111 Eighth Avenue

111 Eighth Avenue, in New York City, is a full-block Art Deco multi-use building located between Eighth and Ninth Avenues, and 15th and 16th Streets in the Chelsea neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York City.

At 2.9 million square feet (270,000 m2), it is currently the city's fourth largest building in terms of floor area as of 2014. It was the largest building until 1963 when the 3.14-million-square-foot (292,000 m2) MetLife Building opened. The World Trade Center (which opened in 1970–71) and 55 Water Street 3.5 million square feet (330,000 m2), which opened in 1972, were also larger but the World Trade Center was destroyed in 2001.[2] When the 3.5-million-square-foot (330,000 m2) One World Trade Center opened in 2014, 111 became the city's fourth largest building.

The building, which has been owned by Google since 2010, is one of the largest technology-owned office buildings in the world. It is also larger than Apple Park, Apple's 2.8 million square feet (260,000 m2) headquarters in Cupertino, California.

Port Authority Commerce Building/Union Inland Terminal #1

The building was designed by Lusby Simpson of Abbott, Merkt & Co. and completed in 1932.[1][3][3] The building had a multipurpose design when it opened in 1932 with the first floor and basement designated as "Union Inland Terminal #1" which was to be used to transport goods by truck to and from railroad lines and/or shipping piers. The second floor was the Commerce section designed for exhibitions and the upper floors were designed for manufacturing.[4][5] The Union Inland Terminal was built by the Port Authority to be a warehouse/union station to handle less than carload (LCL) shipments, consolidating the shipping functions of the Hudson River piers two blocks west of the building, the eight trunk railroads that operated a block west of the building and truck operations (an inland terminal by definition is a warehouse that is not immediately next to railroad lines/piers but is nearby and is used to relieve congestion at the transfer points).[4][5]

At its peak in the 1930s the Port Authority said it was handling more than half of the LCL freight operations south of 59th Street in Manhattan with more than 8,000 tons of goods passing through it each month. On one day alone in 1937 it was reported that 650 trucks had used the facility.[4][5] The railroads involved were the Pennsylvania Railroad; Lehigh Valley Railroad; Baltimore & Ohio; Erie Railroad; Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad; Central Railroad of New Jersey; New York Central Railroad; New York, New Haven & Hartford.[4][5] The building included four freight elevators that could carry fully loaded 20 ton trucks.[4][5] Because of the warehouse mission of the building it was able to avoid some of the setback rules that greatly reduced the buildable space available for the skyscrapers that mark the Manhattan skyline. As a result, the 15-story building with its football field size floors has more available rentable square footage than the 102-story Empire State Building which has 2.2 million square feet.[4][5] The construction occurred at a time of a massive projects built to deal with what at the time was street level freight railroad traffic on Manhattan's west side. Other projects in the neighborhood in the era included construction of the High Line and Starrett-Lehigh Building.

Port Authority Building

The initial plan had called for more inland freight operations to be erected in Manhattan. However the freight transportation changed and freight railroads played a dwindling importance in Manhattan. By 1947 its initial mission was pretty much abandoned and it became the Port Authority Building which remained the Port Authority's headquarters until the opening of the World Trade Center in 1970.[4][5]

Transition to the digital age

The massive building served a dwindling warehouse/backoffice outpost until 1998 when Taconic Investment Partners acquired it.[6]

Taconic began marketing it as a location to be used as a carrier hotel for the new booming internet business. This was coupled with the fashionable rise of the Chelsea neighborhood that surrounded it.[5]

Google
The Ninth Avenue façade featuring the Google corporate logo

In 2010, Google, which had previously leased space in the building,[7] contracted to purchase the entire 2,900,000-square-foot (270,000 m2) building, in a deal reported to be worth around $1.9 billion.[8][9]

The building's meet-me room in its carrier hotel was once the biggest in the city (the other big meet-me room is at 60 Hudson Street).[10]

111 8th Avenue is adjacent to trunk dark fiber lines stretching from Hudson Street and continuing up Ninth Avenue.[10] That line at the time was owned by Lexent Metro Connect. There was speculation at the time of the acquisition that Google would use its strategic location to launch a Google Fiber operation in New York City. The Google Fiber plan never came to pass and Google has denied it has any plans to bring it to New York City anytime in the near future, although in 2013 it did begin offering free Wi-Fi to its Chelsea neighbors. The Lexent dark fiber line has been acquired by Lightower Fiber Networks.[11]

In 2013 the first class of the newly created Cornell NYC Tech school began classes in the building, in space donated by Google. Classes continued in the building until the school moved to its new location on Roosevelt Island in 2017.[12] Despite the massive size of the acquisition, Google has still found itself having to rent space elsewhere because it has been unable to break the leases with some of its tenants, including Nike, Deutsch Inc., and Bank of New York.[13] After years of renting additional space across the street in the Chelsea Market, Google purchased that building in 2018.[14]

Notable tenants
See also
References
  1. Gustin, Sam (December 22, 2010). "Google Buys Giant New York Building for 1.9 Billion". Epicenter (blog of Wired). Retrieved May 2, 2012.
  2. "What is the largest building in New York City?". Quora. Retrieved May 24, 2013.
  3. White, Norval & Willensky, Elliot (2000), AIA Guide to New York City (4th ed.), New York: Three Rivers Press, ISBN 978-0-8129-3107-5, p. 183.
  4. "Railroad Operated Pier Stations & Inland Freight Stations of Manhattan". Members.trainweb.com. Retrieved May 24, 2013.
  5. "NYC Commercial Real Estate - Page 73". Wirednewyork.com. Retrieved May 24, 2013.
  6. Holusha, John (October 24, 1999). "Commercial Property /111 Eighth Avenue; Developers Taking a Manhattan Formula to Chicago". The New York Times. Retrieved May 24, 2013.
  7. Miller, Rich (January 19, 2010). "Google Leases More Space at 111 Eighth Ave". datacenterknowledge.com. Archived from the original on December 1, 2010. Retrieved December 3, 2010.
  8. Miller, Rich (December 3, 2010). "WSJ: Google Is Buying 111 8th Avenue". datacenterknowledge.com. Archived from the original on December 30, 2010. Retrieved December 3, 2010.
  9. Bagli, Charles V. (December 2, 2010). "Google Signs Deal To Buy Manhattan Office Building". The New York Times. Retrieved December 3, 2010.
  10. Optical Networks/WDM - Hui Pan, Editor - Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  11. Alex Fitzpatrick (January 8, 2013). "Google Rolls Out Biggest Free Wi-Fi Network in New York City". Mashable.com. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  12. "Cornell Tech Campus Opens on Roosevelt Island" (Sept 12, 2017)
  13. Geiger, Daniel. "Nike to Google: Just Drop Dead". The Commercial Observer. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  14. "Furthering our New York investment" (March 20, 2018)
  15. "Cornell's NYC tech campus finds temporary home at Google". Cornell Chronicle. Cornell University.
External links

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111 Eighth Avenue

topic

111 Eighth Avenue

111 Eighth Avenue, in New York City, is a full-block Art Deco multi-use building located between Eighth and Ninth Avenues, and 15th and 16th Streets in the Chelsea neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York City. At 2.9 million square feet (270,000 m2), it is currently the city's fourth largest building in terms of floor area as of 2014. It was the largest building until 1963 when the 3.14-million-square-foot (292,000 m2) MetLife Building opened. The World Trade Center (which opened in 1970–71) and 55 Water Street 3.5 million square feet (330,000 m2), which opened in 1972, were also larger but the World Trade Center was destroyed in 2001.[2] When the 3.5-million-square-foot (330,000 m2) One World Trade Center opened in 2014, 111 became the city's fourth largest building. The building, which has been owned by Google since 2010, is one of the largest technology-owned office buildings in the world. It is also larger than Apple Park, Apple's 2.8 million square feet (260,000 m2) headquarters in Cupertino, ...more...

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14th Street/Eighth Avenue (New York City Subway)

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14th Street/Eighth Avenue (New York City Subway)

14th Street/Eighth Avenue is an underground New York City Subway station complex shared by the IND Eighth Avenue Line and the BMT Canarsie Line. It is located at Eighth Avenue and 14th Street in Manhattan, and served by the: A, E, and L trains at all times C train at all times except late nights The whole complex is ADA-compliant, with the accessible station entrance at 14th Street. This complex was renovated at the beginning of the 21st century. This station had two artworks installed here. The first one was in 1989 by Ross Lewis named Parallel Motion. It shows images of moving bodies in the mezzanine drawn by brushstrokes using Chinese calligraphy. It was removed in 1995 and is now at the lobby of Public School 89 in Battery Park City. The second art installation by Tom Otterness, called Life Underground, was installed in 2001. It features whimsical bronze sculptures, including a sewer alligator, scattered about the station. There are a number of MTA New York City Transit Authority training facilit ...more...

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Eighth Avenue (Manhattan)

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Eighth Avenue (Manhattan)

Template:Attached KML/Eighth Avenue (Manhattan) KML is from Wikidata The Hearst Tower at West 57th Street and Eighth Avenue Eighth Avenue is a major north-south avenue on the west side of Manhattan in New York City, carrying northbound traffic below 59th Street. While the avenue has different names at different points in Manhattan, it is actually one continuous stretch of road. Description Eighth Avenue begins in the West Village neighborhood at Abingdon Square (where Hudson Street becomes 8th Avenue at an intersection with Bleecker Street) and runs north for 44 blocks through Chelsea, the Garment District, Hell's Kitchen's east end, Midtown and the Broadway theatre district in the eponymous neighborhood, before it finally enters Columbus Circle at 59th Street and becomes Central Park West. North of Frederick Douglass Circle, it resumes its Eighth Avenue designation, but is also known as Frederick Douglass Boulevard. The avenue ends north of 155th Street, and merges into the Harlem River Drive. The New ...more...

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Googleplex

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Googleplex

The Googleplex is the corporate headquarters complex of Google and its parent company Alphabet Inc., located at 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway in Mountain View, California, United States, near Silicon Valley's capital San Jose. The original complex, with 2,000,000 square feet (190,000 m2) of office space, is the company's second largest square footage assemblage of Google buildings, after Google's 111 Eighth Avenue building in New York City, which the company bought in 2010. Once the 1,100,000-square-foot (100,000 m2) Bay View addition went online in 2015, the Googleplex became the largest collection of Google buildings with 3,100,000 square feet (290,000 m2) of space.[1] "Googleplex" is a portmanteau of Google and complex (meaning a complex of buildings) and a reference to googolplex, the name given to the large number 10(10100), or 10googol. Facilities and history The south side of the Googleplex Complex Former entrance to lobby of Building 40 The Original campus SGI Campus The site was previously occ ...more...

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Chelsea Market

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Chelsea Market

Chelsea Market from south on Ninth Avenue Chelsea Market is a food hall,[1] shopping mall, office building and television production facility located in the Chelsea neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan, in New York City. It was built in the former National Biscuit Company (Nabisco) factory complex where the Oreo cookie was invented and produced. Description The Chelsea Market complex fills an entire city block bounded by Ninth and Tenth Avenues and 15th and 16th Streets, with a connecting bridge over Tenth Avenue to the adjacent 85 Tenth Avenue building, which was also part of the Nabisco complex but is now separately owned.[2] In addition to the retail concourse, it also provides standard office space for tenants, including media and broadcasting companies such as Oxygen Network, Food Network, MLB.com, BAMTech, EMI Music Publishing and the local New York City cable station NY1. Also, more recently, Google has moved into some of the second, third, and fourth floors along with its subsidiary YouTube on ...more...

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Sundar Pichai

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Sundar Pichai

Pichai Sundararajan (born 12 July 1972), also known as Sundar Pichai, is an Indian American business executive. Pichai is the chief executive officer (CEO) of Google Inc.[6][7][8] Formerly the Product Chief of Google, Pichai's current role was announced on 10 August 2015, as part of the restructuring process that made Alphabet Inc. into Google's parent company,[9] and he assumed the position on 2 October 2015.[10] Early life and education Pichai was born in Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India.[11][12]Sundar Pichai’s mother Lakshmi was a stenographer and his father, Regunatha Pichai was an electrical engineer at GEC, the British conglomerate. His father also had a manufacturing plant that produced electrical components.[13][14] Sundar grew up in a two-room apartment in Ashok Nagar, Chennai.[13] Sundar completed schooling in Jawahar Vidyalaya, a Central Board of Secondary Education school in Ashok Nagar, Chennai and completed the Class XII from Vana Vani school in the Indian Institute of Technology Madras.[15][16] P ...more...

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Android P

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Android P

Android "P" is the upcoming ninth major version of the Android operating system. It was first announced by Google on March 7, 2018,[2] and the first developer preview was released on the same day.[3] The second preview, considered beta quality, was released on May 8, 2018.[4] The third preview, called Beta 2, was released on June 6, 2018.[5] The fourth preview, called Beta 3, was released on July 2, 2018.[6] Features Android P Easter eggs New user interface for the quick settings menu.[7] The clock has moved to the left of the notification bar.[8] Battery saver no longer shows an orange overlay on the notification and status bars.[7] A "screenshot" button has been added to the power options.[8] A new "Lockdown" mode which disables biometric authentication once activated. Rounded corners across the graphical user interface. New transitions for switching between apps, or activities within apps. Richer messaging notifications, where a full conversation can be had within a notification, full scal ...more...

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Taconic Investment Partners

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Taconic Investment Partners

Taconic Investment Partners is a real estate developer in New York City.[2] They have been involved in projects such as Essex Crossing, American Bank Note Company Printing Plant, 111 Eighth Avenue (where they have their offices) and Coney Island. Taconic was formed in 1998 by Charles R. Bendit and Paul E. Pariser. 111 Eighth Avenue was one of their first investments[3] The firm became well known when they sold the building to Google for $2 billion in 2010.[4][5] References "Taconic Investment Partners". taconicinvestments.com. Retrieved 2018-02-04. "Taconic Investment Partners". The Real Deal New York. Retrieved 2018-02-04. Holusha, John (25 January 1998). "Commercial Property/111 Eighth Avenue; From Back Office to Front Office and High Tech". New York Times. Retrieved 2018-02-04. "It's official, Google just bought one of New York's biggest buildings". Fortune. Retrieved 2018-02-04. Geiger, Daniel (2 February 2014). "Real estate giants look to outer boroughs". Crain's New York Business. Retr ...more...

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Android Oreo

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Android Oreo

Android "Oreo" (codenamed Android O during development) is the eighth major update and the 15th version of the Android operating system. It was first released as an alpha quality developer preview in March 2017 and released to the public on August 21, 2017. It contains a number of major features, including notification grouping, picture-in-picture support for video, performance improvements and battery usage optimization, and support for autofillers, Bluetooth 5, system-level integration with VoIP apps, wide color gamuts, and Wi-Fi Aware. Android Oreo also introduces two major platform features: Android Go – a software distribution of the operating system for low-end devices – and support for implementing a hardware abstraction layer. As of 17 May 2018, 5.7% of Android devices run Oreo, with 4.9% on 8.0 and 0.8% on 8.1.[3] History Android Oreo was internally codenamed "Oatmeal Cookie."[4] On March 21, 2017, Google released the first developer preview of Android "O",[5][6][7] available for the Nexus 5X, Ne ...more...

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CT (company)

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CT (company)

CT, or the Corporation Trust Company, is a wholly owned subsidiary of Wolters Kluwer, a multi-national information services company based in the Netherlands with operations in over 35 countries. CT Corporation is the largest registered agent service firm in the world[2] representing hundreds of thousands of business entities worldwide. It provides software and services that legal professionals use. History The company now known as CT Corporation has been in the registered agent business since its founding in New Jersey in 1892[3] with only 44 employees. The original charter of the company was handwritten and stated that its purpose was "to carry on a general agency business, especially the acting as agent of and trustee for corporations". In 1895, what was then the Corporation Trust Company began assisting lawyers with the details of incorporating and qualifying corporations in all states and territories. They opened their first office in New York City in 1899. In 1955, they exceeded 75,000 units of statut ...more...

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86th Street (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

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86th Street (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

86th Street is a local station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. Located at Central Park West and 86th Street on the Upper West Side, the station is closed for renovations from June to October 2018. Under normal service patterns, it is served by the C train at all times except nights, when the A train takes over service. The B train provides additional service here on weekdays except nights. Station layout Track layout Upper level to 96 St Lower level to 81 St G Street Level Exit / Entrance B1 Northbound express ← do not stop here Northbound local ← do not stop here (96th Street) Side platform, not in service ...more...

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Google Translate

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Google Translate

Google Translate is a free multilingual machine translation service developed by Google, to translate text. It offers a website interface, mobile apps for Android and iOS, and an API that helps developers build browser extensions and software applications. Google Translate supports over 100 languages at various levels and as of May 2017, serves over 500 million people daily. Launched in April 2006 as a statistical machine translation service, it used United Nations and European Parliament transcripts to gather linguistic data. Rather than translating languages directly, it first translates text to English and then to the target language. During a translation, it looks for patterns in millions of documents to help decide on the best translation. Its accuracy has been criticized and ridiculed on several occasions. In November 2016, Google announced that Google Translate would switch to a neural machine translation engine - Google Neural Machine Translation (GNMT) - which translates "whole sentences at a time, ...more...

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Cornell Tech

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Cornell Tech

Cornell Tech is an engineering campus located on Roosevelt Island in Manhattan, New York City. It is anchored by the Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute, a joint academic venture between Cornell University and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. Cornell Tech arose from an economic development initiative of Michael Bloomberg's mayoral administration in 2008. The initiative sought to attract another engineering school to the city in the hope that it would produce entrepreneurial engineers who would in turn start job-creating companies. Seven bids were submitted for the competition, with the administration ultimately selecting Cornell/Technion's bid. As proposed, Cornell Tech would create 28,000 jobs, including 8,000 for academic staff. It would also be able to create 600 companies, leading to $23 billion in economic benefits and an additional $1.4 billion in taxes, during its first three decades of operation. Cornell Tech began operations in 2012 at a temporary site, the New York City offices of Google ...more...

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Flutter (software)

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Flutter (software)

Flutter is an open-source mobile application framework created by Google. It is used to develop applications for Android and iOS, as well as being the primary method of creating applications for Google Fuchsia.[4] History The first version of Flutter was known as "Sky" and ran on the Android operating system. It was unveiled at the 2015 Dart developer summit, with the stated intent of being able to render consistently at 120 frames per second.[5] Framework Architecture The major components of Flutter include: Flutter engine Foundation library Design-specific widgets Flutter engine Flutter's engine, written primarily in C++, provides low-level rendering support using Google's Skia graphics library. Additionally, it interfaces with platform-specific SDKs such as those provided by Android and iOS.[6] Foundation library The Foundation library, written in Dart, provides basic classes and functions which are used to construct applications using Flutter, such as APIs to communicate with the engine.[6][7 ...more...

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YouTube Premium

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YouTube Premium

YouTube Premium (formerly YouTube Red) is a paid streaming subscription service for YouTube in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, South Korea, Austria, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.[1][2][3] It provides advertising-free streaming of all videos hosted by YouTube, exclusive original content produced in collaboration with the site's major creators, as well as offline playback and background playback of videos on mobile devices.[4] The service was originally launched in November 2014 as Music Key, offering only ad-free streaming of music and music videos from participating labels on YouTube and Google Play Music.[5][6][7] The service was then revised and relaunched as YouTube Red on October 31, 2015, expanding its scope to offer ad-free access to all YouTube videos, as opposed to just music.[8] YouTube announced the rebranding of the service as YouTube Premium on May 17, 2018, alongside the return of a separate, YouTube Mu ...more...

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Cathedral Parkway–110th Street (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

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Cathedral Parkway–110th Street (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

Cathedral Parkway–110th Street[5] is a local station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. It is located in the Upper West Side and Morningside Heights, Manhattan, at West 110th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard at the northwest corner of Central Park. From April to September 2018, the station is closed for renovations. Under normal service patterns, it is served by the C train at all times except nights, when the A train takes over service. The B train provides additional service here on weekdays except nights. Station layout Track layout to 116 St to 103 St G Street Level Exit/Entrance M Mezzanine Fare control, station agent P Platform level Side platform, temporarily closed for construction Northbound local ← do not stop here (116th Street) Northbound express ← do not ...more...

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Gmail

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Gmail

Gmail is a free, advertising-supported email service developed by Google. Users can access Gmail on the web and using third-party programs that synchronize email content through POP or IMAP protocols. Gmail started as a limited beta release on April 1, 2004, and ended its testing phase on July 7, 2009. At launch, Gmail had an initial storage capacity offer of one gigabyte per user, a significantly higher amount than competitors offered at the time. Today, the service comes with 15 gigabytes of storage. Users can receive emails up to 50 megabytes in size, including attachments, while they can send emails up to 25 megabytes. In order to send larger files, users can insert files from Google Drive into the message. Gmail has a search-oriented interface and a "conversation view" similar to an Internet forum. The service is notable among website developers for its early adoption of Ajax. Google's mail servers automatically scan emails for multiple purposes, including to filter spam and malware, and to add context ...more...

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Google Account

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Google Account

A Google Account is a user account that is required for access, authentication and authorization to certain online Google services, including Gmail, Google+, Google Hangouts and Blogger. A wide variety of Google products do not require an account, including Google Search, YouTube, Google Books, Google Finance and Google Maps. However, an account is needed for uploading videos to YouTube and for making edits in Google Maps. After a Google Account is created, the owner may selectively enable or disable various Google applications.[1] YouTube and Blogger maintain separate accounts for users who registered with the services before the Google acquisition. However, effective April 2011 YouTube users are required to link to a separate Google Account if they wish to continue to log into that service.[2] Google Account users may create a publicly accessible Google profile, to configure their presentation on Google products to other Google users. A Google profile can be linked to a user's profiles on various social- ...more...

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Spanner (database)

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Spanner (database)

Cloud Spanner Booth at Google Cloud Summit Spanner is Google's globally distributed NewSQL database.[1] Google describes Spanner as a not pure relational database system because each table must have a primary key column.[2] History, description The lack of transactions in Bigtable led to frequent complaints from users, so Google made distributed transactions central to Spanner's design. Based on its experience with Bigtable, Google argues that it is better to have application programmers deal with performance problems due to overuse of transactions as bottlenecks arise, rather than always coding around the lack of transactions.[2] Described as a NewSQL[3] platform, Spanner is used internally within Google's infrastructure as part of the Google platform[4] and also available as part of Google Cloud Platform.[5] Spanner uses the Paxos algorithm as part of its operation to shard data across hundreds of datacenters.[1] It makes heavy use of hardware-assisted clock synchronization using GPS clocks and atomic c ...more...

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Google Camera

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Google Camera

Google Camera is a camera application developed by Google for Android. It was initially supported on all devices running Android 4.4 KitKat and higher, but is now only officially supported on Google's Nexus and Pixel devices. It was publicly released for Android 4.4+ on the Google Play Store on April 16, 2014[1] and removed from public view on Feb 17, 2016.[2] Whilst Google Camera is now made solely for specific device hardware, in mid-2017, a developer created a modified version of Google Camera for any smartphone equipped with either a Snapdragon 820, 821 or 835 processor.[3] Features Google Camera contains a number of features that can be activated either in the Settings page or on the row of icons at the top of the app. HDR+ HDR+ increases the dynamic range of the photo, however unlike traditional High-dynamic-range (HDR) imaging, this is achieved by combining several underexposed photos which has the added benefit of improving colors at the expense of being less effective. An 'HDR+ enhanced' mode i ...more...

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Google Flights

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Google Flights

Google Flights is an online flight booking search service which facilitates the purchase of airline tickets through third party suppliers. History In April 2011, the United States Department of Justice Antitrust Division approved Google's $700 million purchase of ITA Software.[1] On September 13, 2011 Google launched Google Flights, which used algorithms gained from this purchase.[2] Features An innovation of Google Flights is that it allows open-ended searches based on criteria other than destination; for example, a user may search for flights within a range of times and a budget and be offered various destination choices.[3] Alternatively, a user can select a destination, and Google Flights will calculate every price for each day of the next 12 months, visualised in a graph or table. This allows users to easily spot the cheapest date to fly to the destination. Response The service was immediately compared to competitors such as Expedia, Orbitz, Kayak.com, and Bing.[4] Competitor Kayak.com issued a sta ...more...

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Google

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Google

Google LLC[5] is an American multinational technology company that specializes in Internet-related services and products, which include online advertising technologies, search engine, cloud computing, software, and hardware. Google was founded in 1998 by Larry Page and Sergey Brin while they were Ph.D. students at Stanford University, California. Together, they own about 14 percent of its shares and control 56 percent of the stockholder voting power through supervoting stock. They incorporated Google as a privately held company on September 4, 1998. An initial public offering (IPO) took place on August 19, 2004, and Google moved to its new headquarters in Mountain View, California, nicknamed the Googleplex. In August 2015, Google announced plans to reorganize its various interests as a conglomerate called Alphabet Inc. Google, Alphabet's leading subsidiary, will continue to be the umbrella company for Alphabet's Internet interests. Upon completion of the restructure, Sundar Pichai was appointed CEO of Google, ...more...

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General Trivia #9

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55 Water Street

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55 Water Street

55 Water Street is a 687-foot-tall (209 m) skyscraper in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City, on the East River. The 53-story, 3.5-million-square-foot (325,000 m2) structure was completed in 1972. Emery Roth & Sons designed the building, which is tied with 277 Park Avenue as the 40th-tallest building in New York City. When it was completed it was the largest office building in the world, and is still the largest in New York by floor area. In an arrangement with the Office of Lower Manhattan Development, it was built on a superblock created from four adjoining city blocks, suppressing the western part of Front Street. Its closest competitors in square footage are the Met Life Building at 3,140,000 square feet (292,000 m2) and 111 Eighth Avenue at 2,900,000 square feet (270,000 m2). One World Trade Center has roughly the same square footage (3.5 million square feet). The now-destroyed World Trade Center was bigger when it opened in 1973. Description On the north side of the tower is ...more...

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Google Pixelbook

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Google Pixelbook

Google Pixelbook is a portable laptop / tablet hybrid computer developed by Google which runs Chrome OS. It was announced on October 4, 2017 and was released on October 30.[1] Unlike most typical Chromebook devices, the Pixelbook's retail price is much higher at around $1,000, comparable with laptops such as the Apple MacBook Air.[2][3] Features The Pixelbook was planned as the next generation of Google laptops and is the spiritual successor to the Chromebook Pixel laptop discontinued in 2016.[4] The company realized the Chromebook had become successful after a slow start, obtaining a market share of 58% of schools in the US, and designed the Pixelbook as a serious industry player that can compete with Apple and Microsoft in this field.[5] The Google Pixelbook features a 12.3-inch (310 mm) touchscreen design, allowing the device to be used like a tablet. The device also features Google Assistant with a dedicated button. It runs Chrome OS and can launch Android applications natively.[6] It features instant ...more...

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Google Search Console

topic

Google Search Console

Google Search Console (previously Google Webmaster Tools) is a no-charge web service by Google for webmasters. It allows webmasters to check indexing status and optimize visibility of their websites. As of May 20, 2015, Google rebranded Google Webmaster Tools as Google Search Console.[1][2] In January 2018, Google introduced a new version of the Search Console, with a refreshed user interface and improvements.[3] Features It has tools that let webmasters: Submit and check a sitemap and also helps the webmasters to check if there are any errors with their sitemap. Check and set the crawl rate, and view statistics about when Googlebot accesses a particular site. Write and check a robots.txt file to help discover pages that are blocked in robots.txt accidentally. List internal and external pages that link to the site. Get a list of links which Googlebot had difficulty crawling, including the error that Googlebot received when accessing the URLs in question. See what keyword searches on Google led to th ...more...

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Google Traffic

topic

Google Traffic

Google Traffic is a feature on Google Maps that displays traffic conditions in real time on major roads and highways. Google Traffic can be viewed at the Google Maps website, or by using the Google Maps application on a handheld device. Google Traffic works by analyzing the GPS-determined locations transmitted to Google by a large number of mobile phone users. By calculating the speed of users along a length of road, Google is able to generate a live traffic map.[2] Google processes the incoming raw data about mobile phone device locations, and then excludes anomalies such as postal vehicles which make frequent stops. When a threshold of users in a particular area is noted, the overlay along roads and highways on the Google map changes color.[3] History Early versions of Google Maps provided information to users about how long it would take to travel a particular road in heavy traffic conditions. Traffic information was based on historical traffic data and was not particularly accurate.[3] In 2004 Google ...more...

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Google hacking

topic

Google hacking

Google hacking, also named Google dorking,[1][2] is a computer hacking technique that uses Google Search and other Google applications to find security holes in the configuration and computer code that websites use. Basics Google hacking involves using advanced operators in the Google search engine to locate specific strings of text within search results. Some of the more popular examples are finding specific versions of vulnerable Web applications. The following search query would locate all web pages that have that particular text contained within them. It is normal for default installations of applications to include their running version in every page they serve, for example, "Powered by XOOPS 2.2.3 Final" intitle:admbook intitle:Fversion filetype:php One can even retrieve the username and password list from Microsoft FrontPage servers by inputting the given microscript in Google search field: "#-Frontpage-" inurl:administrators.pwd or filetype:log inurl password login Devices connected to the Inter ...more...

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Nexus 5

topic

Nexus 5

Nexus 5 (codenamed Hammerhead)[12] is an Android smartphone manufactured by LG Electronics for Google. Co-developed with and marketed by Google Inc. as part of its Nexus line of flagship devices and unveiled on October 31, 2013, it is a successor to the Nexus 4. Nexus 5 served as the launch device for Android 4.4 "KitKat", which introduced a refreshed interface, performance improvements, increased Google Now integration, better battery life and other features. The Nexus 5 received mostly positive reviews, praising the device's balance of overall performance and cost in comparison to other "flagship" phones, along with the quality of its display and some of the changes introduced by Android 4.4. The display was, however, criticized for being too dim in comparison to other devices, and the camera was criticized for having inconsistent quality. Release The device was unveiled on October 31, 2013; it was made available for pre-order from Google Play Store the same day in 16 GB and 32 GB models.[13][14] When re ...more...

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Google Goggles

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Google Goggles

Google Goggles is an image recognition mobile app developed by Google.[1] It is used for searches based on pictures taken by handheld devices. For example, taking a picture of a famous landmark searches for information about it, or taking a picture of a product's barcode would search for information on the product.[2] History Google Goggles was developed for use on Google's Android operating system for mobile devices. While initially only available in a beta version for Android phones, Google announced its plans to enable the software to run on other platforms, notably iPhone and BlackBerry devices.[3] Google did not discuss a non-handheld format. On 5 October 2010, Google announced availability of Google Goggles for devices running iOS 4.0.[4] In a May 2014 update to Google Mobile for iOS, the Google Goggles feature was removed. At Google I/O 2017, a similar app Google Lens was announced that has similar functions as Goggles and uses the Google Assistant.[5] Uses The system could identify various labels ...more...

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Alphabet Inc.

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Alphabet Inc.

Alphabet Inc. is an American multinational conglomerate headquartered in Mountain View, California. It was created through a corporate restructuring of Google on October 2, 2015[3] and became the parent company of Google and several former Google subsidiaries.[4][5][6][7][8] The two founders of Google assumed executive roles in the new company, with Larry Page serving as CEO and Sergey Brin as President.[9] It has 80,110 employees (as of December 2017).[10] Alphabet's portfolio encompasses several industries, including technology, life sciences, investment capital, and research. Some of its subsidiaries include Google, Calico, Chronicle, GV, CapitalG, Verily, Waymo, X, Loon[11] and Google Fiber. Some of the subsidiaries of Alphabet have altered their names since leaving Google and becoming part of the new parent company—Google Ventures becoming GV, Google Life Sciences becoming Verily and Google X becoming just X. Following the restructuring, Page became CEO of Alphabet and Sundar Pichai took his position as ...more...

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Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

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Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

An old Port Authority logo from the 2000s The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) is a joint venture between the United States, New York and New Jersey, established in 1921 through an interstate compact authorized by the United States Congress. The Port Authority oversees much of the regional transportation infrastructure, including bridges, tunnels, airports, and seaports, within the geographical jurisdiction of the Port of New York and New Jersey. This 1,500-square-mile (3,900 km2) port district is generally encompassed within a 25-mile (40 km) radius of the Statue of Liberty National Monument.[1] The Port Authority is headquartered at 4 World Trade Center and is a member of the Real Estate Board of New York.[2] The Port Authority operates the Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal, which handled the third-largest volume of shipping among all ports in the United States in 2004 and the largest on the Eastern Seaboard.[3] The Port Authority also operates Hudson River crossings, including the H ...more...

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Android TV

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Android TV

Android TV is a version of the Android operating system designed for digital media players. A replacement for Google TV, it features a user interface designed around content discovery and voice search, surfacing content aggregated from various media apps and services, and integration with other recent Google technologies such as Assistant, Cast, and Knowledge Graph. The platform was first unveiled in June 2014, with its Nexus Player launch device unveiled that October. The platform has also been adopted as smart TV middleware by a number of display companies including Sony, Sharp and VU TVs. History Android TV was first announced at Google I/O in June 2014, as a successor to the commercially-unsuccessful Google TV. The Verge characterized it as being more in line with other digital media player platforms, but leveraging Google's Knowledge Graph project, Chromecast compatibility, a larger emphasis on search, closer ties to the Android ecosystem (including Google Play Store and integration with other Android ...more...

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Google Lens

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Google Lens

Google Lens is an image recognition mobile app developed by Google. First announced during Google I/O 2017,[1] it is designed to bring up relevant information using visual analysis. Features When directing the phone's camera at an object, Google Lens will attempt to identify the object or read labels and text and show relevant search results and information.[2] For example, when pointing the device's camera at a Wi-Fi label containing the network name and password, it will automatically connect to the Wi-Fi source that has been scanned. Lens is also integrated with the Google Photos and Google Assistant apps.[3] The service is similar to Google Goggles, a previous app that functioned similarly but with lesser capability.[4][5] Lens uses more advanced deep learning routines, similar to other apps like Bixby Vision (for Samsung devices released 2016 and after)[6] and Image Analysis Toolset (available on Google Play); artificial neural networks are used to detect and identify objects, landmarks and to improve ...more...

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Google Pixel

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Google Pixel

Google Pixel is a line of consumer electronic devices from Google that run either the Chrome OS or Android operating system. The Pixel brand was introduced in February 2013 with the first generation Chromebook Pixel. The Pixel line includes laptops and smartphones, as well as the discontinued Pixel C tablet. The devices can be bought through the Google Store or at retail stores. Phones Pixel Pixel and Pixel XL smartphones Google announced the first generation Pixel smartphones, the Pixel and the Pixel XL, on October 4, 2016 during the #MadeByGoogle event.[1] Google emphasized the camera on the two phones, which ranked as the best smartphone camera on DxOMarkMobile with 90 points until HTC released the U11, which also scored 90 points.[2] This is largely due to software optimizations such as HDR+. The Pixel phones also include unlimited cloud storage for pictures on Google Photos[3] and an unlockable bootloader (when purchased directly from Google; phones purchased through Verizon Wireless and its partne ...more...

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163rd Street–Amsterdam Avenue (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

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163rd Street–Amsterdam Avenue (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

163rd Street–Amsterdam Avenue is a local station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway, located in Washington Heights, Manhattan at the intersection of Amsterdam and Saint Nicholas Avenues. From March to September 2018, the station is closed for renovations. Under normal service patterns, the station is served by the C train at all times except nights, when the A train takes over service. Station layout Track layout to 168 St to 155 St G Street Level Exit/Entrance B1 Mezzanine Fare control, station agent B2 Side platform, not in service Northbound local ← do not stop here (168th Street) Southbound local → do not stop here (155th Street) → Side platform, not in service B3[6] Northbound express ← does not stop here Southbound express → does not stop here → The 16 ...more...

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Android version history

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Android version history

The version history of the Android mobile operating system began with the public release of the Android beta on November 5, 2007. The first commercial version, Android 1.0, was released on September 23, 2008. Android is continually developed by Google and the Open Handset Alliance, and it has seen a number of updates to its base operating system since the initial release. Versions 1.0 and 1.1 were not released under specific code names, although Android 1.1 was unofficially known as Petit Four. Android code names are confectionery-themed and have been in alphabetical order since 2009's Android 1.5 Cupcake, with the most recent major version being Android 8.1 Oreo, released in December 2017. Global Android version distribution since December 2009, as of May 2018. Android Marshmallow v 6.0 (the oldest supported version) is running on 26.0% of all Android devices accessing Google Play while Android Nougat (v 7.0 & 7.1) is running on 31.1%, and all supported including the newest Oreo versions, run on 62 ...more...

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* IT chronicle *

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Material Design

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Material Design

A material Android app, showing buttons, toggle switches, a notification, check and radio buttons, a scroll bar and a floating action button. Material Design (codenamed Quantum Paper)[1] is a design language developed in 2014 by Google. Expanding upon the "card" motifs that debuted in Google Now, Material Design makes more liberal use of grid-based layouts, responsive animations and transitions, padding, and depth effects such as lighting and shadows. Google announced Material Design on June 25, 2014, at the 2014 Google I/O conference. Overview Designer Matías Duarte explained that, "unlike real paper, our digital material can expand and reform intelligently. Material has physical surfaces and edges. Seams and shadows provide meaning about what you can touch." Google states that their new design language is based on paper and ink but implementation will take place in an advanced manner.[2][3][4] Material Design can be used in all supported versions of Android, or in API Level 21 (Android 5.0) and newer ( ...more...

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72nd Street (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

topic

72nd Street (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

72nd Street is a local station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. It is located at 72nd Street and Central Park West on the Upper West Side. From May to October 2018, the station is closed for renovations. Under normal service patterns, it is served by the C train at all times except nights, when the A train takes over service. The B train provides additional service here on weekdays except nights. Station layout G Street Level Exit / Entrance B1 Northbound express ← do not stop here Northbound local ← do not stop here (81st Street–Museum of Natural History) Side platform, not in service Mezzanine Fare control, station agent, MetroCard vending machines B2 Southbound express → do not stop here → Southbound local → do not stop here (59th Street–Columbus Circle) → Side platform, not in service Track layout Upper level to 81 St–AMNH ...more...

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Google Public DNS

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Google Public DNS

Google Public DNS is a free Domain Name System (DNS) service offered to Internet users world-wide by Google. It functions as a recursive name server. Google Public DNS was announced on 3 December 2009,[1] in an effort described as "making the web faster and more secure".[2][3] As of 2014, it is the largest public DNS service in the world, handling 400 billion requests per day.[4] Google Public DNS is not related to Google Cloud DNS, which is a DNS hosting service. Service Google Public DNS operates recursive name servers for public use at the IP addresses 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 for IPv4 service, and 2001:4860:4860::8888 and 2001:4860:4860::8844, for IPv6 access.[5][6] The addresses are mapped to the nearest operational server by anycast routing.[7] The service does not use conventional DNS name server software, such as BIND, instead relying on a custom-designed implementation, conforming to the DNS standards set forth by the IETF. It fully supports the DNSSEC protocol since 19 March 2013. Previously, Google ...more...

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Google Duo

topic

Google Duo

Google Duo is a video chat mobile app developed by Google, available on the Android and iOS operating systems. It was announced at Google's developer conference on May 18, 2016, and began its worldwide release on August 16, 2016. Google Duo lets users make video calls in high definition. It is optimized for low-bandwidth networks. End-to-end encryption is enabled by default. Duo is based on phone numbers, allowing users to call someone from their contact list. The app automatically switches between Wi-Fi and cellular networks. A "Knock Knock" feature lets users see a live preview of the caller before answering. An update in April 2017 lets users worldwide make audio-only calls. History Google Duo was announced at Google's developer conference on May 18, 2016,[3] and began its international rollout on Android and iOS devices starting August 16, 2016.[4][5][6] In an email sent to Android phone manufacturers on October 5, 2016, Google announced that, starting December 1, 2016, Google Duo replaced Hangouts wi ...more...

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List of largest office buildings

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List of largest office buildings

This is a list of largest office buildings in the world. Use sort function to rank by parameter. Tallest office buildings in the world. Burj Khalifa in Dubai Taipei 101 in Taipei, Taiwan Building City Country Floor Area (m2) Height (ft) Height (m) Floors Year CCTV Headquarters Beijing  People's Republic of China 389,079 768 234 51 2012 Apple Park Cupertino  United States 260,000 4 2017 USAA Headquarters: McDermott Building San Antonio  United States 362,322 4 2001 [1] Desjardins Complex Montreal  Canada 418,154 499 152 87 (12/18/23/34) 1973 The Pentagon Arlington  United States 620,000 77 23.5 7 1943 Place du Portage Gatineau  Canada 462,636 70 (20/9/18/14/9) 1976 Burj Khalifa Dubai  United Arab Emirates 309,473 2,722 828 160 2010 Taipei 101 Taipei  Taiwan (Republic of China) 294,258 1,671 509 101 2004 Petronas Tower 1 Kuala Lumpur  Malaysia 218,000 1,483 452 88 19 ...more...

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Lists of tallest buildings

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Google Maps

topic

Google Maps

Google Maps is a web mapping service developed by Google. It offers satellite imagery, street maps, 360° panoramic views of streets (Street View), real-time traffic conditions (Google Traffic), and route planning for traveling by foot, car, bicycle (in beta), or public transportation. Google Maps began as a C++ desktop program at Where 2 Technologies. In October 2004, the company was acquired by Google, which converted it into a web application. After additional acquisitions of a geospatial data visualization company and a realtime traffic analyzer, Google Maps was launched in February 2005.[1] The service's front end utilizes JavaScript, XML, and Ajax. Google Maps offers an API that allows maps to be embedded on third-party websites,[2] and offers a locator for urban businesses and other organizations in numerous countries around the world. Google Map Maker allowed users to collaboratively expand and update the service's mapping worldwide but was discontinued from March 2017. However, crowdsourced contribut ...more...

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Patent search and news updates

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Android Auto

topic

Android Auto

Android Auto is a mobile app developed by Google to mirror features from an Android device (e.g., smartphone) to a car's compatible in-dash information and entertainment head unit or to a dashcam. Once an Android device is paired with the head unit, the system mirrors qualified apps from the device to the vehicle's display, with a simple, driver-friendly user interface. Supported apps, include GPS mapping/navigation, music playback, SMS, telephone, and web search. The system supports both touchscreen and button-controlled head unit displays, although hands-free operation through voice commands is encouraged to minimize driving distraction. Android Auto debuted at Google I/O 2014, and the app was released on 19 March 2015. Android Auto is part of the Open Automotive Alliance announced in 2014, and is a joint effort between 28 automobile manufacturers, with Nvidia as tech supplier. Functionality Android Auto in use displaying Google Maps The most common way Android Auto is deployed is via an Android mobil ...more...

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Google Street View

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Google Street View

Google Street View is a technology featured in Google Maps and Google Earth that provides panoramic views from positions along many streets in the world. It was launched in 2007 in several cities in the United States, and has since expanded to include cities and rural areas worldwide. Streets with Street View imagery available are shown as blue lines on Google Maps. Google Street View displays panoramas of stitched images. Most photography is done by car, but some is done by trekker, tricycle, walking, boat, snowmobile, and underwater apparatus. History and features Street View had its inception in 2001 with The Stanford CityBlock Project, a Google-sponsored Stanford University research project. The project ended in June 2006, and its technology was folded into StreetView.[4] 2007: Launched on May 25 in the United States using Immersive Media technology. 2008: In May Google announces that it was testing face-blurring technology on its photos of the busy streets of Manhattan.[5] The technology uses a com ...more...

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Google APIs

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Google APIs

Google APIs is a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) developed by Google which allow communication with Google Services and their integration to other services. Examples of these include Search, Gmail, Translate or Google Maps. Third-party apps can use these APIs to take advantage of or extend the functionality of the existing services. The APIs provide functionality like analytics, machine learning as a service (the Prediction API) or access to user data (when permission to read the data is given). Another important example is an embedded Google map on a website, which can be achieved using the Static maps API,[1] Places API[2] or Google Earth API.[3] Authentication and authorization Usage of some of the APIs requires authentication and authorization using the OAuth 2.0 protocol. OAuth 2.0 is a simple protocol. To start, it is necessary to obtain credentials from the Developers Console. Then the client app can request an access token from the Google Authorization Server, and uses that token f ...more...

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Calico (company)

topic

Calico (company)

Calico is a research and development biotech company founded on September 18, 2013 by Bill Maris[3][4][2][1] and backed by Google with the goal of combating aging and associated diseases.[5] In Google's 2013 Founders' Letter, Larry Page described Calico as a company focused on "health, well-being, and longevity." The company's name is an acronym for "California Life Company".[6][7] In 2015, Google restructured into Alphabet Inc., making Calico a subsidiary of the new company along with Google and others. As of 2018, Calico has not developed any known drugs or biotechnology products.[8] Partnerships and staff In September 2014, it was announced that Calico, in partnership with AbbVie, would be opening up a R&D facility focused on aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration and cancer. Initially, each company will invest $350 million, with an option for each to add an extra $500 million later on.[9] In the same month, Calico announced a partnership with the University of Texas Southwestern ...more...

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Health care companies of the United States

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Chrome V8

topic

Chrome V8

Chrome V8, or simply V8, is an open-source JavaScript engine developed by The Chromium Project for Google Chrome and Chromium web browsers.[5] The project’s creator is Lars Bak.[6] The first version of the V8 engine was released at the same time as the first version of Chrome: September 2, 2008. It has also been used in Couchbase, MongoDB and Node.js that are used server-side. V8 compiles JavaScript directly to native machine code before executing it, instead of more traditional techniques such as interpreting bytecode or compiling the whole program to machine code and executing it from a filesystem. The compiled code is additionally optimized (and re-optimized) dynamically at runtime, based on heuristics of the code's execution profile. Optimization techniques used include inlining, elision of expensive runtime properties, and inline caching. The garbage collector is a generational incremental collector.[7] V8 can compile to x86, ARM or MIPS instruction set architectures in both their 32- and 64-bit editio ...more...

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Free compilers and interpreters

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Polymer (library)

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Polymer (library)

Polymer is an open-source JavaScript library for building web applications using Web Components. The library is being developed by Google developers and contributors on GitHub. Modern design principles are implemented as a separate project using Google's Material Design design principles. Polymer is used by a number of Google services and websites, including the redesigned YouTube, YouTube Gaming, the redesigned[8] Google Earth, Google I/O websites, Google Play Music, redesign of Google Sites and Allo for web.[9] Other notable users include Netflix, Electronics Arts, ING, Coca-Cola, McDonald's, BBVA, IBM and General Electric. History Public development of Polymer began on Nov 14, 2013 with the release of a Promises Polyfill. This steadily expanded into a web design library covering visual styling guidelines (via Material Design), data binding, and a large number of "Core" and "Paper" Web Components. Core components were originally envisioned to encompass generic functionality that would be essential to m ...more...

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Free software programmed in JavaScript

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Firebase

topic

Firebase

Firebase is a mobile and web application development platform developed by Firebase, Inc. in 2011, then acquired by Google in 2014.[5] History Firebase evolved from Envolve, a prior startup founded by James Tamplin and Andrew Lee in 2011. Envolve provided developers an API that enables the integration of online chat functionality into their websites. After releasing the chat service, Tamplin and Lee found that it was being used to pass application data that weren't chat messages. Developers were using Envolve to sync application data such as game state in real time across their users. Tamplin and Lee decided to separate the chat system and the real-time architecture that powered it. They founded Firebase as a separate company in April 2012.[6] Firebase Inc. raised seed funding in May 2012. The company further raised Series A funding in June 2013.[7] In October 2014, Firebase was acquired by Google.[8] In October 2015, Google acquired Divshot to merge it with the Firebase team. Since the acquisition, Fireba ...more...

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Blink (web engine)

topic

Blink (web engine)

Blink is a browser engine used in the Google Chrome browser and many other projects. It is developed as part of the Chromium project[2] with contributions from Google, Opera Software ASA, Adobe Systems, Intel, Samsung and others.[3][4] It was first announced in April 2013.[5] Engine Blink is a fork of the WebCore component of WebKit[6], which is originally a fork of the KHTML and KJS libraries from KDE[7][8]. It is used in Chrome starting at version 28,[9][10] Opera (15+),[9] Vivaldi, Amazon Silk and other Chromium-based browsers and frameworks. Much of WebCore's code is used for features which Chrome implements differently (such as sandboxing and the multi-process model). These parts were altered for the Blink fork, and although made slightly bulkier, it allowed greater flexibility for adding new features in the future. The fork will also deprecate vendor prefixes; experimental functionality will instead be enabled on an opt-in basis.[11] Aside from these planned changes, Blink currently remains relativel ...more...

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