Glove prints

Glove prints, also sometimes described as gloveprints or glove marks, are latent, fingerprint-like impressions that are transferred to a surface or object by an individual who is wearing gloves.

Many criminals often wear gloves to avoid leaving fingerprints, which makes the crime investigation more difficult. Although the gloves act as a protective covering for the wearer's prints, the gloves themselves can leave prints that are just as unique as human fingerprints, thus betraying the wearer. After collecting glove prints, law enforcement can then match them to gloves that they have collected as evidence as well as glove prints retrieved from other crime scenes.[1]

History

Since the advent of fingerprint detection, many criminals have resorted to the wearing of gloves during the commission of their crimes in order to avoid leaving their fingerprints as evidence. In the era prior to contemporary advances in forensic science, the simple act of covering the hands often assured criminal assailants their anonymity if no witnesses were present during their offenses; thus a pair of gloves became the most essential and crucial tool for any successful perpetrator.[2]

In earlier decades, investigators would dust for fingerprints only to find smears and smudges caused by gloves. Often in earlier decades these smudges were ignored because very little of their detail was retrievable. With the advent of latent fingerprint detection in the late 20th century, investigators started to collect, analyze, and record prints left at crime scenes that were created by the wearing of gloves. Glove prints can be as simple as marks caused by seams or folds in fabric of a glove, or they can be as complex as marks left behind by the grain or texture of the fabric of a glove. When gloves are collected as evidence their prints can be taken and compared to glove prints that were taken at crime scenes or from evidence.[3]

Offenders who wear gloves tend to use their hands and fingers very freely, and thus, because their gloves give them a false sense of protection, leave easily distinguishable glove prints on the surfaces they handle. If when either a fingerprint is able to pass through a glove, or when, because of holes in a glove, finger and glove prints appear together, investigators are now able to better distinguish between prints made by friction ridges and prints made by gloves. Many times this also happens because criminals also opt to wear gloves that are both tight-fitting and relatively short, which makes the occurrence of prints being made by the butt of the palm and the wrist (palm prints) more common as the gloves may slip, thus exposing areas of the skin that may leave prints.[4] Also, many times criminals would discard their gloves at crime scenes or hide them nearby. Today, latent fingerprints (first discovered on the surfaces of fabrics by investigators in the 1930s),[5] as well as DNA and incriminating bacteria can also be recovered from the inside of these discarded gloves.[6][7][8]

In many jurisdictions the act of wearing gloves itself while committing a crime can be prosecuted as an inchoate offense.[9]

By the 1950s, after over a half century of frustration due to the wearing of gloves by assailants, fingerprint experts began studies to determine how it may be feasible to detect and compare glove prints found at crime scenes.[10]

In 1971, the Metropolitan Police Service of London, England claims the first (or one of the very first) convictions based on glove print-evidence. Glove-prints were found on a broken window and were later matched to the gloves of a suspect.[11]

Starting in early 2009, law enforcement in Derbyshire, East Midlands, England began uploading hundreds of files of collected glove prints into their criminal database.[12] The Glove Mark Working Group in Derbyshire includes the Derbyshire Police Department, the Home Office Scientific Development Branch, and Nottingham Trent University.[13]

With the belief that individual offenders possess preferences for specific types of gloves (style and fabric/material), forensic scientists have also used glove print databases to create complex computations and charts that isolate, geographically, "hot spots" where prints taken from specific types of gloves are matched against similar types of crimes.[14] Forensic scientists have even had success matching partial glove prints by using these databases and related software.[15] Offenders may prefer a specific type of glove depending on its perceived inherent benefits. Latex, nitrile, plastic, rubber, or vinyl gloves are worn because they are thin and cling to the wearer's skin which in turn provides a level of dexterity to the wearer.[16] Leather gloves possess pores that provides the wearer with an enhanced gripping ability. Leather gloves that are thin and tight-fitting provide both enhanced gripping and dexterity to the wearer.[17]

Prints from different glove types
Assailants may prefer thin latex gloves because their snug fit helps to maintain dexterity. This same thin and snugness may allow the wearer's fingerprints to pass through the material. When discovered by authorities, latent fingerprints may also be recovered from the inside of these gloves.
  • Thin, latex, rubber, plastic, vinyl or nitrile gloves: These gloves are worn by criminals because of their tight, thin fit that allows the hands to remain dexterous. Because of the thinness of these gloves, fingerprints may pass through the material, thus transferring the wearer's prints onto whatever surface is touched or handled.[18][19]
Lined leather gloves may leave a print that is as unique as a human fingerprint. When discovered by authorities, latent fingerprints may also be recovered from the inside of these gloves.
  • Leather gloves: These gloves are worn by criminals because the tactile properties of the leather allow for good grip and dexterity. These properties are the result of the grain present on the surface of the glove. The grain makes the surface of the leather unique to each glove. Over time, the pores and grain of leather gloves will pick up dirt and grease from surfaces that they have touched or handled. The dirt and grease can in return help to create prints on surfaces. Also, unlined gloves provide the most dexterity but can over time become saturated with the oils and sweat of the wearer's hands. This helps to increase the gripping properties of the gloves[20] but causes the gloves to leave prints.[21] A print that contains the glove wearer's sweat and oils will contain their DNA, which can incriminate them.[22] Investigators are able to dust for the marks left behind from leather the same way they dust for fingerprints.[19][23]
  • Woolen, cotton, or other fabric gloves: These gloves are worn by criminals because they are typically inexpensive and readily available as well. Weave patterns of fabric gloves may also be unique to that glove and when collected at a crime scene, can be compared to gloves that are taken in as evidence. Like leather gloves, these gloves will over time pick up dirt and grease as well.[24]
Notable instances
Batting gloves usually include an unlined leather palm and a nylon or cotton back. For the same reason baseball players wear these gloves, to improve their grip while maintaining dexterity while batting, assailants wear these gloves as to maintain dexterity and be able to grip easily during their offenses.
  • In 1993, Rochester, New York law enforcement was responding to a reported burglary when they arrested a suspect who was fleeing the burglarized home. On his person, investigators found a yellow rubber glove that was later found to match glove prints that were found on property that was known to have been stolen from the home.[25]
  • In 2001, Cobb County, Georgia, US, law enforcement responded to a break-in and burglary of an under-construction condominium development and found glove marks on a window that had been pushed open by the perpetrator. Law enforcement later found the perpetrator hiding in the complex and collected items that the perpetrator was hiding with him. Investigators were able to match the texture and weave pattern of the palms of the pair of construction/work-type gloves that the perpetrator had to the glove prints found on the window.[26]
  • In 2002, Grand Rapids, Michigan law enforcement was investigating a string of burglaries in the area. No fingerprints were found but latent glove prints were found with the use of fingerprint powder. A particularly detailed hand print of a leather glove became visible at the break-in point of one burglary. After a group of suspected burglars were brought in, the investigators received a warrant to search a vehicle that was linked the suspects. A brown leather batting glove was recovered that seemed to match the stitch detail on the glove prints taken from the break-in point. After scanning both the palm of the leather glove and the recovered glove print into a computer, the investigators used Adobe Photoshop software to compare the grain detail of the glove with the grain detail of the glove print. The investigators were thus able to match the stitching and grain detail of both, thus incriminating the suspects.[27]
  • In 2009, a teenager was arrested in Royal Oak, Michigan for obstructing police near the location of a recently reported burglary. While in custody investigators compared the gloves that the suspect had in his possession to glove prints that were found at several break-in locations. Investigators were able to link marks left on a window to his gloves.[28]
  • In 2011, the Maricopa County, Arizona Sherriff's Office began investigating a string of robberies, dating to at least 1993, of high-end homes in the vicinity of Paradise Valley, Arizona. Investigators noted that the assailant (or assailants) wore fabric/cloth gardening gloves with rubber grips that had left unique prints on many surfaces in the burglarized locations. Upon arresting a 58-year-old suspect near a home that was under surveillance by the sheriff's office, authorities found amongst burglary tools in his possession, gardening gloves that matched the unique prints found at the burglarized locations.[29]
  • In 2012, law enforcement in Newton County, Indiana found unique glove prints at a home that was recently burglarized. The impressions left by the gloves seemed to possess indentations made by letters "M", "e", and "c" which would have been present on the surface of the gloves. Authorities were later able to match these unique impressions to Mechanix-brand gloves that were found at the residence of a suspect.[30]
  • On December 7, 2013 the Toronto Sun reported that the Royal Canadian Mounted Police seized hundreds of firearms that they found while searching homes in High River, Alberta that were temporarily deserted due to the 2013 Alberta floods. Residents who had their firearms seized also found glove marks on conspicuous places such as bedroom furniture, where guns were thought to be stored.[31]
Further reading References
  1. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/3740688/Police-use-glove-prints-to-catch-criminals.html Police use glove prints to catch criminals
  2. Horace Cox, ed. (1905). The Law Times: The Journal and Record: The Law and The Lawyers. vol. CXIX. London: The Law Times. p. 563.
  3. http://www.thisisderbyshire.co.uk/gloves-Liane-s-unique-technique-helps-finger-thieves/story-11638324-detail/story.html The gloves are off as Liane's unique technique helps to finger more thieves
  4. Fisher, Barry A.J. Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation. Boca Raton, CRC Press. 2004. ISBN 0-8493-1691-X
  5. "O'Dougherty Urges All Be Fingerprinted: U.S. Attorney Describes Sciences of Crime Detection to Democrats". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 8, 1938. Retrieved July 1, 2014.
  6. http://www.csigizmos.com/products/latentdevelopment/gloves.html Visualization of latent fingerprints on used vinyl and latex gloves using Gellifters
  7. http://www.glovenation.com/nitrile-gloves/nitrile-gloves-fingerprints.htm Nitrile Gloves and the New Fingerprint
  8. http://articles.latimes.com/2010/apr/07/news/la-bx-science-bacteria7-2010apr07 A hand in crime investigation: Bacteria that live on the hand could one day accurately identify individuals
  9. James W.H. McCord and Sandra L. McCord, Criminal Law and Procedure for the paralegal: a systems approach, supra, p. 127.
  10. Svensson, Arne, and Otto Wendel. Crime Detection: Modern Methods of Criminal Investigation. Amsterdam, Elsevier Publishing Company. 1955. ASIN: B000J0034O
  11. Buckley, William Frank. National Review Bulletin:=, Volume 23: Page B-87. New York, 1971
  12. http://www.digitalid.co.uk/industryNews/p_465/Glove-Print-Database-to-help-Police-in-their-fight-against-crime/ Glove Print Database to help Police in their fight against crime
  13. http://www3.ntu.ac.uk/apps/staff_profiles/staff_directory/125555-2/26/Emma_Rixon.aspx Emma Rixon: Lecturer/Senior Lecturer
  14. http://lpr.oxfordjournals.org/content/2/1/47.full.pdf Forensic intelligence and crime analysis - Law, Probability and Risk
  15. http://www.forensicmag.com/product-releases/2013/04/software-module-evaluation-traces#.Ux0f8M6V7Sg Software Module for Evaluation of Traces
  16. http://www.glovemanufacturer.com/products/rubber-gloves Rubber Gloves
  17. http://www.makingrebeccalynne.com/2011/10/serial-killer-sewing-fmq-friday.html Serial Killer Sewing: FMQ Friday
  18. http://www.chacha.com/question/do-latex-gloves-conceal-fingerprints%3F-if-so%2C-why Do latex gloves conceal fingerprints? If so, Why?
  19. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-05-22. Retrieved 2012-12-14. Personal Identification: Fingerprints
  20. http://tombguard.org/society/faq/ SOCIETY OF THE HONOR GUARD: Frequently Asked Questions
  21. http://gripswell.com/faq.php Frequently Asked Questions
  22. http://www.thesun.co.uk/scotsol/homepage/news/2426114/Eleni-Pachou-murder-trial.html?print=yes Blood is ‘linked’ to Eleni accused
  23. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-07-13. Retrieved 2012-05-22. Crime Labs
  24. http://onin.com/fp/lpcollection.html Latent Print Evidence Collection Guidance...
  25. http://www.leagle.com/xmlResult.aspx?page=2&xmldoc=1993387187AD2d200_1355.xml&docbase=CSLWAR2-1986-2006&SizeDisp=7 PEOPLE v. QUARLES: 187 A.D.2d 200 (1993): Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, Fourth Department: February 5, 1993
  26. In the Court of Appeals of Georgia: A13A2296. MASON v. THE STATE
  27. http://www.clpex.com/Articles/TheDetail/1-99/TheDetail52.htm Glove Analysis Using ACE-V and Adobe Photoshop
  28. http://www.theoaklandpress.com/articles/2009/11/22/news/doc4b08a94a9ddfc063624770.txt?viewmode=default Madison Heights teenager charged in home break-ins
  29. http://www.azcentral.com/12news/news/articles/2011/05/27/20110527rock-burglar-arrest-arizona.html Sheriff's Office: Suspected 'rock burglar' arrested in Phoenix
  30. http://www.in.gov/judiciary/opinions/pdf/05211402nhv.pdf Jacob Herron v. State of Indiana - IN.gov
  31. http://www.torontosun.com/2013/12/06/high-river-gun-grab-a-massive-breach-of-civil-rights High River Gun Grab a massive breach of civil rights
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Glove prints

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Glove prints

Glove prints, also sometimes described as gloveprints or glove marks, are latent, fingerprint-like impressions that are transferred to a surface or object by an individual who is wearing gloves. Many criminals often wear gloves to avoid leaving fingerprints, which makes the crime investigation more difficult. Although the gloves act as a protective covering for the wearer's prints, the gloves themselves can leave prints that are just as unique as human fingerprints, thus betraying the wearer. After collecting glove prints, law enforcement can then match them to gloves that they have collected as evidence as well as glove prints retrieved from other crime scenes.[1] History Since the advent of fingerprint detection, many criminals have resorted to the wearing of gloves during the commission of their crimes in order to avoid leaving their fingerprints as evidence. In the era prior to contemporary advances in forensic science, the simple act of covering the hands often assured criminal assailants their anonymi ...more...

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Glove

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Glove

Assorted gloves (a museum collection) A glove (Middle English from Old English glof) is a garment covering the whole hand. Gloves have separate sheaths or openings for each finger and the thumb; if there is an opening but no (or a short) covering sheath for each finger they are called fingerless gloves. Fingerless gloves having one large opening rather than individual openings for each finger are sometimes called gauntlets, though gauntlets are not necessarily fingerless. Gloves which cover the entire hand or fist but do not have separate finger openings or sheaths are called mittens. Mittens are warmer than other styles of gloves made of the same material because fingers maintain their warmth better when they are in contact with each other. Reduced surface area reduces heat loss. A hybrid of glove and mitten contains open-ended sheaths for the four fingers (as in a fingerless glove, but not the thumb) and an additional compartment encapsulating the four fingers. This compartment can be lifted off the fing ...more...

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Medical glove

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Medical glove

Dentist wearing nitrile gloves. Medical gloves are disposable gloves used during medical examinations and procedures to help prevent cross-contamination between caregivers and patients.[1] Medical gloves are made of different polymers including latex, nitrile rubber, polyvinyl chloride and neoprene; they come unpowdered, or powdered with cornstarch to lubricate the gloves, making them easier to put on the hands.[2] Cornstarch replaced tissue-irritating Lycopodium powder and talc, but even cornstarch can impede healing if it gets into tissues (as during surgery). As such, unpowdered gloves are used more often during surgery and other sensitive procedures. Special manufacturing processes are used to compensate for the lack of powder. There are two main types of medical gloves: examination and surgical. Surgical gloves have more precise sizing with a better precision and sensitivity and are made to a higher standard. Examination gloves are available as either sterile or non-sterile, while surgical gloves are g ...more...

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Rubber glove

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Rubber glove

A latex glove A rubber glove is a glove made out of rubber. Rubber gloves can be unsupported (rubber only) or supported (rubber coating of textile glove). Its primary purpose is protection of the hands while performing tasks involving chemicals. Rubber gloves can be worn during dishwashing to protect the hands from detergent and allow the use of hotter water. Sometimes caregivers will use rubber gloves during the diaper changing process to prevent contact with the child's fecal material/urine. Health professionals use medical gloves rather than rubber gloves when performing surgical operations. Origin In 1889, William Stewart Halsted, the first chief of surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital, invented rubber gloves in order to prevent medical staff from developing dermatitis from surgical chemicals.[1] Household use A disposable nitrile rubber glove Household rubber gloves have been used for washing dishes and cleaning in the home since the 1960s. Many different designs of gloves have been available in a ...more...

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Fingerprint

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Fingerprint

A fingerprint in its narrow sense is an impression left by the friction ridges of a human finger.[1] The recovery of fingerprints from a crime scene is an important method of forensic science. Fingerprints are easily deposited on suitable surfaces (such as glass or metal or polished stone) by the natural secretions of sweat from the eccrine glands that are present in epidermal ridges. These are sometimes referred to as "Chanced Impressions". In a wider use of the term, fingerprints are the traces of an impression from the friction ridges of any part of a human or other primate hand. A print from the sole of the foot can also leave an impression of friction ridges. Deliberate impressions of fingerprints may be formed by ink or other substances transferred from the peaks of friction ridges on the skin to a relatively smooth surface such as a fingerprint card.[2] Fingerprint records normally contain impressions from the pad on the last joint of fingers and thumbs, although fingerprint cards also typically reco ...more...

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Personally identifiable information

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Personally identifiable information

Personal information, described in United States legal fields as either personally identifiable information (PII), or sensitive personal information (SPI),[1][2][3] as used in information security and privacy laws, is information that can be used on its own or with other information to identify, contact, or locate a single person, or to identify an individual in context. The abbreviation PII is widely accepted in the U.S. context, but the phrase it abbreviates has four common variants based on personal / personally, and identifiable / identifying. Not all are equivalent, and for legal purposes the effective definitions vary depending on the jurisdiction and the purposes for which the term is being used. (In other countries with privacy protection laws derived from the OECD privacy principles, the term used is more often "personal information", which may be somewhat broader: in Australia's Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) "personal information" also includes information from which the person's identity is "reasonably as ...more...

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Fingerprint (disambiguation)

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Fingerprint (disambiguation)

Look up fingerprint in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. A fingerprint is a mark made by the pattern of ridges on the pad of a human finger. Fingerprint may also refer to: Science and technology Genetic fingerprint, distinguishing two individuals of the same species using only samples of their DNA Peptide mass fingerprinting, in biochemistry, identification of proteins Fingerprint (computing), uniquely identifying data by extracting from it a small key known as a fingerprint Public key fingerprint, a string of bytes identifying a cryptographic public key Acoustic fingerprint, in audio technology, unique code generated from audio samples, allowing computer identification of music Digital video fingerprinting, generates unique codes from digital video samples, and is used for automated copyright enforcement TCP/IP stack fingerprinting, identifying computer operating systems from network packets Device fingerprint, harvesting of software and hardware settings from a remote computing device Ca ...more...

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Weighted-knuckle glove

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Weighted-knuckle glove

Weighted-knuckle glove for the left hand Weighted-knuckle gloves, also called sap gloves, are a type of weapon used in hand to hand combat. They consist of a pair of ordinary looking gloves usually made of leather or a synthetic material, with powdered lead or steel sewn into a special pouch covering the knuckles, and often the backs of the fingers and the back of the hand. In some designs, this distinctive feature is obvious, while in others it is almost completely indistinguishable from an ordinary glove, allowing the gloves to be worn in plain sight without suspicion. They are primarily used by security guards and by bouncers and other security professionals where physical combat is expected. History Usage The purpose of these gloves in combat is both offensive and defensive. Offensively, the weight of the metal powder adds mass and therefore kinetic energy to punches, back-hands and other hand strikes. The weighting also distributes the impact in a manner similar to a blackjack, transferring concussiv ...more...

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Paraphrase on the Finding of a Glove

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Paraphrase on the Finding of a Glove

Handlung Paraphrase über den Fund eines Handschuhs, often referred to in English as Paraphrase on the Finding of a Glove, is a set of ten etchings by Max Klinger. The series of prints were made by twenty-one-year-old Klinger in 1877-78 and first exhibited at the Berlin Art Association in 1878. They were later exhibited in a mixed technique of engraving, etching, and aquatint in 1881. The etchings are a part of the symbolism movement and hold a story of love, death, and fantasy in which Klinger is most known for. The Paraphrase on the Finding of a Glove etchings are Klinger's first work of narrative sequence. He displays real and imaginary scenes that correspond through dreamlike understanding. Summary Each etching is titled in German: Ort (Place) Handlung (Action) Wünsche (Yearnings) Rettung (Rescue) Triumph Huldigung (Homage) Ängste (Anxieties) Ruhe (Repose) Entführung (Abduction) Amor (Cupid) The cycle of etchings begins at a skating rink in Berlin where Klinger himself is in the ...more...

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Glove One

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Glove One

Glove One is a wearable mobile communications device created by Bryan Cera,[1] a student of the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. The prototype is a 3D-printed wearable "gauntlet", that also functions as a usable cell phone. Glove One was presented at the Peck School of the Arts MA/MFA Thesis Exhibition in April, 2012.[1] Overview Glove One is a wearable cell phone that utilizes numbers on the inside of fingers to dial.[2] Cera says that the “wearable mobile communication device” is also art,[3] and describes it as "a cell phone which, in order to use, one must sacrifice their hand."[4] The parts for Glove One were entirely 3D printed, and used both recycled electronics as well as custom-made circuits.[5] Cera states that plans for constructing a Glove One are in the future.[6] References Bryan Cera's 3D-Printed Glove Doubles as a Cellphone (Video) | Ecouterre Wearable glove is a cell phone made from a 3D printer - AGBeat Cellphone Glove Brings Us One Step Closer to Being Iron Man | PCWorld g ...more...

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Fingerprint powder

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Fingerprint powder

Fingerprint powders are fine powders used in dusting for fingerprints by crime scene investigators and others in law enforcement. The process of dusting for fingerprints involves various methods intended to get the particles of the powder to adhere to residue left by friction ridge skin on the fingers, palms, or feet. Physical development of fingerprints using powders is just one of a selection of methods used to develop fingerprints. Fingerprints often leave residues of oils in the shape of the friction ridges, but the friction ridge skin itself does not secrete oils, and so some fingerprints will only leave a residue of amino acids and other compounds which the powder does not adhere to well. For this reason, 'dusting' is used as part of an array of techniques to develop fingerprints, but is often used on larger areas in a crime scene which cannot be removed for analysis, or cannot be subject to more rigorous analysis for other reasons. Fingerprint powders have various formulations, and the appropriate po ...more...

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Columbo (season 10)

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Columbo (season 10)

The final 14 episodes of Columbo were produced sporadically as a series of specials, spanning 13 years from 1990 to 2003. These episodes have since been released on DVD in several regions as "season 10".[1][2] Two of the episodes, "No Time to Die" and "Undercover", were based on 87th Precinct novels by Ed McBain and thus do not follow the usual Columbo format. Broadcast history The "season" aired different nights of the week on ABC. DVD release The "season" was released on DVD by Universal Home Video. Episodes No. in series No. in season Title Directed by Written by Murderer(s) played by Victim(s) played by Original air date Runtime 56 1 "Columbo Goes to College" E.W. Swackhamer Story by : Jeffrey Bloom and Frederick King KellerTeleplay by : Jeffrey Bloom Stephen Caffrey and Gary Hershberger James Sutorius December 9, 1990 98 minutes Criminology professor D.E. Rusk threatens to expel spoiled fraternity brothers Justin Rowe (Stephen Caffrey) and Cooper Redman (Gary Hershberger) for cheating by stea ...more...

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Forensic science

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Forensic science

Forensic science is the application of science to criminal and civil laws, mainly—on the criminal side—during criminal investigation, as governed by the legal standards of admissible evidence and criminal procedure. Forensic scientists collect, preserve, and analyze scientific evidence during the course of an investigation. While some forensic scientists travel to the scene of the crime to collect the evidence themselves, others occupy a laboratory role, performing analysis on objects brought to them by other individuals.[1] In addition to their laboratory role, forensic scientists testify as expert witnesses in both criminal and civil cases and can work for either the prosecution or the defense. While any field could technically be forensic, certain sections have developed over time to encompass the majority of forensically related cases.[2] Forensic science is the combination of two different Latin words: forensis and science. The former, forensic, relates to a discussion or examination performed in publi ...more...

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Savion Glover

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Savion Glover

Savion Glover (born November 19, 1973) is an American tap dancer, actor, and choreographer. Early life The youngest of three sons, Glover was born to a white father who left the family before Glover's birth and a black mother. Glover's great grandfather on his mother's side, Dick (King Richard) Lundy, was a shortstop in the Negro Leagues. He managed eleven Negro League baseball teams, including the Newark Eagles.[1] His grandfather, Bill Lewis, was a big band pianist and vocalist.[1] His grandmother, Anna Lundy Lewis, was the minister of music at New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, NJ. She played for Whitney Houston when she was singing in the gospel choir. Anna Lundy Lewis was the one who first noticed Savion's musical talent. She once held him and hummed some rhythms to him, and he smiled and joined along.[2] [3] Career Savion states his style is "young and funk." When asked to describe what funk is, he says it is the bass line. "Funk is anything that gets one's head on beat. It is riding with the rhythm. ...more...

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The Mystery of the Invisible Thief

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The Mystery of the Invisible Thief

First edition (publ. Methuen) The Mystery of the Invisible Thief is a novel written by Enid Blyton. It is the 8th in the popular The Five Find-Outers mystery series also known as the Five Find-Outers and Dog. Plot summary The Five Find-Outers are having a chance tea at a local gymkhana with Inspector Jenks and his goddaughter Hilary when a robbery occurs in a nearby large house. The mysterious robber disappears from the scene of the crime without a trace - as if he were invisible and cannot be found. The robbed house turns out to be that of Hilary, so the children have the perfect excuse to investigate as they take the upset girl home. The mysterious thief leaves only a few clues behind - enormous footprints, enormous glove prints, a strange criss-cross mark on the ground, and two torn pieces of paper. The clues do not seem to make any sense. Of all the Peterswood villagers, only policeman Mr Goon and Colonel Cross have feet big enough to fit the footprints, and the thief cannot be either of them. The Fiv ...more...

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Max Klinger

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Max Klinger

Portrait of Max Klinger by Emil Orlik, 1902 Max Klinger (18 February 1857 – 5 July 1920) was a German symbolist painter, sculptor, printmaker, and writer. Klinger was born in Leipzig and studied in Karlsruhe. An admirer of the etchings of Menzel and Goya, he shortly became a skilled and imaginative engraver in his own right. He began creating sculptures in the early 1880s.[1] From 1883–1893 he lived in Rome, and became increasingly influenced by the Italian Renaissance and antiquity.[1] Works Elsa Asenijeff, ca. 1900. His best known work is a series of ten etchings entitled Paraphrase on the Finding of a Glove (printed 1881). These pictures were based on images which came to Klinger in dreams after finding a glove at an ice-skating rink. In the leitmotivic device of a glove—belonging to a woman whose face we never see—Klinger anticipated the research of Freud and Krafft-Ebing on fetish objects. In this case, the glove becomes a symbol for the artist's romantic yearnings, finding itself, in each plat ...more...

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Printmaking

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Printmaking

Mount Fuji, from the Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji, color woodcut by Katsushika Hokusai Rembrandt, Self-portrait, etching, c.1630 Francisco Goya, There is No One To Help Them, Disasters of War series, aquatint c.1810 Printmaking is the process of making artworks by printing, normally on paper. Printmaking normally covers only the process of creating prints that have an element of originality, rather than just being a photographic reproduction of a painting. Except in the case of monotyping, the process is capable of producing multiples of the same piece, which is called a print. Each print produced is not considered a "copy" but rather is considered an "original". This is because typically each print varies to an extent due to variables intrinsic to the printmaking process, and also because the imagery of a print is typically not simply a reproduction of another work but rather is often a unique image designed from the start to be expressed in a particular printmaking technique. A print may be ...more...

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O. J. Simpson murder case

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O. J. Simpson murder case

The O. J. Simpson murder case (officially titled People of the State of California v. Orenthal James Simpson) was a criminal trial held at the Los Angeles County Superior Court in which former National Football League (NFL) player, broadcaster, and actor Orenthal James "O. J." Simpson was tried on two counts of murder for the June 12, 1994, deaths of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman. On June 12, 1994, Nicole and Goldman were found stabbed to death outside Nicole's condominium in the Brentwood area of Los Angeles. Simpson was a person of interest in their murders. Simpson did not turn himself in, and on June 17 he became the object of a low-speed pursuit in a white 1993 Ford Bronco SUV owned and driven by Al Cowlings.[1] TV stations interrupted coverage of the 1994 NBA Finals to broadcast the incident live. The event was watched by an estimated audience of 95 million people.[2] The pursuit, arrest, and trial were among the most widely publicized events in American history. The trial, ...more...

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List of Paranormal State episodes

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List of Paranormal State episodes

This is an episode list of the A&E reality television series Paranormal State. The second column is A&E's episode numbering system from their website. Series overview Season Episodes Premiere Finale 1 20 December 10, 2007 March 24, 2008 2 12 July 28, 2008 October 27, 2008 3 20 January 19, 2009 May 18, 2009 4 12 December 15, 2009 February 9, 2010 5 21 October 17, 2010 May 2, 2011 Season 1 (2007-2008) Episode no. (chronological) Episode no. (produced) Title Original Airdate 101 (1) 14 "Sixth Sense" December 10, 2007 The Paranormal Research Society (PRS) are called in to help a young boy who claims to see dead people. The case strikes a chord with team leader Ryan Buell who says he experienced similar phenomena as a child. 102 (2) 9 "The Name" December 10, 2007 The PRS are called to Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania to help a woman who claims to be experiencing paranormal activity in a home that was the site of brutal murders. It is claimed that an entity taunts Ryan by name du ...more...

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Palm print

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Palm print

A palm print refers to an image acquired of the palm region of the hand. It can be either an online image (i.e. taken by a scanner or CCD) or offline image where the image is taken with ink and paper. The palm itself consists of principal lines, wrinkles (secondary lines), and epidermal ridges. It differs to a fingerprint in that it also contains other information such as texture, indents and marks which can be used when comparing one palm to another. Palm prints can be used for criminal, forensic, or commercial applications. Palm prints, typically from the butt of the palm, are often found at crime scenes as the result of the offender's gloves slipping during the commission of the crime, and thus exposing part of the unprotected hand. References Media related to Palm prints at Wikimedia Commons Zhang, D. (2004). Palmprint Authentication, Kluwer Academic Publishers. Fisher, Barry A.J. Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation. Boca Raton, CRC Press. 2004. ISBN 0-8493-1691-X "FBI — Forensic Spotligh ...more...

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CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (season 3)

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CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (season 3)

The third season of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation premiered on CBS on September 26, 2002 and ended May 15, 2003. The series stars William Petersen and Marg Helgenberger. Plot Grissom begins to suffer from hearing loss ("Inside the Box"), as Catherine faces the possibility of losing her daughter ("Lady Heather's Box") during the third season of CSI. Alongside their team, including Sara Sidle, Warrick Brown, Nick Stokes, and Jim Brass, Willows and Grissom investigate the death of a poker player ("Revenge is Best Served Cold"), the evisceration of a cheerleader ("Let the Seller Beware"), a death at a little persons convention ("A Little Murder"), the overdose of a rock-star ("Abra-Cadaver"), a jewelry heist ("Fight Night"), a mob murder ("Blood Lust"), the discovery of a body covered in fire-ants ("Snuff"), and a drive-by shooting ("Random Acts of Violence"). Meanwhile, the team are faced with their own past when they testify in court ("The Accused is Entitled"), Sara struggles to cope with the psychological t ...more...

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The Glove of Darth Vader

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The Glove of Darth Vader

The Glove of Darth Vader is the first book of the Jedi Prince series by Paul Davids and Hollace Davids, and was released in June 1992. It is preceded by the novel The Truce at Bakura and followed by the second Jedi Prince novel The Lost City of the Jedi. This novel is no longer canon. Summary After the destruction of the second Death Star and the death of the Emperor, the Empire is left without a true leader. The Supreme Prophet Kadann prophesied that the next leader of the Empire would wear the indestructible right hand Glove of Darth Vader, so Imperial senator Timothy Barclay sends Captain Dunwell to find the glove. The Rebel Alliance and the Senate's Planetary Intelligence Network known as SPIN, hoping to find information on the new emperor, send C-3PO and R2-D2 disguised to the planet Kessel. There they discover Grand Moff Hissa introducing Trioculus, who claims to be Palpatine's son, as the heir to Empire. Although he manages to trick his followers by seemingly producing Force lightning, he demands that ...more...

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Resort wear

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Resort wear

Resort wear is a clothing style, as well as a year-round fashion "season". Sometimes known as "cruise wear", it was collections only to very affluent customers who were expected to spend the post-Christmas/New Year's weeks in warm-weather climates. More recently, designers, store buyers, and the media are viewing "resort wear" as a specialized year-round clothing style and fashion season. There are some important reasons for this. Areas such as Las Vegas, Marbella, Bahamas, Palm Beach, San Juan, and the San Barth and the Mustique Islands were holiday destinations, but they are now places of year-round living for more affluent customers. From the spectacular resort destinations of Dubai, South Africa and Thailand, to the Spanish Coast, Costa Rica and the Greek Islands, resort wear popularity is growing and it is not surprising to see Hawaiian shirts being worn on the Mexican Riviera. It has become a cross-cultural style that signifies relaxation, affluence, and appreciation of nature which displays a sense of ...more...

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Hand in Glove (novel)

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Hand in Glove (novel)

Hand in Glove is a detective novel by Ngaio Marsh; it is the twenty-second novel to feature Roderick Alleyn, and was first published in 1962. This story finds its way into an upper society party gone astray into the path of precarious murder. Television Adaptation This novel was adapted for the television series The Inspector Alleyn Mysteries, with Patrick Malahide as Roderick Alleyn in 1994. External links Hand in Glove on IMDb Hand in Glove is a detective novel by Ngaio Marsh; it is the twenty-second novel to feature Roderick Alleyn, and was first published in 1962. This story finds its way into an upper society party gone astray into the path of precarious murder. Television Adaptation This novel was adapted for the television series The Inspector Alleyn Mysteries, with Patrick Malahide as Roderick Alleyn in 1994. External links Hand in Glove on IMDb ...more...

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Like a Velvet Glove Cast in Iron

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Like a Velvet Glove Cast in Iron

Like a Velvet Glove Cast in Iron is a graphic novel by American cartoonist Daniel Clowes. The book follows a rather fantastic and paranoid plot, very different from the stark realism of Clowes' later more widely known Ghost World. It contains nightmarish imagery, including dismemberment, deformed people and animals, and sexual fetishism. Clowes has talked about how the story was inspired by his dreams, as well as a recurring dream of his ex-wife's: A lot of it is just daydreams, where ... I can just have these thoughts that are uncontrolled by common logic, and then I start to see things in a different way. It's sort of the same thing as when you wake up from a long dream and you, for one minute, see the absurdity of the world.[1] The book's title is a quote from the Russ Meyer film Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill![1] (The full line, as delivered by Lori Williams, is "You're cute, like a velvet glove cast in iron. And like a gas chamber, Varla, a real fun gal.") Publication history Like many of Clowes' ext ...more...

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IPhone

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IPhone

iPhone ( EYE-fone) is a line of smartphones designed and marketed by Apple Inc. The iPhone line of products use Apple's iOS mobile operating system software. The first-generation iPhone was released on June 29, 2007, and multiple new hardware iterations with new iOS releases have been released since. The user interface is built around the device's multi-touch screen, including a virtual keyboard. The iPhone has Wi-Fi and can connect to cellular networks. An iPhone can shoot video (though this was not a standard feature until the iPhone 3GS), take photos, play music, send and receive email, browse the web, send and receive text messages, follow GPS navigation, record notes, perform mathematical calculations, and receive visual voicemail. Other functionality, such as video games, reference works, and social networking, can be enabled by downloading mobile apps. As of January 2017, Apple's App Store contained more than 2.2 million applications available for the iPhone. Apple has released eleven generations of ...more...

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George Washington

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George Washington

George Washington (February 22, 1732[b][c] – December 14, 1799) was an American statesman and soldier who served as the first President of the United States from 1789 to 1797. As one of the leading patriots, he was among the new nation's Founding Fathers, and served as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He presided over the 1787 convention. He also came to be known as the "Father of His Country." Washington was born into Colonial Virginia gentry to a family of wealthy planters, vested with tobacco plantations and slaves which he later inherited. He was variously educated and learned mathematics and surveying which he put into practice. Shortly after joining the colonial militia at the start of the French and Indian War he became a senior Virginian officer. He grew in his opposition to Britain’s rule by its Parliament, which allowed no representation from the American colonies yet began to levy direct taxes on them. In 1775, the Second Continental Congress made h ...more...

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Kit (association football)

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Kit (association football)

Pavel Nedvěd pictured in 2006 wearing a typical modern football kit In association football, kit (also referred to as a strip or uniform) is the standard equipment and attire worn by players. The sport's Laws of the Game specify the minimum kit which a player must use, and also prohibit the use of anything that is dangerous to either the player or another participant. Individual competitions may stipulate further restrictions, such as regulating the size of logos displayed on shirts and stating that, in the event of a match between teams with identical or similar colours, the away team must change to different coloured attire. Footballers generally wear identifying numbers on the backs of their shirts. Originally a team of players wore numbers from 1 to 11, corresponding roughly to their playing positions, but at the professional level this has generally been superseded by squad numbering, whereby each player in a squad is allocated a fixed number for the duration of a season. Professional clubs also usual ...more...

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Singer with A Glove

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Singer with A Glove

Edgar Degas, Singer with a Glove, 1878. Singer with A Glove by Edgar Degas, originally titled Chanteuse de Café, la chanteuse au gant, is a pastel drawing on canvas 53.2 x 41 cm from the year 1878. Degas himself was a French artist famous for not only pastels, but his paintings, sculptures, prints, and charcoal drawings as well. This pastel is part of a series of works that have cafe-concert singers as their subject. Degas was a habitué of those places, especially the Cafe des Ambassadeurs, and he uses them as the settings for many of his best works. He is drawn to the dramatic poses of performers and singers, especially when presented, as here, from very close up. Ballet Rehearsal (1873) and The Ballet Class (1874) also depict performers both on stage and in practice. Degas is especially identified with the subject of dance; more than half of his works depict dancers alone. He is regarded as one of the founders of Impressionism, although he rejected the term, and preferred to think of himself as a realist ...more...

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Photographic print toning

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Photographic print toning

A sepia-toned photograph taken in England in 1895 Aerial view of downtown Houston 1977 A digitally sepia-toned image taken in 2007 A digitally sepia-toned image taken in 2011 of the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid In photography, toning is a method of changing the color of black-and-white photographs. In analog photography, it is a chemical process carried out on silver-based photographic prints. This darkroom process cannot be performed with a color photograph. The effects of this process can be emulated with software in digital photography. There is debate whether a toned black-and-white photograph should be considered to still be black-and-white, as simply being monochromatic is not a sufficient condition for an image to count as black-and-white. Chemical toning Most toners work by replacing the metallic silver in the emulsion with a silver compound, such as silver sulfide (AgS) in the case of sepia toning. The compound may be more stable than metallic silver and may also have a differen ...more...

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Farrah Fawcett

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Farrah Fawcett

Farrah Leni Fawcett (originally spelled Ferrah; February 2, 1947 – June 25, 2009) was an American actress, model, and artist. A four-time Emmy Award nominee and six-time Golden Globe Award nominee, Fawcett rose to international fame when she posed for her iconic red swimsuit poster – which became the best selling pin-up poster in history – and starred as private investigator Jill Munroe in the first season of the television series Charlie's Angels (1976–1977). In 1996, she was ranked No. 26 on TV Guide's "50 Greatest TV stars of All-Time".[2] In 1969, Fawcett began her career when she appeared in commercials and guest roles on television. During the 1970s, she appeared in numerous television series, including recurring roles on Harry O (1974–1976), and The Six Million Dollar Man (1974–1978) with her first husband, film and television star Lee Majors. Her breakthrough role came in 1976, when she was cast as Jill Munroe in the ABC series Charlie's Angels, alongside Kate Jackson and Jaclyn Smith. The show prop ...more...

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is a two-part stage play written by Jack Thorne based on an original new story by Thorne, J. K. Rowling and John Tiffany.[1] Previews of the play began at the Palace Theatre, London on 7 June 2016,[2] and it officially premiered on 30 July 2016. The play officially opened on Broadway on 22 April 2018 at the Lyric Theatre, with previews starting on 16 March 2018. Its cast is similar to that of the first year on West End, with returning actors Anthony Boyle, Sam Clemmett, Noma Dumezweni, Poppy Miller, Jamie Parker, Alex Price, and Paul Thornley. The story begins nineteen years after the events of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and follows Harry Potter, now a Ministry of Magic employee, and his younger son Albus Severus Potter, who is about to attend Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. At the 2017 Laurence Olivier Awards, the London production received a record-breaking eleven nominations and an again record-breaking nine awards, including Best New Play, Best Ac ...more...

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The Golden Glove (folk song)

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The Golden Glove (folk song)

The Golden Glove (Roud 141, Laws N20) is an English folk song also popular in Scotland, Ireland and North America. It tells the tale of a young woman who falls in love with a farmer and devises a somewhat far-fetched ruse to win his love. This song is also known as Dog and Gun and The Squire of Tamworth[1] Synopsis A squire is engaged to be married to a nobleman's daughter. A farmer is chosen to "give her away" but when she meets him she falls in love with him. She calls off the wedding, Putting on a man's coat, waistcoat and breeches she goes out hunting with "dog and gun" instead. She ofttimes fired but nothing she killed, Until the young farmer came into the field She asks him why he isn't at the wedding to give the bride away, but he confesses he loves the bride himself. Sometimes at this point the farmer says he would be willing to fight for his love: "I thought you had been at the wedding" she cried, "To wait on the Squi-er and give him his bride." "Oh no," said the farmer, "I'll take sword in ...more...

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The Hand in the Glove

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The Hand in the Glove

The Hand in the Glove (British title Crime on Her Hands) is a Dol Bonner mystery novel by Rex Stout. It was first published by Farrar & Rinehart, Inc., in 1937, and later in paperback by Dell as mapback #177 and, later, by other publishers. Collins Crime Club published the novel in the UK in November 1939 as Crime on Her Hands. Plot summary Theodolinda "Dol" Bonner is half of the Bonner and Raffray Detective Agency. She claims to have been "inoculated against" men and has no use for them, even her perennial suitor, newspaperman Len Chisholm. Her business partner, Sylvia Raffray, doesn't know much about detection but is the firm's financial backer. As the story begins, Len has just been fired from his job at the instigation of Sylvia's guardian, financier P.L. Storrs, who also controls Sylvia's money for the next six months and thus insists that she withdraw her financial support of the detective agency. Strangely, Storrs asks Dol Bonner to join a house party at his place in the country. Other family me ...more...

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Drew Barrymore

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Drew Barrymore

Drew Blythe Barrymore (born February 22, 1975)[3] is an American actress, author, director, model, and producer. She is a member of the Barrymore family of American stage and film actors, and the granddaughter of John Barrymore. She made her breakout role as a child actress in Steven Spielberg's film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982). Following a highly publicized, turbulent childhood marked by drug and alcohol abuse with two stints in rehab,[1][4] she released her autobiography, Little Girl Lost (1991). Barrymore subsequently appeared in a string of successful films, including Poison Ivy (1992), Scream (1996), and Ever After (1998). She has also starred with Adam Sandler in The Wedding Singer (1998), 50 First Dates (2004), and Blended (2014). In 1995, Barrymore and Nancy Juvonen formed a joint production company, Flower Films,[5] and went on to produce several films in which she also starred, such as Never Been Kissed (1999), Charlie's Angels (2000), Donnie Darko (2001), Fever Pitch (2005), Music and Lyric ...more...

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Jack Glover (artist)

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Jack Glover (artist)

Jack Glover is an American artist living and working in Richmond, Virginia. Education Jack Glover went to the John Herron Art Institute and began his life-long concentration on woodcuts at Indiana University Bloomington. "The grain of the wood dictates where a line will go, and you just have to follow it,” he said in an interview by Richmond Magazine. His dyslexia, which reverses letters, offered an advantage as wood blocks must be cut in mirror-image for printing. He developed his own woodcut printmaking technique, which is unusual in the large size of the prints. All of the woodblocks are cut by hand, and the inked impressions are hand-rubbed without the use of a press. Entertainment and other performance venues He participated in the East Virginia Toadsuckers musical ensemble along with Virginia Commonwealth University education professor Howard A. Ozmon Jr. and VCU special education professor Howard Garner. The group's musical virtuosity extended to banjo, guitar, washboard and kazoo played at fairs and ...more...

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Howie Mandel

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Howie Mandel

Howard Michael Mandel (born November 29, 1955) is a Canadian comedian, actor, and television host. He is known as host of the NBC game show Deal or No Deal, as well as the show's daytime and Canadian-English counterparts. In 1987, Mandel starred alongside Amy Steel in the comedy film Walk Like a Man. Before his career as a game show host, Mandel was best known for his role as rowdy ER intern Dr. Wayne Fiscus on the NBC medical drama St. Elsewhere. He is also well known for being the creator and star of the children's cartoon Bobby's World, as well as a judge on NBC's America's Got Talent. Early life Mandel was born and lived in the Willowdale area of Toronto, Ontario. Mandel is Jewish (his ancestors emigrated from Romania and Poland) and a distant cousin to violinist Itzhak Perlman.[1] His father was a lighting manufacturer and a real estate agent.[2] Mandel was expelled from his high school (William Lyon Mackenzie Collegiate Institute[3]) for impersonating a school official and hiring a construction company ...more...

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After the Ball (Tolstoy)

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After the Ball (Tolstoy)

After the Ball (also known as "After the Dance") (Russian: После бала) is a short story by the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, written in the year 1903 and published posthumously in 1911. The short story serves as an example of Tolstoy’s commentary on high culture and social governance, as explored through one man’s experience with love. Background and Publication "After the Ball" was originally entitled "Father and Daughter." Tolstoy then renamed it to "Oh You Say" before settling on "After the Ball".[1] There are semi-autobiographical events in the story. According to Tolstoy, "After the Ball" is based on a series of events that occurred surrounding Tolstoy’s brother, Sergei. Sergei had fallen in love with a woman named Varvara (nicknamed "Varenka") Andreyevna Koreisha, who happened to be the daughter of Commander Andrei Petrovich Koreish. Upon one day witnessing the beating of a runaway soldier under the Commander’s supervision, Sergei’s love quickly faded, and he quickly gave up his intention to marry her.[ ...more...

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Color print film

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Color print film

Color prints have been developed since their beginnings in 1935 with Eastman Kodak’s Company’s Kodachrome film, as well in 1936 with Agfa Company’s Agfacolor film.[1] Color print film is the most common type of photographic film in consumer use. Print film produces a negative image when it is developed, requiring it to be reversed again when it is printed onto photographic paper. Almost all color print film made today is designed to be processed according to the C-41 process. Handling color print film negatives Color negatives are prone to damage through fingerprints and tears, therefore it is a good idea to wear nylon or cotton gloves when handling them and placing them in negative sleeves. Avoid bending, folding or rolling up your negatives sleeves as well. Preserving the prints from a color print film Generally, color prints are more sensitive to temperature and light as opposed to black and white film, therefore there are more precautions to take when trying to protect and optimize the lifespan of them ...more...

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Colony (TV series)

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Colony (TV series)

Colony is an American science-fiction drama television series created by Carlton Cuse and Ryan J. Condal, starring Josh Holloway and Sarah Wayne Callies.[3] A 10-episode first season premiered with an online preview release of the first episode on USA Network's website on December 15, 2015, following the launch of a game-like website[4] to promote the show. The series had its broadcast premiere on USA Network on January 14, 2016.[5] In April 2017, Colony was renewed for a third season which premiered on May 2, 2018.[6][7] Setting In a dystopian near-future Los Angeles, residents live under a regime of military occupation by an organization known as the Transitional Authority. The Authority serves an extraterrestrial group referred to as the "Hosts", about whom little is known. The symbol of the collaborating forces features stylized birds of prey, or raptors, which gives rise to their nickname, the "Raps". The Authority enforces Host policy via militarized police called Homeland Security and nicknamed the "R ...more...

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Carol Danvers

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Carol Danvers

Carol Susan Jane Danvers is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer Roy Thomas and artist Gene Colan, Danvers first appeared as an officer in the United States Air Force and a colleague of the Kree superhero Mar-Vell in Marvel Super-Heroes #13 (March 1968) and later became the first incarnation of Ms. Marvel in Ms. Marvel #1 (cover-dated Jan. 1977) after her DNA was fused with Mar-Vell's during an explosion, giving her superhuman powers. Debuting in the Silver Age of comics, the character was featured in a self-titled series in the late 1970s before becoming associated with the superhero teams the Avengers and the X-Men. The character has also been known as Binary, Warbird and Captain Marvel at various points in her history, and has been featured in other Marvel licensed products including video games, animated television series, and merchandise such as trading cards. Carol Danvers has been labeled "Marvel's biggest female hero"[1] and "quite poss ...more...

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Gina Rodriguez

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Gina Rodriguez

Gina Alexis Rodriguez[1] (born July 30, 1984)[2][3] is an actress, model, writer, producer, and director of Puerto Rican descent. She began her career in theater productions and made her screen debut in an episode of Law & Order. Her breakthrough came in 2012, in the independent musical-drama film Filly Brown. In 2014, Rodriguez began starring as Jane Villanueva in The CW comedy-drama series Jane the Virgin, for which she has been nominated for three Golden Globe Awards for Best Actress in a Television Series Musical or Comedy, winning once in 2015.[4] She has gone on to star in the disaster film Deepwater Horizon (2016) and science fiction horror film Annihilation (2018). Early years Gina Alexis Rodriguez was born in Chicago, Illinois, the youngest daughter of Puerto Rican[5] parents: Magali and Genaro Rodríguez, a boxing referee.[6][7] She is the youngest of three sisters.[8] She was raised in the Belmont Cragin neighborhood on Chicago's Northwest Side.[9][10] At the age of seven, Rodriguez performed ...more...

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Margot Kidder

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Margot Kidder

Margaret Ruth Kidder (October 17, 1948 – May 13, 2018), professionally known as Margot Kidder, was a Canadian-American actress and activist. She rose to fame in 1978 for her role as Lois Lane in the Superman film series, alongside Christopher Reeve. Kidder began her career in the 1960s appearing in low-budget Canadian films and television series, before landing a lead role in Quackser Fortune Has a Cousin in the Bronx (1970). She then played twins in Brian De Palma's cult thriller Sisters (1973), a sorority student in the slasher film Black Christmas (1974) and the titular character's girlfriend in the drama The Great Waldo Pepper (1975), opposite Robert Redford. Her performance as Kathy Lutz in the blockbuster horror film The Amityville Horror (1979) gained her further mainstream exposure. By the late 1980s, Kidder's career began to slow. In 1996, she had a highly publicized manic episode and nervous breakdown. By the 2000s, she maintained steady work in independent films and television, with guest-starrin ...more...

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List of Universal Pictures films

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List of Universal Pictures films

This is a list of films produced or distributed by Universal Pictures, founded in 1912 as the Universal Film Manufacturing Company. It is the main motion picture production and distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBCUniversal division of Comcast. 1910s Poster for Ivanhoe (1913) Poster for Traffic in Souls (1913) Poster for Back to Life (1913) Ad for The Garden of Lies (1915) Poster for Homage (1915) Poster for The Three Godfathers (1916) Ad for The Mark of Cain (1916) Ad for the serial Liberty (1916) Ad for The Measure of a Man (1916) Ad for The Right to Be Happy (1916) Poster for The Scarlet Drop (1918) Lobby card for Danger, Go Slow (1918) Poster for The Ace of the Saddle (1919) Poster for The Great Air Robbery (1919) Release date Title Notes June 24, 1912 Dawn of Netta, TheThe Dawn of Netta First Universal picture, directed by Tom Ricketts[1][2]:11 August 14, 1912 Sally Scraggs, Housemaid [3] October 28, 1912 Sue [3] October ...more...

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List of Saint Tail episodes

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List of Saint Tail episodes

The following is a list of episodes for the anime show, Saint Tail. All original airdates are the dates of original airing in Japan. Title Target Item Notice Method Original Airdate Episode # "The Cutest Little Thief! She Will Steal Your Heart!" (登場! キュートな大泥棒!? あなたのハート盗みます. "Tōjō! Kyūto na Daidorobō!? Anata no Hāto Nusumimasu.") "Blue Meteorite" gemstone October 12, 1995 1 A string of thefts convinces Asuka Jr. that Saint Tail is behind them. "Wonderful Rival: Asuka Jr." (素敵なライバル! アスカJr. "Suteki na Raibaru! Asuka Jr.") "Electra" tiara Written on the side of Saint Tail's balloons. October 12, 1995 2 A notice by Saint Tail to Asuka Jr. starts rumors of the two working together. Special October 12, 1995 It's the autumn of reading, but Meimi and Seira are disrupted when a hot sweet potato vendor drives by. Meimi sets out to buy snacks for herself and her friend when Asuka Jr. shows up. "Meimi's Love!?" (芽美の恋人はハリネズミ!? "Meimi no Koibito wa Harinezumi!?") "Polar Tear" diamond Written on a not ...more...



Michael Jackson

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Michael Jackson

Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958 – June 25, 2009) was an American singer, songwriter, and dancer. Dubbed the "King of Pop", he was one of the most popular entertainers in the world, and was the best-selling music artist during the year of his death.[1][2] Jackson's contributions to music, dance, and fashion[3][4][5] along with his publicized personal life made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades. The eighth child of the Jackson family, Michael made his professional debut in 1964 with his elder brothers Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, and Marlon as a member of the Jackson 5. He began his solo career in 1971 while at Motown Records. In the early 1980s, Jackson became a dominant figure in popular music. His music videos, including those of "Beat It", "Billie Jean", and "Thriller" from his 1982 album Thriller, are credited with breaking racial barriers and transforming the medium into an art form and promotional tool. The popularity of these videos helped bring the television channel MTV ...more...

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Pablo Picasso

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Pablo Picasso

Pablo Ruiz Picasso (;[2] Spanish: ; 25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture,[3][4] the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907), and Guernica (1937), a dramatic portrayal of the bombing of Guernica by the German and Italian airforces. Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas. After 1906, the Fauvist work of the slightly older artist Henri Matisse motivated Picasso t ...more...

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New York City

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.[9] With an estimated 2017 population of 8,622,698[7] distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2),[10][11] New York City is also the most densely populated major city in the United States.[12] Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass[13] and one of the world's most populous megacities,[14][15] with an estimated 20,320,876 people in its 2017 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 23,876,155 residents in its Combined Statistical Area.[4][5] A global power city,[16] New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital[17][18] of the world,[19][20][21][22][23] and exerts a significant impact upon commerce,[23] entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, and sports. The city's fast pace[24][25] defi ...more...

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History of the FIFA World Cup

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History of the FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup was first held in 1930, when FIFA president Jules Rimet decided to stage an international football tournament. The inaugural edition, held in 1930, was contested as a final tournament of only thirteen teams invited by the organization. Since then, the World Cup has experienced successive expansions and format remodeling to its current 32-team final tournament preceded by a two-year qualifying process, involving over 200 teams from around the world. The first official international football match was played in 1872 in Glasgow between Scotland and England,[1] although at this stage the sport was rarely played outside Great Britain. By 1900, however, football had gained ground all around the world and national football associations were being founded. The first official international match outside the British Isles was played between Uruguay and Argentina in Montevideo in July 1902.[2] FIFA was founded in Paris on 22 May 1904 – comprising football associations from France, Belgium (the prece ...more...

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