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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...


Brianna Decker

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Brianna Decker

Brianna Decker (born May 13, 1991) is an American women's ice hockey player for the Calgary Inferno of the Canadian Women's Hockey League. She is a member of the United States women's national ice hockey team. She was awarded the 2012 Patty Kazmaier Award while playing for the University of Wisconsin, recognizing the best female ice hockey player in NCAA Division I play.[1] With the Boston Pride, Decker would score the first hat trick in NWHL history on October 25, 2015. Playing career NCAA In her freshman season (2009–10) with the Wisconsin Badgers women's ice hockey program, Decker scored the Badgers' first goal of the season in a game against North Dakota (October 3). During the season, she accumulated seven multi-point games and four multi-goal games. She was third in team scoring despite missing almost half of the first part of the season. On September 25, 2011, Decker scored her third career hat trick in a 13–0 defeat of the Lindenwood Lady Lions ice hockey program.[2] Her 12-game winning goals during

Calgary Inferno players

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American expatriate sportspeople in Canada

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American expatriate ice hockey people

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Dani Cameranesi

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Dani Cameranesi

Danielle Cameranesi (born June 3, 1995) is an American women's ice hockey player for the Buffalo Beauts. She made her debut for the US national women's team at the 2014 4 Nations Cup in Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada.[1] Playing career During the 2010–11 season, she registered 79 points (35 goals, 44 assists) while serving as team captain with the Blake School. Of note, the team was also conference champions. USA Hockey In August 2011, she was named to the under-18 U.S. team that competed versus Canada in a three-game series in Rockland, Ontario.[2] In the USA 13–1 defeat of the Czech Republic at the 2012 IIHF World Women's U18 Championship, Cameranesi assisted on Molly Illikainens goal.[3] She was named to the roster of the United States national women’s ice hockey team that shall compete at the 2015 IIHF Women's World Championship.[4] NCAA Donning the maroon and gold during exhibition play, she first appeared with the Golden Gophers in a September 26 contest versus the Japanese national team. Wit

People from Plymouth, Minnesota

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American ice hockey forwards

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Buffalo Beauts players

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Monique Lamoureux

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Monique Lamoureux

Monique Edith Lamoureux-Morando (born July 3, 1989) is an American ice hockey player. She scored the game-tying goal in the final of the 2018 Winter Olympics before her twin sister Jocelyne scored the last shootout goal of the game to clinch the gold medal. She also captured silver medals for Team USA at the 2010 and 2014 Winter Olympics.[1] She was previously known as Monique Lamoureux-Kolls.[2] Playing career Lamoureux and her twin sister were both all-state in ice hockey as teenagers.[3] Together, they played on the Peewee A Boys' team in 2001–02 team at twelve years old (called the Seawolves) and led them to the North Dakota State Hockey championship. Afterwards, they accepted a scholarship to Shattuck-St. Mary's School in Minnesota, the same school at which Sidney Crosby played.[3] At Shattuck-St. Mary's, the Lamoureux sisters led the school to three state titles (2005, 2006, and 2007). In her freshman year at Shattuck (2004–05), she tallied 113 points (57 goals, 56 assists) in 62 games. She had 116 p

Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Ice hockey players at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Jocelyne Lamoureux

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Jocelyne Lamoureux

Jocelyne Nicole Lamoureux-Davidson (born July 3, 1989)[1] is an American ice hockey forward. She scored the game-winning shootout goal to win the gold medal for Team USA at the 2018 Winter Olympics against Canada after her twin sister Monique tied the game near the end of regulation. Lamoureux-Davidson also won silver medals for the United States women's national ice hockey team at the 2010 and 2014 Winter Olympics.[2] Lamoureux played one season of NCAA hockey for the University of Minnesota and three for the University of North Dakota. In the 2018 Olympics, she scored two goals six seconds apart, an Olympic record for shortest time between goals by anyone, men or women.[3] Playing career Jocelyne and her twin sister were both all-state in ice hockey as teenagers.[4] Together they played on the Peewee A Boys' team in 2001–02 team (called the Wheat Kings) as twelve-year-olds, leading them to the North Dakota State Hockey championship. Afterwards they accepted a scholarship to Shattuck-St. Mary's School in

Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Ice hockey players at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Megan Keller

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Megan Keller

Megan Keller (born May 1, 1996) is an American women's ice hockey player that competes with the Boston College Eagles women's ice hockey program in NCAA competition. She was named to the roster of the United States national women's ice hockey team that competed at both the 2015 IIHF Women's World Championship and 2016 IIHF Women's World Championship.[1] She was selected to the U.S.A Women's 2018 Olympic Team. USA Hockey career At the 2014 IIHF Under-18 Women's World Championships, she led all skaters with a plus/minus rating of +9. To date, her best international performance came in the 2015 IIHF World Championships in Malmö, Sweden, where she contributed 5 points in 4 games as a member of the Gold-Medalist team. USA Hockey statistics Event 'GP G A Pts' 2014 IIHF U18 Worlds 5 1 2 3 2014 Four Nations Cup 3 0 0 0 2015 Sweden WC 4 2 3 5 2015 Canada WC 4 1 0 1 2016 Four Nations Cup 4 1 1 2 NCAA career Keller emerged as one of the nation's best defense players in the 2015–16 campaign. Sh

American ice hockey defensemen

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Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Amanda Kessel

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Amanda Kessel

Amanda Kessel (born August 28, 1991) is an American professional ice hockey player for the Metropolitan Riveters of the National Women's Hockey League. She has also been a member of the United States women's national ice hockey team. She played four seasons for the Minnesota Golden Gophers women's ice hockey program (2010–2011 through 2012–13, and 2015–16). Playing career Prior to high school, she participated for the Madison Capitols Bantam boys team in 2005–06 and helped the team to state and regional championships. Kessel attended Shattuck St. Mary's in Minnesota. The 2007 edition of the team captured the U-19 national championship, while Kessel marked 102 points in 56 games. In her junior year, Kessel registered 44 goals and 56 assists for 100 points (1.29 goals per game and 1.65 assist per game). She accomplished the 100-point mark in just 34 games and won her second consecutive U-19 national championship. She tallied 122 points (67 goals (1.46 goals per game) and 55 assists (1.20 assists per game) in

Metropolitan Riveters players

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American ice hockey forwards

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Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Nicole Hensley

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Nicole Hensley

Nicole Hensley (born June 23, 1994) is an American women’s ice hockey player. She is currently a member of the Buffalo Beauts of the National Women's Hockey League. Playing career Hensley was named one of three goaltenders to compete for the United States women's national ice hockey team at the 2016 IIHF Women's World Championship in Kamloops, British Columbia.[1] Hensley was also named to the 2017 team. She made the 2018 Olympic team, in which the United States won the gold medal, earning a shutout win over the Russian team in her only appearance.[2] NWHL On June 12, 2018, Hensley signed a contract with the Buffalo Beauts of the National Women's Hockey League (NWHL).[3] In her debut for the Beauts, Hensley earned a shutout win over Finnish Olympian Meeri Räisänen of the Connecticut Whale in a 4–0 final on October 7, 2018.[4] Statistics     Season Team League GP W L T MIN SVS GAA 2012–13 Lindenwood Lady Lions NCAA 27 7 16 3 1597:16 1083 3.42 2013–14 Lindenwood Lady Lions NCAA 3

Buffalo Beauts players

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Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Ice hockey players at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Sidney Morin

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Sidney Morin

Sidney Morin (born June 6, 1995) is an American ice hockey player. Morin is a member of MODO Hockey in the SWHL.[1] Morin was named the WCHA Defensive player of the year in 2017. References http://www.modohockey.se/artikel/m5lnaj32p-4ij6i1/sidney-morin-till-modo-hockey

Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Ice hockey players at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Olympic ice hockey players of the United States

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Hilary Knight (ice hockey)

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Hilary Knight (ice hockey)

Hilary Atwood Knight (born July 12, 1989)[1] is an American ice hockey forward for Les Canadiennes de Montreal. She is a member of the United States women's national ice hockey team[2] and Les Canadiennes de Montreal of the Canadian Women's Hockey League. She previously played for the Boston Pride of the National Women's Hockey League, with whom she won the inaugural Isobel Cup. Knight competed for the Wisconsin Badgers women's ice hockey program, as well as for Choate Rosemary Hall. Her first year at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Knight helped the team place second in the NCAA championships. The following year she led her team in points as the Badgers went on to win the National Championship.[3] With the US national team, she won seven gold medals at the IIHF World Women's Championships and the gold medal at the 2018 Winter Olympics. Early life Knight was born in Palo Alto, California, but grew up in Lake Forest, Illinois.[4] Playing career Wisconsin Badgers In her freshman season (2007–2008), Kn

American expatriate ice hockey people

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American expatriate sportspeople in Canada

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American ice hockey forwards

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Kelly Pannek

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Kelly Pannek

Kelly Pannek (born December 29, 1995) is an American ice hockey player for the Minnesota Golden Gophers and the American national team.[1] She participated at the 2017 IIHF Women's World Championship and the 2018 Winter Olympics.[2] References 2019 IIHF Women's World Championship roster 2017 World Championship roster External links Biographical information and career statistics from Eliteprospects.com

American ice hockey forwards

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Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Olympic ice hockey players of the United States

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Gigi Marvin

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Gigi Marvin

Gisele Marie "Gigi" Marvin (born March 7, 1987) is an American ice hockey player for the Boston Pride of the National Women's Hockey League. As a member of the United States national women's ice hockey team, Marvin won a silver medal at the 2010 Olympic Winter Games and the 2014 Winter Olympics, and a gold medal at the 2018 Winter Olympics. Her grandfather is Cal Marvin, the coach of the 1958 United States Men's National Ice Hockey Team and the manager of the 1965 United States Men's National Ice Hockey Team, is a member of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame.[1] She hails from Warroad, Minnesota, in Roseau County, the same small northern Minnesota town as 1960 gold medalists Bill and Roger Christian and 1980 gold medalist Dave Christian and 2018 Stanley Cup champion T. J. Oshie.[2] Playing career High school Marvin attended Warroad High School and was named the 2005 recipient of the Let's Play Hockey Ms. Hockey Award. During her freshman, junior, and senior seasons, she was an All-state honoree. As a se

Olympic silver medalists for the United States

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People from Roseau County, Minnesota

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Olympic medalists in ice hockey

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Emily Pfalzer

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Emily Pfalzer

Emily Pfalzer (born June 14, 1993) is an American women's ice hockey player that currently captains the Buffalo Beauts of the National Women's Hockey League (NWHL). Internationally, Pfalzer plays for United States women's national ice hockey team and has won a gold medal at the 2015 IIHF Women's World Championship, 2016 IIHF Women's World Championship, 2017 IIHF Women's World Championship and the 2018 Winter Olympics. Playing career NCAA Pfalzer played for Boston College for her entire NCAA career, 2011–2015, and was the first defender in the program to reach 100 career points.[1] NWHL Pfalzer made her professional debut in the NWHL on October 11, 2015, with the Buffalo Beauts playing against the Boston Pride.[2] During the 2015–16 season, Pfalzer was named the captain of the Buffalo Beauts on November 11, 2015.[3] On November 22, in a match against the Connecticut Whale, Pfalzer would record five assists, setting a Beauts franchise record for most points in one game.. In January 2016, Pfalzer captained

American expatriate sportspeople in Canada

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American expatriate ice hockey people

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American ice hockey defensemen

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Amanda Pelkey

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Amanda Pelkey

Amanda Pelkey (born May 29, 1993) is an American women’s ice hockey player with the Boston Pride of the National Women's Hockey League (NWHL). At the NCAA level, she accumulated 105 points with the University of Vermont women's ice hockey program.[1] Playing career Early career As a teenager, Amanda Pelkey played for North American Hockey Academy (NAHA) White, based in Stowe, Vermont, part of the Junior Women's Hockey League.[2] She played in the 2010-2011 season for NAHA White, and was selected for the JWHL All-Star Game during the 2011 JWHL Challenge Cup.[3] University of Vermont Catamounts Pelkey entered the 2011-2012 NCAA season as a freshman, playing all 32 games of the season. Her sophomore year, the 2012-2013 season, she tied for second on the team in points with twenty (nine goals, eleven assists) even though she missed the first month of the season with an injury (a broken collarbone sustained at the U.S. National Team Evaluation Camp during the summer).[4] Pelkey's junior year, 2013-2014, was h

Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Ice hockey players at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Alex Rigsby

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Alex Rigsby

Alexandria Rigsby (born January 3, 1992)[1] is an American ice hockey player for Calgary Inferno and has competed for the United States women's national ice hockey team in numerous tournaments. She is the first goaltender in USA Hockey history to have competed with the US National Under-18, Under-22, and Senior women's teams.[2] She competed for the Wisconsin Badgers women's ice hockey program 2010–2014,[3] and was on the roster of the Minnesota Whitecaps.[4] She is also the first American-born goaltender to have won an Olympic Gold Medal, an IIHF World Championship, and the Clarkson Cup, having played with the victorious Calgary Inferno in the 2019 Clarkson Cup Finals. Playing career Rigsby played boys hockey from the age of six, including AAA boys hockey from the age of 10. As a freshman in high school, she played for the Chicago Mission AAA Boys Bantam Majors. That team won state and regional champions and participated in the USA Hockey National Championships. In addition to hockey, Rigsby also played va

Calgary Inferno players

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American expatriate sportspeople in Canada

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American expatriate ice hockey people

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Maddie Rooney (ice hockey)

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Maddie Rooney (ice hockey)

Madeline S. Rooney (born July 7, 1997) is an American college ice hockey player for the Minnesota–Duluth Bulldogs. She was the starting goaltender on the U.S. women's hockey team that won the gold medal at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang with a shootout victory in the final against Canada. Early life and education Maddie Rooney was born July 7, 1997 in Duluth, Minnesota.[1] Rooney attended Andover High School.[1] In her senior year of high school, Rooney switched from the girls to the boys varsity team and finished the season with a .910 save percentage.[2][3] Rooney is pursuing a business degree.[3] Collegiate career Rooney plays for the University of Minnesota–Duluth Bulldogs in the WCHA conference as part the NCAA's Division I ice hockey league. In her second year, she compiled a save percentage of .942 and a goals against average of 1.65, good for fourth-best and tenth-best in the NCAA respectively.[1] International play At the age of 19, Rooney won a gold medal at the 2017 IIHF Women's Wor

American ice hockey goaltenders

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Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Ice hockey people from Minnesota

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Haley Skarupa

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Haley Skarupa

Haley Rae Skarupa (born January 3, 1994) is an American ice hockey player for the Boston Pride and the American national team. Skarupa was raised in Rockville, Maryland, and she graduated from Wootton High School. She participated at the 2015 IIHF Women's World Championship.[1] Playing career In the 2015 NWHL Draft, she was selected by the New York Riveters of the National Women's Hockey League (NWHL). On April 26, 2016, Skarupa's draft rights were traded to the Connecticut Whale by the Riveters for Michelle Picard.[2] Skarupa played forward for the United States' women's ice hockey team at the 2018 Winter Olympics.[3] References "Team Roster". 2015 IIHF World Championship. May 29, 2015. "Riveters, Whale Trade Rights to Skarupa and Picard". National Women's Hockey League. Archived from the original on May 14, 2016. Woodfork, Rob (February 8, 2018). "Haley Skarupa: From thin ice to center ice". WTOP. External links Biographical information and career statistics from Eliteprospects.com

Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Ice hockey players at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Olympic ice hockey players of the United States

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Bill Johnson (skier)

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Bill Johnson (skier)

William Dean "Bill" Johnson (March 30, 1960 – January 21, 2016) was an American World Cup alpine ski racer. By winning the downhill at the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, Johnson became the first American male to win an Olympic gold medal in alpine skiing and the first racer not from an Alpine country to win an Olympic downhill race. Olympic triumph Bill Johnson was born in Los Angeles, California, on March 30, 1960,[1] and moved with his family to Boise, Idaho, when he was seven. He learned to ski at Bogus Basin in the late 1960s.[2] Two years later, they moved to Brightwood, Oregon, near Mount Hood, and Johnson later attended Sandy Union High School in Sandy.[2][3] He was a troubled youth who began competitive skiing on nearby Mount Hood as a means of harnessing his energy. After a run-in with the law at age 17, the juvenile defendant was given the choice between six months in jail or attending the Mission Ridge ski academy in central Washington state, and he chose the latter.[4] His talent

FIS alpine skier ID same as Wikidata

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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American Gladiators contestants

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Debbie Armstrong

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Debbie Armstrong

Debra Rae "Debbie" Armstrong (born December 6, 1963) is a former World Cup alpine ski racer from Seattle, Washington. She was the first gold medalist from the U.S. in women's alpine skiing in 12 years, winning the giant slalom at the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia.[1] Racing career Born in Salem, Oregon, Armstrong grew up in Seattle and was a multi-sport athlete at Garfield High School; in addition to ski racing, she also played basketball, soccer, volleyball and tennis and has been inducted in the Seattle Public School Hall of Fame[2] and State of Washington Sports Hall of Fame[3] and the U.S. Ski Hall of Fame.[4] Debbie Armstrong developed her racing skills in the 1970s at the Alpental ski area at Snoqualmie Pass, an hour east of Seattle on I-90. The run "Debbie's Gold" and the "Armstrong's Express" high-speed quad chairlift are named for her.[5] She was the Junior National Giant Slalom Champion (Squaw Valley) in 1980.[6] After being named to the U.S. Ski Team in 1981 she placed 14th[7] in

FIS alpine skier ID same as Wikidata

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Garfield High School (Seattle) alumni

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Barbara Cochran

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Barbara Cochran

Barbara Ann Cochran (born January 4, 1951) is a former World Cup alpine ski racer and Olympic gold medalist from the United States.[1] Born in Claremont, New Hampshire, Cochran was the second of four siblings of the famous "Skiing Cochrans" family of Richmond, Vermont, which has operated a small ski area in their backyard since 1961. Her father, Gordon "Mickey" Cochran, was a longtime coach, coaching youngsters of the Smuggler's Notch Ski Club, the University of Vermont Ski Team, and the U.S. Ski Team. The family has placed several generations of athletes on the U.S Ski Team: three-time national champion sister Marilyn, Barbara Ann, nine-time national champion brother Bob, and two-time national champion sister Lindy. The family's next generation includes niece Jessica Kelley, nephews Jimmy Cochran, Roger Brown, Tim Kelley, Robby Kelley, and son, Ryan Cochran-Siegle. After retiring from competitions, Cochran graduated from college in Vermont, married Ron Williams, and published her book Skiing for Women. She

FIS alpine skier ID same as Wikidata

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Sportspeople from Vermont

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Maddie Bowman

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Maddie Bowman

Maddison Michelle "Maddie" Bowman (born January 10, 1994) is an American freestyle skier. She won a silver medal in the superpipe at Winter X Games XVI in 2012.[3] Bowman won gold at Winter X Games XVII in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 & 2018,[4] and a gold medal at the 2014 Winter Olympics in the ski halfpipe. At the 2018 Winter Olympics, she finished in 11th place.[5][6] References "Maddie Bowman – 2014 Winter Olympics". ESPN. Retrieved March 7, 2014. "Maddie Bowman". teamusa.org. United States Olympic Committee. Retrieved March 7, 2014. "Roz Groenewoud wins Ski SuperPipe". ESPN.com. January 28, 2012. Retrieved January 28, 2012. "Maddie Bowman's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved February 28, 2018. "2018 Winter Olympics: Sochi gold medalist Maddie Bowman crashes out of halfpipe". USA TODAY. Retrieved February 28, 2018. "Maddie Bowman Finishes 11th in Crushing Blow for Former Gold Medal Skier". Time. Retrieved February 28, 2018. External links Maddie Bowman at t

Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Sportspeople from California

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Freestyle skiers at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Joss Christensen

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Joss Christensen

Joss Christensen (born December 20, 1991) is an American freestyle skier from Park City, Utah. Christensen's highest sports accomplishment to date is winning a gold medal at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.[2] References "Joss CHRISTENSEN". sochi2014.com. Organizing Committee of the XXII Olympic Winter Games. Retrieved February 16, 2014. "Joss CHRISTENSEN | Freestyle Skiing | United States – Sochi 2014 Olympics". m.sochi2014.com. Retrieved February 10, 2014. External links Team USA profile for Joss Christensen

Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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American male freestyle skiers

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X Games athletes

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Nikki Stone

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Nikki Stone

Nicole 'Nikki' Stone (born February 4, 1971) is a former American Olympic skier. She was born in Princeton, New Jersey, currently residing in Park City, Utah. Nikki Stone, who competed in the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, is best known for being the first American to win a gold medal as inverted aerial skier. Aerial Skiing is a sport where athletes ski into a 10-foot snow jump at approximately 40 miles per hour, flip and/or twist to a height of 50-feet, and land on a 45 degree hill. Eighteen months before this second Olympic appearance, Stone sustained a career-threatening spinal injury in which doctors believed she would never jump again. Career highlights Throughout her career, Nikki earned 35 World Cup medals, eleven World Cup titles, four national titles, two year-long Aerial World Cup titles, and a World Championship title. She also became the first pure aerialist ever (male or female) to become the year-long Overall Freestyle World Cup Champion. At the 2002 Olympics, she carried the Olympic

Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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American female freestyle skiers

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Olympic gold medalists

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Florence Griffith Joyner

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Florence Griffith Joyner

Florence Delorez Griffith Joyner[4] (born Florence Delorez Griffith;[1] December 21, 1959 – September 21, 1998), also known as Flo-Jo, was an American track and field athlete. She is considered the fastest woman of all time[5][6][7] based on the fact that the world records she set in 1988 for both the 100 m and 200 m still stand. During the late 1980s she became a popular figure in international track and field because of her record-setting performances and flashy personal style. Griffith-Joyner was born and raised in California. She was athletic from a young age. She attended California State University, Northridge (CSUN) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) where she participated in track and field. Griffith-Joyner qualified for the 100 m 1980 Olympics, although she did not actually compete due to the U.S. boycott. She made her Olympic debut four years later winning a silver medal. At the 1988 U.S. Olympic trials, Griffith set a new world record in the 100 m. She went on to win three gold medals

Burials in Orange County, California

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African-American female track and field athletes

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People from Watts, Los Angeles

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James Brendan Connolly

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James Brendan Connolly

James Brendan Bennet "Jamie" Connolly (Irish: Séamas Breandán Ó Conghaile, October 28, 1868 – January 20, 1957) was an American athlete and author. In 1896, he was the first modern Olympic champion.[1] Early life Connolly was born to poor Irish immigrants from the Aran Islands, fisherman John Connolly and Ann O'Donnell, as one of twelve children, in South Boston, Massachusetts. Growing up at a time when the parks and playground movement in Boston was slowly developing, Connolly joined other boys in the streets and vacant lots to run, jump, and play ball. He was educated at Notre Dame Academy and then at the Mather and Lawrence grammar school, but never went to high school. Instead, Connolly worked as a clerk with an insurance company in Boston and later with the United States Army Corps of Engineers in Savannah, Georgia. His predisposition to sport also became apparent. Calling a special meeting of the Catholic Library Association (CLA) of Savannah in 1891, he was instrumental in forming a football team.

19th-century sportsmen

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Olympic male high jumpers

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Athletes (track and field) at the 1906 Intercal...

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Matt McGrath

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Matt McGrath

Matthew John "Matt" McGrath (December 28, 1875 – January 29, 1941) was a member of the Irish American Athletic Club, the New York Athletic Club, and the New York City Police Department. At the time of his death at age 65, he attained the rank of Inspector, and during his career received the NYPD's Medal of Valor twice. He competed for the U.S. team in the Olympics in 1908, 1912, 1920 and 1924 (at age 47). In his prime, he was known as "one of the world's greatest weight throwers."[1][2] Life Matt McGrath holding a 56lb weight McGrath was born on 28 December 1875 in Curraghmore, Portrane, near Nenagh, County Tipperary, Ireland, to Tim McGrath, a farmer, and Anne McGrath. He later immigrated to the United States.[3] During his competitive years he stood 5′ 11½″ (1.82 m) tall and weighed 247 lb (112 kg), and was part of a group of large and dominant throwers referred to as the Irish Whales. He did not achieve success in the hammer throw until age 27, when he ranked seventh on the world list of best marks.

Weight throwers

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Tug of war competitors at the 1908 Summer Olympics

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Sportspeople from County Tipperary

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John Taylor (athlete)

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John Taylor (athlete)

John Baxter Taylor Jr. (November 3, 1882, Washington, D.C. – December 2, 1908, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an American track and field athlete, notable as the first African American to win an Olympic gold medal. Biography He was born in Washington D.C. to former slaves. The family settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he attended public schools and graduated from Central High School in 1902. He spent a year at Brown Preparatory School, also in Philadelphia, where he was the fastest high school quarter-miler in the country. As a freshman at the University of Pennsylvania, he was the ICAAAA (Intercollegiate Association of Amateur Athletes of America) champion in the quarter mile. He bested his personal time in 1907, and again was the ICAAAA quarter mile champion. He graduated from Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine in 1908, and was a member of Sigma Pi Phi, the first black fraternity. [1] He was recruited by the Irish American Athletic Club in New York, and was its most prominent African American

Burials at Eden Cemetery

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DeeDee Trotter

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DeeDee Trotter

De'Hashia Tonnek ("DeeDee") Trotter (born December 8, 1982 in Twenty Nine Palms, California) is an American athlete. Trotter is a former NCAA national champion in the 400m, and competed in the 2004, 2008, and 2012 Summer Olympics. There, she was a two-time Olympic gold medalist in the 4 × 400 m relay (2004 and 2012), in addition to a bronze medalist in the 2012 400m event. She placed 5th in the same event in 2004. Trotter is currently a brand ambassador for international company Education First, and a global motivational speaker. Early life Trotter was born in Twenty Nine Palms, California on December 8, 1982.[1] She grew up in Decatur, Georgia, graduating from Cedar Grove High School in 2001.[2] She was a member of both the track and basketball teams, helping to lead the basketball team in her senior year to an undefeated season on home court. She specialized in both the 200m and 400m in track, and in her senior year, she also helped lead the 4 × 400 m relay team from her highschool to the Georgia State Ch

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Babe Didrikson Zaharias

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Babe Didrikson Zaharias

Mildred Ella "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias (June 26, 1911 – September 27, 1956) was an American athlete who excelled in golf, basketball, baseball and track and field. She won two gold medals in track and field at the 1932 Summer Olympics, before turning to professional golf and winning 10 LPGA major championships. She is widely regarded as one of the greatest female athletes of all time. Biography Mildred Ella Didrikson was born on June 26, 1911,[3] the sixth of seven children, in the coastal city of Port Arthur, Texas. Her mother, Hannah, and her father, Ole Didriksen, were immigrants from Norway. Although her three eldest siblings were born in Norway, Babe and her three other siblings were born in Port Arthur. She later changed the spelling of her surname from Didriksen to Didrikson.[4] She moved with her family to 850 Doucette in Beaumont, Texas, at age 4. She claimed to have acquired the nickname "Babe" (after Babe Ruth) upon hitting five home runs in a childhood baseball game, but her Norwegian mother had

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Travis Dawkins

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Travis Dawkins

Travis Sentell "Gookie" Dawkins (born May 12, 1979 in Newberry, South Carolina) is a retired Major League Baseball shortstop. Drafted by the Cincinnati Reds in the 2nd round of the 1997 Major League Baseball Draft, Dawkins would make his Major League Baseball debut with the Reds on September 3, 1999. His first major league at-bat was on September 4, 1999, at Philadelphia (a game in which the Reds hit nine home runs). Dawkins singled and reached third base on a throwing error. A young Philadelphia Phillies fan seated down the first base line reached over the fence and grabbed the rolling the ball during play. The Reds staff later obtained the first major league hit ball for Dawkins by trading with the fan. Dawkins won an Olympic Gold medal in 2000 while playing for the United States baseball team. Dawkins spent the 2007 season, playing for the Tacoma Rainiers, the Triple-A affiliate of the Seattle Mariners and the Ottawa Lynx, the Triple-A affiliate of the Philadelphia Phillies. Dawkins was re-signed by the

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Nathaniel Cartmell

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Nathaniel Cartmell

Nathaniel John Cartmell (January 13, 1883 – August 23, 1967), also known as Nat and Nate, was an American athlete who won medals at two editions of the Olympic Games. He is also known for being the first head coach of the North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team. Nickname While the reason why Cartmell was nicknamed "Bloody Neck" is not entirely known, author Ken Rappoport speculates that it either comes from his use of the term Bloody due to the fact his family came from Cartmel, England, or from the fact that he had a childhood accident where he lost two and a half fingers from his right hand when an ax slipped while he was chopping wood.[3] 1904 Summer Olympics In the 1904 Summer Olympics in St. Louis, Missouri, Cartmell won silver medals in both the 100 meter dash and the 200 meter straightaway. He also participated in the 60 meters event but was eliminated in the repechage.[1] 1908 Summer Olympics Cartmell was a member of the gold medal American medley relay team at the 1908 Summer Olympics in

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Allyson Felix

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Allyson Felix

Allyson Michelle Felix OLY (born November 18, 1985)[1] is an American track and field sprinter who competes in the 100 meters, 200 meters, and 400 meters. At 200 meters, she is the 2012 Olympic champion, a 3-time World champion (2005–09), and 2-time Olympic silver medalist (2004–08). At 400 meters, she is the 2015 World champion, 2011 World silver medalist, 2016 Olympic silver medalist, and 2017 World bronze medalist. Felix has won five additional Olympic gold medals as a member of the United States' women's relay teams: three at 4 × 400 meters (2008–16), and two at 4 x 100 meters (2012–16). The 2012 U.S. Olympic 4 x 100 meters team also set the women's 4x100 meters world-record that still stands. Felix is the only female track and field athlete to ever win six Olympic gold medals,[2] and is tied with Merlene Ottey as the most decorated female Olympian in track and field history, with a total of nine Olympic medals. Felix is also the most decorated athlete in IAAF World Championships history with 16 career m

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Rod Milburn

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Rod Milburn

Milburn on a stamp of Umm al-Quwain Rodney "Rod" Milburn Jr. (May 18, 1950 – November 11, 1997) was an American athlete who won gold at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich in the 110m hurdles. Career During the early 1970s, Milburn dominated the 110m hurdles, tying or breaking the world record for the 110 m hurdles/120 yards five times.[3][note 1][4][5] 1971, as a sophomore at Southern University, was when Milburn announced himself on the national and world stage. Amongst his achievements that year was his first world record. In a semi-final of the USA Championships he broke the record for 120 y with 13.0 s.[6][note 2] Milburn went on to win the title, in 13.1 s.[7] Milburn was to remain undefeated in 1971, including winning the 110m hurdles event t the 1971 Pan-American Games. He also showed his versatility by winning a bronze as a member of the United States sprint relay team at the Pan-American Games.[1][8] With these performances, Milburn earned the nickname "Hot Rod",[9] and was awarded the Track and

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Industrial accident deaths

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Harold Osborn

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Harold Osborn

Harold Marion Osborn D.O. (April 13, 1899 – April 5, 1975) was a U.S. track athlete. He won a gold medal in Olympic decathlon and high jump in 1924. The apex of the athletic career of Harold M. Osborn occurred at the 1924 Olympic games in Paris, France (the games of the VIII Olympiad, featured in the popular film, Chariots of Fire). Osborn was the first and, to this day, the only athlete ever to win gold in both the decathlon and an individual event.[1] Early life Harold Marion Osborn was born April 13, 1899, the fourth child and third son of Jesse Ware Osborn and Emma Ware, whose parents and grandparents were settled in central Illinois in the early 19th century. Osborn grew up on the family farm in Butler Grove Township in Montgomery County. Harold Osborn family farmhouse in Butler Grove Township, 5 miles north of Hillsboro, IL – August 2007. Family lore tells us that Harold and his brothers, Wesley, Clarence, and Loren, were encouraged to run and practice jumping hurdles on the farm. Their father, Je

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Charley Paddock

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Charley Paddock

Charles William Paddock (August 11, 1900 – July 21, 1943) was an American athlete and two time Olympic champion.[2] Biography Paddock was born in Gainesville, Texas to Charles H. and Lulu (Robinson) Paddock. His family moved to Pasadena, California when he was a child. After serving in World War I as a lieutenant of field artillery in the U.S. Marines, Paddock studied at the University of Southern California.[3] There he became a member of the track and field team, and excelled in the sprint events. He won the 100 and 200 m in the first major sporting event after the war, the 1919 Inter-Allied Games, in which soldiers of the Allied nations competed against each other. Paddock was the first person named "The fastest man alive".[4] In 1920, Paddock represented his country at the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. In Belgium, he had his greatest successes, winning the 100 m final, while placing second in the 200 m event. With the American 4 × 100 m relay team, Paddock won a third Olympic medal. Paddock became f

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Tommie Smith

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Tommie Smith

Tommie C. Smith (born June 6, 1944)[3] is an American former track & field athlete and wide receiver in the American Football League. At the 1968 Summer Olympics, Smith, aged 24, won the 200-meter sprint finals and gold medal in 19.83 seconds – the first time the 20-second barrier was broken legally. His Black Power salute with John Carlos atop the medal podium to protest racism and injustice against African-Americans in the United States caused controversy, as it was seen as politicizing the Olympic Games. It remains a symbolic moment in the history of the Black Power movement. Early life and career Tommie Smith was born on June 6, 1944, in Clarksville, Texas, the seventh of twelve children born to Richard and Dora Smith. He suffered from pneumonia as a child, but still grew to be an athletic youth. While attending Lemoore High School in Lemoore, California, Smith showed great potential, setting most of the school's track records, many of which remain. He won the 440-yard dash in the 1963 CIF Californ

Universiade silver medalists for the United States

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Annette Rogers

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Annette Rogers

Annette Rogers (later Kelly, October 22, 1913 – November 8, 2006) was an American sprinter and high jumper. She competed in the individual 100 m, 4×100 m relay and high jump at the 1932 and 1936 Olympics and won two gold medals in the relay, setting a world record in 1932. She placed fifth in the individual 100 m in 1932 and sixth in the high jump in 1932 and 1936.[3] Domestically she won the AAU outdoor titles in the 100 yards in 1933 and in the relay in 1931–1933. She also won the AAU indoor titles in the 200 m and high jump in 1933 and 1936.[1] Rogers was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts, but at an early age moved to Chicago with her parents, John and Mary Rogers, two immigrants from Ireland. Rogers graduated from Senn High School in Chicago, and Northwestern University. She then worked as a teacher of physical education in the Chicago public school system, retiring in 1965. While going to school and working, Rogers trained and competed with the following organizations—Illinois Women's Athletic Club (IWAC),

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Bill Smith (swimmer)

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Bill Smith (swimmer)

William Melvin Smith Jr. (May 16, 1924 – February 8, 2013) was an American former competition swimmer, two-time Olympic champion, and a former world record-holder in four events. He was one of the most successful competitive swimmers in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Smith was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, of mixed Irish and Hawaiian ancestry. He attended Ohio State University, and competed for the Ohio State Buckeyes swimming and diving team within the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).[1] As a college swimmer, he was undefeated in three years of dual meet competition, and was a four-time All-American. He set seven world records and won fourteen U.S. national championships: seven NCAA, six AAU indoor and one AAU outdoor. At the 1948 Summer Olympics in London, England, Smith won gold medals in the 400-meter freestyle and 4×200-meter freestyle relay.[2] At one time, Smith held all of the world records in freestyle swimming events between 200 and 1,000 meters. At the US Ol

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Doug Russell (swimmer)

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Doug Russell (swimmer)

Doug Russell Pool in Midland, Texas Douglas Albert Russell (born February 20, 1946) is an American former competitive swimmer, Olympic champion, and former world record-holder in three different events. Career Russell was born in New York City,[1] but raised in Midland, Texas. He began swimming in high school for Midland High School, swimming in the new 50-meter "Alamo" pool built by the city in 1962. It was later renamed in his honor: the "Douglas Russell Swimming Pool."[2] He was an all-around swimmer in high school—swimming competitively in butterfly, backstroke, and individual medley events. Other school swimmers of the era remember him as a tough competitor who was hard to beat but who brought out the best in swimmers around him.[3] He attended The University of Texas at Arlington, where he swam for coach Don Easterling's UT Arlington Mavericks swimming and diving team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) competition.[4] Doug Russell Park, part of the southern edge of the UT Arlington

Universiade silver medalists for the United States

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Frank McKinney

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Frank McKinney

Frank Edward McKinney Jr. (November 3, 1938 – September 11, 1992) was an American competition swimmer, Olympic champion, and former world record-holder. He later became a prominent executive in the American banking industry, but died in a mid-air collision of two aircraft. McKinney was the son of Frank E. McKinney, a former chairman of the Democratic National Committee and a former owner of the National League's Pittsburgh Pirates. He was the youngest member of a U.S. national swim team that set a world record in the 4×100-meter medley relay at the 1955 Pan American Games. At the Pan American Games, the 16-year-old high school student also won a gold medal in the 100-meter backstroke. Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, he did the most to introduce modern backstroke techniques. Following Yoshi Oyakawa as the premier U.S. backstroker, McKinney was the pioneer of the modern bent-arm backstrokers, even as Oyakawa had been the last of the straight-arm school. McKinney was the leader of a remarkable group of teenager

Swimmers at the 1955 Pan American Games

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Leo Goodwin (swimmer)

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Leo Goodwin (swimmer)

Leo Joseph Goodwin (November 13, 1883 – May 25, 1957) was an American swimmer, diver, and water polo player. He competed in the 1904 and 1908 Summer Olympics and won medals in all three disciplines.[1] Goodwin nearly lost his arm after blood poisoning in 1906. Dr. Dave Hennen, a swimmer from his club and a famous surgeon, dissected his entire forearm while cleaning it from poison, then re-assembled the veins, muscles and ligaments. Goodwin quickly recovered, but was unfit for the 1906 Olympics.[2] At the 1915 Panama–Pacific International Exposition Goodwin set an outdoor record by swimming 3.5 miles in 1 hour and 38 minutes in San Francisco Bay. He won by 200 yards. He later received the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest peacetime award in the United States, for rescuing people from drowning at Newport News, Virginia. He retired from active competitions in 1922, but continued swimming through his seventies. In 1971 he was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame as an "Honor Swimmer".[2] S

Divers at the 1904 Summer Olympics

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Water polo players at the 1904 Summer Olympics

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American male divers

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Lilly King

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Lilly King

Lilly King (born February 10, 1997)[2] is an American swimmer. At the 2016 Summer Olympics she won the gold medal in the 100 meter breaststroke competition and also won a gold medal in the women's 4 × 100 m medley relay, in which she swam the breaststroke leg. She is the current world record holder in 100-metre and 50-metre breaststroke (long course). Early life King was born and raised in Evansville, Indiana, the daughter of Mark and Ginny King. Mark ran track and cross-country at Indiana State University and Ginny swam for Eastern Kentucky University and Illinois State University. King's younger brother Alex is a walk-on swimmer at the University of Michigan.[3] King attended FJ Reitz High School, where the school's swim team shared Lloyd Pool with five other teams.[3] The lanes at Lloyd Pool were often crowded with swimmers below King's ability, so in order to help compensate, King added several morning practices a week with the local masters team and joined a competitive swim team called the Newburgh Se

Universiade bronze medalists for the United States

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Joe Verdeur

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Joe Verdeur

Joseph Thomas "Joe" Verdeur (March 7, 1926 – August 6, 1991) was an American competition swimmer, Olympic champion, and former world record-holder. Career Verdeur was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He had a sister, Theresa, and a brother, Edward. His mother was Polish American, who was born in Poland as Sophie Machalowska. His father died when Joseph was six years old.[15] Verdeur attended North Catholic High School in Philadelphia, and led the North Catholic Falcons swim team to three consecutive Catholic League championships and two city championships. He was also a two-time first-team All-Catholic swimmer. While attending La Salle University, he set nineteen world and twenty-one American records swimming for the La Salle Explorers and was a four time All-American.[15] His first world record came on April 5, 1946 breaking Alfred Nakache's 200 meter breaststroke record of 2:36.8 set in a long course pool. Verdeur set the record with a time of 2:35.6 in Bainbridge's 25 yard indoor pool at the National

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Mike Conley Sr.

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Mike Conley Sr.

Michael Alex Conley Sr. (born October 5, 1962) is an American former track and field athlete who competed primarily in the triple jump and the long jump.[1] In the triple jump, he won an Olympic gold medal in 1992, silver in 1984, and gold in the 1993 World Championship.[2] Competitive career Conley competed collegiately at the University of Arkansas where he won 9 NCAA long jump and triple jump titles. Conley was ranked #1 in the United States 9 times in the triple jump during his professional career. Conley is the former world indoor triple jump record holder and he still holds the U.S. indoor record in the triple jump at 17.76 meters (58 feet, 3.25 inches). Conley was ranked #1 in the world 6 times in the Triple Jump during his career and was ranked 8th in the U.S. in the 200 meter dash in 1985. Conley received the USATF Jim Thorpe Award in 1986 and 1992 as the top field events athlete in the U.S.[3] In 2004, Conley was inducted into the United States National Track and Field Hall of Fame.[4] A 5 ft 11

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American male triple jumpers

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James Harden

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James Harden

James Edward Harden Jr. (born August 26, 1989) is an American professional basketball player for the Houston Rockets of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for Arizona State, where he was named a consensus All-American and Pac-10 Player of the Year in 2009. Harden was selected with the third overall pick in the 2009 NBA draft by the Oklahoma City Thunder. In 2012, he was named NBA Sixth Man of the Year with the Thunder and helped the team reach the NBA Finals, where they lost to the Miami Heat in five games. Harden was traded to Houston before the 2012–13 NBA season. During his tenure with the Rockets, he became one of the NBA's most prolific scorers and earned recognition as the best shooting guard in the NBA,[1][2] as well as one of the top overall players in the league.[3] In 2018, Harden led the league in scoring and was named the NBA Most Valuable Player. He is a seven-time NBA All-Star, and has earned All-NBA Team honors six times, including five times to the first t

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Larry Bird

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Larry Bird

Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is an American former professional basketball player, former coach, and former executive who most recently served as President of Basketball Operations for the Indiana Pacers in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Nicknamed "The Hick from French Lick," Bird has been described as one of the greatest basketball players and greatest shooters of all time. Drafted into the NBA by the Boston Celtics with the sixth overall pick in the 1978 NBA draft, Bird started at small forward and power forward for the Celtics for 13 seasons. Bird was a 12-time NBA All-Star and received the NBA Most Valuable Player Award three consecutive times (1984–1986). He played his entire professional career for Boston, winning three NBA championships and two NBA Finals MVP awards. Bird was also a member of the gold-medal-winning 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team known as "The Dream Team". He was voted to the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team in 1996, was inducted into the Nai

Universiade gold medalists for the United States

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Walt Hazzard

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Walt Hazzard

Mahdi Abdul-Rahman (born Walter Raphael Hazzard Jr.; April 15, 1942 – November 18, 2011) was an American college, Olympic and professional basketball player and college basketball coach. He was best known for his association with the men's basketball team at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), having been a star player for that team when it won its first national championship in 1964 and having served as the team's head coach in the 1980s. College career Hazzard at UCLA (1964) Hazzard attended Overbrook High School in Philadelphia, where his teams went 89-3 and he was named the city's player of the year when he was a senior.[1] Hazzard then went on to UCLA, where he became a key player on the varsity basketball team. In Hazzard's first season on the varsity squad, the UCLA Bruins made their first Final Four appearance in the 1962 NCAA Toournament. They lost 72-70 to Cincinnati, the eventual champion, in the semi-finals. UCLA's first undefeated season of 1963–64 was in no small part due to

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Burdette Haldorson

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Burdette Haldorson

Burdette Eliele "Burdie" Haldorson (born January 24, 1934) was an American basketball player who competed in the 1956 Summer Olympics and in the 1960 Summer Olympics. Haldorson played collegiately at the University of Colorado. He was part of the American basketball team that won the gold medal in 1956. He never played professionally, but was a member of the AAU Phillips 66ers for a number of years. Four years later, in 1960, he won his second gold medal as part of the American team. He was inducted into the Pac-12 Basketball Hall of Honor during the 2012 Pac-12 Conference Men's Basketball Tournament, March 10, 2012.[1] References 2011-12 Hall of Honor Class Announced, Pac-12 Conference, February 7, 2012 External links Burdie Haldorson at Olympics at Sports-Reference.com Burdette Haldorson at the International Olympic Committee

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Tom LaGarde

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Tom LaGarde

Thomas Joseph LaGarde (born February 10, 1955) is a retired American basketball player who played in the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1977 to 1985. LaGarde earned a Gold medal as a member of Team USA in the 1976 Olympics, and an NBA Championship in 1979 with the Seattle Super Sonics. Basketball career After playing collegiately at the University of North Carolina, LaGarde was selected 9th overall in the first round of the 1977 NBA draft by the Denver Nuggets. At 6'10" and 220 lb, LaGarde played forward and center in the NBA. After spending his rookie season with the Nuggets, LaGarde spent the following two seasons with the Seattle SuperSonics, winning an NBA Championship with the Sonics in 1979. In 1980, he was selected by the expansion Dallas Mavericks that offseason in the 1980 expansion draft. LaGarde was the only team member who played all 82 games for the Mavericks in their inaugural 1980-81 season,[1] finishing second on the team in points to Jim Spanarkel and leading the team in rebou

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Candace Parker

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Candace Parker

Candace Nicole Parker (born April 19, 1986) is an American professional basketball player who plays for the Los Angeles Sparks of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). She is the younger sister of former NBA player Anthony Parker and was the first overall pick in the 2008 WNBA Draft. In high school, Parker won the 2003 and 2004 Gatorade National Girls Basketball Player of the Year awards, becoming just the second junior and the only woman to receive the award twice. A versatile player, Parker mainly plays the forward position. In college she was listed on Tennessee's roster as a forward, center and guard.[1] Parker was the first woman to dunk in an NCAA tournament game and the first woman to dunk twice in a college game. She set both milestones as a redshirt freshman on March 19, 2006. Parker became the second player to dunk in a WNBA game on June 22, 2008.[2][3][4] Prior to her first WNBA game, Parker had signed long-term endorsement deals with Adidas and Gatorade.[5][6] In leading the Lady Vo

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Wayne Wells

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Wayne Wells

Wayne Alton Wells (born September 29, 1946 in Abilene, Texas)[1] is an American wrestler and Olympic champion in Freestyle wrestling. Olympics Wells competed at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich where he received a gold medal in Freestyle wrestling, the welterweight class.[2] At the University of Oklahoma, Wayne was a three-time Big Eight champion and a three-time All-American. NCAA runner-up as a junior, he won the championship the following year and went on to earn fourth place in the Olympic Games of 1968. While turning his attention to law school and the foundation of his professional career, Wayne intensified his wrestling efforts. He captured the silver medal in the 1969 World Championships, then returned a year later to win the gold. He won two national freestyle titles and placed second in the Pan American Games. In the months leading up to the 1972 Olympics he completed his final year of law school, passed the state bar exam, assisted the OU coaching staff and trained five hours a day. He is a D

Competitors at the 1971 Pan American Games

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Wrestlers at the 1968 Summer Olympics

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Oklahoma Sooners wrestlers

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