Google The Thinking Factory

Google: The Thinking Factory is documentary film about Google Inc. from 2008 written and directed by Gilles Cayatte.

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AdWords

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AdWords

Google AdWords (to be rebranded as Google Ads effective on July 24, 2018[2]) is an online advertising service developed by Google, where advertisers pay to display brief advertisements, service offerings, product listings, and video content within the Google ad network to web users. [3] Google AdWords' system is based partly on cookies and partly on keywords determined by advertisers. Google uses these characteristics to place advertising copy on pages where they think it might be relevant. Advertisers pay when users divert their browsing to click on the advertising copy. Partner websites receive a portion of the generated income.[4] AdWords has evolved into Google's main source of revenue, contributing to Google's total advertising revenues of USD $95.4 billion in 2017.[5] AdWords offers services under a pay-per-click (PPC) pricing model. Although an advanced bidding strategy can be used to automatically reach a predefined cost-per-acquisition (CPA), this should not be confused with a true CPA pricing model ...more...

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Googleplex

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Googleplex

The Googleplex is the corporate headquarters complex of Google and its parent company Alphabet Inc., located at 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway in Mountain View, California, United States, near Silicon Valley's capital San Jose. The original complex, with 2,000,000 square feet (190,000 m2) of office space, is the company's second largest square footage assemblage of Google buildings, after Google's 111 Eighth Avenue building in New York City, which the company bought in 2010. Once the 1,100,000-square-foot (100,000 m2) Bay View addition went online in 2015, the Googleplex became the largest collection of Google buildings with 3,100,000 square feet (290,000 m2) of space.[1] "Googleplex" is a portmanteau of Google and complex (meaning a complex of buildings) and a reference to googolplex, the name given to the large number 10(10100), or 10googol. Facilities and history The south side of the Googleplex Complex Former entrance to lobby of Building 40 The Original campus SGI Campus The site was previously occ ...more...

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Google Pixel

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Google Pixel

Google Pixel is a line of consumer electronic devices from Google that run either the Chrome OS or Android operating system. The Pixel brand was introduced in February 2013 with the first generation Chromebook Pixel. The Pixel line includes laptops and smartphones, as well as the discontinued Pixel C tablet. The devices can be bought through the Google Store or at retail stores. Phones Pixel Pixel and Pixel XL smartphones Google announced the first generation Pixel smartphones, the Pixel and the Pixel XL, on October 4, 2016 during the #MadeByGoogle event.[1] Google emphasized the camera on the two phones, which ranked as the best smartphone camera on DxOMarkMobile with 90 points until HTC released the U11, which also scored 90 points.[2] This is largely due to software optimizations such as HDR+. The Pixel phones also include unlimited cloud storage for pictures on Google Photos[3] and an unlockable bootloader (when purchased directly from Google; phones purchased through Verizon Wireless and its partne ...more...

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List of Google apps for Android

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List of Google apps for Android

The list of Google apps for Android lists the mobile apps developed by Google for its Android operating system. All of these apps are available for free from the Google Play Store, although some may not show up in search results if they are listed as incompatible with your device (even though they may still function from an *.apk). Some of Google's apps may be pre-installed on some devices, depending upon the device manufacturer and the version of Android. A few of these apps, such as Gboard, are not supported on older versions of Android. Accessibility Scanner AdWords AdWords Express Androidify Android Auto Android Device Policy Android Messages Android Settings Android System WebView Android Things Toolkit Android TV Core Services Android TV Launcher Android TV Remote Control Android TV Remote Service ARCore by Google AR Stickers Audio Factory Beacon Tools Blogger Calculator Camera Cardboard Cardboard Camera Cardboard Design Lab Google Cast Receiver Chrome Beta Google Chrome for ...more...

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Google Fuchsia

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Google Fuchsia

Fuchsia is a capability-based operating system currently being developed by Google. It first became known to the public when the project appeared on GitHub in August 2016 without any official announcement. In contrast to prior Google-developed operating systems such as Chrome OS and Android, which are based on Linux kernels, Fuchsia is based on a new microkernel called "Zircon", derived from "Little Kernel",[1][2] a small operating system intended for embedded systems, which was developed by Travis Geiselbrecht, a creator of the NewOS kernel used by Haiku OS.[3] Upon inspection, media outlets noted that the code post on GitHub suggested Fuchsia's capability to run on universal devices, from embedded systems to smartphones, tablets and personal computers. In May 2017, Fuchsia was updated with a user interface, along with a developer writing that the project was not a "dumping ground of a dead thing", prompting media speculation about Google's intentions with the operating system, including the possibility of i ...more...

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PageRank

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PageRank

Mathematical PageRanks for a simple network, expressed as percentages. (Google uses a logarithmic scale.) Page C has a higher PageRank than Page E, even though there are fewer links to C; the one link to C comes from an important page and hence is of high value. If web surfers who start on a random page have an 85% likelihood of choosing a random link from the page they are currently visiting, and a 15% likelihood of jumping to a page chosen at random from the entire web, they will reach Page E 8.1% of the time. (The 15% likelihood of jumping to an arbitrary page corresponds to a damping factor of 85%.) Without damping, all web surfers would eventually end up on Pages A, B, or C, and all other pages would have PageRank zero. In the presence of damping, Page A effectively links to all pages in the web, even though it has no outgoing links of its own. PageRank (PR) is an algorithm used by Google Search to rank websites in their search engine results. PageRank was named after Larry Page,[1] one of the founders ...more...

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Google Play Games

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Google Play Games

Google Play Games is an online gaming service and software development kit operated by Google for the Android operating system. It features real-time multiplayer gaming capabilities, cloud saves, social and public leaderboards, and achievements.[3] The Play Games service allows developers to incorporate the above features into their games without having to develop those features from scratch themselves. The Google Play Games service was introduced at the Google I/O 2013 Developer Conference,[4] and the standalone Google Play Games mobile app was launched for Android on July 24, 2013.[5] Andrew Webster of The Verge compared Google Play Games to Game Center, a similar gaming network for users of Apple Inc.'s own iOS operating system.[4] Google Play Games has received updates over the years since its launch, including a screen-recording feature,[6] and custom gamer IDs.[7] References "Google Play Games". APKMirror. Android Police. June 27, 2018. Retrieved June 27, 2018. "Google Play Games (Android TV) ...more...

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Google Assistant

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Google Assistant

The Google Assistant is a virtual assistant powered by Artificial Intelligence[2] and developed by Google that is primarily available on mobile and smart home devices. Unlike Google Now, the Google Assistant can engage in two-way conversations. Assistant initially debuted in May 2016 as part of Google's messaging app Allo, and its voice-activated speaker Google Home. After a period of exclusivity on the Pixel and Pixel XL smartphones, it began to be deployed on other Android devices in February 2017, including third-party smartphones and Android Wear, and was released as a standalone app on the iOS operating system in May. Alongside the announcement of a software development kit in April 2017, the Assistant has been, and is being, further extended to support a large variety of devices, including cars and smart home appliances. The functionality of the Assistant can also be enhanced by third-party developers. Users primarily interact with the Google Assistant through natural voice, though keyboard input is a ...more...

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Google Pixelbook

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Google Pixelbook

Google Pixelbook is a portable laptop / tablet hybrid computer developed by Google which runs Chrome OS. It was announced on October 4, 2017 and was released on October 30.[1] Unlike most typical Chromebook devices, the Pixelbook's retail price is much higher at around $1,000, comparable with laptops such as the Apple MacBook Air.[2][3] Features The Pixelbook was planned as the next generation of Google laptops and is the spiritual successor to the Chromebook Pixel laptop discontinued in 2016.[4] The company realized the Chromebook had become successful after a slow start, obtaining a market share of 58% of schools in the US, and designed the Pixelbook as a serious industry player that can compete with Apple and Microsoft in this field.[5] The Google Pixelbook features a 12.3-inch (310 mm) touchscreen design, allowing the device to be used like a tablet. The device also features Google Assistant with a dedicated button. It runs Chrome OS and can launch Android applications natively.[6] It features instant ...more...

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Google Surveys

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Google Surveys

Google Surveys (formerly Google Consumer Surveys)[3] is a business product by Google that facilitates customized market research.[1] The product was designed by Google as an alternative to internet pay walls for websites that publish content. The program was launched by several online publishers such as Pandora, AdWeek, and the New York Daily News.[4] Model Diagram of the model For survey creators Google Surveys provides both a web interface with which to design the survey as well as the audience that takes the survey. The survey questions are subject to some requirements in length and content. The survey creators are the source of money in the model. Monetization by Google Google receives money from business customers such as market research firms and small businesses who create the surveys. In addition to the paid services, Google also offers a free survey for websites with predefined questions targeted at people visiting the website.[5] For publishers Every time a user responds to a survey, the ...more...

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Google Sites

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Google Sites

Google Sites is a structured wiki- and Web page-creation tool offered by Google. The goal of Google Sites is for anyone to be able to create simple web sites that support collaboration between different editors.[1] History Google Sites started out as JotSpot, the name and sole product of a software company that offered enterprise social software. It was targeted mainly at small-sized and medium-sized businesses. The company was founded by Joe Kraus and Graham Spencer, co-founders of Excite. In February 2006, JotSpot was named part of Business 2.0, "Next Net 25",[2] and in May 2006, it was honored as one of InfoWorld's "15 Start-ups to Watch".[3] In October 2006, JotSpot was acquired by Google.[4] Google announced a prolonged data transition of webpages created using Google Page Creator (also known as "Google Pages") to Google Sites servers in 2007. On February 28, 2008, Google Sites was unveiled using the JotSpot technology.[5] The service was free, but users needed a domain name, which Google offered for ...more...

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Google Video

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Google Video

Google Video was a free video hosting service from Google, similar to YouTube, that allowed video clips to be hosted on Google servers and embedded on to other websites. This allowed websites to host lots of video remotely without running into bandwidth or storage-capacity issues. The service was launched on January 25, 2005.[1] In 2009, Google discontinued the ability to upload videos to Google Video.[2] The service was ultimately shut down on August 20, 2012.[3] Thereafter, the web address video.google.com has been reused to host Google Videos search engine. Video content Google Video was geared towards providing a large archive of freely searchable videos. Besides amateur media, Internet videos, viral ads, and movie trailers, the service also aimed to distribute commercial professional media, such as televised content and movies. A number of educational discourses by Google employees were recorded and made available for viewing via Google Video. The lectures were done mainly at the employees' former u ...more...

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Google Panda

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Google Panda

Google Panda is a change to Google's search results ranking algorithm that was first released in February 2011. The change aimed to lower the rank of "low-quality sites" or "thin sites",[1] in particular "content farms",[2] and return higher-quality sites near the top of the search results. CNET reported a surge in the rankings of news websites and social networking sites, and a drop in rankings for sites containing large amounts of advertising.[3] This change reportedly affected the rankings of almost 12 percent of all search results.[4] Soon after the Panda rollout, many websites, including Google's webmaster forum, became filled with complaints of scrapers/copyright infringers getting better rankings than sites with original content. At one point, Google publicly asked for data points to help detect scrapers better.[5] In 2016, Matt Cutts, Google's head of webspam at the time of the Panda update, commented that "with Panda, Google took a big enough revenue hit via some partners that Google actually needed ...more...

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Android Marshmallow

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Android Marshmallow

Android 6.0 "Marshmallow" (codenamed Android M during development) is the sixth major version of the Android operating system and the 13th version of Android. First released as a beta build on May 28, 2015, it was officially released on October 5, 2015, with Nexus devices being the first to receive the update. Marshmallow primarily focuses on improving the overall user experience of its predecessor, Lollipop. It introduced a new permissions architecture, new APIs for contextual assistants (first used by a new feature "Now on Tap" to provide context-sensitive search results), a new power management system that reduces background activity when a device is not being physically handled, native support for fingerprint recognition and USB-C connectors, the ability to migrate data and applications to a microSD card, and other internal changes. As of April 2018, 26.0% of devices accessing Google Play run Android 6.0. It is the most popular single version of Android.[4] History The release was internally codenamed ...more...

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YouTube Premium

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YouTube Premium

YouTube Premium (formerly YouTube Red) is a paid streaming subscription service for YouTube in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, South Korea, Austria, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.[1][2][3] It provides advertising-free streaming of all videos hosted by YouTube, exclusive original content produced in collaboration with the site's major creators, as well as offline playback and background playback of videos on mobile devices.[4] The service was originally launched in November 2014 as Music Key, offering only ad-free streaming of music and music videos from participating labels on YouTube and Google Play Music.[5][6][7] The service was then revised and relaunched as YouTube Red on October 31, 2015, expanding its scope to offer ad-free access to all YouTube videos, as opposed to just music.[8] YouTube announced the rebranding of the service as YouTube Premium on May 17, 2018, alongside the return of a separate, YouTube Mu ...more...

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Google APIs

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Google APIs

Google APIs is a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) developed by Google which allow communication with Google Services and their integration to other services. Examples of these include Search, Gmail, Translate or Google Maps. Third-party apps can use these APIs to take advantage of or extend the functionality of the existing services. The APIs provide functionality like analytics, machine learning as a service (the Prediction API) or access to user data (when permission to read the data is given). Another important example is an embedded Google map on a website, which can be achieved using the Static maps API,[1] Places API[2] or Google Earth API.[3] Authentication and authorization Usage of some of the APIs requires authentication and authorization using the OAuth 2.0 protocol. OAuth 2.0 is a simple protocol. To start, it is necessary to obtain credentials from the Developers Console. Then the client app can request an access token from the Google Authorization Server, and uses that token f ...more...

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Spanner (database)

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Spanner (database)

Cloud Spanner Booth at Google Cloud Summit Spanner is Google's globally distributed NewSQL database.[1] Google describes Spanner as a not pure relational database system because each table must have a primary key column.[2] History, description The lack of transactions in Bigtable led to frequent complaints from users, so Google made distributed transactions central to Spanner's design. Based on its experience with Bigtable, Google argues that it is better to have application programmers deal with performance problems due to overuse of transactions as bottlenecks arise, rather than always coding around the lack of transactions.[2] Described as a NewSQL[3] platform, Spanner is used internally within Google's infrastructure as part of the Google platform[4] and also available as part of Google Cloud Platform.[5] Spanner uses the Paxos algorithm as part of its operation to shard data across hundreds of datacenters.[1] It makes heavy use of hardware-assisted clock synchronization using GPS clocks and atomic c ...more...

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Google Hangouts

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Google Hangouts

Google Hangouts is a communication platform developed by Google which includes messaging, video chat, SMS and VOIP features. It replaces three messaging products that Google had implemented concurrently within its services, including Google Talk, Google+ Messenger (formerly: Huddle), and Hangouts, a video chat system present within Google+. Google has also stated that Hangouts is designed to be "the future" of its telephony product, Google Voice, and integrated some of the capabilities of Google Voice into Hangouts. Users can be messaged by their Google+ accounts.[6] History Prior to the launch of Hangouts, Google had maintained several similar, but technologically separate messaging services and platforms across its suite of products. These have included the enterprise-oriented Google Talk (based on XMPP), Google+ Messenger, and the Hangouts feature of Google+, which provided chat, voice, videoconferencing features. However, its increasingly fragmented and non-unified suite of messaging offerings was also ...more...

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AdSense

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AdSense

Google AdSense is a program run by Google that allows publishers in the Google Network of content sites to serve automatic text, image, video, or interactive media advertisements, that are targeted to site content and audience. These advertisements are administered, sorted, and maintained by Google. They can generate revenue on either a per-click or per-impression basis. Google beta-tested a cost-per-action service, but discontinued it in October 2008 in favor of a DoubleClick offering (also owned by Google).[2] In Q1 2014, Google earned US $3.4 billion ($13.6 billion annualized), or 22% of total revenue, through Google AdSense.[3] AdSense is a participant in the AdChoices program, so AdSense ads typically include the triangle-shaped AdChoices icon.[4][5] This program also operates on HTTP cookies. Over 14.3 million websites use AdSense.[6] Overview Google uses its technology to serve advertisements based on website content, the user's geographical location, and other factors. Those wanting to advertise wit ...more...

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Chromecast

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Chromecast

Chromecast is a line of digital media players developed by Google. The devices, designed as small dongles, enable users with a mobile device or personal computer to initiate and control playback of Internet-streamed audio-visual content on a high-definition television or home audio system through mobile and web apps that support the Google Cast technology. Alternatively, content can be mirrored from the Google Chrome web browser running on a personal computer, as well as from the screen of some Android devices. The first-generation Chromecast, a video streaming device, was announced on July 24, 2013, and made available for purchase on the same day in the United States for US$35.[4] The second-generation Chromecast and an audio-only model called Chromecast Audio were released in September 2015. A model called Chromecast Ultra that supports 4K resolution and high dynamic range was released in November 2016. Critics praised the Chromecast's simplicity and potential for future app support. The Google Cast SDK w ...more...

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Firebase

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Firebase

Firebase is a mobile and web application development platform developed by Firebase, Inc. in 2011, then acquired by Google in 2014.[5] History Firebase evolved from Envolve, a prior startup founded by James Tamplin and Andrew Lee in 2011. Envolve provided developers an API that enables the integration of online chat functionality into their websites. After releasing the chat service, Tamplin and Lee found that it was being used to pass application data that weren't chat messages. Developers were using Envolve to sync application data such as game state in real time across their users. Tamplin and Lee decided to separate the chat system and the real-time architecture that powered it. They founded Firebase as a separate company in April 2012.[6] Firebase Inc. raised seed funding in May 2012. The company further raised Series A funding in June 2013.[7] In October 2014, Firebase was acquired by Google.[8] In October 2015, Google acquired Divshot to merge it with the Firebase team. Since the acquisition, Fireba ...more...

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Google Takeout

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Google Takeout

Google Takeout (Google Takeaway in some languages) is a project by the Google Data Liberation Front[1] that allows users of Google products, such as YouTube and Gmail, to export their data to a downloadable ZIP file. Usage Users can select different services from the list of options provided. As of 24 March 2016, the services that can be exported are as follows: Google+ +1s, Circles, Pages, Streams and posts Chrome Sync bookmarks Google Calendar appointments Google Contacts Google Drive files Google Fit Google Photos Google Play Books metadata and notes Google Groups Google Hangouts Google Keep Google Location History Gmail data Google Maps My Maps, saved places and reviews Google Profile Google Voice billing history, greetings and voicemail recordings Google Wallet YouTube videos The user can elect to export all of the available services or choose services from the above list. Takeout will then process the request and put all the files into a zip file. Takeout then optionall ...more...

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List of Google Easter eggs

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List of Google Easter eggs

The technology giant[1][2][3] Google "prides itself on being a playful company" and has added Easter eggs and April Fools' Day jokes and hoaxes into many of its products and services, such as Google Search, YouTube, and Android since at least 2000.[4] Easter eggs are hidden features or messages, inside jokes, and cultural references inserted into media. They are often well hidden, so that users find it gratifying when they discover them, helping form bonds between Google and its users. The easter eggs are sometimes created by employees during their 20% time. Google avoids adding easter eggs to popular search pages, as they do not want to negatively impact usability.[5][6] An Easter egg in Google Maps warned users asking for walking directions from "The Shire" to "Mordor" that they should "Use caution – One does not simply walk into Mordor." Search engine A Google web search for: "a long time ago in a galaxy far far away" resulted in the same tilted, scrolling style that the introductions to the origin ...more...

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Google Labs

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Google Labs

Google Labs was a page created by Google to demonstrate and test new projects. Google described Google Labs as "a playground where our more adventurous users can play around with prototypes of some of our wild and crazy ideas and offer feedback directly to the engineers who developed them."[1] Google Labs' icon Google also uses an invitation-only phase for trusted testers to test projects including Gmail, Google Calendar and Google Wave and many of these have their own "labs" webpages for experimental projects unique to each product. In 2006, all Google Labs products had a consistent logo, using the flask, and a gray title, as opposed to other color-coded Google products, such as Google News and Google Maps. Discontinuation In July 2011, Google announced that it was discontinuing Google Labs.[2] Many of the experiments have been discontinued although a few have moved to the main search pages. http://GoogleLabs.com now returns a DNS look-up failure. Google still has many links to its defunct "labs" to ...more...

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Blink (web engine)

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Blink (web engine)

Blink is a browser engine used in the Google Chrome browser and many other projects. It is developed as part of the Chromium project[2] with contributions from Google, Opera Software ASA, Adobe Systems, Intel, Samsung and others.[3][4] It was first announced in April 2013.[5] Engine Blink is a fork of the WebCore component of WebKit[6], which is originally a fork of the KHTML and KJS libraries from KDE[7][8]. It is used in Chrome starting at version 28,[9][10] Opera (15+),[9] Vivaldi, Amazon Silk and other Chromium-based browsers and frameworks. Much of WebCore's code is used for features which Chrome implements differently (such as sandboxing and the multi-process model). These parts were altered for the Blink fork, and although made slightly bulkier, it allowed greater flexibility for adding new features in the future. The fork will also deprecate vendor prefixes; experimental functionality will instead be enabled on an opt-in basis.[11] Aside from these planned changes, Blink currently remains relativel ...more...

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Google Desktop

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Google Desktop

Google Desktop is a computer program with desktop search capabilities, created by Google for Linux, Apple Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows systems. It allowed text searches of a user's email messages, computer files, music, photos, chats, Web pages viewed, and the ability to display "Google Gadgets" on the user's desktop in a Sidebar. In September 2011, Google announced it would discontinue a number of its products, including Google Desktop. The reason given was that "In the last few years, there’s been a huge shift from local to cloud-based storage and computing, as well as the integration of search and gadget functionality into most modern operating systems. People now have instant access to their data, whether online or offline. As this was the goal of Google Desktop, the product will be discontinued".[2] Features As of January 2008, Google Desktop featured the following functionality: Sidebar A prominent feature of the Google Desktop is the Sidebar, which holds several common Gadgets and resides off t ...more...

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Material Design

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Material Design

A material Android app, showing buttons, toggle switches, a notification, check and radio buttons, a scroll bar and a floating action button. Material Design (codenamed Quantum Paper)[1] is a design language developed in 2014 by Google. Expanding upon the "card" motifs that debuted in Google Now, Material Design makes more liberal use of grid-based layouts, responsive animations and transitions, padding, and depth effects such as lighting and shadows. Google announced Material Design on June 25, 2014, at the 2014 Google I/O conference. Overview Designer Matías Duarte explained that, "unlike real paper, our digital material can expand and reform intelligently. Material has physical surfaces and edges. Seams and shadows provide meaning about what you can touch." Google states that their new design language is based on paper and ink but implementation will take place in an advanced manner.[2][3][4] Material Design can be used in all supported versions of Android, or in API Level 21 (Android 5.0) and newer ( ...more...

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Susan Wojcicki

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Susan Wojcicki

Susan Diane Wojcicki ( woh-JIS-kee;[2] born July 5, 1968) is an American technology executive. She has been the CEO of YouTube since February 2014.[3][4] She is from Los Altos, California, and has a net worth of $410 million.[5] Early life and education Wojcicki is the daughter of Esther Wojcicki, an educator of Russian-Jewish descent,[6] and Stanley Wojcicki, a Polish American physics professor at Stanford University. She has two sisters: Janet Wojcicki, (PhD, anthropologist and epidemiologist)[7] and Anne Wojcicki, founder of 23andMe. She grew up on the Stanford campus with George Dantzig as a neighbor.[8] She attended Gunn High School in Palo Alto, California, and wrote for the school newspaper.[9] Wojcicki's first business was selling "spice ropes" door-to-door at age 11. A humanities major in college, she took her first computer science class as a senior.[10] Wojcicki studied history and literature at Harvard University and graduated with honors in 1990. She originally planned on getting a PhD in eco ...more...

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Google Analytics 360 Suite

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Google Analytics 360 Suite

Google Analytics 360 Suite is a data management platform announced on 15 March 2015 by Google. It provides analytical data which companies can use to track ROI and marketing indicators. There are five main products in the suite: Analytics, Tag Manager, Optimize, Data Studio, and Surveys. Suite Products Google Analytics for premium users has been renamed Google Analytics 360. The service has no change in features, while the user interface has been simplified.[1] Google Tag Manager for premium users has become Tag Manager 360. User interface has similarly been simplified, and users get guaranteed service levels for critical components. Optimize 360 is a testing and personalization DMP. Users can test and experiment more features on their website and create A/B, multivariate, or redirect tests to alter end-user experiences. Attribution 360 displays combined information from online and offline channels. It integrates with Analytics 360 and Double Click. Audience Center 360, which is still in beta, helps to ...more...

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Android Lollipop

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Android Lollipop

Android "Lollipop" is a codename for the Android mobile operating system developed by Google, spanning versions between 5.0 and 5.1.1.[4] Unveiled on June 25, 2014 at the Google I/O 2014 conference, it became available through official over-the-air (OTA) updates on November 12, 2014, for select devices that run distributions of Android serviced by Google (such as Nexus and Google Play edition devices). Its source code was made available on November 3, 2014. It is the fifth major update and the twelfth version of Android. One of the most prominent changes in the Lollipop release is a redesigned user interface built around a design language known as Material Design, which was made to retain a paper-like feel to the interface. Other changes include improvements to the notifications, which can be accessed from the lockscreen and displayed within applications as top-of-the-screen banners. Google also made internal changes to the platform, with the Android Runtime (ART) officially replacing Dalvik for improved app ...more...

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Google Keep

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Google Keep

Google Keep is a note-taking service developed by Google. Launched on March 20, 2013, Google Keep is available on the web, and has mobile apps for the Android and iOS mobile operating systems. Keep offers a variety of tools for taking notes, including text, lists, images, and audio. Users can set reminders, which are integrated with Google Now. Text from images can be extracted using optical character recognition, and voice recordings can be transcribed. The interface allows for a single-column view or a multi-column view. Notes can be color-coded, and labels can be applied for organization. Later updates have added functionality to pin notes, and to collaborate on notes with other Keep users in real-time. Google Keep has received mixed reviews. A review just after launch in 2013 praised its speed, the quality of voice notes, synchronization, and the widget that could be placed on the Android home screen. Reviews in 2016 have criticized the lack of formatting options, inability to undo changes, and an interf ...more...

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Google Shopping

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Google Shopping

Google Shopping,[2] formerly Google Product Search, Google Products and Froogle, is a Google service invented by Craig Nevill-Manning which allows users to search for products on online shopping websites and compare prices between different vendors. Originally, the service listed prices submitted by merchants, and was monetized through AdWords advertising like other Google services. However, in May 2012, Google announced that the service (which was also immediately renamed Google Shopping) would shift in late-2012 to a paid model where merchants would have to pay the company in order to list their products on the service.[2][3] In June 2017 Google Shopping was fined a record €2.4 billion by the EU Commission for giving its own online shopping services top priority in search results.[4] History Created by Craig Nevill-Manning[5] and launched in December 2002, Froogle was different from most other price comparison services in that it used Google's web crawler to index product data from the websites of vendo ...more...

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Google Chrome App

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Google Chrome App

A Google Chrome App is a web application that runs on the Google Chrome web browser. Chrome apps can be obtained from the Chrome Web Store where apps, extensions, and themes can be installed or bought. There are two types of apps, hosted and packaged, which have different locations of their executable and are targeted at different use cases. On August 19, 2016, Google announced that it would begin phasing out Chrome Apps for Windows, Mac and Linux (both packaged and hosted) by the end of 2016, finishing the process in early 2018.[1] The company said that such apps will however continue to be supported and maintained on Chrome OS "for the foreseeable future".[1][2] Types of apps Chrome apps can be hosted or packaged. Hosted apps have their background web pages on a remote server and the app acts like a bookmark or shortcut;[3] packaged apps have off-line functionality making use of local storage. Packaged apps Packaged apps were launched on September 5, 2013.[4] They have features very similar to a native ...more...

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Google Nexus

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Google Nexus

Google Nexus is a line of consumer electronic devices that run the Android operating system. Google manages the design, development, marketing, and support of these devices, but some development and all manufacturing are carried out by partnering with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). As of August 2016, the devices currently available in the line are two smartphones, the Nexus 6P (made with Huawei) and Nexus 5X (made with LG). The line has also included tablets and streaming media players, though neither type of device is currently available. The most recent tablet was the Nexus 9 (made with HTC), and the most recent streaming media player the Nexus Player (made with Asus). Devices in the Nexus line[2] are considered Google's flagship Android products. They contain little to no manufacturer or wireless carrier modifications to Android (such as custom user interfaces[3]), although devices sold through carriers may be SIM locked and may bear some extra branding. Nexus 6 devices sold through AT&T, f ...more...

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Android Nougat

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Android Nougat

Android "Nougat" (codenamed Android N during development) is the seventh major version and 14th original version of the Android operating system. First released as an alpha test version on March 9, 2016, it was officially released on August 22, 2016, with Nexus devices being the first to receive the update. The LG V20 was the first smartphone released with Nougat. Nougat introduces notable changes to the operating system and its development platform, including the ability to display multiple apps on-screen at once in a split-screen view, support for inline replies to notifications, and an expanded "Doze" power-saving mode that restricts device functionality once the screen has been off for a period of time. Additionally, the platform switched to an OpenJDK-based Java environment and received support for the Vulkan graphics rendering API, and "seamless" system updates on supported devices. Nougat received positive reviews. The new app notification format received particular praise, while the multitasking int ...more...

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Google bomb

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Google bomb

Look up google bomb in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. An example of Google bombing in 2006 that caused the search query "miserable failure" to be associated with George W. Bush and Michael Moore. The terms Google bomb and Googlewashing refer to the practice of causing a website to rank highly in web search engine results for irrelevant, unrelated or off-topic search terms by linking heavily. In contrast, search engine optimization (SEO) is the practice of improving the search engine listings of web pages for relevant search terms. Google-bombing is done for either business, political, or comedic purposes (or some combination thereof).[1] Google's search-rank algorithm ranks pages higher for a particular search phrase if enough other pages linked to it use similar anchor text. By January 2007, however, Google tweaked its search algorithm to counter popular Google bombs such as "miserable failure" leading to George W. Bush and Michael Moore; now, search results list pages about the Google bomb itself.[2] ...more...

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Google IME

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Google IME

Google IME is a set of typing tools (input method editors) by Google for 22 languages, including Amharic, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Greek, Gujarati, Hindi, Japanese, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali, Persian, Punjabi, Russian, Sanskrit, Serbian, Tamil, Telugu, Tigrinya, and Urdu. It is a virtual keyboard that allows users to type in their local language text directly in any application without the hassle of copying and pasting. Google Transliteration IME Google's service for Indic languages was previously available as an online text editor, named Google Indic Transliteration. Other language transliteration capabilities were added (beyond just Indic languages) and it was renamed simply Google transliteration. Later on, because of its steady rise in popularity, it was released as Google Transliteration IME for offline use in December 2009. It works on a dictionary-based phonetic transliteration approach, which means that whatever you type in Latin characters, it matches the characters with its dictionary ...more...

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Google services

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Knowledge Graph

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Knowledge Graph

Knowledge Graph data about Thomas Jefferson displayed on Google Search, as of January 2015 The Knowledge Graph is a knowledge base used by Google and its services to enhance its search engine's results with information gathered from a variety of sources. The information is presented to users in an infobox next to the search results. Knowledge Graph infoboxes were added to Google's search engine in May 2012, starting in the United States, with international expansion by the end of the year. The Knowledge Graph was powered in part by Freebase.[1] The information covered by the Knowledge Graph grew significantly after launch, tripling its original size within seven months, and being able to answer "roughly one-third" of the 100 billion monthly searches Google processed in May 2016. The information is often used as a spoken answer in Google Assistant and Google Home searches. The Knowledge Graph has been criticized for providing answers without source attribution. History Google announced Knowledge Graph on Ma ...more...

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Censorship by Google

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Censorship by Google

Censorship by Google is Google's removal or omission of information from its services or those of its subsidiary companies, such as YouTube, in order to comply with its company policies, legal demands, or various government censorship laws.[1] Google's censorship varies between countries and their regulations, and ranges from advertisements to speeches. Over the years, the search engine's censorship policies and targets have also differed, and have been the source of internet censorship debates.[2] Numerous governments have asked Google to censor what they publish. In 2012 Google ruled in favor of more than half of the requests they received via court orders and phone calls. This did not include China and Iran who block their site entirely.[3] Google AdSense In February 2003, Google stopped showing the advertisements of Oceana, a non-profit organization protesting against a major cruise ship operation's sewage treatment practices. Google cited its editorial policy at the time, stating "Google does not acce ...more...

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Google Cloud Platform

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Google Cloud Platform

Google Cloud Platform, offered by Google, is a suite of cloud computing services that runs on the same infrastructure that Google uses internally for its end-user products, such as Google Search and YouTube.[1] Alongside a set of management tools, it provides a series of modular cloud services including computing, data storage, data analytics and machine learning.[2] Registration requires a credit card or bank account details.[3] Google Cloud Platform provides Infrastructure as a Service, Platform as a Service, and Serverless Computing environments. In April 2008, Google announced App Engine, a platform for developing and hosting web applications in Google-managed data centers, which was the first cloud computing service from the company. The service became generally available in November 2011. Since the announcement of App Engine, Google added multiple cloud services to the platform. Google Cloud Platform is a part of Google Cloud, which includes the Google Cloud Platform public cloud infrastructure, as w ...more...

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Cloud computing providers

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Google Pay Send

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Google Pay Send

Google Pay Send (formerly Google Wallet) is a peer-to-peer payments service developed by Google that allows people to send and receive money from a mobile device or desktop computer at no cost to either sender or receiver. When set up, a Google Pay account must be linked to an existing debit card or bank account in the United States or United Kingdom.[4] Google Pay Send can be used through the Google Pay Send app and Gmail. The app is available for Android devices running Android 4.0 and above, and for iOS devices running iOS 7.0 and above.[5] Since 2018, Android Pay and Google Wallet has unified into a single pay system called Google Pay.[6] Google Pay Send, a feature included inside Google Pay, has replaced the Google Wallet service.[7] Service Google Pay is structured to allow its patrons to send money to each other. To send money, a Google Pay user enters the email address or phone number of the recipient. The recipient must then link that phone number or email address to a bank account in order to acc ...more...

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2011 introductions

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Google Express

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Google Express

Google Shopping Express vehicle, original livery Google Shopping Express vehicle, newer livery Google Express, formerly Google Shopping Express,[1] is a shopping service from Google available in some parts of the United States that was launched on a free trial basis across the San Francisco Peninsula. Originally it was a same-day service.[2] It later expanded to same-day and overnight delivery.[3] Originally pricing was the same as in-person shopping, but later increased to the point where prices are typically US$4-$10 more per item; Google Express Help said, "Because item prices are set by stores, sometimes you'll see prices on Google Express that differ from what you'd see in the store: this depends both on the merchant and the location of the store your items come from."[4] The service was first announced in March 2013, from San Francisco as far south as San Jose. Retailers include a mix of national and local stores.[5][6][7] It was publicly launched on September 25, 2013, with some added retailers bu ...more...

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Google

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Google Cloud Print

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Google Cloud Print

Google Cloud Print is a Google service that lets users print from any Cloud-Print-aware application (web, desktop, mobile) on any device in the network cloud to any printer[2] – without Google having to create and maintain printing subsystems for all the hardware combinations of client devices and printers, and without the users having to install device drivers to the client,[2] but with documents being fully transmitted to Google.[3] Since July 23, 2013 it also allows printing from any Windows application, if Google Cloud Printer[4] is installed on the machine.[5] FeaturesIntegration with other Google products Google Cloud Print integrates with the mobile versions of Gmail and Google Docs, allowing users to print from their mobile devices.[6] Google Cloud Print is listed as a printer option in the Print Preview page of Google's Web browser, Google Chrome, in Chrome 16 and higher.[7] Printers without built-in Cloud Print support, often referred to as "legacy" or "classic",[2][8] are supported through a "Clou ...more...

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Google Pay

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Google Pay

Google Pay (formerly Pay with Google and Android Pay) is a digital wallet platform and online payment system developed by Google to power in-app and tap-to-pay purchases on mobile devices, enabling users to make payments with Android phones, tablets or watches. As of January 8, 2018, the old Android Pay and Google Wallet have unified into a single pay system called Google Pay.[3] Android Pay was rebranded and renamed as Google Pay. It also took over the branding of Google Chrome's autofill feature.[4] Google Pay would have all the features of Android Pay, while Google Wallet features such as requesting and sending money appear in Google Pay Send, currently a separate app.[5][6] The rebranded service provided a new API that allows merchants to add the payment service to websites, apps, Stripe, Braintree, and Google Assistant.[7] The service allows users to use the payment cards they have on file with Google Play.[8] The Google Pay app also added support for boarding passes and event tickets in May 2018.[9] ...more...

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Google services

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Chrome V8

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Chrome V8

Chrome V8, or simply V8, is an open-source JavaScript engine developed by The Chromium Project for Google Chrome and Chromium web browsers.[5] The project’s creator is Lars Bak.[6] The first version of the V8 engine was released at the same time as the first version of Chrome: September 2, 2008. It has also been used in Couchbase, MongoDB and Node.js that are used server-side. V8 compiles JavaScript directly to native machine code before executing it, instead of more traditional techniques such as interpreting bytecode or compiling the whole program to machine code and executing it from a filesystem. The compiled code is additionally optimized (and re-optimized) dynamically at runtime, based on heuristics of the code's execution profile. Optimization techniques used include inlining, elision of expensive runtime properties, and inline caching. The garbage collector is a generational incremental collector.[7] V8 can compile to x86, ARM or MIPS instruction set architectures in both their 32- and 64-bit editio ...more...

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Free compilers and interpreters

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Google Safe Browsing

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Google Safe Browsing

Google Safe Browsing is a blacklist service provided by Google that provides lists of URLs for web resources that contain malware or phishing content.[1][2] The Google Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Opera, Vivaldi, and GNOME Web browsers use the lists from the Google Safe Browsing service for checking pages against potential threats.[3][4] Google also provides a public API for the service.[5] Google also provides information to Internet service providers, by sending e-mail alerts to autonomous system operators regarding threats hosted on their networks.[2] According to Google, as of June 2012, some 600 million Internet users were using this service, either directly or indirectly.[6] Clients protected Web browsers: Google Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Opera, Vivaldi, and GNOME Web. Android: Google Play Protect, Verify Apps API Google Search Google AdSense: prevent advertisements to promote dangerous websites Gmail Privacy Google maintains the Safe Browsing Lookup API, which has a privacy drawback: "The URL ...more...

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Google services

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Google (verb)

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Google (verb)

Look up google in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. As a result of the increasing popularity and dominance of the Google search engine,[1] usage of the transitive verb[2] to google (also spelled Google) grew ubiquitously. The neologism commonly refers to searching for information on the World Wide Web, regardless of which search engine is used.[3] The American Dialect Society chose it as the "most useful word of 2002."[4] It was added to the Oxford English Dictionary on June 15, 2006,[5] and to the eleventh edition of the Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary in July 2006.[6] Etymology The first recorded usage of google used as a participle, thus supposing an intransitive verb, was on July 8, 1998, by Google co-founder Larry Page himself, who wrote on a mailing list: "Have fun and keep googling!".[7] Its earliest known use (as a transitive verb) on American television was in the "Help" episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer (October 15, 2002), when Willow asked Buffy, "Have you googled her yet?"[8] On February ...more...

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Calico (company)

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Calico (company)

Calico is a research and development biotech company founded on September 18, 2013 by Bill Maris[3][4][2][1] and backed by Google with the goal of combating aging and associated diseases.[5] In Google's 2013 Founders' Letter, Larry Page described Calico as a company focused on "health, well-being, and longevity." The company's name is an acronym for "California Life Company".[6][7] In 2015, Google restructured into Alphabet Inc., making Calico a subsidiary of the new company along with Google and others. As of 2018, Calico has not developed any known drugs or biotechnology products.[8] Partnerships and staff In September 2014, it was announced that Calico, in partnership with AbbVie, would be opening up a R&D facility focused on aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration and cancer. Initially, each company will invest $350 million, with an option for each to add an extra $500 million later on.[9] In the same month, Calico announced a partnership with the University of Texas Southwestern ...more...

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Health care companies of the United States

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Google Developers

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Google Developers

Google Developers (previously Google Code) is Google's site for software development tools, application programming interfaces (APIs), and technical resources. The site contains documentation on using Google developer tools and APIs—including discussion groups and blogs for developers using Google's developer products. There are APIs offered for almost all of Google's popular consumer products, like Google Maps, YouTube, Google Apps, and others. The site also features a variety of developer products and tools built specifically for developers. Google App Engine is a hosting service for web apps. Project Hosting gives users version control for open source code. Google Web Toolkit (GWT) allows developers to create Ajax applications in the Java programming language. The site contains reference information for community based developer products that Google is involved with like Android from the Open Handset Alliance and OpenSocial from the OpenSocial Foundation. Google APIs Google offers a variety of APIs, m ...more...

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Articles containing potentially dated statement...

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Google Storage

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Google Storage

Google Cloud Storage is a RESTful online file storage web service for storing and accessing data on Google Cloud Platform infrastructure. The service combines the performance and scalability of Google's cloud with advanced security and sharing capabilities. It is an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), comparable to Amazon S3 online storage service. Contrary to Google Drive and according to different service specifications, Google Cloud Storage appears to be more suitable for enterprises.[1] Feasibility User activation is resourced through the API Developer Console. Google Account holders must first access the service by logging in and then agreeing to the Terms of Service, followed by enabling a billing structure. Design Google Storage (GS) stores objects (originally limited to 100 GiB, currently up to 5 TiB) that are organized into buckets (as S3 does) identified within each bucket by a unique, user-assigned key. All requests are authorized using an access control list associated with each bucket and obj ...more...

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Web services

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