to a combination of permanent water, varied landforms and plant species. Victoria contains a wider variety of natural habitats than any area of similar size in Australia. Habitats range from warm temperate rainforest in the far east of the state ( East Gippsland ), cool temperate rainforest, heathlands, mallee (stunted eucalypt) scrubland, grasslands, open woodland, montane forest, permanent lakes, estuaries, large permanent rivers, ocean and bay coastline. 4 million hectares of the state's 23.7 million hectare total land and marine area is protected in National Parks and cons ...more...



List of birds of Tasmania

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The yellow wattlebird is Australia's largest honeyeater and an endemic Tasmanian species. A total of 262 species of bird have been recorded living in the wild on the island of Tasmania , nearby islands and islands in Bass Strait , 182 of which are regularly recorded, while another 79 are vagrants and one is extinct. Birds of Macquarie Island are not included in this list. Twelve species are unique (endemic) to the island of Tasmania, and most of these are common and widespread. However, the forty-spotted pardalote is rare and restricted, while the island's two breeding endemic species, the world's only migratory parrots, are both threatened. Several species of penguin are late summer visitors to Tasmanian shores. Tasmania's endemic birds have led to it being classified as an Endemic Bird Area (EBA), one of 218 such areas worldwide. Priority regions for habitat-based conservation of birds around the world, they are defined by containing two or more restricted-range (endemic) species. Although Tasmania has ...more...



List of birds of Asia

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The birds of Asia are diverse. The taxonomy of this list adheres to James Clements ' Birds of the World: A Checklist, 6th edition. Taxonomic changes are on-going. As more research is gathered from studies of distribution, behaviour, and DNA , the order and number of families and species may change. Furthermore, different approaches to ornithological nomenclature have led to concurrent systems of classification (see Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy ). The area covered by this list corresponds with the Asian listing area as defined by the American Birding Association . The area includes Russia east of the Ural River and Ural Mountains and the Russian Arctic islands east of but not including Novaya Zemlya , as well as Kazakhstan , Georgia , Azerbaijan , Turkey (except for the portion north of the Bosporus , Sea of Marmara and the Dardanelles ) and Cyprus . The area is separated from Africa by the Suez Canal . In the Indian Ocean it includes Sri Lanka , Lakshadweep (the Laccadive Islands ), the Andaman and Nicobar Island ...more...



List of birds of Papua New Guinea

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This is a list of the bird species recorded in Papua New Guinea . The avifauna of Papua New Guinea include a total of 781 species, of which 76 are endemic , one has been introduced by humans and eighteen are rare or accidental. Twenty-eight species are globally threatened. This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World , 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Papua New Guinea. The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories. (A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Papua New Guinea (E) Endemic - a species that is native only to Papua New Guinea (I) Introduced - a ...more...



Threatened species known to occur in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area

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Threatened species known to occur in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area and listed under the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (Bonn Convention), CITES (CITES) Agreement, China–Australia Migratory Bird Agreement (CAMBA), Japan–Australia Migratory Bird Agreement and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Red List (IUCN Red List) status for the species. Key Latin name The scientific name of the species Common names Common names of the species Image An image of the species Bonn Convention Appendix I: Endangered migratory species Migratory species that have been categorized as being in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant proportion of their range are listed on Appendix I of the Convention. Bonn Convention Appendix II: Migratory species conserved through Agreements Migratory species that have an unfavourable conservation status or would benefit significantly from international co-operation organised by tailored agreements are listed in Appe ...more...



List of birds of New Caledonia

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This is a list of the bird species recorded in New Caledonia . The avifauna of New Caledonia include a total of 189 species, of which 23 are endemic , 14 have been introduced by humans and 48 are rare or accidental. Three species listed are extirpated in New Caledonia and are not included in the species count. Twelve species are globally threatened. This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World , 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for New Caledonia. The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories. (A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in New Caledonia (E) E ...more...



List of birds of South Australia

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This is a list of birds of South Australia , a state within Australia. Order Struthioniformes Family Casuariidae Dromaius baudinianus (Kangaroo Island emu) — extinct Dromaius novaehollandiae (emu) — native on mainland, introduced to Kangaroo and Wedge Islands Family Struthionidae Struthio camelus (ostrich) — naturalised Order Galliformes Family Megapodiidae Alectura lathami (Australian brush-turkey) — naturalised Leipoa ocellata (malleefowl) Family Phasianidae Coturnix chinensis (king quail) Coturnix pectoralis (stubble quail) Coturnix ypsilophora (brown quail) Pavo cristatus (Indian peafowl) — naturalised Order Anseriformes Family Anseranatidae Anseranas semipalmata (magpie goose) Family Anatidae Subfamily Dendrocygninae Dendrocygna eytoni (plumed whistling duck) Subfamily Oxyurinae Oxyura australis (blue-billed duck) Biziura lobata (musk duck) Subfamily Stictonettinae Stictonetta naevosa (freckled duck) Subfamily Anserinae Cereopsis novaehollandiae (Cape Barren goose) Cygnus atratus (black swan) Subfamily T ...more...



List of birds of the Solomon Islands

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This is a list of the bird species recorded in the Solomon Islands . The geographical area covered by this article refers to the archipelago of the Solomon Islands , which includes the island of Bougainville , a province of Papua New Guinea , as well as the group of islands that make up the nation state of Solomon Islands . The area's avifauna include a total of 289 species, of which 71 are endemic , three have been introduced by humans and 39 are rare or accidental. Of these, 26 species are globally threatened. This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World , 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for the Solomon Islands. The following tags have been used to highlight several cate ...more...



List of birds of Indonesia (non-passerine)

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Conservation status NE = not evaluated NT = near threatened CR = critical DD = data deficient VU = vulnerable EW = extinct in the wild LC = least concern EN = endangered EX = extinct Struthioniformes Casuariidae Casuarius casuarius ( southern cassowary ) - VU Casuarius bennetti ( dwarf cassowary ) - NT Casuarius unappendiculatus ( northern cassowary ) - VU Craciformes Megapodiidae Aepypodius arfakianus ( wattled brushturkey ) - LC Aepypodius bruijnii ( Bruijn's brushturkey ) - VU Talegalla cuvieri ( red-billed brushturkey ) - LC Talegalla fuscirostris ( black-billed brushturkey ) - LC Talegalla jobiensis ( brown-collared brushturkey ) - LC Macrocephalon maleo ( maleo ) - EN Eulipoa wallacei ( Moluccan scrubfowl ) - VU Megapodius cumingii ( Tabon scrubfowl ) - LC Megapodius bernsteinii ( Sula scrubfowl ) - NT Megapodius reinwardt ( orange-footed scrubfowl ) - LC Megapodius tenimberensis ( Tanimbar scrubfowl ) - NE Megapodius freycinet ( dusky scrubfowl ) - LC Megapodius geelvinkianus ( Biak scrubfowl ) - VU Me ...more...





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