Criticism of Microsoft Windows

The various versions of Microsoft's desktop operating system, Windows, have received many criticisms since Microsoft's inception.

Patch time

In 2010, Google engineer Tavis Ormandy criticized Microsoft for taking too long to patch (fix) a reported security vulnerability in the Windows virtual DOS machine (VDM), which was patched 7 months after Mr. Ormandy reported it to Microsoft.[1] In 2004, Marc Maiffret, chief hacking officer for security research firm eEye Digital Security, had criticized Microsoft for providing a security patch for the Windows ASN.1 implementation only after 200 days.[2]

Digital rights management

Right after the release of Windows Vista, computer scientist Peter Gutmann criticised the digital rights management (DRM) that had been included in Microsoft Windows to allow content providers to place restrictions on certain types of multimedia playback. He collected the criticism in a write-up he released in which he stated that:[3]

  • The DRM could inadvertently disable functionality.
  • A hardware functionality scan requirement could potentially shut out open-source hardware.
  • The hardware architecture made unified drivers impossible.
  • Some drivers were buggy.
  • If one driver was found to be leaking content, Microsoft could remotely shut that driver down for all computers that used it, leading to denial of service problems.
  • The DRM decreased system reliability and increased hardware costs.
  • Software makers had to license unnecessary third-party intellectual property, increasing the costs for their drivers.
  • The DRM consumed too much CPU and device resources.

The analysis drew responses from Microsoft,[4] where Microsoft states some of the criticized DRM features were already present in Windows XP, and thus a new problem for customers and that these problematic features would only be activated when required by the content being played. Other responses came from George Ou of ZDNet[5][6] and Ed Bott of ZDNet.[7] Ed Bott also published a three-part rebuttal[8][9][10] of Peter Gutmann's claims in which he details a number of factual errors in the analysis and criticizes Gutmann's reliance on questionable sources (personal blog postings, friends' anecdotal evidence, Google searches) for his analysis paper and that Gutmann never tested his theories himself.

For Windows 7, allegations were also made about "draconian DRM" which spurred a debate and criticism on the website Slashdot. As with the claims about the overreaching Vista DRM, independent tech writers quickly dismissed the claims as faulty analysis. The actual problem which spurred the criticism turned out to be an unrelated problem experienced by a single user who tried to circumvent Adobe Creative Suite copy protection mechanisms by changing files. When it failed to work the user concluded that it had to be the "draconian DRM" of Windows.[11]

Integration of Internet Explorer into Windows

Windows is criticized for having the Internet Explorer web browser integrated into the Windows shell from Windows 98 onwards. Previously Internet Explorer was shipped as a separate application.[12] One problem was that since the Explorer cannot be easily replaced with a product of another vendor, this undermines consumer choice.[13] This issue precipitated concerns that Microsoft engages in monopolistic practices and resulted in the United States v. Microsoft Corp. court case, which was eventually settled out of court.

Another issue with the integration was that security vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer also create security vulnerabilities in Windows, which could allow an attacker to exploit Windows with remote code execution.[14]

In January 2009, the European Commission started to investigate Microsoft's bundling of Internet Explorer into Windows; the Commission stated: "Microsoft's tying of Internet Explorer to the Windows operating system harms competition between web browsers, undermines product innovation and ultimately reduces consumer choice."[15] The European Commission and Microsoft eventually agreed that Microsoft would include a web browser choice selection screen to Windows users in the European Economic Area, by means of BrowserChoice.eu.[16]

Windows rot

Google, a Microsoft competitor, has criticized Windows for becoming slower and less reliable over long term use.[17]

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes, writing for ZDNet, believes that the slow-down over time[18] is due to loading too much software, loading duplicate software, installing too much free/trial/beta software, using old, outdated or incorrect drivers, installing new drivers without uninstalling the old ones and may also be due to malware and spyware.[19]

NSA backdoor allegations

In 1999 Andrew Fernandez, chief scientist with Cryptonym of Morrisville, North Carolina found a cryptographic public key stored in the variable _KEY and a second key labeled NSAKEY.[20] The discovery lead to a flurry of speculation and conspiracy theories; such as the second key could be owned by the United States National Security Agency (the NSA), and that it could allow the intelligence agency to subvert any Windows user's security. Also researcher Dr. Nicko van Someren discovered these cryptographic keys and a third key in the ADVAPI.DLL file[21] which, at that time, existed in Windows 2000 before its release. Concerns were raised about CPUs with encrypted instruction sets which, if they existed during that time, would have made it impossible to discover the cryptographic keys.[21]

Microsoft denied the allegations[22] — Microsoft attributes the naming of the key was due to a technical review by the NSA pointing out a backup key was required to conform to regulations.[23]

No evidence other than the name of the key has ever been presented that the key enabled a backdoor.

Cryptographer and computer security specialist Bruce Schneier has also argued against the conspiracy theory[24] pointing out that if the NSA wanted a back door into Windows with Microsoft's consent, they would not need their own cryptographic key to do so.

The cryptographic keys have been included in all versions of Windows from Windows 95 OSR2 onwards.[21]

Data collection

Concerns were shown by advocates and other critics for Windows 10's privacy policies and its collection and use of customer data.[25] Under the default "Express" settings, Windows 10 is configured to send various information to Microsoft and other parties, including the collection of user contacts, calendar data, and "associated input data" to personalize "speech, typing, and inking input", typing and inking data to improve recognition, allow apps to use a unique "advertising ID" for analytics and advertising personalization (functionality introduced by Windows 8.1)[26] and allow apps to request the user's location data and send this data to Microsoft and "trusted partners" to improve location detection (Windows 8 had similar settings, except that location data collection did not include "trusted partners"). Users can opt out from most of this data collection,[25][27] but telemetry data for error reporting and usage is also sent to Microsoft, and this cannot be disabled on non-Enterprise versions of Windows 10.[27] The use of Cortana intelligent personal assistant also requires the collection of data "such as your device location, data from your calendar, the apps you use, data from your emails and text messages, who you call, your contacts and how often you interact with them on your device” to personalize its functionality.[25][28]

Rock Paper Shotgun writer Alec Meer argued that Microsoft's intent for this data collection lacked transparency, stating that "there is no world in which 45 pages of policy documents and opt-out settings split across 13 different Settings screens and an external website constitutes 'real transparency'."[25] ExtremeTech pointed out that, whilst previously campaigning against Google for similar data collection strategies, "[Microsoft] now hoovers up your data in ways that would make Google jealous."[27] However, it was also pointed out that the requirement for such vast usage of customer data had become a norm, citing the increased reliance on cloud computing and other forms of external processing, as well as similar data collection requirements for services on mobile devices such as Google Now and Siri.[25][28] In August 2015, Russian politician Nikolai Levichev called for Windows 10 to be banned from use by the Russian government, as it sends user data to servers in the United States (a federal law requiring all online services to store the data of Russian users on servers within the country, or be blocked, has taken effect September 2016).[29][30][31]

Following the release of 10, allegations also surfaced that Microsoft had backported the operating system's increased data collection to Windows 7 and Windows 8 via "recommended" patches that added additional "telemetry" features. The updates' addition of a "Diagnostics Tracking Service" is connected specifically to Microsoft's existing Customer Experience Improvement Program (which is an opt-in program that sends additional diagnostic information to Microsoft for addressing issues), and the Application Insights service for third-party software.[32]

The data collection functionality is capable of transmitting personal information, browsing history, the contents of emails, chat, video calls, voice mail, photos, documents, personal files[33] and keystrokes to Microsoft, for analysis, in accordance with the End User License Agreement.[34] The terms of services agreement from Microsoft was updated to state the following:[33]

See also
References
  1. "Microsoft confirms 17-year-old Windows bug". 21 January 2010.
  2. "200 days to fix a broken Windows". 13 February 2004.
  3. "A Cost Analysis of Windows Vista Content Protection". Retrieved 24 January 2011.
  4. "Windows Vista Content Protection - Twenty Questions (and Answers)". Microsoft. Retrieved 20 November 2011.
  5. Ou, George. "Does DRM really limit Vista?". ZDNet. Retrieved 20 November 2011.
  6. Ou, George. "Claim that Vista DRM causes full CPU load and global warming debunked!". ZDNet. Retrieved 20 November 2011.
  7. Bott, Ed. "Busting the FUD about Vista's DRM". ZDNet. Retrieved 20 November 2011.
  8. Bott, Ed. "Everything you've read about Vista DRM is wrong (Part 1)". Everything you've read about Vista DRM is wrong. ZDNet. Retrieved 20 November 2011.
  9. Bott, Ed. "Everything you've read about Vista DRM is wrong (Part 2)". Everything you've read about Vista DRM is wrong. ZDNet. Retrieved 20 November 2011.
  10. Bott, Ed. "Everything you've read about Vista DRM is wrong (Part 3)". Everything you've read about Vista DRM is wrong. ZDNet. Retrieved 20 November 2011.
  11. "Oh, the humanity: Windows 7's draconian DRM?". Ars Technica. Retrieved 20 November 2011.
  12. Karp, David A. Windows 98 Annoyances. O'Reilly Media, Inc. p. 326. ISBN 978-1-56592-417-8.
  13. Chandrasekaran, Rajiv; Corcoran, Elizabeth (21 October 1997). "U.S. Says Microsoft Violates Antitrust Pact". Washington Post. Retrieved 27 January 2012.
  14. Manion, Art (9 June 2004). "Vulnerability Note VU#713878". US-CERT. Retrieved 7 April 2006. There are a number of significant vulnerabilities in technologies relating to the IE domain/zone security model, local file system (Local Machine Zone) trust, the Dynamic HTML (DHTML) document object model (in particular, proprietary DHTML features), the HTML Help system, MIME type determination, the graphical user interface (GUI), and ActiveX. … IE is integrated into Windows to such an extent that vulnerabilities in IE frequently provide an attacker significant access to the operating system.
  15. "Microsoft is accused by EU again". BBC News. 17 January 2009. Retrieved 14 July 2011.
  16. "Microsoft Statement on European Commission Decision". 16 December 2009. Retrieved 10 January 2012.
  17. Keyzer, Greg (2011). "Google's Top Five Jabs at Microsoft". Computer World. PC World. Retrieved 27 January 2012.
  18. "Optimize Windows 7 for better performance". Retrieved 16 March 2012.
  19. "Windows bit-rot - fact or fiction?". 12 January 2009. Retrieved 2 December 2011.
  20. "Microsoft, the NSA, and You". Cryptonym. 31 August 1999. Archived from the original on 17 June 2000. Retrieved 7 January 2007. (Internet Archive / Wayback Machine)
  21. "How NSA access was built into Windows". 4 September 1999. Retrieved 16 March 2012. Date of that page is either 4 September 1999 or 9 April 1999, due to differences with American and European date formats.
  22. "Microsoft Says Speculation About Security and NSA is "Inaccurate and Unfounded"" (Press release). Microsoft Corp. 3 September 1999. Retrieved 9 November 2006.
  23. "There is no "Back Door" in Windows". 3 September 1999. Archived from the original on 20 May 2000.
  24. Schneier, Bruce. "NSA Key in Microsoft Crypto API?". Retrieved 6 January 2012.
  25. "Windows 10: Microsoft under attack over privacy". The Guardian. London. 1 August 2015. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  26. "Microsoft makes new ad platform SDKs available for Windows 8.1 to help Store developers monetize their apps". The Next Web. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  27. "Windows 10s default privacy settings and controls leave much to be desired". ExtremeTech. Retrieved 31 July 2015.
  28. "Windows 10s privacy policy is the new normal". Ars Technica. Retrieved 9 August 2015.
  29. "Facebook, Gmail, Skype face Russia ban under 'anti-terror' plan". CNET. 23 July 2014. Retrieved 24 July 2014.
  30. "Russian MPs back law on internet data storage". BBC News. Retrieved 24 July 2014.
  31. "Senior Russian lawmaker seeks ban on Windows 10 in state agencies". RT. Retrieved 23 August 2015.
  32. "Microsoft accused of adding spy features to Windows 7, 8". Ars Technica. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  33. "Windows 10: how much of my personal information can Microsoft access?". 5 August 2015. Retrieved 19 May 2016.
  34. "Microsoft Admits Windows 10 Automatic Spying Cannot Be Stopped", Forbes, 2 November 2015, retrieved 19 May 2016
Continue Reading...
Content from Wikipedia Licensed under CC-BY-SA.

Criticism of Microsoft Windows

topic

Criticism of Microsoft Windows

The various versions of Microsoft's desktop operating system, Windows, have received many criticisms since Microsoft's inception. Patch time In 2010, Google engineer Tavis Ormandy criticized Microsoft for taking too long to patch (fix) a reported security vulnerability in the Windows virtual DOS machine (VDM), which was patched 7 months after Mr. Ormandy reported it to Microsoft.[1] In 2004, Marc Maiffret, chief hacking officer for security research firm eEye Digital Security, had criticized Microsoft for providing a security patch for the Windows ASN.1 implementation only after 200 days.[2] Digital rights management Right after the release of Windows Vista, computer scientist Peter Gutmann criticised the digital rights management (DRM) that had been included in Microsoft Windows to allow content providers to place restrictions on certain types of multimedia playback. He collected the criticism in a write-up he released in which he stated that:[3] The DRM could inadvertently disable functionality. A ha ...more...

Member feedback about Criticism of Microsoft Windows:

Microsoft Windows

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Criticism of Microsoft

topic

Criticism of Microsoft

Criticism of Microsoft has followed various aspects of its products and business practices. Issues with ease of use, robustness, and security of the company's software are common targets for critics. In the 2000s, a number of malware mishaps targeted security flaws in Microsoft Windows and other products. Microsoft was also accused of locking vendors and consumers in to their products, and of not following or complying with existing standards in its software.[1][2] Total cost of ownership comparisons between Linux and Microsoft Windows are a continuous point of debate.[3] The company has been the subject of numerous lawsuits, brought by several governments and by other companies, for unlawful monopolistic practices. In 2004, the European Union found Microsoft guilty in the European Union Microsoft competition case. Additionally, EULAs for Microsoft programs are often criticized for being too restrictive.[4] Vendor lock-in From its inception, Microsoft defined itself as a platform company and understood the ...more...

Member feedback about Criticism of Microsoft:

Criticisms of software and websites

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows 7

topic

Windows 7

Windows 7 (codenamed Vienna, formerly Blackcomb[7]) is a personal computer operating system developed by Microsoft. It is a part of the Windows NT family of operating systems. Windows 7 was released to manufacturing on July 22, 2009 and became generally available on October 22, 2009,[8] less than three years after the release of its predecessor, Windows Vista. Windows 7's server counterpart, Windows Server 2008 R2, was released at the same time. Windows 7 was primarily intended to be an incremental upgrade to the operating system, intended to address Windows Vista's poor critical reception while maintaining hardware and software compatibility. Windows 7 continued improvements on Windows Aero (the user interface introduced in Windows Vista) with the addition of a redesigned taskbar that allows applications to be "pinned" to it, and new window management features. Other new features were added to the operating system, including libraries, the new file sharing system HomeGroup, and support for multitouch input. ...more...

Member feedback about Windows 7:

IA-32 operating systems

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Microsoft Windows

topic

Microsoft Windows

Microsoft Windows is a group of several graphical operating system families, all of which are developed, marketed, and sold by Microsoft. Each family caters to a certain sector of the computing industry. Active Windows families include Windows NT and Windows Embedded; these may encompass subfamilies, e.g. Windows Embedded Compact (Windows CE) or Windows Server. Defunct Windows families include Windows 9x, Windows Mobile and Windows Phone. Microsoft introduced an operating environment named Windows on November 20, 1985, as a graphical operating system shell for MS-DOS in response to the growing interest in graphical user interfaces (GUIs).[5] Microsoft Windows came to dominate the world's personal computer (PC) market with over 90% market share, overtaking Mac OS, which had been introduced in 1984. Apple came to see Windows as an unfair encroachment on their innovation in GUI development as implemented on products such as the Lisa and Macintosh (eventually settled in court in Microsoft's favor in 1993). On PC ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft Windows:

1985 software

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Criticism of Windows 10

topic

Criticism of Windows 10

Windows 10, an operating system released by Microsoft in July 2015, has been criticized by reviewers and users. Due to issues mostly about privacy, it has been the subject of a number of negative assessments by various groups. General criticism Critics have noted that Windows 10 heavily emphasizes freemium services, and contains various advertising facilities. Some outlets have considered these to be a hidden "cost" of the free upgrade offer.[1][2][3] Examples include media storefronts, Office 365, paid functionality in bundled games such as Microsoft Solitaire Collection,[4][1][5][6] default settings that display promotions of "suggested" apps in Start menu and "tips" on the lock screen that may contain advertising,[2][3] ads displayed in File Explorer for Office 365 subscriptions on Redstone 2 builds,[3] and notifications promoting the Microsoft Edge web browser when a different browser is set as default.[7] Update system Windows 10 Home is permanently set to download all updates automatically, includin ...more...

Member feedback about Criticism of Windows 10:

Microsoft criticisms and controversies

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Outlook.com

topic

Outlook.com

Outlook.com is a web-based suite of webmail, contacts, tasks, and calendaring services from Microsoft. One of the world's first webmail services,[3] it was founded in 1996 as Hotmail (stylized as HoTMaiL) by Sabeer Bhatia and Jack Smith in Mountain View, California, and headquartered in Sunnyvale.[4][5] Microsoft acquired Hotmail in 1997 for an estimated $400 million, calling it MSN Hotmail, later rebranded to Windows Live Hotmail as part of the Windows Live suite of products.[2][6] Microsoft released the final version of Hotmail in October 2011, available in 36 languages.[7][8][9] It was replaced by Microsoft's Outlook.com in 2013. History Launch of Hotmail Hotmail service was founded by Sabeer Bhatia[10] and Jack Smith, and was one of the first webmail services on the Internet along with Four11's RocketMail (later Yahoo! Mail). It was commercially launched on July 4, 1996, symbolizing "freedom" from ISP-based email[11] and the ability to access a user's inbox from anywhere in the world. The name "Hotmail" ...more...

Member feedback about Outlook.com:

Webmail

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows 8

topic

Windows 8

Windows 8 is a personal computer operating system developed by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems. Development of Windows 8 started before the release of its predecessor, Windows 7, in 2009. It was announced at CES 2011, and followed by the release of three pre-release versions from September 2011 to May 2012. The operating system was released to manufacturing on August 1, 2012, and was released for general availability on October 26, 2012.[5] Windows 8 introduced major changes to the operating system's platform and user interface to improve its user experience on tablets, where Windows was now competing with mobile operating systems, including Android and iOS.[6] In particular, these changes included a touch-optimized Windows shell based on Microsoft's "Metro" design language, the Start screen (which displays programs and dynamically updated content on a grid of tiles), a new platform for developing "apps" with an emphasis on touchscreen input, integration with online services ( ...more...

Member feedback about Windows 8:

IA-32 operating systems

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows 10

topic

Windows 10

Windows 10 is a series of personal computer operating systems developed and released by Microsoft, as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems. It was released on July 29, 2015.[9] Windows 10 receives new releases on an ongoing basis, which are available at no additional cost to users. Devices in enterprise environments can receive these updates at a slower pace, or use long-term support milestones that only receive critical updates, such as security patches, over their ten-year lifespan of extended support.[10][11] Windows 10 introduces what Microsoft described as "universal apps"; expanding on Metro-style apps, these apps can be designed to run across multiple Microsoft product families with nearly identical code‍—‌including PCs, tablets, smartphones, embedded systems, Xbox One, Surface Hub and Mixed Reality. The Windows user interface was revised to handle transitions between a mouse-oriented interface and a touchscreen-optimized interface based on available input devices‍—‌particularly on 2-in- ...more...

Member feedback about Windows 10:

Windows 10

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Microsoft Office

topic

Microsoft Office

Microsoft Office is a family of client software, server software, and services developed by Microsoft. It was first announced by Bill Gates on 1 August 1988, at COMDEX in Las Vegas. Initially a marketing term for an office suite (bundled set of productivity applications), the first version of Office contained Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft PowerPoint. Over the years, Office applications have grown substantially closer with shared features such as a common spell checker, OLE data integration and Visual Basic for Applications scripting language. Microsoft also positions Office as a development platform for line-of-business software under the Office Business Applications brand. On 10 July 2012, Softpedia reported that Office is used by over a billion people worldwide.[3] Office is produced in several versions targeted towards different end-users and computing environments. The original, and most widely used version, is the desktop version, available for PCs running the Windows and macOS operatin ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft Office:

1989 software

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Windows Vista

topic

Windows Vista

Windows Vista (codenamed Longhorn[7]) is an operating system by Microsoft for use on personal computers, including home and business desktops, laptops, tablet PCs and media center PCs. Development was completed on November 8, 2006,[2] and over the following three months, it was released in stages to computer hardware and software manufacturers, business customers and retail channels. On January 30, 2007, it was released worldwide[3] and was made available for purchase and download from the Windows Marketplace.[8] The release of Windows Vista came more than five years after the introduction of its predecessor, Windows XP, the longest time span between successive releases of Microsoft Windows desktop operating systems. New features of Windows Vista include an updated graphical user interface and visual style dubbed Aero, a new search component called Windows Search, redesigned networking, audio, print and display sub-systems, and new multimedia tools such as Windows DVD Maker. Vista aimed to increase the level ...more...

Member feedback about Windows Vista:

IA-32 operating systems

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Windows 1.0

topic

Windows 1.0

Windows 1.0 is a graphical personal computer operating environment developed by Microsoft. Microsoft had worked with Apple Computer to develop applications for Apple's January 1984 original Macintosh, the first mass-produced personal computer with a graphical user interface (GUI) that enabled users to see user friendly icons on screen. Windows 1.0 was released on November 20, 1985, as the first version of the Microsoft Windows line. It runs as a graphical, 16-bit multi-tasking shell on top of an existing MS-DOS installation. It provides an environment which can run graphical programs designed for Windows, as well as existing MS-DOS software. Its development was spearheaded by the company founder Bill Gates after he saw a demonstration of a similar software suite known as Visi On at COMDEX. Despite positive responses to its early presentations and support from a number of hardware and software makers, Windows 1.0 was received poorly by critics. Critics felt Windows 1.0 did not meet their expectations. In part ...more...

Member feedback about Windows 1.0:

1985 software

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User

Stuff

(dmyers2099)

Revolvy User


Windows 10 version history

topic

Windows 10 version history

Windows 10 is an operating system developed by Microsoft. Microsoft described Windows 10 as an "operating system as a service" that would receive ongoing updates to its features and functionality, augmented with the ability for enterprise environments to receive non-critical updates at a slower pace, or use long-term support milestones that will only receive critical updates, such as security patches, over their five-year lifespan of mainstream support. Terry Myerson, executive vice president of Microsoft's Windows and Devices Group, said that the goal of this model was to reduce fragmentation across the Windows platform.[1] Rings Overview Version Code name Marketing name Release date Support until Latest build SAC Home Pro SAC Ent Edu LTSC Mobile PC Mobile 1507 Threshold 1 N/A July 29, 2015 May 9, 2017 May 9, 2017 October 14, 2025 N/A Older version, yet still supported: 10240 N/A 1511 Threshold 2 November Update November 10, 2015 October 10, 2017 April 10, 2 ...more...

Member feedback about Windows 10 version history:

Windows 10

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Criticism of Windows XP

topic

Criticism of Windows XP

Criticism of Windows XP deals with issues with security, performance and the presence of product activation errors that are specific to the Microsoft operating system Windows XP. Security issues Windows XP has been criticized for its vulnerabilities due to buffer overflows and its susceptibility to malware such as viruses, trojan horses, and worms. Nicholas Petreley for The Register notes that "Windows XP was the first version of Windows to reflect a serious effort to isolate users from the system, so that users each have their own private files and limited system privileges."[1] However, users by default receive an administrator account that provides unrestricted access to the underpinnings of the system. If the administrator's account is compromised, there is no limit to the control that can be asserted over the PC. Windows XP Home Edition also lacks the ability to administer security policies and denies access to the Local Users and Groups utility. Microsoft executives have stated that the release of se ...more...

Member feedback about Criticism of Windows XP:

Microsoft criticisms and controversies

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Microsoft Windows version history

topic

Microsoft Windows version history

Microsoft Windows was announced by Bill Gates on November 10, 1983.[1] Microsoft introduced Windows as a graphical user interface for MS-DOS, which had been introduced a couple of years earlier. In the 1990s, the product line evolved from an operating environment into a fully complete, modern operating system over two lines of development, each with their own separate codebase. The first versions of Windows (1.0 through to 3.11) were graphical shells that run from MS-DOS; later on, Windows 95, though still being based on MS-DOS, was its own operating system, using a 16-bit DOS-based kernel and a 32-bit user space. Windows 95 introduced many features that have been part of the product ever since, including the Start menu, the taskbar, and Windows Explorer (renamed File Explorer in Windows 8). In 1997, Microsoft released Internet Explorer 4 which included the (at the time) controversial Windows Desktop Update. It aimed to integrate Internet Explorer and the web into the user interface and also brought many new ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft Windows version history:

History of software

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows 8.1

topic

Windows 8.1

Windows 8.1 (codenamed Blue) is a computer operating system released by Microsoft. First unveiled and released as a public beta in June 2013, it was released to manufacturing on August 27, 2013, and reached general availability on October 17, 2013, almost a year after the retail release of its predecessor. Windows 8.1 is available free of charge for retail copies of Windows 8 and Windows RT users via the Windows Store. Unlike service packs on previous versions of Windows, users who obtained Windows 8 outside of retail copies or pre-loaded installations (i.e., volume licensing) must obtain Windows 8.1 through new installation media from their respective subscription or enterprise channel. Microsoft's support lifecycle policy treats Windows 8.1 similar to previous service packs of Windows: It is part of Windows 8's support lifecycle, and installing Windows 8.1 is required to maintain access to support and Windows updates after January 12, 2016. However, unlike previous service packs, Windows 8.1 cannot be acqui ...more...

Member feedback about Windows 8.1:

IA-32 operating systems

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Microsoft Word

topic

Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word (or simply Word) is a word processor developed by Microsoft. It was first released on October 25, 1983[4] under the name Multi-Tool Word for Xenix systems.[5][6][7] Subsequent versions were later written for several other platforms including IBM PCs running DOS (1983), Apple Macintosh running the Classic Mac OS (1985), AT&T Unix PC (1985), Atari ST (1988), OS/2 (1989), Microsoft Windows (1989), SCO Unix (1994), and OS X (2001). Commercial versions of Word are licensed as a standalone product or as a component of Microsoft Office, Windows RT or the discontinued Microsoft Works suite. Microsoft Word Viewer and Office Online are freeware editions of Word with limited features. History Origins In 1981, Microsoft hired Charles Simonyi, the primary developer of Bravo, the first GUI word processor, which was developed at Xerox PARC.[8] Simonyi started work on a word processor called Multi-Tool Word and soon hired Richard Brodie, a former Xerox intern, who became the primary software engineer.[ ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft Word:

Technical communication tools

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Windows 10 editions

topic

Windows 10 editions

Windows 10 has twelve editions, all with varying feature sets, use cases, or intended devices. Certain editions are distributed only on devices directly from a device manufacturer, while editions such as Enterprise and Education are only available through volume licensing channels. Microsoft also makes editions of Windows 10 available to device manufacturers for use on specific classes of devices, including smartphones (Windows 10 Mobile) and IoT devices. Baseline editions Baseline editions are the only editions available as standalone purchases in the retail outlets. Home Windows 10 Home is designed for use in PCs, tablets and 2-in-1 PCs. It includes all consumer-directed features.[1][2][3] Pro Windows 10 Pro adds additional features that are oriented towards business environments and power users. It is functionally equivalent to Windows 8.1 Pro.[1][2][3] Organizational editions These editions add features to facilitate centralized control of many installations of the OS within an organization. The m ...more...

Member feedback about Windows 10 editions:

Microsoft Windows

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Microsoft account

topic

Microsoft account

Microsoft account or MSA[1] (previously known as Microsoft Passport,[2] .NET Passport, Microsoft Passport Network, and Windows Live ID) is a single sign-on web service developed and provided by Microsoft that allows users to log into websites (like Outlook.com), devices (e.g. Windows 10 computers and tablets, Windows Phones, or Xbox consoles), and applications (including Visual Studio) using one account. History Microsoft Passport, the predecessor to Windows Live ID, was originally positioned as a single sign-on service for all web commerce. Microsoft Passport received much criticism. A prominent critic was Kim Cameron, the author of The Laws of Identity,[3] who questioned Microsoft Passport in its violations of those laws. He has since become Microsoft's Chief Identity Architect and helped address those violations in the design of the Windows Live ID identity meta-system. As a consequence, Windows Live ID is not positioned as the single sign-on service for all web commerce, but as one choice of many among ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft account:

Federated identity

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Microsoft Store (digital)

topic

Microsoft Store (digital)

Microsoft Store (formerly known as Windows Store prior to October 2017) is a digital distribution platform for Microsoft Windows. It started as an app store for Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 as the primary means of distributing Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps. With Windows 10, however, Microsoft merged its other distribution platforms (Windows Marketplace, Windows Phone Store, Xbox Video and Xbox Music) into Microsoft Store, making it a unified distribution point for apps, digital video, digital music and e-book. According to Microsoft, as of September 28, 2015, there were over 669,000 apps available on the store, which includes apps for Windows NT, Windows Phone, and UWP apps, which work on both platforms.[1] Categories containing the largest number of apps are "Games", "Entertainment", "Books and Reference", and "Education". The majority of the app developers have one app.[2] Both free and paid apps can be distributed through Microsoft Store, with paid apps ranging in cost from US$0.99 to $999.99. ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft Store (digital):

Metro-style apps

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Development of Windows Vista

topic

Development of Windows Vista

Development of Windows Vista occurred over the span of five and a half years, starting in earnest in May 2001,[1] prior to the release of Microsoft's Windows XP operating system, and continuing until November 2006. Microsoft originally expected to ship the new version sometime late in 2003 as a minor step between Windows XP (codenamed "Whistler") and Windows 7 (codenamed "Blackcomb" and "Vienna"). Vista's original codename, "Longhorn", was an allusion to this plan: While Whistler and Blackcomb are large ski resorts in British Columbia, Longhorn is the name of a bar between the two mountains that Whistler's visitors pass to reach Blackcomb. Gradually, Windows "Longhorn" assimilated many of the important new features and technologies slated for "Blackcomb", resulting in the release date being pushed back a few times. Many of Microsoft's developers were also re-tasked with improving the security of Windows XP. Faced with ongoing delays and concerns about feature creep, Microsoft announced on August 27, 2004 th ...more...

Member feedback about Development of Windows Vista:

Windows Vista

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows Phone

topic

Windows Phone

Windows Phone (WP) is a family of discontinued[6] mobile operating systems developed by Microsoft for smartphones as the replacement successor to Windows Mobile[7][8] and Zune.[9] Windows Phone features a new user interface derived from Metro design language. Unlike Windows Mobile, it is primarily aimed at the consumer market rather than the enterprise market.[10] It was first launched in October 2010 with Windows Phone 7.[11] Windows Phone 8.1 is the latest public release of the operating system, released to manufacturing on April 14, 2014.[12][13] Windows Phone was replaced by Windows 10 Mobile in 2015; it emphasizes a larger amount of integration and unification with its PC counterpart—including a new, unified application ecosystem, along with an expansion of its scope to include small-screened tablets.[14] On October 8, 2017, Joe Belfiore announced that work on Windows 10 Mobile was drawing to a close due to lack of market penetration and resultant lack of interest from app developers.[15] History Dev ...more...

Member feedback about Windows Phone:

ARM operating systems

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Microsoft SmartScreen

topic

Microsoft SmartScreen

SmartScreen (officially called Windows SmartScreen, Windows Defender SmartScreen and SmartScreen Filter in different places) is a cloud-based anti-phishing and anti-malware component included in several Microsoft products, including Windows 8 and later, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge and Outlook.com. It is designed to help protect users against attacks that utilize social engineering and drive-by downloads to infect a system by scanning URLs accessed by a user against a blacklist of websites containing known threats. With the Windows 10 Creators Update, Microsoft placed the SmartScreen settings into the Windows Defender Security Center.[1] SmartScreen in Internet Explorer Internet Explorer 7: Phishing Filter SmartScreen was first introduced in Internet Explorer 7 then known as the Phishing Filter. Phishing Filter does not check every website visited by the user, only those that are known to be suspicious.[2] Internet Explorer 8: SmartScreen Filter With the release of Internet Explorer 8, the Phishing F ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft SmartScreen:

Microsoft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Microsoft PowerPoint

topic

Microsoft PowerPoint

Microsoft PowerPoint (or simply PowerPoint) is a presentation program,[4] created by Robert Gaskins and Dennis Austin[4] at a software company named Forethought, Inc.[4] It was released on April 20, 1987,[5] initially for Macintosh computers only.[4] Microsoft acquired PowerPoint for $14 million three months after it appeared.[6] This was Microsoft's first significant acquisition,[7] and Microsoft set up a new business unit for PowerPoint in Silicon Valley where Forethought had been located.[7]Microsoft PowerPoint is one of many programs run by the company Microsoft and can be identified by its trademark orange, and P initial on the logo. It offers users many ways to display information from simple presentations to complex multimedia presentations. PowerPoint became a component of the Microsoft Office suite, first offered in 1989 for Macintosh[8] and in 1990 for Windows,[9] which bundled several Microsoft apps. Beginning with PowerPoint 4.0 (1994), PowerPoint was integrated into Microsoft Office development, ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft PowerPoint:

Technical communication tools

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Criticism of Windows Vista

topic

Criticism of Windows Vista

Windows Vista, an operating system released by Microsoft for consumers on January 30, 2007, has been criticised by reviewers and users. Due to issues with new security features, performance, driver support and product activation, Windows Vista has been the subject of a number of negative assessments by various groups. Security Driver signing requirement For security reasons, 64-bit versions of Windows Vista (and of Windows 7 as well) allow only signed drivers to be installed in kernel mode.[1][2] Because code executing in kernel mode enjoys wide privileges on the system, the signing requirement aims to ensure that only code with known origin execute at this level. In order for a driver to be signed, a developer/software vendor will have to obtain an Authenticode certificate[3] with which to sign the driver. Authenticode certificates can be obtained from certificate authorities trusted by Microsoft. Microsoft trusts the certificate authority to verify the applicant's identity before issuing a certificate. If ...more...

Member feedback about Criticism of Windows Vista:

Windows Vista

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows XP

topic

Windows XP

Windows XP (codenamed Whistler) is a personal computer operating system that was produced by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems. It was released to manufacturing on August 24, 2001, and broadly released for retail sale on October 25, 2001. Development of Windows XP began in the late 1990s as "Neptune", an operating system built on the Windows NT kernel which was intended specifically for mainstream consumer use. An updated version of Windows 2000 was also originally planned for the business market; however, in January 2000, both projects were shelved in favor of a single OS codenamed "Whistler", which would serve as a single OS platform for both consumer and business markets. As such, Windows XP was the first consumer edition of Windows not to be based on MS-DOS.[5] Upon its release, Windows XP received generally positive reviews, with critics noting increased performance and stability (especially in comparison to Windows ME), a more intuitive user interface, improved hardware s ...more...

Member feedback about Windows XP:

2001 software

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Windows Movie Maker

topic

Windows Movie Maker

Windows Movie Maker (formerly known as Windows Live Movie Maker[4] in Windows 7) is a video editing software by Microsoft. It is a part of Windows Essentials software suite and offers the ability to create and edit videos as well as to publish them on OneDrive, Facebook, Vimeo, YouTube, and Flickr. Movie Maker was officially discontinued on January 10, 2017 and it is replaced by Windows Story Remix which is built with Photos. History Initial releases The first release of Windows Movie Maker was included with Windows ME on September 14, 2000. Version 1.1 was included in Windows XP a year later, and included support for creating DV AVI and WMV 8 files. Version 2.0 was released as a free update in November 2002, and added a number of new features. Version 2.1, a minor update, is included in Windows XP Service Pack 2. The Movie Maker in Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 had more transitions and support for DVD burning. Windows Vista The next version of Movie Maker was released as part of Windows Vista an ...more...

Member feedback about Windows Movie Maker:

Video editing software

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows Live Messenger

topic

Windows Live Messenger

Windows Live Messenger (formerly MSN Messenger) is a discontinued instant messaging client developed by Microsoft for Windows, Xbox 360, Mac OS X, BlackBerry OS, iOS, Java ME, S60 on Symbian OS 9.x, and Zune HD.[1] It connected to the Microsoft Messenger service while also having compatibility with Yahoo! Messenger and Facebook Messenger. The client was first released as MSN Messenger on July 22, 1999, and was marketed under the MSN branding until 2005 when it was rebranded under Windows Live and has since been officially known by its present name, although its previous name was still used colloquially by most of its users.[2][3] In June 2009, Microsoft reported the service attracted over 330 million active users each month, placing Messenger among the most widely used instant messaging clients in the world. Following the acquisition of Skype Technologies in May 2011, Microsoft added interoperability between Skype and Microsoft accounts, allowing Skype (which had features unique to its platform and a wider u ...more...

Member feedback about Windows Live Messenger:

Windows instant messaging clients

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Windows XP Professional x64 Edition

topic

Windows XP Professional x64 Edition

Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, released on April 25, 2005, is an edition of Windows XP for x86-64 personal computers. It is designed to use the expanded 64-bit memory address space provided by the x86-64 architecture.[1] The primary benefit of moving to 64-bit is the increase in the maximum allocatable random-access memory (RAM). 32-bit editions of Windows XP are limited to a total of 4 gigabytes. Although the theoretical memory limit of a 64-bit computer is about 16 exabytes (17.1 billion gigabytes), Windows XP x64 is limited to 128 GB of physical memory and 16 terabytes of virtual memory.[3] Windows XP Professional x64 Edition uses the same kernel and code tree as Windows Server 2003[4] and is serviced by the same service pack.[5] However, it includes client features of Windows XP such as System Restore, Windows Messenger, Fast User Switching, Welcome Screen, Security Center and games, which Windows Server 2003 does not have. Windows XP Professional x64 Edition is not to be confused with ...more...

Member feedback about Windows XP Professional x64 Edition:

X86-64 operating systems

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Microsoft Product Activation

topic

Microsoft Product Activation

The Activation Wizard in Windows XP Microsoft Product Activation is a DRM technology used by Microsoft Corporation in several of its computer software programs, most notably its Windows operating system and its Office productivity suite. The procedure enforces compliance with the program's end-user license agreement by transmitting information about both the product key used to install the program and the user's computer hardware to Microsoft, inhibiting or completely preventing the use of the program until the validity of its license is confirmed.[1] The procedure has been met with significant criticism by many consumers, technical analysts and computer experts, who argue that it is poorly designed, highly inconvenient and ultimately does nothing to prevent software piracy.[2] The process has been successfully circumvented on multiple occasions.[3] Process Before activation The Activation Wizard in Office 2010 When installing a retail copy of Windows or Office, the user is asked to input a unique pr ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft Product Activation:

Windows components

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Windows 10 Mobile

topic

Windows 10 Mobile

Windows 10 Mobile is a mobile operating system developed by Microsoft, released in 2015. Although it is the successor of Windows Phone 8.1,[6] it is an edition of Windows 10 running on devices that have less than a 9-inch screen, as a result of Microsoft's plans to unify Windows families across multiple device classes.[7] Windows 10 Mobile aims to provide greater consistency with its counterpart for personal computers, including more extensive synchronization of content, a new universal application platform that allows one app to run on multiple Windows 10 devices such as PCs, mobile devices and Xbox, as well as the capability, on supported hardware, to connect devices to an external display and use a "PC-like" interface with mouse and keyboard input support. Microsoft has built tools for developers to easily port some iOS apps with minimal modifications. Windows Phone 8.1 smartphones are eligible for upgrade to Windows 10 Mobile, pursuant to manufacturer and carrier support.[8] Some features vary depending ...more...

Member feedback about Windows 10 Mobile:

Smartphones

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Bassam Infotech

Bassam Infotech (bassaminfotech)

Revolvy User Great article and information. There is one more such school management software. Odoo is a smart school ERP, Admission CRM and mobile app that facilitates cloud-based school management for hassle-free administration saving time and cost.

my folder

Bill Hitchens (billhitchens)

Revolvy User


Bundling of Microsoft Windows

topic

Bundling of Microsoft Windows

Bundling of Microsoft Windows is the installation of Microsoft Windows in computers before their purchase. Microsoft encourages original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) of personal computers to include Windows licenses with their products, and agreements between Microsoft and OEMs have undergone antitrust scrutiny. Users opposed to the bundling of Microsoft Windows have sought refunds for Windows licenses, arguing that the Windows end-user license agreement entitles them to return unused Windows licenses for a cash refund. Although some customers have successfully obtained payments (in some cases after litigation or lengthy negotiations), others have been less successful. The "Windows tax" Microsoft encourages original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to supply computers with Windows pre-installed,[1] saying that consumers benefit by not having to install an operating system.[2] Analyst Vishal Tripathi said that many consumers purchase PCs with pre-installed operating systems because they do not want to deal w ...more...

Member feedback about Bundling of Microsoft Windows:

Microsoft criticisms and controversies

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows XP editions

topic

Windows XP editions

Windows XP has been released in several editions since its original release in 2001. Windows XP is available in many languages.[1] In addition, add-ons translating the user interface are also available for certain languages.[2] Home and Professional Home and Professional editions: Original box, 2002 Home and Professional editions with Service Pack 2 Diagram representing the main editions of Windows XP, based on the category of the edition (grey) and codebase (black arrow) The first two editions released by Microsoft are Windows XP Home Edition, designed for home users, and Windows XP Professional, designed for business and power users. Windows XP Professional offers a number of features unavailable in the Home Edition, including:[3] The ability to become part of a Windows Server domain, a group of computers that are remotely managed by one or more central servers. An access control scheme that allows specific permissions on files to be granted to specific users under normal circumstances ...more...

Member feedback about Windows XP editions:

Windows XP

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Microsoft Lumia

topic

Microsoft Lumia

Microsoft Lumia (previously the Nokia Lumia Series) is a discontinued line of mobile devices that was originally designed and marketed by Nokia and later by Microsoft Mobile. Introduced in November 2011, the line was the result of a long-term partnership between Nokia and Microsoft—as such, Lumia smartphones run on Microsoft software, the Windows Phone operating system; and later the newer Windows 10 Mobile. The Lumia name is derived from the partitive plural form of the Finnish word lumi, meaning "snow".[1][2] On 3 September 2013, Microsoft announced its purchase of Nokia's mobile device business, with the deal closing on 25 April 2014. As a result, the Lumia line's maintenance was transferred to Microsoft Mobile. As part of the transition, Microsoft continued to use the Nokia brand on Lumia devices until October 2014, when it began to officially phase out the Nokia name in its promotion and production of smartphones in favor of Microsoft branding.[3] In November 2014, Microsoft announced the first Microsof ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft Lumia:

Videotelephony

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows Insider

topic

Windows Insider

[1] http://insider.windows.com Windows Insider is an open software testing program by Microsoft that allows users who own a valid license of Windows 10[1][2] or Windows Server 2016[3][4] to sign up for pre-release builds of the operating system previously only accessible to developers.[5] Microsoft launched Windows Insider for developers, enterprise testers and the "technically able" to test out new developer features on pre-release software & builds, not given publicly released, to gather low level diagnostics feedback in order to identify, investigate, mitigate & improve the Windows 10 OS, with the help, support and guidance of the Insider Program Participants, in direct communication with Microsoft Engineers via a proprietary communication & diagnostic channel. It was announced on September 30, 2014 along with Windows 10.[6] By September 2015, over 7 million people took part in the Windows Insider Program.[7] On February 12, 2015, Microsoft started to test out previews of Windows 10 Mobi ...more...

Member feedback about Windows Insider:

Windows 10

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Universal Windows Platform apps

topic

Universal Windows Platform apps

Khan Academy, an example of a Universal Windows App Left: A traditional desktop app without contents; it is showing 60 graphical widgets, and a thick border.Right: Metro-style app; entirely composed of contents Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps[1] (formerly Windows Store apps and Metro-style apps)[2] are apps that can be used across all compatible Microsoft Windows devices, including personal computers (PCs), tablets, smartphones, Xbox One, Microsoft HoloLens, and Internet of Things. UWP apps are primarily purchased and downloaded via the Microsoft Store.[3] Nomenclature Starting with Windows 10, Windows uses "Windows app" to refer to UWP apps. Any app installed from Microsoft Store (formerly Windows Store), is a "Trusted Windows Store app". Other computer programs running on a desktop computer are "desktop apps".[4] The terms "Universal Windows Platform" (or "UWP") and "UWP app" only appear on Microsoft documentation for its developers.[5] Microsoft started to retrospectively use "Windows Runtime ...more...

Member feedback about Universal Windows Platform apps:

Microsoft application programming interfaces

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Internet Explorer

topic

Internet Explorer

Internet Explorer[a] (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer[b] and Windows Internet Explorer,[c] commonly abbreviated IE or MSIE) is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included in the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems, starting in 1995. It was first released as part of the add-on package Plus! for Windows 95 that year. Later versions were available as free downloads, or in service packs, and included in the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) service releases of Windows 95 and later versions of Windows. The browser is discontinued, but still maintained.[2] Internet Explorer was one of the most widely used web browsers, attaining a peak of about 95% usage share by 2003.[5] This came after Microsoft used bundling to win the first browser war against Netscape, which was the dominant browser in the 1990s. Its usage share has since declined with the launch of Firefox (2004) and Google Chrome (2008), and with the growing popularity of operating systems such as Android and iOS ...more...

Member feedback about Internet Explorer:

History of the Internet

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Patch Tuesday

topic

Patch Tuesday

Patch Tuesday (also known as Update Tuesday[1]) is an unofficial term used to refer to when Microsoft regularly releases security patches for its software products. It is widely referred to in this way by the industry.[2][3][4] Microsoft formalized Patch Tuesday in October 2003.[5] Patch Tuesday occurs on the second, and sometimes fourth, Tuesday of each month in North America. As far as the integrated Windows Update (WU) function is concerned, Patch Tuesday begins at 18:00 or 17:00 UTC (10:00 PST (UTC−8) or 10:00 PDT (UTC−7)).[6] The updates show up in Download Center before they are added to WU, and the KB articles and the Technet bulletin are unlocked later. Microsoft has a pattern of releasing a larger number of updates in even-numbered months, and fewer in odd-numbered months.[7][8][9] Minor updates are also released outside Patch Tuesday. Daily updates consist of malware database refreshes for Windows Defender and Microsoft Security Essentials. Sometimes there is an extraordinary Patch Tuesday, two we ...more...

Member feedback about Patch Tuesday:

Tuesday

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Comparison of Windows Vista and Windows XP

topic

Comparison of Windows Vista and Windows XP

This page is a comparison of Windows Vista and Windows XP. Windows XP and Windows Vista differ considerably in regards to their security architecture, networking technologies, management and administration, shell and user interface, and mobile computing. Windows XP has suffered criticism for security problems and issues with performance. Vista has received criticism for issues with performance and product activation. Another common criticism of Vista concerns the integration of new forms of DRM into the operating system, and User Account Control (UAC) security technology. Compatibility Windows Vista faces backward compatibility problems with many of the games and utility programs that work in Windows XP. As of July 2008, there were about 2,000 applications that specifically carried the 'Vista Compatibility Logo',[1] although the majority of applications without the logo will run without any problems. This number is low compared to the number of programs that can currently work under XP, either natively or i ...more...

Member feedback about Comparison of Windows Vista and Windows XP:

Windows Vista

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Internet Explorer version history

topic

Internet Explorer version history

Internet Explorer (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer and Windows Internet Explorer, commonly abbreviated IE or MSIE) is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included as part of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems, starting in 1995. The first version of Internet Explorer, (at that time named Microsoft Internet Explorer, later referred to as Internet Explorer 1) made its debut on 17 August 1995. It was a reworked version of Spyglass Mosaic, which Microsoft licensed from Spyglass Inc., like many other companies initiating browser development. It was first released as part of the add-on package Plus! for Windows 95 that year. Later versions were available as free downloads, or in service packs, and included in the OEM service releases of Windows 95 and later versions of Windows. Originally Microsoft Internet Explorer only ran on Windows using Intel 80386 (IA-32) processor. Current versions also run on x64, 32-bit ARMv7, PowerPC and IA-64. Versions on Windows have supporte ...more...

Member feedback about Internet Explorer version history:

1995 software

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows Firewall

topic

Windows Firewall

Windows Firewall (officially called Windows Defender Firewall in Windows 10), is a firewall component of Microsoft Windows. It was first included in Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. Prior to the release of Windows XP Service Pack 2 in 2004, it was known as Internet Connection Firewall. With the release of Windows 10 version 1709, in September 2017, it was renamed Windows Defender Firewall as part of the "Windows Defender" branding campaign. Overview When Windows XP was originally shipped in October 2001, it included a limited firewall called "Internet Connection Firewall". It was disabled by default due to concerns with backward compatibility, and the configuration screens were buried away in network configuration screens that many users never looked at. As a result, it was rarely used. In mid-2003, the Blaster worm attacked a large number of Windows machines, taking advantage of flaws in the RPC Windows service.[1] Several months later, the Sasser worm did something similar. The ongoing prevalence of th ...more...

Member feedback about Windows Firewall:

Windows components

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows Genuine Advantage

topic

Windows Genuine Advantage

Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) is an anti-infringement system created by Microsoft that enforces online validation of the licensing of several recent Microsoft Windows operating systems when accessing several services, such as Windows Update, and downloading Windows components from the Microsoft Download Center. In Windows 7, WGA is renamed Windows Activation Technologies.[1] WGA consists of two components: an installable component called WGA Notifications that hooks into Winlogon and validates the Windows license upon each logon and an ActiveX control that checks the validity of the Windows license when downloading certain updates from the Microsoft Download Center or Windows Update. WGA Notifications covers Windows XP and later, with the exception of Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP Professional x64 Edition. The ActiveX control checks Windows 2000 Professional licenses as well.[2] WGA also advertises the latest service pack, Service Pack 3, for Windows XP, which requires manual intervention to disable. ...more...

Member feedback about Windows Genuine Advantage:

Windows components

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Microsoft Lumia 650

topic

Microsoft Lumia 650

The Microsoft Lumia 650 is a smartphone developed by Microsoft, officially revealed on February 15, 2016.[1] It is the successor to the Microsoft Lumia 640 and is aimed primarily at business users, with support for Microsoft's business applications as well as security features like device encryption and remote wiping.[2] Due to hardware limitations, it does not support Continuum.[3] The phone is available in both single- and dual-SIM variants and is the most recent model in the Lumia series, with Microsoft discontinuing mobile hardware production the following year.[4] Availability In the United Kingdom, the Lumia 650 is available from EE,[5] O2[6] and Vodafone.[7] In the United States, the Lumia 650 is available from Cricket Wireless.[8] In Canada, the United States, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand, the Lumia 650 is available unlocked from the Microsoft Store.[9] Hardware The Lumia 650 has a 5-inch pentile OLED display with Corning Gorilla Glass 3 protection and oleophobic (fingerprint-resistant) coat ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft Lumia 650:

Microsoft hardware

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Criticism of Linux

topic

Criticism of Linux

The first-generation Nexus 7 tablet running Android, an operating system using the Linux kernel. While Linux-based operating systems are in common use in computer tablets, they are less frequently adopted as desktop computers. The criticism of Linux focuses on issues concerning use of operating systems which use the Linux kernel. While the Linux-based Android operating system dominates the smartphone market in many countries,[1][2] and Linux is used on the New York Stock Exchange and most supercomputers,[3] it is used in few desktop and laptop computers.[4] Much of the criticism of Linux is related to the lack of desktop and laptop adoption, although as of 2015 there has been growing unease with the project's perspective on security and its adoption of systemd has been controversial.[5][6] Linux Kernel criticisms Kernel development politics Some security professionals say that the rise in prominence of operating system-level virtualization using Linux has raised the profile of attacks against the kernel, ...more...

Member feedback about Criticism of Linux:

Operating system criticisms

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Linux!

Jack Greenwood (jackgreenwood)

Revolvy User


Windows Spotlight

topic

Windows Spotlight

Windows Spotlight is a feature included by default in Windows 10 that downloads pictures and advertisements automatically from Bing and displays them when the lock screen is being shown on a computer running Windows 10. Users are occasionally given an opportunity to mark whether they wish to see more or fewer images of a similar type, and sometimes the images are overlaid with links to advertisements. In 2017, Microsoft began adding location information for many of the photographs. Photo locations For most of the images, no photo credits are available, but some do display information about where the picture was taken. Many are of well-known locations, or famous historical or natural landmarks, and therefore can be identified. Identified images include (alphabetical by country): Africa The White Desert (Sahara el Beyda) near Farafra, Egypt Sway bridge at The Palace of the Lost City, Sun City, South Africa Grand Anse Beach, La Digue Island, Seychelles Antarctica Lemaire Channel Asia Longsheng Ric ...more...

Member feedback about Windows Spotlight:

Windows 10

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows Media Video

topic

Windows Media Video

Windows Media Video (WMV) is a series of video codecs and their corresponding video coding formats developed by Microsoft. It is part of the Windows Media framework. WMV consists of three distinct codecs: The original video compression technology known as WMV, was originally designed for Internet streaming applications, as a competitor to RealVideo. The other compression technologies, WMV Screen and WMV Image, cater for specialized content. After standardization by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE),[1][2] WMV version 9 was adopted for physical-delivery formats such as HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc and became known as VC-1.[3][4] Microsoft also developed a digital container format called Advanced Systems Format to store video encoded by Windows Media Video. History In 2003, Microsoft drafted a video compression specification based on its WMV 9 format and submitted it to SMPTE for standardization. The standard was officially approved in March 2006 as SMPTE 421M, better known as VC-1, th ...more...

Member feedback about Windows Media Video:

Video codecs

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Windows XP Media Center Edition

topic

Windows XP Media Center Edition

Windows XP Media Center Edition (MCE) is a version of the Windows XP operating system which was the first version of Windows to include Windows Media Center, designed to serve as a home-entertainment hub. The last version, Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005, was released on October 12, 2004. After that, Windows Media Center was included in certain editions of later Windows versions before being discontinued in Windows 10. Versions Windows XP Media Center Edition has had the following releases, all based on Windows XP Professional with all features enabled except domain-joining ability disabled in Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 and Terminal Services in the original release. A preview version of Windows XP Media Center Edition from Microsoft's eHome division, was shown at CES 2002, with the final version released later that year.[4] Windows XP Media Center Edition (codenamed "Freestyle")[5] was the original version of Windows XP Media Center. It was first announced on 16 July 2002,[5] released to ...more...

Member feedback about Windows XP Media Center Edition:

2004 software

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Outlook Express

topic

Outlook Express

Outlook Express, formerly known as Microsoft Internet Mail and News, is a discontinued email and news client included with Internet Explorer versions 3.0 through to 6.0. As such, it was bundled with several versions of Microsoft Windows, from Windows 98 to Windows Server 2003, and was available for Windows 3.x, Windows NT 3.51, Windows 95, Mac System 7, Mac OS 8, and Mac OS 9. In Windows Vista, Outlook Express was superseded by Windows Mail. In macOS, Outlook Express was superseded by Apple Mail. Outlook Express is a different application from Microsoft Outlook. The two apps do not share a common codebase, but they do share a common architectural philosophy.[1] The similar names lead many people to conclude incorrectly that Outlook Express is a stripped-down version of Microsoft Outlook. Outlook Express uses the Windows Address Book to store contact information and integrates tightly with it. On Windows XP, it also integrates with Windows Messenger. History Microsoft Internet Mail and News Version 1.0 w ...more...

Member feedback about Outlook Express:

Internet Explorer

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User


Office Assistant

topic

Office Assistant

Clippit (known as Clippy), the default assistant in Office 2000/XP/2003 (after the makeover). Clippit is asking if the user needs help. The Office Assistant was an intelligent user interface for Microsoft Office that assisted users by way of an interactive animated character, which interfaced with the Office help content. It was included in Microsoft Office for Windows (versions 97 to 2003), in Microsoft Publisher and Microsoft Project (versions 98 to 2003), and Microsoft Office for Mac (versions 98 to 2004). The default assistant in the English Windows version was named Clippit (commonly nicknamed Clippy), after a paperclip.[1][2] The character was designed by Kevan J. Atteberry.[2] Clippit was the default and by far the most notable Assistant (partly because in many cases the setup CD was required to install the other assistants), which also led to it being called simply the Microsoft Paperclip.[3] The original Clippit in Office 97 was given a new look in Office 2000. The feature drew a strongly negative ...more...

Member feedback about Office Assistant:

Fictional shapeshifters

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


United States v. Microsoft Corp.

topic

United States v. Microsoft Corp.

United States v. Microsoft Corporation, 253 F.3d 34 (D.C. Cir. 2001),[1] is a U.S. antitrust law case, ultimately settled by the Department of Justice (DOJ), in which Microsoft Corporation was accused of holding a monopoly and engaging in anti-competitive practices contrary to sections 1 and 2 of the Sherman Antitrust Act. The plaintiffs alleged that Microsoft abused monopoly power on Intel-based personal computers in its handling of operating system and web browser sales (for at the time web browsers were not freeware, but payware). The issue central to the case was whether Microsoft was allowed to bundle its flagship Internet Explorer (IE) web browser software with its Microsoft Windows operating system. Bundling them together is alleged to have been responsible for Microsoft's victory in the browser wars as every Windows user had a copy of Internet Explorer. It was further alleged that this restricted the market for competing web browsers (such as Netscape Navigator or Opera) that were slow to download ov ...more...

Member feedback about United States v. Microsoft Corp.:

United States district court cases

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Microsoft Office XP

topic

Microsoft Office XP

Microsoft Office XP (codenamed Office 10[8]) is an office suite created and distributed by Microsoft for the Windows operating system. Office XP was released to manufacturing on March 5, 2001[9] and was later made available to retail on May 31, 2001.[1] It is the successor to Office 2000 and the predecessor of Office 2003. New features in Office XP include smart tags, a selection-based search feature that recognizes different types of text in a document so that users can perform additional actions; a task pane interface that consolidates popular menu bar commands on the right side of the screen to facilitate quick access to them; new document collaboration capabilities, support for MSN Groups and SharePoint; and integrated handwriting recognition and speech recognition capabilities. With Office XP, Microsoft incorporated several features to address reliability issues observed in previous versions of Office.[10] Office XP also introduces separate Document Imaging,[10] Document Scanning,[10] and Clip Organizer ...more...

Member feedback about Microsoft Office XP:

2001 software

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Personal

Andreas Kavaratzis (AndreasKavaratzis)

Revolvy User



Next Page
Javascript Version
Revolvy Server https://www.revolvy.com
Revolvy Site Map