Creative peacebuilding

Creative peacebuilding is the larger name for artist approaches to peacebuilding within individuals, groups, and societies. It includes various forms of art therapy, whereby individuals and groups can express themselves to nurture healing and restoration. It is also used to overcome the recurrence of violence, as a preventative measure to make the foundations of peace stronger, especially in contexts of war and conflict. Creating an environment of lasting peace is the primary goal of creative peacebuilding.

War and conflict

According to Johan Galtung, peacebuilding is the process of creating self-supporting structures that "remove causes of wars and offer alternatives to war in situations where wars might occur."[1] For John Paul Lederach, peacebuilding is a comprehensive concept that encompasses, generates, and sustains the full array of processes, approaches, and stages needed to transform conflict toward more sustainable, peaceful relationships, which involves a wide range of activities. It has a diverse range of interaction and involves various stakeholders in various levels within the spectrum of governance and development.[2]

Creative peacebuilding facilitates the establishments of sustainable peace by preventing recurrence of violence, addresses the root causes, healing and effects of conflict, and offer alternatives to violence through reconciliation, economic and social transformation with the use of photography, film, painting, and the like. Jolyon Mitchell argues that the visual arts can both encourage peacebuilding and instigating violence. This is true of various forms of visual arts, ranging from posters, cartoons, and stained glass, to websites, radio, and films by reflecting on examples from around the world.[3]

Creative peacebuilding can be especially powerful when used with those suffering from a young demographic and those with post-traumatic stress disorder. For at-risk youth, it lays the roots for a peaceful lifestyle and to help children who have already experienced trauma in their lives become fully functional adults.[4]

Art therapy

Art therapy has been used to help rehabilitate child soldiers in Uganda as well as to help children who lost their homes in the tsunami of 2004 cope with their feelings. Many youth centers catering to impoverished children use art forms to build community, discipline and trust.[5]

Music

Music therapy can be used in several different fashions to build peace. It can be used to help individuals express themselves or to foster communication between individuals or groups of people. It can be used to nurture healing and reconciliation. Music is something that transcends language and national or ethnic boundaries. It has unique styles depending on the community it originates in and can also be adapted to fit individual's tastes. When two groups who have been in conflict or have the potential for conflict make music together communication and healing become possible. When individuals listen to or play music, they can reduce their stress levels and express their feelings.[6]

Visual arts

Visual art therapy can be used to help individuals cope with their feelings resulting from violent experiences. It is also used to treat post-traumatic stress disorder. Art therapy is especially useful for people who are having trouble verbalizing their feelings and are keeping them bottled up. By sharing their experiences and processing them through a tactical and visual activity, people are able to heal. No prior experience with visual art is needed to participate in and gain benefits from art therapy—it is about the process of creation, not about the aesthetic appeal of the product. Art therapy can be used in group settings as well—creating a collaborative art project can be an experience that bridges differences between people and builds feelings of trust.[7]

Visualization and technology

If people who have lived through traumatic or violent experiences can relive them and change the situation or their response to the situation they can come to terms with their past. Virtual technology and especially virtual reality simulations can be especially useful in cases like these and have been used to treat veterans of the Iraq war who are suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. If the technology needed for these simulations is too expensive to be practical, mental visualization, in which the victim uses their imagination to create situations and feel as if they are gaining control of the way events play out, can be used as an alternative.[8]

Examples
Create Peace Project

Create Peace Project is an arts-for-peace education organization working to promote the practices of peace and spread the message of hope and goodwill to children around the world using creativity. Create Peace Project was founded in San Francisco, California in 2007 by artist and peace activist Ross Holzman in response to the overwhelming amount of violence in the world, on the news, and in our communities. Violence, coupled with the lack of creativity in peoples lives sparked the creation of projects such as Banners for Peace and The Peace Exchange. Create Peace Project has included more than 25,000 children from around the world in its arts-for-peace projects since its inception and continues to work with schools in the US and beyond promoting peace through creativity to children of all ages.[9]

Barefoot artists

Artist Lily Yeh has helped to heal the wounds genocide left on a village of widows and orphans through her work with Barefoot Artists. The members of the community were provided with a chance to honor their lost loved ones through their construction of a beautiful and expressive monument commemorating the mass grave of the local victims of the genocide. The construction process also provided a sense of closure to their mourning. Other aspects of the peacebuilding process in the village included paintings on building walls created by the village children of things that they hoped to see in the future as well as things important to their everyday existence. On the economic side of this peacebuilding effort, the people of the village learned how to mosaic and pour concrete, two useful and marketable skills to help provide economic stability.[10]

River City Drum Corps

In the United State, creative peacebuilding is used in many inner-city areas in places such as New York, Philadelphia, and Louisville. The River City Drum Corps in Louisville, Ky provides a musical outlet for children who perhaps are not listened to in other parts of their lives. It is also a structured program where discipline and the importance of both uniqueness and teamwork are taught. The children learn drumming patterns and perform for different events and groups of people throughout the city. Both the children in the program and their audience benefit from the cultural exchange and communication that take place during drum corps performances.[11]

See also
References
  1. "Selected Definitions of Peacebuilding". Alliance for Peacebuilding. Retrieved 10 November 2017.
  2. Lederach, John Paul (2010). The Moral Imagination: The Art and Soul of Building Peace. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-974758-0.
  3. Mitchell, Jolyon P. (2012). Promoting Peace, Inciting Violence: The Role of Religion and Media. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-55746-7.
  4. Ishaq, Ashfaq (December 2006). "Development of children's creativity to foster peace". The Lancet. 368: 26–27. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(06)69915-7.
  5. Prutzman, Priscilla (October 1981). "Children's Creative Response to Conflict". Peace and Change. 7 (4): 77–79. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0130.1981.tb00454.x.
  6. Sutton, Julie P., ed. (2002). Music, Music Therapy and Trauma: International Perspectives. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. ISBN 978-1-84310-027-0.
  7. Avrahami, Dalia (2006). "Visual Art Therapy's Unique Contribution in the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders". Journal of Trauma & Dissociation. 6 (4): 5–38. doi:10.1300/j229v06n04_02. ISSN 1529-9732.
  8. Jones, Brent (18 June 2007). "Iraq vets use virtual reality to ease post-battle trauma". www.usatoday.com. Retrieved 14 November 2017.
  9. Holzman, Ross (8 May 2008). "Create Peace Project". Retrieved 14 November 2017.
  10. Yeh, Lily. "Barefoot Artists". Barefoot Artists. Retrieved 14 November 2017.
  11. "About RCDC". River City Drum Corp. Retrieved 14 November 2017.
External links
Continue Reading...
Content from Wikipedia Licensed under CC-BY-SA.

Creativity (religion)

topic

Creativity (religion)

Creativity (formerly known as The Church of the Creator and World Church of the Creator) is a pantheistic white separatist, white supremacist, antisemitic, anti-Christian religion which has been classified as a Neo-Nazi hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center.[2] It was founded in Lighthouse Point, Florida by Ben Klassen as the Church of the Creator in 1973. The worldview of Creativity is based on the veneration of the white race and the supposed safeguarding of its survival, including waging "racial holy war" on Jews, "niggers" and non-white colored "mud races". Creativity is promoted by two organizations: the Creativity Alliance (CA – also known as the Church of Creativity) and the Creativity Movement (TCM). The groups have common origins.[3] Name Adherents of Creativity are known as Creators. The church was originally founded as the Church of the Creator by Ben Klassen in 1973. Matthew F. Hale in 1996 formed a separate group known as the World Church of the Creator which largely supplanted the ori ...more...

Member feedback about Creativity (religion):

Anti-Christianity

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

the guys

(msjester)

Revolvy User


Catherine Filloux

topic

Catherine Filloux

Catherine Filloux is a French-American playwright (her mother is from Oran, Algeria and her father from Guéret, France and she lives in New York City.) She has received awards from the Kennedy Center Fund for New American Plays, the O'Neill, the MAP Fund, and the Asian Cultural Council. Catherine is the winner of the 2017 Otto René Castillo Award for Political Theatre in New York City, and she received the 2015 Planet Activist Award "to acknowledge Filloux's dedication to art and activism, in the theater community," Planet Connections, New York City. She has been a Fulbright Senior Specialist in playwriting in Cambodia and Morocco. Filloux's plays have confronted the issue of human rights in many nations. She was first drawn to the subject upon reading of the psychosomatic blindness suffered by a group of Cambodian women after witnessing the massacres of the Khmer Rouge, a story that formed the basis of her 2004 play Eyes of the Heart. She worked with survivors of the Cambodian genocide, developing the oral ...more...

Member feedback about Catherine Filloux:

American people of French descent

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Rabia Salihu Sa'id

topic

Rabia Salihu Sa'id

Rabia Salihu Sa'id[a] (born April 21, 1963) is a Nigerian physicist, professor of atmospheric and space-weather physics, and a researcher at Bayero University Kano. She conducts research in atmospheric and space weather physics, particle physics, and electronics. Sa'id is an advocate and mentor for young women in science with the Visiola Foundation and Peace Corps; she co-founded Nigeria's Association of Women Physicists. She is an advocate and mentor of Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and is a facilitator for the British Council's Active Citizens' Programme. Sai'd has received fellowships from Institute of Applied Physics in Bern, Switzerland and the Ford Foundation and made a fellow of African Scientific Institute (ASI). In 2015, she received an Elsevier Foundation Award for Women Scientists in the Developing World.[4] She was also recognised in 2015 by the British Council for her community work, and by the BBC as part of their 100 Women series. Personal life Rabia Sa'i ...more...

Member feedback about Rabia Salihu Sa'id:

20th-century physicists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Religious views on same-sex marriage

topic

Religious views on same-sex marriage

Many views are held or have been expressed by religious organisations in relation to same-sex marriage. Arguments both in favor of and in opposition to same-sex marriage (or equal marriage rights) is often made on religious grounds and/or formulated in terms of religious doctrine. Although the majority of world religions oppose to same-sex marriage, the number of religious denominations that are conducting same-sex marriages have been increasing in recent times. Religious views on same-sex marriage are closely related to religious views on homosexuality. Religious support Buddhism Due to the ambivalent language about homosexuality in Buddhist teachings, there has been no official stance put forth regarding the issue of marriage between members of the same gender.[1] There is no objection of the Buddha found in the Tipitaka. Buddha was neither supportive nor against marriages between members of the same gender. Also, from the Tipitaka, it is clear that the Buddha acknowledged the difference between hermaph ...more...

Member feedback about Religious views on same-sex marriage:

Religion and politics

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Nwabueze Nwokolo

topic

Nwabueze Nwokolo

Nwabueze Jaja Wachuku Nwokolo (born 11 December 1954), a royal princess of Ngwaland, is a Nigerian United Kingdom based lawyer who is a director and board chair of Great Britain's Black Solicitors Network: BSN,[1][2] the largest membership organisation of its kind in Europe; as well as being a member of the Law Society of England and Wales' Minority Ethnic Concerns Group.[3][4][5] She also sits on the RAB: Regulatory Affairs Board of the Law Society.[6] Nwokolo is a humanitarian, multiculturalism[1] and better family plus social justice advocate; as well as a mediation, philanthropy, nonprofit, servant leadership, community development, peacebuilding, equality, tolerance, inclusion and diversity expert.[7] In November 2011, Nwokolo contributed to the Judicial Appointments Process in the House of Lords of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.[8][9] Nwokolo is the daughter of Jaja Wachuku: Nigeria's first Speaker of the House of Representatives as well as first Nigerian Ambassador and Perm ...more...

Member feedback about Nwabueze Nwokolo:

English barristers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Peace and Truce of God

topic

Peace and Truce of God

The Peace and Truce of God (Latin: Pax et treuga Dei; German: Gottesfrieden; French: Paix de Dieu; Catalan: Pau i Treva de Déu) was a movement in the Middle Ages led by the Catholic Church. The goal of both the Pax Dei and the Treuga Dei was to limit the violence of feuding endemic to the western half of the former Carolingian Empire -- following its collapse in the middle of the 9th century -- using the threat of spiritual sanctions.[1] The eastern half of the former Carolingian Empire did not experience the same collapse of central authority, and neither did England.[2] The Peace of God was first proclaimed in 989, at the Council of Charroux. It sought to protect ecclesiastical property, agricultural resources and unarmed clerics.[3] The Truce of God, first proclaimed in 1027 at the Council of Toulouges, attempted to limit the days of the week and times of year that the nobility engaged in violence.The movement survived in some form until the thirteenth century. Other strategies to deal with the problem o ...more...

Member feedback about Peace and Truce of God:

Middle Ages

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Daisaku Ikeda

topic

Daisaku Ikeda

Daisaku Ikeda (池田 大作 Ikeda Daisaku, born 2 January 1928) is a Buddhist philosopher, educator, author, and nuclear disarmament advocate.[2][3][4] He has served as the third president and then honorary president of the Soka Gakkai, the largest of Japan's new religious movements.[5] Ikeda is the founding president of the Soka Gakkai International (SGI), the world's largest Buddhist lay organization with approximately 12 million practitioners in 192 countries and territories.[6][7] Ikeda was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1928, to a family of seaweed farmers. He survived the devastation of World War II as a teenager, which he said left an indelible mark on his life and fueled his quest to solve the fundamental causes of human conflict. At age 19, Ikeda began practicing Nichiren Buddhism and joined a youth group of the Soka Gakkai Buddhist association, which led to his lifelong work developing the global peace movement of SGI and founding dozens of institutions dedicated to fostering peace, culture and education.[7]:3[ ...more...

Member feedback about Daisaku Ikeda:

Japanese pacifists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Mark Stephens (solicitor)

topic

Mark Stephens (solicitor)

Mark Howard Stephens CBE (born 7 April 1957) is an English solicitor specialising in media law, intellectual property rights and human rights with the firm Howard Kennedy LLP. Stephens studied law at North East London Polytechnic (now the University of East London), graduating in 1978. After further study in Brussels he was admitted as a solicitor in 1982. Stephens started his career as a lawyer providing advice to artists and soon established his own practice with a partner. In 1987 Stephens helped defend the American artist J. S. G. Boggs from a counterfeiting charge. He gained a reputation as "the patron solicitor of previously lost causes" following this case and others where he defended artists' freedom of expression, as well as representing the leaders of the miners' strike of 1984–85 and James Hewitt when allegations of his affair with Diana, Princess of Wales first emerged. During the 1990s Stephens worked on cases arising from the occupation of the Brent Spar oil platform. He also provided advice to ...more...

Member feedback about Mark Stephens (solicitor):

English sceptics

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Helena Group

topic

Helena Group

Helena, Helena Group, The Helena Group, or The Helena Group Foundation is a global non-governmental organization and think-tank composed of prominent leaders from multiple generations of society.[1][2] Its membership includes senior military and political figures, Fortune 500 executives, Nobel Laureates, entertainment figures, leading scientists, technology leaders and philanthropists.[3][4] Helena is structurally designed to produce initiatives that address global issues, which are devised and executed during frequent meetings between its members.[5][6][7] Helena’s current members include Nicolas Berggruen, Brian Grazer, Rt Hon. David Miliband, Beth Comstock, Gen. Norton A. Schwartz, Chloe Grace Moretz, Sylvia Earle, Dynamo, Myron Scholes, Alaa Murabit, Gen. Stanley McChrystal, Deepak Chopra, and Yeonmi Park.[8][4] Origins Helena was conceived in late 2015 by Henry Elkus and Zachary Bohn as a way to encourage dialogue and collaboration between leaders of different generations.[9] Bohn exited the project s ...more...

Member feedback about Helena Group:

Started in 2016 in the United States

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Karim Alrawi

topic

Karim Alrawi

Karim Alrawi (Arabic كريم الراوي) is a writer born in Alexandria, Egypt. His family emigrated to England then to Canada. Alrawi graduated from University College London and the University of Manchester, England. He gained an MFA in creative writing from the University of British Columbia and was an International Writing Fellow at the University of Iowa.[1] In the UK, after his first full-length stage play Migrations won the prestigious John Whiting Award he became Literary Manager of the Theatre Royal Stratford East and later Resident Writer at the Royal Court Theatre in Central London. He moved to Egypt, where he taught in the theatre department of the American University in Cairo. In Egypt his plays were banned by the state censor.[2][3] He was arrested and detained for interrogation by Egyptian State Security about his writings and for his work with the Egyptian Organisation for Human Rights (EOHR).[4] As a Fulbright International Scholar he moved to the United States. He later took positions as Writer in ...more...

Member feedback about Karim Alrawi:

Alumni of University College London

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


IPCRI – Israel/Palestine Center for Research and Information

topic

IPCRI – Israel/Palestine Center for Research and Information

IPCRI - Israel/Palestine Center for Research and Information(Hebrew: איפקרי‎; Arabic: ايبكري) is a joint Israeli/Palestinian NGO and public policy think tank based in Jerusalem working towards building partnerships in Israel/Palestine. Under shared Israeli-Palestinian leadership, IPCRI carries out research and projects in various fields from economic development to environmental sustainability. IPCRI also facilitates public outreach and track two negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians.[1] Mission The Israel/ Palestine Center for Research and Information is a joint institution of Israelis and Palestinians dedicated to a just, viable and sustainable resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict on the basis of “two states for two peoples."[1] Israeli peace activist Jonathan Kis-Lev described the various peace building activities led by IPCRI as "revolutionary" in his book "My Quest For Peace",[2] and author Michelle I. Gawerc noted IPCRI importance as one of the only organizations to be active during ...more...

Member feedback about IPCRI – Israel/Palestine Center for Research and Information:

Peace organizations

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Feminism in India

topic

Feminism in India

Feminism in India is a set of movements aimed at defining, establishing, and defending equal political, economic, and social rights and equal opportunities for Indian women. It is the pursuit of women's rights within the society of India. Like their feminist counterparts all over the world, feminists in India seek gender equality: the right to work for equal wages, the right to equal access to health and education, and equal political rights.[1] Indian feminists also have fought against culture-specific issues within India's patriarchal society, such as inheritance laws and the practice of widow immolation known as Sati. The history of feminism in India can be divided into three phases: the first phase, beginning in the mid-eighteenth century, initiated when male European colonists began to speak out against the social evils of Sati;[2] the second phase, from 1915 to Indian independence, when Gandhi incorporated women's movements into the Quit India movement and independent women's organisations began to eme ...more...

Member feedback about Feminism in India:

Indian culture

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Feminist theology

topic

Feminist theology

Feminist theology is a movement found in several religions, including Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, and New Thought, to reconsider the traditions, practices, scriptures, and theologies of those religions from a feminist perspective. Some of the goals of feminist theology include increasing the role of women among the clergy and religious authorities, reinterpreting male-dominated imagery and language about God, determining women's place in relation to career and motherhood, and studying images of women in the religion's sacred texts and matriarchal religion. Methodology Feminist theology attempts to consider every aspect of religious practice and thought. Some of the questions feminist theologians ask are: How do we do theology? The basic question of how theologians may go about creating systems of thought is currently being reinterpreted by feminist theologians. Many feminist theologians assert that personal experience can be an important component of insight into the divine, along with the more tradi ...more...

Member feedback about Feminist theology:

Feminism and spirituality

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Thealogy

topic

Thealogy

Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture Thealogy (a neologism derived from Ancient Greek θεά meaning "Goddess" and λόγος, -logy, meaning "study of") is generally understood as a discourse that reflects upon the meaning of Goddess (thea) in contrast to God (theo).[1] As such, it is the study and reflection upon the feminine divine from a feminist perspective.[2] Thealogy is distinguished from feminist theology, which is the study of God from a feminist perspective,[3][4] but the two fields can be seen as related and interdependent.[5] History of the term Look up thealogy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. The term's origin and initial use is open to continuing debate. Patricia 'Iolana traces the early use of the neologism to 1976 crediting both Valerie Saiving and Isaac Bonewits for its initial use.[6] There has tended to be an emphasis on the coinage of 'thealogian' on record by Bonewits in 1976,[7][8] In the 1979 book Changing of the Gods, Naomi Goldenberg introduces the term as a future p ...more...

Member feedback about Thealogy:

Postmodern theory

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Outline of the United Nations

topic

Outline of the United Nations

United Nations sign at the United Nations Office at Geneva (Switzerland). The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the United Nations: United Nations – international organization whose stated aims are facilitating cooperation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress, human rights, and achievement of world peace. The UN was founded in 1945 after World War II to replace the League of Nations, to stop wars between countries, and to provide a platform for dialogue. It contains multiple subsidiary organizations to carry out its missions. Legal foundation: The United Nations Charter United Nations Charter – foundational treaty of the United Nations which states that obligations to the United Nations prevail over all other treaty obligations and is binding for all United Nations members. Type of document: treaty Signed: 26 June 1945 Location: San Francisco, California, United States Effective: 24 October 1945 Condition: Ratificati ...more...

Member feedback about Outline of the United Nations:

United Nations-related lists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User




Javascript Version
Revolvy Server https://www.revolvy.com
Revolvy Site Map