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Carmine Pecorelli

Carmine Pecorelli

Carmine Pecorelli (September 14, 1928 – March 20, 1979), known as Mino, was an Italian journalist, shot dead in Rome a year after former prime minister Aldo Moro's 1978 kidnapping and subsequent killing. He was described as a "maverick journalist with excellent secret service contacts."[1] According to Pecorelli, Aldo Moro's kidnapping had been organized by a "lucid superpower" and was inspired by the "logic of Yalta". Pecorelli's name was on Licio Gelli's list of Propaganda Due masonic members, discovered in 1980 by the Italian police.[2] In 2002, former prime minister Giulio Andreotti was sentenced, along with Mafia boss Gaetano Badalamenti, to 24 years' imprisonment for Pecorelli's murder. The sentence was thrown out by the Italian Supreme Court in 2003.

Life

Pecorelli was born in Sessano del Molise, a small municipality in the province of Isernia. During the German occupation of Italy in World War II he briefly enrolled in Junio Valerio Borghese's private fascist militia Decima Flottiglia MAS, forging contacts which would later come in handy during his career as journalist. After graduating in law, he began practicing as a bankruptcy lawyer. Later he became Minister Fiorentino Sullo's head of press service, thereby starting his career as a journalist. He founded a press agency, called Osservatore Politico (OP), which quickly became a weekly magazine, specializing in political scandals and publishing many first-hand stories that Pecorelli was able to obtain through his numerous contacts in the government, including in secret services. Pecorelli publicly acknowledged that his best pieces were the ones which had not been published on OP, due to agreements with the parts involved, which preferred to pay him hefty sums of money to ensure his silence. Pecorelli was able to describe with ease complex situations, often protecting facts and characters behind pseudonyms. For example, he referred to General Carlo Alberto Dalla Chiesa as "general Amen," explaining that it was he who, during the weeks of Aldo Moro's detention in the hands of his kidnappers, had informed Interior Minister Francesco Cossiga of the location of the hideout where Moro was being detained. In 1978, Pecorelli wrote that Dalla Chiesa was in danger and would be assassinated. Dalla Chiesa was murdered four years later, in September 1982.

After Aldo Moro's 1978 assassination, Mino Pecorelli published some confidential documents, mainly Moro's letters to his family. In a cryptic article published in May 1978, Pecorelli drew a connection between Operation Gladio, NATO's stay-behind anti-communist organization (whose existence was publicly acknowledged by Prime Minister Giulio Andreotti in October 1990) and Moro's death. During his interrogations by terrorists, Aldo Moro had made reference to "NATO's anti-guerrilla activities".[1]

Death
Pecorelli's dead body in his Citroën CX.

Mino Pecorelli was killed in Rome's Prati district with four gunshots, on March 20, 1979. The bullets used to kill him were Gevelot brand, a peculiarly rare type of bullets not easily found on gun markets, legal and clandestine alike. The same kind of bullets were later found in the Banda della Magliana 's weapon stock, concealed in the Health Ministry's basement.

Investigations targeted Massimo Carminati, member of the far-right organization Nuclei Armati Rivoluzionari (NAR) and of the Banda della Magliana; Danilo Abbruciati; the head of Propaganda Due, Licio Gelli; Antonio Viezzer; and Cristiano and Valerio Fioravanti.

On April 6, 1993, Mafia turncoat Tommaso Buscetta told Palermo prosecutors that he had learnt from his boss Gaetano Badalamenti that Pecorelli's murder had been carried out in the interest of prime minister Giulio Andreotti. The Salvo cousins, two powerful Sicilian politicians with deep ties to local Mafia families, were also involved in the murder. Buscetta testified that Gaetano Badalamenti told him that the murder had been commissioned by the Salvo cousins, as a favor to Andreotti. Andreotti allegedly was afraid that Pecorelli was about to publish information that could have destroyed his political career. Among the information was the complete memorial of Aldo Moro, which would be published only in 1990 and which Pecorelli had shown to general Carlo Alberto Dalla Chiesa before his death.[3] Dalla Chiesa was also assassinated by Mafia in September 1982.

In 1999, a Perugia court acquitted Andreotti, his right-hand man Claudio Vitalone (a former Foreign Trade Minister), Badalamenti and Giuseppe Calò, as well as the alleged killers Massimo Carminati, one of the founder of the NAR, and Michelangelo La Barbera from the charges brought against them.

On November 17, 2002, on appeal, Andreotti and Badalamenti were sentenced to 24 years of reclusion for Pecorelli's murder. The sentence, however, was thrown out by the Supreme Court of Cassation on October 30, 2003.

References
  1. Moro's ghost haunts political life, by Philip Willan, The Guardian, May 9, 2003
  2. List of P2 affiliated
  3. Maria Antonietta, Calabrò. "Intreccio Pecorelli-Moro: già da un anno s'indaga" (in Italian). Corriere della Sera. Retrieved 19 October 2010.
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Carmine Pecorelli

topic

Carmine Pecorelli Carmine Pecorelli (September 14, 1928 – March 20, 1979), known as Mino, was an Italian journalist, shot dead in Rome a year after former prime minister Aldo Moro's 1978 kidnapping and subsequent killing. He was described as a "maverick journalist with excellent secret service contacts."[1] According to Pecorelli, Aldo Moro's kidnapping had been organized by a "lucid superpower" and was inspired by the "logic of Yalta". Pecorelli's name was on Licio Gelli's list of Propaganda Due masonic members, discovered in 1980 by the Italian police.[2] In 2002, former prime minister Giulio Andreotti was sentenced, along with Mafia boss Gaetano Badalamenti, to 24 years' imprisonment for Pecorelli's murder. The sentence was thrown out by the Italian Supreme Court in 2003. Life Pecorelli was born in Sessano del Molise, a small municipality in the province of Isernia. During the German occupation of Italy in World War II he briefly enrolled in Junio Valerio Borghese's private fascist militia Decima



Sessano del Molise

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Sessano del Molise is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Isernia in the Italian region Molise , located about 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Campobasso and about 9 kilometres (6 mi) northeast of Isernia . As of 31 December 2004, it had a population of 871 and an area of 24.7 square kilometres (9.5 sq mi). Sessano del Molise borders the following municipalities: Carpinone , Chiauci , Civitanova del Sannio , Frosolone , Miranda , Pesche , Pescolanciano . Demographic evolution People Carmine Pecorelli References All demographics and other statistics: Italian statistical institute Istat . Sessano del Molise is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Isernia in the Italian region Molise , located about 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Campobasso and about 9 kilometres (6 mi) northeast of Isernia . As of 31 December 2004, it had a population of 871 and an area of 24.7 square kilometres (9.5 sq mi). Sessano del Molise borders the following municipalities: Carpinone , Chiauci , Civitanova del Sannio



Banda della Magliana

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The Banda della Magliana ( Italian pronunciation:  , Magliana Gang) is an Italian criminal organization based in Rome founded in 1975. Given by the media , the name refers to the original neighborhood, the Magliana , of some of its members. The Banda della Magliana was involved in criminal activities during the Italian years of lead (anni di piombo). The Italian justice tied it to other criminal organizations such as the Cosa Nostra , Camorra or 'Ndrangheta , but most importantly also to neofascist activists such as the Nuclei Armati Rivoluzionari (NAR), responsible for the 1980 Bologna massacre , the secret services ( SISMI ) and political figures such as Licio Gelli , grand-master of the freemasonic lodge Propaganda Due (P2). Along with Gladio , the NATO clandestine anti-communist organization, P2 was involved in a strategy of tension during the years of lead which included false flag terrorist attacks. These ties, underground compared to their standard (i.e. "run-of-the-mill") activities (drug dealing, hor



Kidnapping of Aldo Moro

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The kidnapping of Aldo Moro (Italian: Rapimento di Aldo Moro) was a seminal event in Italian political history. On the morning of 16 March 1978, the day on which the new cabinet led by Giulio Andreotti was supposed to have undergone a confidence vote in the Italian Parliament, the car of Aldo Moro, former prime minister and then president of Christian Democracy (Italian: Democrazia Cristiana, or DC, Italy's relative majority party at the time), was assaulted by a group of Red Brigades (Italian: Brigate Rosse, or BR) terrorists in Via Fani in Rome. Firing automatic weapons, the terrorists killed Moro's bodyguards, (two Carabinieri in Moro's car and three policemen in the following car) and kidnapped him. On 9 May 1978 Moro's body was found in the trunk of a Renault 4 in Via Caetani after 55 days of imprisonment, during which Moro was submitted to a political trial by the so-called "people's court" set up by the Brigate Rosse and the Italian government was asked for an exchange of prisoners. Despite the commo



Nuclei Armati Rivoluzionari

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The Nuclei Armati Rivoluzionari ( Italian:  , Armed Revolutionary Core), abbreviated NAR , was an Italian neofascist Militant organization active from 1977 to November 1981. It committed 33 murders in four years, and had planned to assassinate Francesco Cossiga , Gianfranco Fini and Adolfo Urso . The group maintained close links with the Banda della Magliana , a Rome-based criminal organization, which provided such logistical support as lodging, false papers, weapons, and bombs to the NAR. In November 1981, it was discovered that the NAR hid weapons in the basements of the Health Ministry. The first trial against them sentenced 53 persons on 2 May 1985, on charges of terrorist activities. Members The NAR were directed by former RAI child actor , Valerio Fioravanti , his brother Cristiano Fioravanti , Dario Pedretti , Francesca Mambro and Alessandro Alibrandi , who were previous militants of the Movimento Sociale Italiano (MSI). Other important members included: Luigi Ciavardini , Gilberto Cavallini , Stefano



Massimo Carminati

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