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Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club


Bob Appleyard

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Bob Appleyard

Robert Appleyard MBE (27 June 1924 – 17 March 2015) was a Yorkshire and England first-class cricketer.[1] He was one of the best English bowlers of the 1950s, a decade which saw England develop its strongest bowling attack of the twentieth century. Able to bowl fast-medium swingers or seamers and off-spinners with almost exactly the same action, Appleyard's career was almost destroyed by injury and illness after his first full season in 1951. In his limited Test career, he took a wicket every fifty-one balls, and in first-class cricket his 708 wickets cost only 15.48 runs each.[1] Career Appleyard in 1954 As a young cricketer Appleyard spent eleven months in hospital after being diagnosed with advanced tuberculosis. Whilst in hospital, Appleyard kept his fingers strong by squeezing a cricket ball under the bed covers. He had to learn to walk again and had the upper half of his left lung removed. After success in local cricket within Yorkshire, Appleyard was engaged by the county in 1950 at the age of 26

Cricketers from Yorkshire

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Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Thomas Barker (cricketer, born 1812)

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Thomas Barker (cricketer, born 1812)

Thomas Rawson Barker (9 April 1812 – 26 April 1873) was an English first-class cricketer, whose career spanned the 1833 to 1849 seasons. He was an amateur who appeared in only nine matches due to his business commitments. He played for Sheffield Cricket Club, whose team was sometimes called Yorkshire, and for other clubs in the county. Barker was born in Bakewell, Derbyshire. He was a right-handed batsman and a left-arm medium pace bowler using the roundarm style. He appeared in what is sometimes called the inaugural Yorkshire first-class match at the Hyde Park Ground, Sheffield, in 1833 against Norfolk, although at this time Yorkshire was still the Sheffield Club. In doing so, he became the first non-Yorkshire born player to play first-class cricket for a team called Yorkshire.[1] Barker played in nine first-class matches from 1833 to 1849, scoring 121 runs at 11 with a top score of 37, and taking 38 wickets at an estimated 7.93, with a best analysis of five for 11. A lead merchant in Sheffield, Barker ser

Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Sheffield Cricket Club cricketers

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People from Bakewell

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Dickie Bird

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Dickie Bird

Harold Dennis "Dickie" Bird, OBE (born 19 April 1933,[1] Staincross, West Riding of Yorkshire, England) is a retired English international cricket umpire. During his long umpiring career, he became a much-loved figure among players and viewing public, due to his excellence as an umpire, but also his many eccentricities. Bird played first-class cricket for Yorkshire and Leicestershire as a right-handed batsman, but only scored two centuries in 93 appearances. His career was blighted by a knee injury, which eventually caused him to retire aged 31. He umpired in 66 Test matches (at the time a world record) and 69 One Day Internationals including 3 World Cup Finals. In February 2014, Yorkshire announced that Bird was to be voted in as the club's president at their Annual General Meeting on 29 March.[2] His autobiography sold more than a million copies. Early life The son of a miner, he gained the nickname 'Dickie' at school. He lives in the South Yorkshire village of Staincross. Bird failed his 11-plus and we

Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Presidents of Yorkshire CCC

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Sportspeople from Barnsley

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Geoffrey Boycott

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Geoffrey Boycott

Sir Geoffrey Boycott OBE (born 21 October 1940) is a retired cricketer, who formerly played cricket for Yorkshire and England. In a prolific and sometimes controversial playing career from 1962 to 1986, Boycott established himself as one of England's most successful opening batsmen.[3] Since retiring as a player, he has pursued a successful career as a cricket commentator, despite a conviction in 1998 for assaulting his then partner. Boycott made his international debut in a 1964 Test match against Australia.[4][5] He was known for his ability to occupy the crease and became a key feature of England's Test batting line-up for many years, although he was less successful in his limited One Day International (ODI) appearances.[6] He accumulated large scores – he is the equal fifth-highest accumulator of first-class centuries in history, eighth in career runs and the first English player to average over 100 in a season (1971 and 1979) – but often encountered friction with his teammates.[4][7][8] Never the most

Cricket players and officials awarded knighthoods

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Cancer survivors

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Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Lawrence Byford

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Lawrence Byford

Sir Lawrence Byford CBE QPM DL (10 August 1925 – 10 February 2018) was Chief Inspector of Constabulary from 1983 to 1987.[1] Education Byford was educated at the University of Leeds.[2] Wartime service During World War Two Byford served with the Royal Signals. Career Byford's police career began in 1947 as a constable with the West Riding Constabulary, where he rose to be the Commander of the Huddersfield Division. He left in 1968 to join the senior leadership team of Lincolnshire Police, and was Chief Constable from 1973 to 1977. He was a Regional Inspector of Constabulary from 1978 until his appointment to the top job. In retirement he served as President of Yorkshire County Cricket Club from 1991 to 1999.[3] Reports He conducted the inquiry into the Yorkshire Ripper Case.[4] Awards He was awarded the Queen's Police Medal in 1973. He was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1979, and was knighted in the 1984.[5] Ribbon Description Notes Knight Bachelor (Kt)

2018 deaths

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Deputy Lieutenants of North Yorkshire

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Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Michael Ellison

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Michael Ellison

Michael Joseph Ellison (1 June 1817 – 12 July 1898) was an English first-class cricketer active 1846–55 who played for Sheffield and Nottinghamshire. He became a key figure in the foundation and development of Yorkshire County Cricket Club from 1863. He was the club's first Treasurer and soon afterwards became its President. Ellison was born in Worksop and died, aged 81, in Sheffield.[1] Ellison played in 16 important matches as a right-handed batsman. He was judged a "useful" player only, scoring 195 runs in his 28 innings, averaging 6.96.[2] He held one catch as a fielder and was an occasional bowler who took one wicket in 30 overs.[1][3] Ellison's significance came after he stopped playing and undertook administrative responsibilities at Sheffield Cricket Club. In 1863, he played a major role in the foundation of Yorkshire County Cricket Club. Officially, the first Club President was former Sheffield player T. R. Barker, who was then the Lord Mayor of Sheffield, although he probably never attended any me

Gentlemen of the North cricketers

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Non-international England cricketers

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Gentlemen of England cricketers

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Brian Close

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Brian Close

Dennis Brian Close, CBE (24 February 1931 – 13 September 2015) was an English first-class cricketer, the youngest man ever to play Test cricket for England. He was picked to play against New Zealand in July 1949, when he was 18 years old. Close went on to play 22 Test matches for England, captaining them seven times to six wins and one drawn test. Close also captained Yorkshire to four county championship titles – the main domestic trophy in English cricket. He later went on to captain Somerset, where he is widely credited with developing the county into a hard-playing team, and helping to mould Viv Richards and Ian Botham into the successful players they became. Throughout his cricket career, which lasted from 1948 until the 1977 season, Close was one of the most charismatic and well-known cricketers. He scored almost 35,000 runs as a batsman, including 52 centuries with a highest innings score of 198. He also took 1,168 wickets as a bowler, over 800 catches as a fielder and one stumping, as a stand-in wick

Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Presidents of Yorkshire CCC

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England Test cricket captains

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John Hampshire

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John Hampshire

John Harry Hampshire (10 February 1941 – 1 March 2017),[1][2] also known as Jack Hampshire, was an English cricketer and umpire,[3] who played eight Tests and three One Day Internationals (ODIs) for England between 1969 and 1975.[4] He played first-class cricket for Yorkshire from 1961 to 1981,[5] and for Derbyshire from 1982 to 1984. Overseas, he was a successful captain of Tasmania in the period before the state was included in the Sheffield Shield.[6] He was also appointed President of Yorkshire County Cricket Club in 2016, serving until his death.[4] Cricket writer Colin Bateman remarked, "Hampshire thrilled English cricket supporters when he scored a century at Lord's on his Test debut – a unique achievement for an England player. An attractive middle-order stroke-player, Hampshire looked one for the future but he was dropped after one more match".[1] Early life Born on 10 February 1941[7] in Thurnscoe, Hampshire came from a cricketing family.[8] His father, John, played for Yorkshire in 1937.[8] His

Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Sportspeople from Yorkshire

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Presidents of Yorkshire CCC

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Len Hutton

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Len Hutton

Sir Leonard Hutton (23 June 1916 – 6 September 1990) was an English cricketer who played as an opening batsman for Yorkshire County Cricket Club from 1934 to 1955 and for England in 79 Test matches between 1937 and 1955. Wisden Cricketers' Almanack described him as one of the greatest batsmen in the history of cricket. He set a record in 1938 for the highest individual innings in a Test match in only his sixth Test appearance, scoring 364 runs against Australia, a milestone that stood for nearly 20 years (and remains an England Test record). In 1952, he became the first professional cricketer of the 20th Century to captain England in Tests; under his captaincy England won the Ashes the following year for the first time in 19 years. Following the Second World War, he was the mainstay of England's batting, and the team depended greatly on his success. Marked out as a potential star from his teenage years, Hutton made his debut for Yorkshire in 1934 and quickly established himself at county level. By 1937, he w

Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Presidents of Yorkshire CCC

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England Test cricket captains

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Ray Illingworth

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Ray Illingworth

Raymond Illingworth CBE (born 8 June 1932) is a former English cricketer, cricket commentator and cricket administrator. As of 2015, he is one of only nine players to have taken 2,000 wickets and made 20,000 runs in first-class cricket.[1]:302 He played for Yorkshire (1951–68 and 1982–83), Leicestershire (1969–78) and England (1958–73) and was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1960. He was born in Pudsey, West Riding of Yorkshire. He is currently the oldest living cricketer who had played at least one ODI.[2] Ray Illingworth's son-in-law Ashley Metcalfe later played cricket for Yorkshire. He is not, however, related to fellow Yorkshire cricketer Richard Illingworth, as has sometimes been incorrectly reported. Player Illingworth made his first-class debut at 19, was capped in 1955 and became a stalwart of the Yorkshire team in the 1960s. He made his Test début for England in 1958 but struggled on his first tour, in the West Indies in 1959–60, taking just five wickets in five Test matches. After failing to m

Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Presidents of Yorkshire CCC

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England Test cricket captains

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Richard Butler, 17th Viscount Mountgarret

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Richard Butler, 17th Viscount Mountgarret

Richard Henry Piers Butler, 17th Viscount Mountgarret (8 November 1936 – 7 February 2004) was a British soldier. Early life Butler was born at Knaresborough, the son of Piers Butler, 16th Viscount Mountgarret and Eglantine Christie. He was educated at Eton and the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst before joining the Irish Guards. Career He was commissioned in the Irish Guards in 1957, retiring in the rank of captain in 1964. Two years later he succeeded his father in the viscountcy, which had been created in 1550. After retiring from the Irish Guards, he was president of Yorkshire Cricket Club between 1984 and 1989. He moved to the 2,000-acre (8.1 km2) estate in South Stainley, near Ripon, after selling his family home, Nidd Hall, in the mid-1960s. He became the most likely heir to the title of Earldom of Ormond(e) (created 1328), the 16th century Earldom of Ossory and thus Chief Butler/Chief of the Butlers of Ireland (dormant since the death of the last Marquess of Ormonde), but submitted no claim to th

Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Presidents of Yorkshire CCC

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Butler dynasty

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Norman Yardley

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Norman Yardley

Norman Walter Dransfield Yardley (19 March 1915 – 3 October 1989) was an English cricketer who played for Cambridge University, Yorkshire County Cricket Club and England, as a right-handed batsman and occasional bowler. An amateur, he captained Yorkshire from 1948 to 1955 and England on fourteen occasions between 1947 and 1950, winning four Tests, losing seven and drawing three. Yardley was named Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1948 and in his obituary in Wisden Cricketers' Almanack, he was described as Yorkshire's finest amateur since Stanley Jackson. Yardley played schoolboy cricket at St Peter's, York. A highly talented all-round sportsman, he went to St John's College, Cambridge, and won Blues at cricket, squash, rugby fives and field hockey. In the university matches, he scored 90 in his second year, 101 in his third and was captain for his final year. He made his Yorkshire debut in 1936 and played for the county until 1955, when he retired as a player. He made his Test match debut against South Africa

English cricketers of 1919 to 1945

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Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Presidents of Yorkshire CCC

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William Worsley

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William Worsley

Col. Sir William Arthington Worsley of Hovingham, 4th Baronet (5 April 1890 – 4 December 1973) was an English landowner and amateur first-class cricketer. Biography Worsley was born at Hovingham Hall, Yorkshire, England, the son of Sir William Henry Arthington Worsley of Hovingham, 3rd Baronet (born 12 January 1861) and his wife, Lady Augusta Mary (née Chivers Bower; died 1913). His paternal grandparents were Sir Arthington Worsley of Hovingham, 2nd Baronet (21 December 1830 – 3 June 1861) and Marianne Christina Isabella Hely-Hutchinson (5 May 1832 – 11 August 1893): his maternal grandparents were Edward Chivers Bower and Amelia Mary Bennett-Martin. Worsley served as a lieutenant and subsequently captain with the Green Howards (now part of the Yorkshire Regiment) in World War I. He was wounded and taken prisoner.[1] Worsley was Lord Lieutenant of the North Riding of Yorkshire from 1951 to 1965. In 1967, Worsley was awarded an honorary LLD by the University of Leeds. The degree was conferred on him by hi

Worsley family

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Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Presidents of Yorkshire CCC

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Martin Hawke, 7th Baron Hawke

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Martin Hawke, 7th Baron Hawke

Martin Bladen Hawke, 7th Baron Hawke (16 August 1860 – 10 October 1938), generally known as Lord Hawke, was an English amateur cricketer active from 1881 to 1911 who played for Yorkshire and England. He was born in Willingham by Stow, near Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, and died in Edinburgh. He appeared in 633 first-class matches, including five Test matches, as a righthanded batsman, scoring 16,749 runs with a highest score of 166 and held 209 catches. He scored 13 centuries and 69 half-centuries.[1] Since an 1870 inheritance of his father, Hawke was styled Hon.; he inherited the barony on 5 December 1887 on the death of his father, Rev. Rt. Hon. Edward Henry Julius Hawke, Rector of Willingham 1854–1875, after which the family returned to its seat (main home held for a generation or more), Wighill House and Park, near Tadcaster, Yorkshire. Admiral Hawke, the first Baron, was among the few Admirals elevated for his roles during the Seven Years' War: at the Battle of Quiberon Bay, off Nantes, France, and promot

Barons Hawke

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Over 30s v Under 30s cricketers

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People from Willingham by Stow

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Richard Hutton (cricketer)

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Richard Hutton (cricketer)

Richard Anthony Hutton (born 6 September 1942)[1] is a former English cricketer, who played in five Test matches for the England cricket team in 1971. A right-handed batsman and right-arm seam bowler, Hutton's bowling was probably his stronger discipline, but he was considered an all-rounder. He played first-class cricket for Yorkshire County Cricket Club.[1] He is the son of Len Hutton. Life and career He was educated at Repton School, where he developed a reputation as an all-round cricketer, and Christ's College, Cambridge, being awarded a blue at Cambridge. He played for Yorkshire from 1962 until 1974, and for Transvaal in South Africa. Hutton made his Test debut in a drawn match against Pakistan in 1971, being promoted to open in the second innings and scoring 58 not out in his maiden Test innings. His highest Test score of 81 came in his last Test match, at The Oval against India. He shared a century partnership for the seventh wicket with the wicket-keeper Alan Knott, after the Indian spinners did s

Cricketers from Yorkshire

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Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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Sportspeople from Yorkshire

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Stanley Jackson

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Stanley Jackson

Sir Francis Stanley Jackson GCSI GCIE KStJ[1] (21 November 1870 – 9 March 1947),[2] known as the Honourable Stanley Jackson during his playing career, was an English cricketer, soldier and Conservative Party politician. He played in 20 Test matches for the England cricket team between 1893 and 1905. Early life Jackson was born in Leeds. His father was William Jackson, 1st Baron Allerton. During Stanley's time at Harrow School his fag was fellow parliamentarian and future Prime Minister Winston Churchill.[1] He went up to Trinity College, Cambridge in 1889.[3] Cricket career Jackson c. 1895 Jackson played for Cambridge University, Yorkshire and England. He spotted the talent of Ranjitsinhji when the latter, owing to his unorthodox batting and his race, was struggling to find a place for himself in the university side, and as captain was responsible for Ranji's inclusion in the Cambridge First XI and the awarding of his Blue. According to Alan Gibson this was "a much more controversial thing to do than w

North v South cricketers

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Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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England Test cricket captains

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Tom Taylor (Yorkshire cricketer)

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Tom Taylor (Yorkshire cricketer)

Tom Taylor (25 May 1878 – 16 March 1960) was an English amateur first-class cricketer, who played for Yorkshire during its successful period under Lord Hawke between 1900 and 1902.[1] Taylor was a noted amateur batsman, who retired early as he needed to devote his time to his engineering business after the 1902 season. It is likely that Taylor would have received England honours had he been able to keep up the game, for he was chosen as 12th man in the rain-ruined Lord's Test match in 1902. Taylor was a fleet-footed and extremely sound middle order batsman, who was especially strong against slow bowling on the many difficult pitches experienced in Yorkshire. Against fast bowling he was not as certain. Life and career Tom Launcelot Taylor was born in Headingley, Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Taylor began his career as a batsman and wicket-keeper for Uppingham School and his 100 not out against Repton in 1896 gave him a reputation as the best public school batsman in England at the time – a claim amply justifi

Over 30s v Under 30s cricketers

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Presidents of Yorkshire County Cricket Club

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People from Headingley

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