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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...


Robert Taylor (sprinter, born 1948)

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Robert Taylor (sprinter, born 1948)

Robert Taylor (September 14, 1948 – November 13, 2007) was an American sprinter. He won a gold medal in the 4×100 m relay at the 1972 Olympics and placed second in the 100 m final. He is the father of former NFL player Bobby Taylor. Career Taylor won the AAU championships in the 100-meter dash in 1972.[2] At the Munich Olympics, Taylor was second in the 100 m.[3] On the way to the final, Taylor was unwittingly a participant in the first athletics controversy of his career. Unlike his teammates Eddie Hart and Rey Robinson, Taylor was narrowly able to reach the start of his quarter-final race, when their coach Stan Wright unknowingly used an outdated Olympic schedule and failed to deliver his athletes to the track in time. As Taylor told it in a 2000 interview with the Tyler Morning Telegraph,[4] the three athletes and Wright had left the Olympic village for their quarter-final runs. Whilst waiting for the bus to transport them, they wandered into the ABC-TV headquarters where they saw to their utter horror

African-American male track and field athletes

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Texas Southern University alumni

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Sportspeople from Tyler, Texas

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Mark Daniel Gangloff

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Mark Daniel Gangloff

Mark Daniel Gangloff (born June 8, 1982) is an American former competition swimmer, Olympic gold medalist, world champion, and former world record-holder. Gangloff represented the United States at two consecutive Summer Olympics. At the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, he earned a gold medal by swimming for the winning U.S. team in the preliminary heats of the 4×100-meter medley relay. In individual competition, he placed fourth in the men's 100-meter breaststroke. Four years later at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, he again participated in his signature event, the 100-meter breaststroke, and placed eighth in the event final.[1] Gangloff broke the American record in the 100-meter breaststroke with a time of 59.01 at the U.S. Swimming National Championships in 2009.[2] He attended Firestone High School in Akron, Ohio. He accepted an athletic scholarship to attend Auburn University, where he swam for the Auburn Tigers swimming and diving team in NCAA competition from 2001 to 2005. He graduated from Aubur

Swimmers at the 2007 Pan American Games

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American male breaststroke swimmers

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Swimmers at the 2008 Summer Olympics

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Tiffeny Milbrett

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Tiffeny Milbrett

Tiffeny Carleen Milbrett (born October 23, 1972) is an American retired professional soccer forward who was a longtime member of the United States women's national soccer team. In May 2018 the National Soccer Hall of Fame announced Milbrett will be enshrined in the Hall.[1] A native of Oregon, she starred at the University of Portland where she scored a then school record 103 goals during her career.[2] She won an Olympic gold medal in 1996 in Atlanta and a silver medal at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. She also played in three World Cups, winning in 1999. A player who enjoys signing autographs for her fans, she is in the top five all-time in the United States national soccer team in three offensive categories. Early life Milbrett was born in Portland, Oregon, on October 23, 1972.[3] She started her soccer career playing for the Hillsboro Soccer Club in Hillsboro, Oregon, in the Portland metropolitan area. Milbrett grew up in Hillsboro, attending W. Verne McKinney Elementary School in the northwest part of th

USL W-League players

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Vancouver Whitecaps FC (women) players

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L.League players

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Curtis Tomasevicz

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Curtis Tomasevicz

Curtis "Curt" Tomasevicz (born September 17, 1980) is an American former college football player for the University of Nebraska Cornhuskers, and bobsledder who has competed since 2004. He won six medals at the FIBT World Championships with two golds (Four-man: 2009, 2012), a silver (Mixed team: 2007) and three bronzes (Two-man: 2009, Mixed team: 2008, 2009). Tomasevicz finished sixth in the four-man event at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin. He was an alternate during the (2006–07) season on World Cup tour for driver Steven Holcomb and won a gold in Cesana, Italy during the 2007–08 season. It was announced on 15 January 2010 that he made the US team in both the two-man and four-man events at the 2010 Winter Olympics, where he won a gold medal. Personal life Tomasevicz earned his bachelor degree and Master of Science degree in electrical engineering with a minor in astronomy, and in December 2017 a PhD in biological systems engineering, all from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He was named an Academic

People from Shelby, Nebraska

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21st-century American engineers

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Bobsledders at the 2006 Winter Olympics

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Oscar De La Hoya

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Oscar De La Hoya

Oscar De La Hoya (born February 4, 1973)[1][2] is a Mexican-American former professional boxer who, in 2002, also became a boxing promoter and, in 2018, a mixed martial arts (MMA) promoter. As a boxer, he competed from 1992 to 2008, winning multiple world titles in six weight classes, including the lineal championship in three weight classes.[3][4][5] He is ranked as the 11th best boxer of all time, pound for pound, by BoxRec.[6] De La Hoya was nicknamed "The Golden Boy of boxing" by the media when he represented the United States at the 1992 Summer Olympics where, shortly after having graduated from James A. Garfield High School, he won a gold medal in the lightweight division, and reportedly "set a sport back on its feet."[7] De La Hoya was named The Ring magazine Fighter of the Year in 1995, and was its top-rated fighter in the world, pound for pound, in 1997 and 1998. He generated approximately $700 million in pay-per-view income, making De La Hoya the top pay-per-view earner before being surpassed by Fl

World super-featherweight boxing champions

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World lightweight boxing champions

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The Ring champions

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Tessa Gobbo

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Tessa Gobbo

Tessa Gobbo (born December 8, 1990) is an American rower. She attended high school Northfield Mount Hermon in Massachusetts. She won the gold medal in the eight at the 2015 World Rowing Championships and the 2016 Rio Olympics representing the United States. References Tessa Gobbo at USRowing Tessa Gobbo at FISA WorldRowing.com

People from Keene, New Hampshire

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Rowers at the 2016 Summer Olympics

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World Rowing Championships medalists for the Un...

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George Hunt (rower)

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George Hunt (rower)

George Elwood Hunt Jr. (August 1, 1916 – September 3, 1999) was an American rower who competed in the 1936 Summer Olympics.[1] In 1936, he won the gold medal as a member of the American boat in the eights competition.[2] References Beers, Carole (September 4, 1999). "George Hunt, Engineer Who Won Olympic Gold Medal With UW". The Seattle Times. Lange, Greg (1999-01-15). "HistoryLink: Rowing crew of the University of Washington wins the Olympic Gold Medal on August 14, 1936". HistoryLink.org. Retrieved 2009-07-25. External links profile

Rowers at the 1936 Summer Olympics

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American male rowers

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Olympic rowers of the United States

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Alden Sanborn

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Alden Sanborn

Alden Ream "Zeke" Sanborn (May 22, 1899 – December 1, 1991) was an American rower who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. He won a gold medal in men's eight. He also served as a United States Naval Aviator. Biography Sanborn was born in Jefferson, Wisconsin on May 22, 1899 to Edwin J. Sanborn (1865–1941) and Augusta Irene Ream Sanborn (1873–1933). After attending Beloit College, he then entered the United States Naval Academy, where he graduated in 1922 with special honors. At the 1920 Summer Olympics, he was part of the American boat from the Academy, which won the gold medal in the eights. At the Academy, he received a Marine Engineering degree. He then earned a Masters in Aeronautical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[1][2][3] After receiving his aviator wings at the Pensacola naval air facility, he supported the development of torpedo planes and dive bombers for the United States Navy. He continued in support of aircraft and aircraft carrier maintenance during and

People from Jefferson, Wisconsin

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American male rowers

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Olympic rowers of the United States

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Michael Galitzen

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Michael Galitzen

Michael Riley Galitzen, also known as Mickey Riley (September 6, 1909, Los Angeles, California – June 6, 1959, Hollywood, California) was an American diver who won four total medals, one gold, at the 1928 Summer Olympics and 1932 Summer Olympics. Galitzen was a native of southern California, and won acclaim both for his individual diving and as a tandem diver with his brother John. He won two medals in diving at Amsterdam in 1928 as Michael Galitzen. In 1931 his coach suggested that the brothers use Americanized stage names — "Mickey Riley" and "Johnny Riley." He won gold and silver medals in Los Angeles in 1932 under that name. After the Olympics, he worked as a film editor, and he and John appeared frequently in diving shows. He was found dead in his Hollywood apartment in 1959; the death was attributed to natural causes. Galitzen was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1977. External links International Swimming Hall of Fame profile Hickoksports.com profile New York Times obitua

American male divers

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Olympic silver medalists for the United States ...

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Olympic bronze medalists for the United States ...

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Micki King

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Micki King

Maxine Joyce "Micki" King (born July 26, 1944) is an American former competitive diver and diving coach. She was a gold medal winner at the 1972 Summer Olympics in the three meter springboard event. She was the dominant figure in women's diving in the United States from 1965 to 1972, winning 10 national championships, including both springboard and platform events. At the 1968 Summer Olympics, she was in first place in the three meter springboard event when she broke her left arm on the ninth dive; she completed the tenth dive, but finished in fourth place. In 1972, she made a comeback at the Munich Olympics, winning the gold medal in the three meter springboard event. King was a career officer in the United States Air Force from 1966 to 1992, retiring with the rank of colonel.[1] She taught physical education and coached diving at the United States Air Force Academy, becoming the first woman to serve on the faculty of a U.S military academy and the first woman to coach a male athlete to an NCAA championshi

Universiade bronze medalists for the United States

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Universiade gold medalists for the United States

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University of Kentucky people

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Jenny Schmidgall-Potter

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Jenny Schmidgall-Potter

Jennifer Lynn Schmidgall-Potter (born January 12, 1979) is an American ice hockey player. She is a member of the United States women's national ice hockey team. She won a gold medal at the 1998 Winter Olympics, silver medals at the 2002 Winter Olympics and 2010 Winter Olympics, and a bronze medal at the 2006 Winter Olympics. Currently, she plays for the Minnesota Whitecaps of the Western Women's Hockey League, where she won the league championship and was named MVP for the 2008–09 season. She was selected to the 2010 US Olympic team and was the only mother on the team.[1] Playing career NCAA Her NCAA career included three years at the University of Minnesota Duluth, and one year at the University of Minnesota. Potter set an NCAA record (since tied) for most goals in one game with 6. This was accomplished on December 18, 2002 versus St. Cloud State.[2] Potter is the all-time leading scorer in Bulldogs history and was named to the WCHA All-Decade team in 2009.[3] She was a four-time All-American. On January 2

Sportspeople from Edina, Minnesota

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Minnesota Whitecaps players

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Boston Blades players

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Mark Johnson (ice hockey)

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Mark Johnson (ice hockey)

Mark Einar Johnson (born September 22, 1957) is an American ice hockey coach for the University of Wisconsin–Madison women's ice hockey team. He is a former NHL player who appeared in 669 NHL regular season games between 1980 and 1990. He also played for the gold medal-winning 1980 U.S. Olympic Hockey team. Amateur career As a teenager, Johnson attended James Madison Memorial High School, where he was on the hockey team. He then played for the University of Wisconsin–Madison ice hockey team for three years under his father, legendary coach Bob Johnson. In 1977, during his first year at the university, he helped the Badgers win the NCAA national championship. He was the first Badger to win the WCHA Rookie of the year. He went on to become the school's leading goal scorer and second all-time scorer. Johnson was also a two time All-American. His brother, Peter, also played at the university. International and professional career Johnson made his international debut with the United States national team as an

HC Milano players

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American expatriate sportspeople in Austria

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Birmingham Bulls draft picks

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Helen Wills

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Helen Wills

Helen Newington Wills (October 6, 1905 – January 1, 1998), also known as Helen Wills Moody and Helen Wills Roark, was an American tennis player. She became famous around the world for holding the top position in women's tennis for a total of nine years: 1927–33, 1935 and 1938.[1] She won 31 Grand Slam tournament titles (singles, women's doubles, and mixed doubles) during her career, including 19 singles titles. Wills was the first American woman athlete to become a global celebrity, making friends with royalty and film stars despite her preference for staying out of the limelight. She was admired for her graceful physique and for her fluid motion. She was part of a new tennis fashion, playing in knee-length pleated skirts rather than the longer ones of her predecessors. Unusually, she practiced against men to hone her craft, and she played a relentless game, wearing down her female opponents with power and accuracy. In 1933 she beat the 8th-ranked US male player in an exhibition match. Her record of eight w

Sportspeople from Alameda County, California

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Tennis writers

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Brianna Rollins-McNeal

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Brianna Rollins-McNeal

Brianna Rollins-McNeal (born August 18, 1991) is an American track and field athlete, who specializes in the 100 metres hurdles. She is the 2016 Olympic champion and the 2013 World champion in the 100 meter hurdles. Her time of 12.26 is tied as the fourth-fastest run in history. Personal life Rollins was born in Miami, Florida, daughter of Temperance Rollins. She is the eldest of seven siblings and the only female. She is a 2009 graduate of Miami Northwestern Senior High School. Rollins competed for Clemson University and graduated in 2013, majoring in travel and tourism. At Clemson, Rollins was a three-time NCAA champion: winning the 60 metres hurdles in 2011 and 2013 and the 100 metres hurdles in 2013. She turned professional following the 2013 NCAA Outdoor Championships, where she broke the NCAA record in the 100 m hurdles with a time of 12.39.[1] Career Rollins competed at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials, but did not make the Olympic team, finishing sixth in the 100 metres hurdles with a time of 12.94. T

Clemson Tigers track and field athletes

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Female hurdlers

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American hurdlers

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Brian Lewis (sprinter)

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Brian Lewis (sprinter)

Brian M. Lewis (born December 5, 1974) is an American athlete, winner of gold medal in 4 × 100 m relay at the 2000 Summer Olympics. Born in Sacramento, California, Brian Lewis played baseball (his father and uncle had played professional baseball) through his ninth grade, but moved then to athletics, because he did not want his father to coach him. Lewis graduated from Highlands High School in 1993. Lewis was the member of American 4 × 100 m relay team, that did not finish its heat at the 1997 World Championships. At the 1998 Goodwill Games, Lewis was third in 100 m. In 1999, Lewis won the US National Championships in 100 m and ran the third leg on the American 4 × 100 m relay team, which won the gold medal at the World Championships and also reached the semifinals of 100 m. At the Sydney Olympics, Lewis ran the third leg on the gold medal-winning American 4 × 100 m relay team. External links Brian Lewis at USATF Brian Lewis at IAAF Brian Lewis at the International Olympic Committee Brian Lew

World Championships in Athletics medalists

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Athletes (track and field) at the 2000 Summer O...

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American sprinters

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Dean Smith (sprinter)

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Dean Smith (sprinter)

Finis Dean Smith (born January 15, 1932) is an American former track and field athlete and stuntman, winner of the gold medal in the 4 × 100 m relay at the 1952 Summer Olympics.[1] Born in Breckenridge, Texas, Smith won the Amateur Athletic Union championships in 100 m in 1952. At the Helsinki Olympics, he was fourth in the 100 m and ran the leadoff leg for American gold medal winning 4 × 100 m relay team. As a sprinter on the Longhorn track team, Smith ran a 100-yard dash in 9.4 seconds; one tenth of a second off the world record at the time. After graduating from University of Texas at Austin where he ran track and was a member of the Silver Spurs, Smith played professional football for the Los Angeles Rams and the Pittsburgh Steelers, but never played in a regular season game. After his sports career, Smith performed as a professional rodeo cowboy and stuntman in various Western movies as The Alamo, The Comancheros, How The West Was Won, McLintock!, Rio Conchos, Big Jake, and El Dorado. He also appeared

People from Breckenridge, Texas

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Roping (rodeo)

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Jim "Bad News" Barnes

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Jim "Bad News" Barnes

Velvet James Barnes (April 13, 1941 – September 14, 2002),[1] also affectionately known as Jim "Bad News" Barnes, was an American basketball player, who was an Olympic Gold Medalist and the No. 1 overall pick of the 1964 NBA draft. Early life As a child, Barnes picked and chopped cotton, growing up in Tuckerman, Arkansas. He played basketball wearing socks, as his family was too poor to afford basketball shoes. At age 13, Barnes had grown to 6'6" and his grandfather was said to have been 7'0" tall.[2] Barnes attended the all black[3] W.F. Branch High School in Newport, Arkansas after they promised to provide him basketball shoes. The team finished 3rd in the 1957 State Black Basketball Championships. Barnes then moved to Poplar Bluff High School (Mo.), where he was ruled ineligible due to residency issues. He returned to Branch where, playing in socks, as his feet had grown to size 17, he scored 68 points and had 38 rebounds against Vanndale.[4] Barnes' family was influenced, moved and he then enrolled at

Centers (basketball)

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Olympic basketball players of the United States

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Olympic gold medalists

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Tony Terlazzo

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Tony Terlazzo

Anthony Terlazzo (July 28, 1911 – March 26, 1966) was an Italian-born American weightlifter. He was America's first weightlifter to win an Olympic gold medal, which he had done in 1936.[1] He also won a bronze medal at the 1932 Games. While winning the 1936 gold medal Terlazzo set Olympic records in the total, at 312.5 kg (687.5 lbs), and in the snatch, at 97.5 kg (214.5 lbs).[2] Terlazzo won two world (1937–38) and 12 national titles, which remains the highest number for any American weightlifter.[3] Between 1935 and 1938 he set five ratified world records: three in the press and two in the clean and jerk.[4] References Wikimedia Commons has media related to Tony Terlazzo. "Legacy of Iron by Brooks Kubik". Brooks Kubik. Retrieved February 6, 2013. "Tony Terlazzo's winning Snatch Lift at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin | Oldtime Strongman". Old Time Strong Man. Retrieved February 6, 2013. Tony Terlazzo. sports-reference.com Anthony Terlazzo. chidlovski.net

Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Weightlifters at the 1932 Summer Olympics

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Weightlifters at the 1936 Summer Olympics

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Allen Morgan (rowing)

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Allen Morgan (rowing)

Allen Jerome Morgan (July 16, 1925 – September 12, 2011) was an American rowing coxswain who competed in the 1948 Summer Olympics. Born in Seattle, Washington, he coxed the American boat that won the gold medal in the coxed four event in 1948. External links Allen Morgan at FISA WorldRowing.com Allen Morgan at Olympics at Sports-Reference.com Allan Jerome Morgan at the International Olympic Committee Allen Jerome Morgan's obituary

American sportsmen

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Coxes

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Rowers at the 1948 Summer Olympics

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Edward Jennings (rowing)

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Edward Jennings (rowing)

Edward Francis Jennings (April 9, 1898 – February 9, 1975) was an American rowing coxswain who competed in the 1924 Summer Olympics and in the 1932 Summer Olympics. He was born in Pennsylvania and died in San Diego, California. In 1924 he was the cox of the American boat, which won the bronze medal in the coxed pairs. Eight years later he won the gold medal as cox of the American boat in the same event.[1] References Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill. "Edward Jennings". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 9, 2018. External links profile

Male rowers

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1898 births

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American sportsmen

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Sarah and Karen Josephson

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Sarah and Karen Josephson

Sarah and Karen Josephson (born January 10, 1964) are American competitors in synchronised swimming and Olympic champions. They won gold medals in the Women's duet at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, and received silver medals in the same event at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul.[1][2] Sarah and Karen are twin sisters. See also List of members of the International Swimming Hall of Fame References "Sarah Josephson Olympic Results". sports-reference.com. Retrieved 8 February 2015. "Karen Josephson Olympic Results". sports-reference.com. Retrieved 10 February 2015.

Competitors at the 1987 Pan American Games

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Synchronized swimmers at the 1986 World Aquatic...

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Edward Etzel

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Edward Etzel

Edward Fredrick "Ed" Etzel, Jr. (born September 6, 1952) is a sports shooter and Olympic Champion for the United States. He won a gold medal in the 50 metre rifle prone event at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.[1] Etzel was born in New Haven, Connecticut. He competed for the U.S. Army team. As of 2016, he is professor of Sport and Exercise Psychology at West Virginia University.[2] References Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill. "Ed Etzel". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2015. "The Olympian struggle: How do Olympic athletes pay the electric bill?". salon.com. August 10, 2016.

Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Shooters at the 1984 Summer Olympics

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Olympic medalists in shooting

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Kim Rhode

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Kim Rhode

Kimberly Susan Rhode (born July 16, 1979) is an American double trap and skeet shooter.[1] A California native, she is a six-time Olympic medal winner, including three gold medals, and six-time national champion in double trap. She is the most successful female shooter at the Olympics as the only triple Olympic Champion and the only woman to have won two Olympic gold medals for Double Trap. She won a gold medal in skeet shooting at the 2012 Summer Olympic Games, equaling the world record of 99 out of 100 clays.[2] Most recently, she won the bronze medal at the Rio 2016 Olympics, making her the first Olympian to win a medal on five different continents, the first Summer Olympian to win an individual medal at six consecutive summer games, and the first woman to medal in six consecutive Olympics.[3] Early life Kimberly Rhode was born in Whittier, California in 1979. Rhode began sport hunting at an early age, traveling on African safaris by the age of 12. Rhode began competing in skeet at age 10.[1][4] Interna

Olympic silver medalists for the United States ...

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Shooters at the 2011 Pan American Games

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Shooters at the 2007 Pan American Games

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Matt Hamilton (curler)

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Matt Hamilton (curler)

Matthew Hamilton (born February 19, 1989) is an American curler.[1] Hamilton currently plays second for the Duluth, Minnesota-based John Shuster rink. Career In 2007 and 2008, Hamilton participated in the US Men's National Championships, placing 9th in both events.[1] In 2008 and 2009, he participated in the United States Junior National Championships, where he took first place on both occasions.[1] Hamilton traveled to the 2008 World Junior Curling Championships in Östersund, Sweden as a member of the Chris Plys rink where he took home the gold medal after beating Sweden 9-5. While in Sweden, Hamilton won the championship's 2008 Sportsmanship Award, an award only given out to one male junior curler and one female junior curler.[1] In the 2009 World Junior Curling Championships, held in the newly completed Vancouver Olympic Centre, Hamilton's team won the bronze medal. In the stages leading up to the 2011 United States Men's Curling Championship, he played as Paul Pustovar's second through the Medford qu

US curling champions

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People from McFarland, Wisconsin

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Tyler George

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Tyler George

Tyler George (born October 6, 1982) is an American curler. Career George went to junior nationals on three occasions, but was never successful. He was invited to be the alternate on the 2001 U.S. national junior team skipped by Andy Roza which won a bronze medal at the 2001 World Junior Curling Championships. He was a member of the 2010 American national championship team. George has played in three national championships. At the 2010 United States Men's Curling Championship, George played lead for the Pete Fenson rink which won. The team would represent the United States at the 2010 Capital One World Men's Curling Championship, where they finished fourth. George left the Fenson rink in 2010 to form his own team consisting of Chris Plys, Rich Ruohonen and Phill Drobnick. They played in the 2011 US Nationals, where he went through the round robin with a 7-2 win-loss record. He was defeated by Pete Fenson in the 1 vs. 2 playoffs and in the final. Upon their semifinal win at the 2013 United States Men's Cur

Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Olympic curlers of the United States

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John Landsteiner

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John Landsteiner

John Landsteiner (born May 19, 1990) is an American curler and two-time Olympian. He competed in the 2014 Winter Olympics and won gold as part of John Shuster's rink in the 2018 Winter Olympics.[2] Career Landsteiner was a prolific junior curler, playing in the United States Junior Curling Championships 6 times, every year from 2007 through 2011. His best finish was 2010 when his team earned the silver medal.[3] In 2011 Landsteiner participated at the World Junior Championships as alternate for the American team.[4] Since 2012 Landsteiner has played lead for John Shuster's team. With this team Landsteiner has played in seven US National Championships, only missing one year, 2018, because of obligations after the Olympics. Of the seven appearances at the National Championship, Team Shuster earned a medal six times, including gold in 2015, 2017, and 2019. Landsteiner's team placed first at the 2013 United States Olympic Curling Trials,[3] then earned the final qualification spot for the 2014 Olympics at the

US curling champions

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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Joe Polo

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Joe Polo

Joseph Polo (born December 10, 1982) is an American curler. Polo was raised in Floodwood, Minnesota before moving to Cass Lake. He learned to curl in nearby Bemidji at the age of 10 in the Bemidji Curling Club's Sunday Night Junior League. Polo participated in the 2006 Winter Olympics as the second for Pete Fenson's U.S. team. The team defeated David Murdoch's Great Britain rink to take the bronze medal. On January 16, 2007, the team was named the 2006 USOC Team of the Year.[1] After participating at the 2010 Worlds and finishing in 4th place, Polo, Fenson, Shawn Rojeski, and Ryan Brunt went to the 2011 Continental Cup of Curling, where Team North America defeated Team World. The team then headed to the 2011 US Nationals, where, after finishing the round robin undefeated, the team won the gold medal at the nationals. They represented the United States at the 2011 Ford World Men's Curling Championship in April at Regina, Saskatchewan, finishing with a 3-8 win-loss record at 10th after a series of close losses

US curling champions

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Medalists at the 2018 Winter Olympics

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John Shuster

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John Shuster

John Shuster (born November 3, 1982) is an American curler.[1] He led team USA to gold at the 2018 Winter Olympics, the first American team to ever win gold in curling. He also won a bronze medal at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin.[2] He has played in four straight Winter Olympics (2006, 2010, 2014, 2018) and seven World Curling Championships (2003, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2015, 2016, 2017). Career Pete Fenson rink and 2006 Winter Olympics Shuster began his international career playing lead for the Pete Fenson rink. He played in his first world competition at the 2003 Ford World Men's Curling Championship, where the U.S. finished eighth. The rink returned to the Worlds at the 2005 Ford World Men's Curling Championship, where the rink lost in a tiebreaker game, after posing an 8-3 round robin record. The Fenson rink won the 2005 United States Olympic Curling Trials and went on to play at the 2006 Winter Olympics, where it won a bronze medal (the first-ever Olympic medal in curling for the U.S.). After the season

Competitors at the 2007 Winter Universiade

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Universiade gold medalists for the United States

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US curling champions

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Michele Smith (softball)

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Michele Smith (softball)

Michele Mary Smith (born June 21, 1967) is an American, former collegiate All-American, two-time medal-winning Olympian, international pro left-handed hitting fastpitch softball pitcher and current sports commentator, originally from Califon, New Jersey. Smith played her college career for the Oklahoma State Cowgirls for the years 1986–89 where she set numerous records in the now defunct Big Eight Conference. She is also a double Olympic Softball gold medalist with the United States women's national softball team, having played in the 1996 and 2000 Summer Olympics.[1] She has been ESPN's lead college softball color analyst since 1998.[1] In 2012, Smith became the first woman to serve as commentator for a nationally televised Major League Baseball game.[2] Smith is a USA Softball Hall of Fame honoree. Early life and education Smith started playing softball at the age of five.[3] She attended Voorhees High School in Glen Gardner, New Jersey, where she set school records for wins, strikeouts and no-hitters. Sh

American expatriate sportspeople in Japan

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Major League Baseball announcers

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Olympic medalists in softball

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John Muldoon (rugby union, born 1896)

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John Muldoon (rugby union, born 1896)

John Muldoon (March 2, 1896 – January 2, 1944) was an American rugby union player who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics. He was a member of the American rugby union team, which won the gold medal. External links Profile

Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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American rugby union players

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United States international rugby union players

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Harry Babcock (pole vaulter)

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Harry Babcock (pole vaulter)

Henry Stoddard "Harry" Babcock (December 15, 1890 – June 5, 1965) was an American pole vaulter who won the gold medal at the 1912 Summer Olympics, setting an Olympic record at 3.95 meters.[1] Babcock started as a long jumper, and only around 1910 changed to the pole vault. He graduated in engineering from Columbia University in 1912, and later worked as a salesman with a lumber company in Irvington, New York.[1] References Harry Babcock. sports-reference.com External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Harry Babcock. Profile on databaseOlympics.com

Olympic decathletes

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American male pole vaulters

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Athletes (track and field) at the 1912 Summer O...

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Elizabeth Armstrong

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Elizabeth Armstrong

Elizabeth Anne "Betsey" Armstrong (born January 31, 1983) is an American water polo goalkeeper, who won gold medals with the United States women's national water polo team at the 2012 Olympics, 2007 and 2011 Pan American Games, and 2007 and 2009 world championships.[2] Armstrong attended Huron High School in Ann Arbor and was a three-year letterwinner on her water polo team.[3] She then went on to graduate from the University of Michigan in 2005, where she was the goalkeeper for the women's water polo team. Betsey graduated with a bachelor's degree in English language and Literature.[3] She is currently the record holder at University of Michigan with 350 saves.[3] Armstrong made her debut for the national team in 2006. At the 2008 China Summer Olympic games, she and the American team lost 8–9 in the championship game to the Netherlands and took home the silver medal. In June 2009, Armstrong was named to the USA water polo women's senior national team for the 2009 FINA World Championships.[4] She was named

Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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American female water polo players

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Water polo players at the 2011 Pan American Games

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Christa Williams (softball)

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Christa Williams (softball)

Christa Lee Williams-Yates (born February 8, 1978) is an American, former collegiate three-time All-American, two-time Gold Medal winning Olympian, retired three-time pro All-Star, right-handed hitting softball pitcher originally from Houston, Texas. She competed at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta where she received a gold medal with the American team. Four years later at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, she won her second gold medal. Williams-Yates began her college career with the UCLA Bruins before transferring to play softball with the Texas Longhorns. Joining in its inaugural year, she played three years in the National Pro Fastpitch with the Texas Thunder and still ranks top-10 in career wins, strikeouts and ERA. In 2018, Williams-Yates was named to the USA National Softball Hall of Fame.[1] Currently, Williams-Yates teaches high school softball in Houston. Statistics UCLA Bruins & Texas Longhorns [2][3][4] YEAR W L GP GS CG SHO SV IP H R ER BB SO ERA WHIP

College softball players in the United States

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Olympic medalists in softball

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American softball players

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Kendall Coyne Schofield

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Kendall Coyne Schofield

Kendall Coyne Schofield (born May 25, 1992) is an American professional ice hockey player for the Minnesota Whitecaps and a member of the United States women's national ice hockey team.[1][2] With the national team, she won five gold medals at the IIHF World Women's Championships and the gold medal at the 2018 Winter Olympics. In 2016, she was the winner of the Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award.[3] In January 2017, Coyne was recognized as the recipient of the NCAA Today's Top 10 Award.[4][5] Early life and education Coyne was born in Oak Lawn, Illinois to John and Ahlise Coyne.[6] She has two brothers and a sister. Her oldest brother Kevin Coyne played Division III hockey and is currently an elite skills hockey coach.[7] Her younger sister, Bailey, is a forward for the Northeastern Huskies women's ice hockey team.[6] From 2006 to 2010, Coyne attended Sandburg High School[8] and later attended the prep school, the Berkshire School, in Sheffield, Massachusetts for the academic year 2010 to 2011.[9] In 2016, she

Olympic silver medalists for the United States

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American ice hockey forwards

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Olympic medalists in ice hockey

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Kelsi Dahlia

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Kelsi Dahlia

Kelsi Worrell Dahlia (born July 15, 1994) is an American competition swimmer who specializes in butterfly and freestyle events. She qualified for the 2016 Rio Olympics in the 100-meter butterfly and won a gold medal in the 4 x 100-meter medley relay for swimming in the heats.[4] Career At the 2015 Pan American Games in Toronto, she won the gold medal in the 100-meter butterfly.[3][5] Worrell holds the American record in the 100-yard butterfly. At the NCAA finals in March 2015, she broke the 13-year-old record held by Natalie Coughlin, and became the first woman to break 50 seconds in the event.[6] In March 2016, she improved her record to 49.43 s.[7] At the Duel in the Pool meeting in December 2015, Worrell broke the world record in the 4×100 meter medley relay (short course) together with her teammates Courtney Bartholomew, Katie Meili, and Simone Manuel.[8] 2016 Summer Olympics At the US Olympic Swimming Trials, Worrell placed first in the 100-meter butterfly and qualified for the US Olympic team. In

Swimmers at the 2015 Pan American Games

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Pan American Games medalists in swimming

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Medalists at the FINA World Swimming Championsh...

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Ken Myers

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Ken Myers

Kenneth Myers (August 10, 1896 – September 22, 1972) was an American rower who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics, in the 1928 Summer Olympics, and in the 1932 Summer Olympics. In 1920, he was part of the American boat, which won the silver medal in the coxed fours event. Eight years later, he won his second silver medal, this time in the single sculls competition. In 1932, he won the gold medal with his partner William Gilmore in the double sculls event. External links profile

Rowers at the 1928 Summer Olympics

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Olympic silver medalists for the United States ...

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American male rowers

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Sherm Clark

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Sherm Clark

Sherman Rockwell Clark (November 16, 1899 – November 8, 1980) was an American rowing coxswain who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics. In 1920, he was coxed the American boat from the United States Naval Academy, which won the gold medal in the men's eight. He also won the silver medal as coxswain of the American boat in the coxed four event.[1] He graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1922. He retired as a rear admiral.[1] References Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill. "Sherm Clark". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 3, 2018. Sherman CLARK at FISA WorldRowing.com

Olympic silver medalists for the United States ...

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American male rowers

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Coxswains (rowing)

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Vince Gallagher

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Vince Gallagher

Vincent Joseph Gallagher Jr. (April 30, 1899 – June 27, 1983) was an American rower, born in Brooklyn, who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics. In 1920, he was part of the American boat from the United States Naval Academy (USNA), which won the gold medal in the men's eight. He graduated from USNA in 1922.[1] References Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill. "Vince Gallagher". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2018. External links profile

Sportspeople from New York City

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Rowers from New York City

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Medalists at the 1920 Summer Olympics

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Anthony Davis

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Anthony Davis

Anthony Marshon Davis Jr. (born March 11, 1993) is an American professional basketball player for the New Orleans Pelicans of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He plays the power forward and center positions. Davis was selected first overall in the 2012 NBA draft by New Orleans, is a six-time NBA All-Star, and has been named to three All-NBA First Teams and three NBA All-Defensive Teams. He also earned a gold medal playing with Team USA at the 2012 Summer Olympics. Davis played one season of college basketball for the University of Kentucky, when he was first team All-American and the Consensus National Player of the Year. He also won the USBWA National Freshman of the Year, NABC Defensive Player of the Year and the Pete Newell Big Man Award. Davis led the NCAA in blocks and set Southeastern Conference and NCAA Division I freshman single-season blocked shots records. He led Kentucky to a National Championship and was named Most Outstanding Player of the NCAA tournament. Davis left college for the N

Twin sportspeople

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New Orleans Hornets draft picks

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Basketball players from Illinois

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Hindu temple

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Hindu temple

Kandariya Mahadeva Temple, Madhya Pradesh Chennakesava Temple, Karnataka Panchchura Temple, West Bengal Thanjavur Brihadisvara Temple, Tamil Nadu Elements in a Hindu temple architecture. A Hindu temple is a symbolic house, seat and body of god. It is a structure designed to bring human beings and gods together, using symbolism to express the ideas and beliefs of Hinduism.[1][2] The symbolism and structure of a Hindu temple are rooted in Vedic traditions, deploying circles and squares.[3] It also represents recursion and equivalence of the macrocosm and the microcosm by astronomical numbers, and by "specific alignments related to the geography of the place and the presumed linkages of the deity and the patron". [4][5] A temple incorporates all elements of Hindu cosmos—presenting the good, the evil and the human, as well as the elements of Hindu sense of cyclic time and the essence of life—symbolically presenting dharma, kama, artha, moksa, and karma.[6][7][8] The spiritual principles s

LGBT rights activists from the United States

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Basketball players at the 1992 Summer Olympics

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Internet properties started in 2006

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Richard Rodenhiser

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Richard Rodenhiser

Richard Peter "Dick" Rodenhiser (born October 17, 1932 in Malden, Massachusetts) is an American ice hockey player. He won a silver medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics and a gold medal at the 1960 Winter Olympics. Awards and honors Award Year AHCA First Team All-American 1952–53 [1] References "1952-1953 All-American Team". The American Hockey Coaches Association. Retrieved 2017-06-21. External Links Biographical information and career statistics from Eliteprospects.com, or The Internet Hockey Database

Sportspeople from Malden, Massachusetts

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Medalists at the 1956 Winter Olympics

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Medalists at the 1960 Winter Olympics

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Emily LeSueur

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Emily LeSueur

Emily LeSueur (born November 7, 1972 in Glendale, California) is an American competitor in synchronized swimming and Olympic champion. She competed with the American team that received a gold medal in synchronized team at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta.[1] References "1996 Summer Olympics – Atlanta, United States – Synchronized Swimming". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on August 22, 2008. Retrieved April 27, 2008. Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill. "Emily LeSueur". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC.

Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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Olympic synchronized swimmers of the United States

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Synchronized swimmers at the 1996 Summer Olympics

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Dave Schultz (wrestler)

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Dave Schultz (wrestler)

David Leslie Schultz (June 6, 1959 – January 26, 1996) was an American Olympic and world champion freestyle wrestler, a seven-time World and Olympic medalist. He coached individuals and teams at the college level and also privately. He was murdered by John Eleuthère du Pont, a millionaire philanthropist who sponsored the private Foxcatcher wrestling team at an amateur sports center, known as Foxcatcher Farm, he set up on his estate in Pennsylvania. Dave and his brother Mark Schultz, also a wrestler, were noted for both winning gold at the same Olympics (1984). The Schultzes were one of three sets of brothers (the others are Buvaisar and Adam Saitiev, and Anatoli and Sergei Beloglazov), to win both World and Olympic championships. The Schultz brothers won more NCAA, U.S. Open, World, and Olympic titles than any other American brother combination in history. Early life David Leslie Schultz was born in Palo Alto, California, to Dorothy Jean St. Germain (née Rich)[1] and Phillip Gary Schultz. He was the brothe

Universiade silver medalists for the United States

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Wrestlers at the 1995 Pan American Games

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Competitors at the 1987 Pan American Games

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Jimmy Butler

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Jimmy Butler

Jimmy Butler III (born September 14, 1989) is an American professional basketball player for the Philadelphia 76ers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). After playing one year of college basketball for Tyler Junior College, he transferred to Marquette University. He was drafted with the 30th overall pick in the 2011 NBA draft by the Chicago Bulls. Butler is a four-time NBA All-Star, a four-time NBA All-Defensive Team honoree, and a two-time All-NBA Team honoree. In 2015, he was named the NBA Most Improved Player. Early life Before the 2011 draft, one NBA general manager said about Butler, "His story is one of the most remarkable I've seen in all my years of basketball. There were so many times in his life where he was set up to fail. Every time, he overcame just enormous odds. When you talk to him—and he's hesitant to talk about his life—you just have this feeling that this kid has greatness in him."[1] Born in Houston, Texas, Butler's father abandoned the family when he was an infant. By the time

People from Tomball, Texas

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Philadelphia 76ers players

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National Basketball Association All-Stars

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Katelin Guregian

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Katelin Guregian

Katelin Guregian (née Snyder; August 16, 1987 in Nashua, New Hampshire) is an American national rowing team coxswain. She attended Winter Park High School.[1] She coxed the University of Washington men's eight in college to multiple victories, and has since moved on to the international level.[2][3] She coxed the US Women's 8+ to a gold medal in the 2016 Summer Olympics. In 2013, Snyder coxed the U.S. Women's eight to a world record of 5:54.16 at the Rowing World Cup III in Lucerne, Switzerland.[4] Competitive history Senior Year Event Women's 8+ Men's 8+ 2013 World Rowing Cup III 2014 World Championships World Rowing Cup II 2015 World Championships World Rowing Cup II 2016 Olympic Games World Rowing Cup II 2017 World Championships 4th Private life Snyder met her future husband, Nareg Guregian, in the summer of 2013 at a training camp. They got engaged in 2015 and married towards the end of 2016.[5][6] References "Winter Park graduate earns gold for Tea

Winter Park High School alumni

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Coxswains (rowing)

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Sportspeople from Winter Park, Florida

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Boxing career of Muhammad Ali

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Boxing career of Muhammad Ali

Muhammad Ali is regarded by boxing commentators and historians as one of the greatest professional boxers of all time. The Ring, a prominent boxing magazine, named him number one in a 1998 ranking of greatest heavyweights from all eras.[3] In 1999, The Associated Press voted Ali the number one heavyweight of the 20th century.[4] In 1999, Ali was named the second greatest boxer in history, pound for pound, by ESPN; behind only welterweight and middleweight legend Sugar Ray Robinson.[5] In December 2007, ESPN listed Ali second in its choice of the greatest heavyweights of all time, behind Joe Louis.[6] Early career On-site poster for Cassius Clay's fifth professional bout Clay made his professional debut on October 29, 1960, winning a six-round decision over Tunney Hunsaker. From then until the end of 1963, Clay amassed a record of 19–0 with 15 wins by knockout. He defeated boxers including Tony Esperti, Jim Robinson, Donnie Fleeman, Alonzo Johnson, George Logan, Willi Besmanoff, LaMar Clark, Doug Jones an

Muhammad Ali

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Boxers at the 1960 Summer Olympics

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Boxers from Kentucky

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Chris Mullin

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Chris Mullin

Christopher Paul Mullin (born July 30, 1963) is an American retired professional basketball player and former head coach of the St. John's Red Storm. He previously served as special advisor for the Sacramento Kings and general manager of the Golden State Warriors. He is a two-time Olympic Gold medalist and a two-time Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame inductee (in 2010 as a member of the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team ("The Dream Team"), and in 2011 for his individual career). Mullin played shooting guard and small forward in the NBA from 1985 to 2001. During his playing time at St. John's University, he was named Big East Player of the Year three times[1] and was a member of the 1984 U.S. Men's Olympic Basketball team,[2] Mullin was chosen as the seventh pick by the Golden State Warriors in the first round of the 1985 NBA draft. He returned to the Olympics in 1992 as a member of the "Dream Team", which was the first American Olympic basketball team to include professional players.

Golden State Warriors players

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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National Basketball Association All-Stars

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A. J. Mleczko

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A. J. Mleczko

Allison Jaime "A.J." Mleczko is an American ice hockey player and analyst. She won a gold medal at the 1998 Winter Olympics and a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics. Born June 14, 1975 in Nantucket, Massachusetts, Mleczko attended New Canaan Country School and is a graduate of The Taft School in Watertown, Connecticut. Mleczko played college hockey at Harvard University, where she led Crimson to a national title in 1999.[1] That same year she became the second winner of the Patty Kazmaier Award, which is awarded annually to the best female college ice hockey player in the United States.[2] On September 24, 2002 she was inducted into the New England Women's Hall of Fame.[1] She is a hockey commentator for the NBC Sports Group.[3] In June 2018, Allison will be inducted into the National Polish-American Sports Hall of Fame in Troy, Michigan. Awards and honors 1999 American Women's College Hockey Alliance All-Americans, First Team[4] Patty Kazmaier Award 1999 USA Hockey Women's Player of the Year Aw

People from Nantucket, Massachusetts

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Medalists at the 2002 Winter Olympics

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Taft School alumni

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Maddie Musselman

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Maddie Musselman

Madeline Musselman (born June 16, 1998) is an American water polo player.[1] She was part of the gold medal-winning American team at the 2016 Summer Olympics.[2]She was the second-leading goal scorer in the event with 15 goals and named to the Olympic All-Star Team.[3] Musselman won gold with Team USA at the 2015 FINA World Championships in Kazan, Russia,[4] and at the Pan American Games in Toronto.[5] She was named 2017 Mountain Pacific Sports Federation Newcomer of the Year after she won a conference-record seven Newcomer of the Week awards.[3] Earned tournament MVP[6] at 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest, Hungary, where Team USA won gold; scored 16 goals in six games, including hat trick in 13-6 final-round win over Spain.[7] References "U.S. women's water polo attacker Maddie Musselman is just doing what runs in the family". ESPN.com. August 15, 2016. "Water Polo, Women's final and bronze matches - US retain title, their reign is unchallenged". FINA.org. August 19, 2016. "Musselman -

Water polo players at the 2015 Pan American Games

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Pan American Games medalists in water polo

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Olympic gold medalists for the United States in...

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David Robinson

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David Robinson

David Maurice Robinson (born August 6, 1965) is an American former professional basketball player, who played center for the San Antonio Spurs in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for his entire career. Based on his prior service as an officer in the United States Navy, Robinson earned the nickname "The Admiral". Robinson is a 10-time NBA All-Star, the 1995 NBA MVP, a two-time NBA Champion (1999 and 2003), a two-time Olympic Gold Medal winner (1992, 1996), a two-time Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame inductee (2009 for his individual career, 2010 as a member of the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team), and a two-time U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame inductee (2008 individually, 2009 as a member of the 1992 Olympic team).[1] He is widely considered one of the greatest centers in both college basketball and NBA history.[2] To date, Robinson is the only player from the Naval Academy to play in the NBA. Early life David Robinson was born in Key West, Florida, the second child of Ambrose a

Basketball players from Virginia

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Olympic bronze medalists for the United States ...

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National Basketball Association All-Stars

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