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Shichi-Go-San

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Shichi-Go-San

Shichi-Go-San (七五三, lit. "Seven-Five-Three") is a traditional rite of passage and festival day in Japan for three- and seven-year-old girls and five-year-old (and less commonly three-year-old) boys, held annually on November 15 to celebrate the growth and well-being of young children. As it is not a national holiday, it is generally observed on the nearest weekend. History Shichi-Go-San ritual at a Shinto shrine Kunisada Shichi-Go-San is said to have originated in the Heian period amongst court nobles who would celebrate the passage of their children into middle childhood. The ages 3, 5 and 7 are consistent with East Asian numerology, which holds that odd numbers are lucky.[1] The practice was set to the fifteenth of the month during the Kamakura period.[2] Its meaning is to celebrate the survival of children, because in the past people have lost their children due to poor health conditions. So, until the age 7, children were thought to be offspring of Japanese Gods. Over time, this tradition pa

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November observances

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Wagashi

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Shōwa Day

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Shōwa Day

Shōwa Day (昭和の日, Shōwa no Hi) is a Japanese annual holiday held on April 29. It honors the birthday of Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito), the reigning emperor from 1926 to 1989.[1] Shō (昭) means “shining” or “bright”, and wa (和) means “peace”, signifying the "enlightened peace" that citizens receive. According to the now defunct Democratic Party of Japan, the purpose of the holiday is to encourage public reflection on the turbulent 63 years of Hirohito's reign. A protest against Shōwa Day, 2016 Coincidentally, Shōwa Day happens on the same date that in 1948 the Allies' International Military Tribunal for the Far East condemned key officials of the Imperial government during World War II to death, including former Prime Minister Hideki Tojo. History Emperor Hirohito died on January 7, 1989. April 29 was subsequently no longer celebrated as The Emperor's Birthday but instead as Greenery Day, part of Japan's Golden Week. After a series of failed legislative attempts beginning in 2000, the April 29 holiday was final

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Public holidays in Japan

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April observances

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Shravana Putrada Ekadashi

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Shravana Putrada Ekadashi

Shravana Putrada Ekadashi, also known as Pavitropana Ekadashi and Pavitra Ekadashi, is a Hindu holy day, which falls on the 11th lunar day (ekadashi) of the fortnight of the waxing moon in the Hindu month of Shravana which in the Gregorian calendar falls in July or August.[4] This day is known as Shravana Putrada Ekadashi, to differentiate it from the other Putrada Ekadashi in Pausha (December–January), which is also called Pausha Putrada Ekadashi.[1] On this day, 24 hours fasting is observed and worship is offered to the god Vishnu (like other ekadashis) by both husband and wife in particular, who do not have a son for a long time after marriage, to beget a male child. This day is especially observed by Vaishnavas, followers of Vishnu.[1] A son is considered entirely important in Hindu society as he takes care of the parents in their old age in life and by offering shraddha (ancestor rites) ensures well-being of his parents in the after-life. While each ekadashi has a separate name and is prescribed for c

July observances

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Hindu festivals

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Observances set by the Hindu calendar

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Shrove Monday

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Shrove Monday

Shrove Monday and other named days and day ranges around Lent and Easter in Western Christianity, with the fasting days of Lent numbered Shrove Monday, sometimes known as Collopy Monday, Rose Monday, Merry Monday or Hall Monday, is a Christian observance falling on the Monday before Ash Wednesday every year.[1] A part of the English traditional Shrovetide celebrations of the week before Lent, the Monday precedes Shrove Tuesday. As the Monday before Ash Wednesday, it is part of diverse Carnival celebrations which take place in many parts of the Christian world, from Greece, to Germany, to the Mardi Gras and Carnival of the Americas. Shrovetide The word shrove is the past tense of the English verb shrive, which means to obtain absolution for one's sins by way of confession and doing penance. Thus Shrovetide gets its name from the shriving that English Christians were expected to do prior to receiving absolution immediately before Lent begins. Shrove Tuesday is the last day of "shrovetide", somewhat analogous

Monday observances

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Christian festivals and holy days

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Moveable Christian observances

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Sigd

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Sigd

Mehlella (Ge'ez: ምህልላ, lit. 'Supplication'), also Amata Saww (ዐመተ ሰወ, 'Grouping Day') or Sigd (ሰግድ, 'Prostration', Hebrew: סיגד‎, also romanized Sig'd[1]), is one of the unique holidays of the Beta Israel (Ethiopian Jewish) community, and is celebrated on the 29th of the Hebrew month of Cheshvan. Since 2008, it has been recognised as a state holiday for all Israelis. Date Previously, Sigd was celebrated on the 29th of Kislev, and after a calendar reform in mid-19 century it was moved to its present day, 50 days after Yom Kippur.[2] Etymology The word Sigd itself is Ge'ez for "prostration" and is related to Aramaic: סְגֵד‎ sgēd "to prostrate oneself (in worship)".[3][4] The Semitic root √sgd is the same as in mesgid, one of the two Beta Israel Ge'ez terms for "synagogue" (etymologically related to Arabic: مَسْجِد‎ masjid "mosque", literally "place of prostration", and the word for mosque in Hebrew: מסגד misgad). Significance Originally Sigd was another name for Yom Kippur[5] and after the reform that reu

Kislev observances

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Ethiopian Jews

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Beta Israel

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Shrove Tuesday

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Shrove Tuesday

Shrove Tuesday (also known in Commonwealth countries and Ireland as Pancake Tuesday or Pancake Day) is the day in February or March immediately preceding Ash Wednesday (the first day of Lent), which is celebrated in some countries by consuming pancakes. In others, especially those where it is called Mardi Gras or some translation thereof, this is a carnival day, and also the last day of "fat eating" or "gorging" before the fasting period of Lent.[1] This moveable feast is determined by Easter. The expression "Shrove Tuesday" comes from the word shrive, meaning "absolve".[1] Shrove Tuesday is observed by many Christians, including Anglicans, Lutherans, Methodists and Roman Catholics,[2] who "make a special point of self-examination, of considering what wrongs they need to repent, and what amendments of life or areas of spiritual growth they especially need to ask God's help in dealing with."[3] As this is the last day of the liturgical season historically known as Shrovetide, before the penitential season of

Pancakes

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Moveable Christian observances

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Movable Western Christian observances

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Simchat Torah

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Simchat Torah

Simchat Torah or Simhat Torah (Hebrew: שִׂמְחַת תּוֹרָה, lit., "Rejoicing with/of the Torah", Ashkenazi: Simchas Torah) is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simchat Torah is a component of the Biblical Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret ("Eighth Day of Assembly"), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkot in the month of Tishrei (occurring in mid-September to early October on the Gregorian calendar). The main celebrations of Simchat Torah take place in the synagogue during evening and morning services. In Orthodox as well as many Conservative congregations, this is the only time of year on which the Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark and read at night. In the morning, the last parashah of Deuteronomy and the first parashah of Genesis are read in the synagogue. On each occasion, when the ark is opened, the worshippers leave their seats to dance and sing with the Torah scrolls in a joyous cel

Tishrei observances

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Jewish observances

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Non-Gregorian October observances

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Sindhi dress

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Sindhi dress

Sindhi women wear the Shalwar kameez or the sari and the men wear the shalwar kameez or the kurta with pyjamma. However, before the adoption of the Shalwar kameez, the sari and the kurta, Sindhi's had their own traditional costumes. Background Sindhi lehenga, choli and Sindhi traditional pantaloon shalwar (1845). Up until the 1840s, women wore the lehenga and choli, and men the lungi or the traditional Sindhi shalwar/suthan. Thereafter, up to the 1930s women began to wear the suthan and Sindhi cholo which was the typical dress for all women of Sindh.[1] In the past, the younger women wore velvet or amber pyjama (suthan) both at home and outside. Also they wore a long skirt (jablo) on top and a thick poplin blouse (koti) and a white rawa (a muslin head scarf). Middle aged and young ladies wore churidar pyjama (sorhi suthan). Elderly ladies used to wear a white sheet (chaadar) to cover her body with only a peep hole (akhiri) deftly contrived. Over time, older ladies started to wear the Salwar Kurta with S

Indian clothing

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Pakistani clothing

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Sinhalese New Year

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Sinhalese New Year

Sinhalese New Year, generally known as Aluth Avurudda (Sinhala: අලුත් අවුරුද්ද) in Sri Lanka, is a Sri Lankan holiday that celebrates the traditional New Year of the Sinhalese people in Sri Lanka. It is a major anniversary celebrated by not only the Sinhalese people but by most Sri Lankans. The timing of the Sinhala New Year coincides with the new year celebrations of many traditional calendars of South and Southeast Asia. The festival has close semblance to the Tamil New year and other South and Southeast Asian New Years. It is a public holiday in Sri Lanka. It is generally celebrated on 13 April or 14 April and traditionally begins at the sighting of the new moon.[5][6] According to Sinhalese astrology, New Year begins when the sun moves from Meena Rashiya (the house of Pisces) to Mesha Rashiya (the house of Aries). It also marks the end of the harvest season and of spring. History Cultural anthropological history of the 'Traditional New Year' which is celebrated in the month of April, goes back to an an

Public holidays in Sri Lanka

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Annual events in Sri Lanka

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Non-Gregorian April observances

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Sinulog

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Sinulog

Sinulog Festival Queen 2014 in Cebu City The Sinulog-Santo Niño Festival is an annual cultural and religious festival held on the third Sunday of January in Cebu City, and is the centre of the Santo Niño Catholic celebrations in the Philippines. The festival is considered to be first of most popular festivals in the Philippines, with every celebration of the festival routinely attracting around 1 to 2 million people from all over the Philippines every year.[1] Aside from the religious aspect of the festival, Sinulog is also famous for its street parties, usually happening at night before and at the night of the main festival.[2] Street Procession Fluvial Procession Other places like Kabankalan City, Maasin City, Balingasag Misamis Oriental, Cagayan de Oro City, Butuan City and Pagadian City also have their own version of the festival in honor of Santo Niño. Etymological The word Sinulog comes from the Cebuano adverb sulog which roughly means "like Water current movement;" it describes the forward-b

Culture in Cebu City

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Holidays and observances by scheduling (nth wee...

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Christian Sunday observances

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Sirimanothsavam

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Sirimanothsavam

Sirimanothsavam, (Telugu: సిరిమాను పండుగ, సిరి మాను ఉత్సవం) (also referred to as Sirimanu Uthsavam, Siri Manu Fete/Festival, Sirimanu Panduga) is a festival organized to propitiate Goddess Pyddithallamma of Vizianagram Town. Siri means lean and small and manu means stump or stick. The priest of the temple, while taking procession between the fort and temple three times in the evening, hangs from the tip of the long, lean wooden stick (measuring 60 feet), raised high into the sky. The priest possessed by the goddess would himself tell a few days before, where this manu is available; from there only, this has to be procured.[1] Hanging from the upper end of the stick, which is raised high into the sky, is a very risky exercise, but the grace of the Goddess, it is believed, saves the priest from falling. It is organized in the month of September or October (Dasara) of every year. It is a stupendous event attended by two to three lakhs of people from the neighboring towns and villages.[2] The Rajas of Vizianagara

October events

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September events

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Observances on non-Gregorian calendars

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Sitalsasthi

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Sitalsasthi

The marriage of Shiva and Parvati is celebrated as Sitalsasthi, a major festival of Utkal Brahmins since ages.[1] It was started 400 years ago in Sambalpur after the king of Sambalpur brought Utkal Srotriya Vaidika Brahmins from Brahmin sasana villages of puri district.The localities of Nandapada is oldest seat of these Brahmins.They first started Sitalsasti Utsav[2][3] This Hindu festival is in the form of a carnival. Where people and artists from different walks of life participate making it more beautiful and bringing out the true colour of life. Every year it is celebrated towards the end of the summer season (sixth day of the bright fortnight of the month of Jyestha),[4] the aim being to call the rain Gods to give reprieve from the scorching heat of the Sun. During the carnival period Sambalpur attracts tourists from nearby states and abroad also.[5] Legend Sitalsasthi is observed to celebrate the marriage of Gouri and Shankar - as depicted in the Shiva Purana.[3] When Tarakasur[6] was causing terror

Observances set by the Hindu calendar

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Odisha articles missing geocoordinate data

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Non-Gregorian May observances

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Small Business Saturday

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Small Business Saturday

Small Business Saturday is an American shopping holiday held during the Saturday after US Thanksgiving during one of the busiest shopping periods of the year. This Saturday is always the last one in November, so falls between November 24 and November 30. History First observed in the United States on November 27, 2010, it is a counterpart to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, which feature big box retail and e-commerce stores respectively. By contrast, Small Business Saturday encourages holiday shoppers to patronize brick and mortar businesses that are small and local. Small Business Saturday is a registered trademark of American Express.[1] The first event was created by American Express, in partnership with the non-profit National Trust for Historic Preservation, Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino, and Roslindale Village Main Street. In 2010, the holiday was promoted by American Express via a nationwide radio and television advertising campaign. That year Amex bought advertising inventory on Facebook, which it in

Started in 2010 in the United States

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Recurring events started in 2010

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Observances based on the date of Thanksgiving (...

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Slava

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Slava

The Slava (Serbian Cyrillic: слава, lit. 'celebration', pronounced ) is a Serbian Orthodox Christian tradition of the ritual glorification of one's family's patron saint. The family celebrates the Slava annually on the saint's feast day. In November 2014 it was inscribed in UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists. Overview The Slava is the family's annual ceremony and veneration of their patron saint, a social event in which the family is together at the house of the patriarch. The Slava also brings friends to the house, regardless if they have the same Slava. The family saint is inherited from the patriarch (head of the household) – from father to son, while women adopt the patron saint of their husbands upon marriage. As several patron saints are venerated twice a year, the main day is the Slava, while the secondary one is called preslava. Some families may celebrate another patron saint in the case when the wife is the only left of her kin, in respect to her family. In cases where the daughter's husban

Meals

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Dining events

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Serbian words and phrases

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Sombrero Festival

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Sombrero Festival

Sombrero Festival, also known as Sombrero Fest, is a two-nation fiesta and an annual three-day pre-Lenten celebration held in Brownsville, Texas, United States.[1] The grito—a joyous Mexican shout—opens the festivities every year. This festival is a shared heritage celebration between the two border cities of Matamoros, Tamaulipas and Brownsville, Texas. This festival is designed to enhance the spirit of Charro Days, and to add to the festivities.[2] The Sombrero Festival is held in Washington Park in Brownsville, Texas. The Sombrero Festival, was founded in Brownsville, TX, in 1986 by Danny Loff in order to enhance the spirit of Charro Days and to expand the activities available to the general public. The Sombrero Festival includes a jalapeño-eating contest, 1-mile run/walk and a 5K run/walk, music and dancers, activities, numerous food stands and cooking contests. Several rock stars, corrido singers, and Tejano music entertainers perform in this annual event. During his campaign for President, Barack Obam

Culture of Brownsville, Texas

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Tourist attractions in Tamaulipas

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Latin American festivals

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Sonepur Cattle Fair

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Sonepur Cattle Fair

Sonepur Cattle Fair (Hindi: सोनपुर पशु मेला) is held on Kartik Poornima (the full moon day) in the month of November- December in Sonepur, Bihar,[1][2] on the confluence of river Ganges(Gandak).[3][4] It is also known as Harihar Kshetra Mela and it attracts visitors from all over Asia. Till date, it is the biggest cattle fair of Asia and stretches on from fifteen days to one month.[5] It has its origins during ancient times. This is when Chandragupta Maurya (340 - 297 BCE) used to buy elephants and horses across the river Ganges. The Sonpur Cattle Fair once used to attract traders from places as distant as Central Asia. In 2018, the Fair will start on 21 November and continue till 22 December.[6] History Lord Vishnu with Gaj and Grah Originally, the venue of the fair was Hajipur and only the performance of the puja used to take place at the Harihar Nath temple of Sonpur. However, under the rule of the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb, the venue of the fair got shifted to Sonpur.[7] The temple of Harihar Nath i

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Fairs in India

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Saran district

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St Nicholas Day

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St Nicholas Day

Saint Nicholas Day, also called the Feast of Saint Nicholas, is observed on the 6th of December or on the eve of the 5th of December in Western Christian countries, and on the 19th of December in Eastern Christian countries using the old church Calendar. It is the feast day of Nicholas of Myra with particular regard to his reputation as a bringer of gifts. In the European countries of Germany and Poland, boys have traditionally dressed as bishops and begged alms for the poor.[3] In Ukraine, children wait for St. Nicholas to come and to put a present under their pillows provided that the children were good during the year. Children who behaved badly may expect to find a twig or a piece of coal under their pillows. In the Netherlands, Dutch children put out a clog filled with hay and a carrot for Saint Nicholas' horse. On Saint Nicholas Day, gifts are tagged with personal humorous rhymes written by the sender.[4] In the United States, one custom associated with Saint Nicholas Day is children leaving their shoe

Belarusian traditions

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Russian traditions

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Serbian traditions

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Spanish Radio Academy

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Spanish Radio Academy

[1][2] The Spanish Radio Academy (Academia Española de la Radio) is the institution that promoted the establishment of the World Radio Day by UNESCO. Its founder in 1997 was the radio producer and sound engineer, Jorge Álvarez. In 2012 this Academy founded the International Committee of Radio in union with the most important broadcasting organizations from five continents and under the auspices of UNESCO and ITU. References WORLD RADIO DAY RADIO Spanish Radio Academy -ITU [1] International Committee of Radio Radio National Awards

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Radio organizations

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International observances

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Store Bededag

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Store Bededag

Store bededag, translated literally as Great Prayer Day or more loosely as General Prayer Day, "All Prayers" Day, Great Day of Prayers or Common Prayer Day, is a Danish holiday celebrated on the 4th Friday after Easter. It is also celebrated in the Faroe Islands, where it is called Dýri biðidagur, and in Greenland (Greenlandic Tussiarfissuaq). Overview Store bededag is a collection of minor Christian holy days consolidated into one day. The day was introduced in the Church of Denmark in 1686 by King Christian V as a consolidation of several minor (or local) Roman Catholic holidays that had survived the Reformation of the national church. Store bededag is a statutory holiday in Denmark. It was one of the few holidays that survived in the great holiday reform that was carried out in 1771 during the reign of Christian VII, when his Prime Minister, Count Johann Friedrich von Struensee, was in power. The day was introduced as a more efficient alternative to individually celebrating a number of holidays honoring

Moveable Christian observances

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Public holidays in Denmark

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Movable Western Christian observances

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Sultan Yazidis

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Sultan Yazidis

Holiday Yezidis is one of the Yezidis religious holidays, which is preceded by a three-day post. Everyone must observe the Yezidi these days dedicated to Sultan Yazidis, who along with Sheikh Adi and Melek Taus is a triad. Lent begins on Tuesday and ends on Thursday, after which comes the holiday, i.e. "Eid". Features The Yezidis of Turkey, Syria and Iraq some two weeks before the post Yazidis have three-day fast in honor of Sheshams (Sheh Shams), and next week for three days in honor of the patron saint of the family "hudane Male." Sources Yezidis Russia

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Yazidi

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Religious holidays

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Sukkot

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Sukkot

Sukkot (Hebrew: סוכות‎ or סֻכּוֹת, sukkōt), commonly translated as Feast of Tabernacles (traditional Ashkenazi spelling: Sukkos/Succos), known also as the Festival of Ingathering (חג האסיף, Chag HaAsif) or in some translations the Festival of Shelters[5], is a biblical Jewish holiday celebrated on the 15th day of the seventh month, Tishrei (varies from late September to late October). During the existence of the Jerusalem Temple, it was one of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals (Hebrew: שלוש רגלים‎, shalosh regalim) on which the Israelites were commanded to perform a pilgrimage to the Temple. The names used in the Torah are Chag HaAsif, translated to "Festival of Ingathering" or "Harvest Festival", and Chag HaSukkot, translated to "Festival of Booths".[6] This corresponds to the double significance of Sukkot. The one mentioned in the Book of Exodus is agricultural in nature—"Festival of Ingathering at the year's end" (Exodus 34:22)—and marks the end of the harvest time and thus of the agricultural year in the La

Tishrei observances

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Jewish observances

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Non-Gregorian September observances

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Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival

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Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival

Tokyo Skytree The Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival (隅田川花火大会, Sumidagawa Hanabi Taikai) is an annual fireworks festival held on the last Saturday in July, over the Sumidagawa near Asakusa. The Sumidagawa Hanabi Taikai follows the Japanese tradition of being a competition between rival pyrotechnic groups. It is a revival of celebrations held in the Edo period, and annually attracts close to a million celebrants. Similar events are held at the same time of year at many other sites throughout Japan. History Hiroshige - Fireworks at Ryōgoku - BMA The tradition of the Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival can be traced back to Kyōhō famine in 1732, when fireworks were launched as part of festivals for the dead. The country was in an economic crisis, and the people suffered from famine and disease to a greater degree than normal. Thus, the rituals and celebrations in which the fireworks took part played multiple roles. These were mourning observances for the dead, as well as celebrations of life, and entertainment for

Tokyo articles missing geocoordinate data

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Summer events in Japan

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Fireworks events in Asia

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Suna Besha

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Suna Besha

Suna Besha, also known as Raja or Rajadhiraja besha [1] or Raja Besha or Rajarajeshwara Besha, is an event when the Lord Jagannath and other deities Balabhadra, and Goddess Subhadra are adorned with gold jewelry.[2] Suna Bhesha is observed 5 times during a year.[2] It is commonly observed on Magha Purnima (January), Bahuda Ekadashi also known as Asadha Ekadashi (July), Dashahara (Vijyadashami) (October), Karthik Purnima (November), and Pousa Purnima (December).[3][4] The name Suna Bhesha is derived from two words, 'Suna' meaning "gold" and 'Bhesha' meaning "costume".[5] While one such Suna Bhesha event is observed on Bahuda Ekadashi during the Rath Yatra on the chariots placed at the lion's gate (also called Singhadwara.[6]); the other four Beshas' are observed inside the temple on the Ratna Singhasana (gem studded altar). On this occasion gold plates are decorated over the hands and feet of Jagannath and Balabhadra; Jagannath is also adorned with a Chakra (disc) made of gold on the right hand while a silver

December observances

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Hindu festivals

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Observances set by the Hindu calendar

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Sunshine Week

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Sunshine Week

Sunshine Week is a national initiative spearheaded by the American Society of News Editors to educate the public about the importance of open government and the dangers of excessive and unnecessary secrecy. It was established in March 2005 with funding from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.[1] Overview Sunshine Week occurs each year in mid-March, coinciding with James Madison's birthday and National Freedom of Information Day on the 16th. During Sunshine Week, hundreds of media organizations, civic groups, libraries, nonprofits, schools and other participants engage public discussion on the importance of open government through news and feature articles and opinion columns; special Web pages and blogs; infographics; editorial cartoons; public service advertising; public seminars and forums. The purpose of the week is to highlight the fact that "government functions best when it operates in the open."[2] Unfortunately, in many states legislatures exempt themselves from public-records laws, claimin

Awareness weeks in the United States

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Investigative news sources

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March observances

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Super Saturday

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Super Saturday

Super Saturday or Panic Saturday is the last Saturday before Christmas, a major day of revenue for American retailers, marking the end of the shopping season they, and many customers, believe begins on Black Friday. Super Saturday targets last-minute shoppers. Typically the day is ridden with one-day sales in an effort to accrue more revenue than any other day in the Christmas and holiday season.[1] The date is slightly more likely to fall on December 22, December 19 or December 17 (58 in 400 years each), than on December 21 or December 20 (57), and slightly less likely to occur on December 23 or December 18 (56). Sales Super Saturday typically nets approximately $15 billion in retail sales.[2] To compete with each other, stores offer significant discounts and extend store hours in an attempt to attract customers and drive impulse buying.[3] Super Saturday accounts for a significant portion of the holiday sales for retail stores. In 2006, a study determined that sales between December 21 and 24 accounted f

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Teej

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Teej

Teej is a generic name for a number of Hindu festivals that are celebrated by women in many states of India (mainly in northern and central India) and by Khas women of Nepal. Haryali Teej and Hartalika Teej welcome the monsoon season and are celebrated primarily by girls and women, with songs, dancing and prayer rituals.[2] The monsoon festivals of Teej are primarily dedicated to Goddess Parvati and her union with Lord Shiva.[2].In this festival woman follow a ritual of not eating anything for long life of her husband. Etymology Red velvet mite (Trombidium), also called Teej, appears during the monsoon season.[2] It is unclear if the mite is named after the festival, or vice versa. "Teej" refers to the "third" day that falls every month after the new moon (Amavasya), and the third day after the full moon night of every month.[3] The monsoon festivals of Teej include Haryali Teej, Kajari Teej and Hartalika Teej.[4] Teej refers to the monsoon festivals, observed particularly in western and northern state

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Tazaungdaing festival

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Tazaungdaing festival

The Tazaungdaing Festival (Burmese: တန်ဆောင်တိုင်ပွဲတော်, also known as the Festival of Lights and spelt Tazaungdine Festival), held on the full moon day of Tazaungmon, the eighth month of the Burmese calendar, is celebrated as a national holiday in Burma (Myanmar) and marks the end of the rainy season.[2][3] It also marks the end of the Kathina (Kahtein in Burmese) season, during which monks are offered new robes and alms. The festival's origins predate the introduction of Buddhism to Burma, and are believed to stem from the Kattika festival, which honors the guardian planets in Hindu astrology.[4] Celebrations Robe-weaving competitions to weave special yellow monk robes called matho thingan (မသိုးသင်္ကန်း) are also held throughout the country, most notably in Yangon's Shwedagon Pagoda.[5] During these competitions, held for two consecutive nights (the night preceding and the night of the full moon), contestants work nonstop from night until dawn to weave these garments.[5] The tradition commemorates a wi

Buddhist festivals in Myanmar

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Buddhist festivals

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Teeyan

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Teeyan

Teeyan (Punjabi: ਤੀਆਂ) is the Punjabi name of the festival of Teej which is celebrated in Punjab (where it is also called Punjabi teej) which is dedicated to the onset of the monsoon[1] and focuses on daughters[2][3] and sisters. Celebration The festival is celebrated during the monsoon season from the third day of the lunar month of Sawan on the bright half, up to the full moon of sawan(about 13 days), by women. Married women go to their maternal house to participate in the festivities.[4][5] In the past, it was traditional for women to spend the whole month of Sawan with their parents.[4][6] Gifts Whether or not a married woman goes to her parents, brothers take a gift set to their sisters called a 'sandhara'. A sandhara includes a Punjabi Suit/sari, laddoo, bangles, mehndi (henna) and a swing.[4] Boondi laddoo Bangles Mehandi Punjabi suit Swing Gidha and swings Peengh The festival of teeyan centres on girls and women getting together in the village green and ty

Observances set by the Punjabi calendar

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Tenth of Tevet

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Tenth of Tevet

Tenth of Tevet (Hebrew: עשרה בטבת‎, Asarah BeTevet), the tenth day of the Hebrew month of Tevet, is a fast day in Judaism. It is one of the minor fasts observed from before dawn to nightfall. The fasting is in mourning of the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylonia—an event that began on that date and ultimately culminated in the destruction of Solomon's Temple (the First Temple) and the conquest of the Kingdom of Judah (today Jerusalem and the southern West Bank). The day has no relationship to Hanukkah, but it happens to follow that festival by a week. Whether the 10th of Tevet falls 7 or 8 days after Hanukkah depends on whether the preceding Hebrew month of Kislev has 29 or 30 days in the relevant year. History According to II Kings,[2] on the 10th day of the 10th month (Tevet)[note 2], in the ninth year of Zedekiah's reign (588 BCE), Nebuchadnezzar, the Babylonian king, began the siege of Jerusalem. 18 months later, on the 17th of Tammuz at the end of the eleventh year of Zedekiah's reign[

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Non-Gregorian January observances

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Tết

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Tết

Tết ( or ), Vietnamese New Year, Vietnamese Lunar New Year or Tet Holiday, is the most important celebration in Vietnamese culture. The word is a shortened form of Tết Nguyên Đán (節元旦), which is Sino-Vietnamese for "Feast of the First Morning of the First Day". Tết celebrates the arrival of spring based on the Vietnamese calendar, which usually has the date falling in January or February in the Gregorian calendar.[1] Vietnamese people celebrate the Lunar New Year annually, which is based on a Chinese lunisolar calendar (calculating both the motions of Earth around the Sun and of the Moon around Earth). Tết is generally celebrated on the same day as Chinese New Year, except when the one-hour time difference between Vietnam and China results in new moon occurring on different days. It takes place from the first day of the first month of the Vietnamese calendar (around late January or early February) until at least the third day. Many Vietnamese prepare for Tết by cooking special holiday food and cleaning the h

Observances held on the new moon

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Non-Gregorian February observances

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Terminalia

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Terminalia

Terminalia was an ancient Roman festival in honour of the god Terminus, who presided over boundaries. His statue was merely a stone or post stuck in the ground to distinguish between properties. His worship is said to have been instituted by Numa who ordered that every one should mark the boundaries of his landed property by stones to be consecrated to Jupiter Terminalis, and at which every year sacrifices were to be offered at the festival of the Terminalia.[1] On the festival the two owners of adjacent property crowned the statue with garlands and raised a crude altar, on which they offered up some corn, honeycombs, and wine, and sacrificed a lamb[2] or a suckling pig. They concluded with singing the praises of the god.[3] The public festival in honour of this god was celebrated at the sixth milestone on the road towards Laurentum[4] doubtless because this was originally the extent of the Roman territory in that direction. The festival of the Terminalia was celebrated a. d. VII. Kal. Mart., or the 23d of F

Non-Gregorian February observances

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Thadingyut Festival

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Thadingyut Festival

The Thadingyut Festival (Burmese: သီတင်းကျွတ်ပွဲတော်), also known as the Lighting Festival of Myanmar, is held on the full moon day of the Burmese lunar month of Thadingyut. As a custom, it is held at the end of the Buddhist sabbath (Vassa) and is the second most popular festival in Myanmar after Thingyan Festival (New Year Water Festival). Thadingyut festival is the celebration to welcome the Buddha’s descent from the heaven after he preached the Abhidhamma to his mother, Maya, who was reborn in the heaven.[1] Origins Thadingyut, the seventh month of the Myanmar calendar, is the end of the Buddhist sabbath or Vassa. Thadingyut festival lasts for three days: the day before the full moon day, the full moon day (when Buddha descends from heaven) and the day after the full moon day. Buddha's mother, Maya, died seven days after the Buddha was born and then she was reborn in the Trayastrimsa Heaven as a male devāḥ.[2] In order to show the gratitude for motherhood, Buddha preached Abhidhamma to that deva who was

Buddhist festivals in Myanmar

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Thai Pongal

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Thai Pongal

Pongal (பொங்கல், , also spelled Poṅkal), is also referred to as Thai Pongal (தைப்பொங்கல், also spelled Tai Pongal), is a multi-day Hindu harvest festival of South India, particularly in the Tamil community.[3][4][5] It is observed at the start of the month Tai according to Tamil solar calendar,[4] and this is typically about January 14.[3][1] It is dedicated to the Hindu sun god,[6] the Surya, and corresponds to Makar Sankranti, the harvest festival under many regional names celebrated throughout India.[7][8][9] The three days of the Pongal festival are called Bhogi Pongal, Surya Pongal and Maattu Pongal.[7] According to tradition, the festival marks the end of winter solstice, and the start of the sun's six-month-long journey northwards (the Uttaraayanam) when the sun enters the zodiac Makara (Capricorn).[10] The festival is named after the ceremonial "Pongal", which means "to boil, overflow" and refers to the traditional dish prepared from the new harvest of rice boiled in milk with jaggery (raw sugar).[10

Harvest festivals in India

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Harvest festivals

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Thaipusam

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Thaipusam

Thaipusam or Thaipoosam (Tamil: தைப்பூசம், Taippūcam ?), is a festival celebrated by the Tamil community on the full moon in the Tamil month of Thai (January/February), usually coinciding with Pushya star, known as Poosam in Tamil. It is mainly observed in countries where there is a significant presence of Tamil community such as India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia,[1] Mauritius[2] Singapore,[3] South Africa, Canada and other places where ethnic Hindu Tamils reside as a part of the local Indian diaspora population such as Réunion, Indonesia, Thailand, Myanmar, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, Suriname, Jamaica and the other parts of the Caribbean. It is a national holiday in many countries like Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Mauritius. In certain states of Malaysia and in the nations of Sri Lanka and Mauritius it is a government and a bank holiday. In Singapore, it was previously a national holiday but was removed from the official list of national holidays..[4] The word Thaipusam is a combination of the name of the month, Thai,

Observances held on the full moon

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Religious festivals in Indonesia

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Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant

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Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant

Hundreds of vessels pass Tower Bridge The Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant was a parade on 3 June 2012 of 670 boats on the Tideway of the River Thames in London as part of the celebrations of the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II. The Queen, Prince Philip and other members of the Royal Family were aboard vessels that took part in the parade. The parade was organised by the Thames Diamond Jubilee Foundation, and funded by private donations and sponsorship.[1] The pageant master was Adrian Evans.[2] The vessels that took part included military, commercial, and pleasure craft. According to Guinness World Records, this was the largest ever parade of boats, surpassing the previous record of 327 vessels set in Bremerhaven, Germany, in 2011.[3] Sailing vessels and others too tall to pass under the bridges were moored as an "Avenue of Sail" downstream of London Bridge with smaller craft in St Katherine Docks.[4] British media organisations estimated that one million spectators watched from the banks of the Thames.[5][

June 2012 events in Europe

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EngvarB from March 2016

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June 2012 events

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Thanksgiving

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Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday celebrated on various dates in the United States, Canada, some of the Caribbean islands, and Liberia. It began as a day of giving thanks and sacrifice for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year. Similarly named festival holidays occur in Germany and Japan. Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday of October in Canada and on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States and Brazil, and around the same part of the year in other places. Although Thanksgiving has historical roots in religious and cultural traditions, it has long been celebrated as a secular holiday as well. History Prayers of thanks and special thanksgiving ceremonies are common among almost all religions after harvests and at other times.[1] The Thanksgiving holiday's history in North America is rooted in English traditions dating from the Protestant Reformation. It also has aspects of a harvest festival, even though the harvest in New England occurs well before the late-Novem

Holidays and observances by scheduling (nth wee...

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Food and drink appreciation

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Monday observances

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Thursday of the Dead

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Thursday of the Dead

Thursday of the Dead (Arabic: خميس الأموات‎, Khamis al-Amwat), also known as Thursday of the Secrets (Arabic: خميس الأسرار‎, Khamis al-Asrar) or Thursday of the Eggs[1] is a feast day shared by Christians and Muslims in the Levant.[2] It falls sometime between the Easter Sundays of the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christian traditions. It is a day on which the souls of the dead are honoured. A popular day among women in the region,[1] it underscores the shared culture between Arab Christians and Muslims.[3] Ove reviews In Julian Morgenstern's The Rites of Birth, Marriage, Death, and Kindred Occasions Among the Semites (1966), Thursday of the Dead is described as a universal day for visiting tombs, engaged in most assiduously by townspeople, followed by fellaheen ("peasants"), and then Bedouins.[1] Women would go to the cemetery before sunrise to pray for the departed and distribute bread cakes known as kaʿak al-asfar ("the yellow roll") and dried fruit to the poor, to children, and to relatives. Children w

Public holidays in the State of Palestine

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Halloween

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Thrissur Pooram

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Thrissur Pooram

Thrissur Pooram (Thrissur Puram) is an annual Hindu festival held in Kerala, India. It is held at the Vadakkunnathan Temple in Thrissur every year on the Pooram (pronounced ) day - the day when the moon rises with the Pooram star in the Malayalam Calendar month of Medam. It is the largest and most famous of all poorams.[2] History Peruvanam Kuttan Marar, leader of 'Chenda' group of Paramekkavu temple Kizhakkoottu Aniyan Marar, leader of 'Chenda' group of Thiruvambady temple Kanimangalam Valiyalukkal Bhagavathi Temple Illumination of Poora Pandal Thrissur Pooram (തൃശ്ശൂര്‍ പൂരം) was the brainchild of Raja Rama Varma, famously known as Sakthan Thampuran, the Maharaja of Cochin (1790–1805). Before the start of Thrissur Pooram, the largest temple festival in Kerala was the one-day festival held at Aarattupuzha known as Arattupuzha Pooram. Temples in and around the city of Thrissur were regular participants. In the year 1798 because of incessant rains, the temples with from Thrissur were late for the

March observances

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April observances

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May observances

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Tihar (festival)

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Tihar (festival)

Tihar (Nepali: तिहार), also known as Deepawali and Yamapanchak or Swanti (Nepal Bhasa: स्वन्ती:), is a five-day-long Hindu festival celebrated in the Indian subcontinent, notably in Nepal and the Indian states of Assam and Sikkim including in Darjeeling district of West Bengal. It is the festival of lights, as diyas are lit inside and outside the houses to make it illuminate at night. It is popularly known as Swanti among the Newars and as Deepawali among Madhesis.[2] Set in the Vikram Samvat calendar, the festival begins with Kaag Tihar in Trayodashi of Kartik Krishna Paksha and ends with Bhai Tika in Dwitiya of Kartik Sukla Paksha every year.[3] Tihar is the second biggest Nepalese festival after Dashain. It is considered to be of great importance as it shows contribution to not just the humans and the gods, but also to the animals like crows, cows, and dogs that maintain an intimate relationship with humans. People make patterns on the floor of living rooms or courtyards using materials such as colored ri

November observances

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October observances

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Animals in Hinduism

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Tiregān

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Tiregān

Tirgan (Persian: تیرگان‎, Tirgān), is a mid summer Iranian festival, celebrated annually on Tir 13 (July 2, 3, or 4). It is celebrated by splashing water, dancing, reciting poetry, and serving traditional foods such as spinach soup and sholezard. The custom of tying rainbow-colored bands on wrists, which are worn for ten days and then thrown into a stream, is also a way to rejoice for children. Overview Tirgan is an ancient Iranian tradition which is still celebrated in various regions of Iran, including Mazenderan, Khorasan, and Arak.[1][2][3] It is widely attested by historians such as Gardezi, Biruni, and Masudi, as well as European travelers during the Safavid era. Statue of Arash the Archer at the Sa'dabad Complex, Tehran. The celebration is dedicated to Tishtrya, an archangel who appeared in the sky to generate thunder and lightning for much needed rain. Legend says that Arash the Archer was a man chosen to settle a land dispute between the leaders of the lands Iran and Turan. Arash was to loose

Ancient Iranian religion

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Observances set by the Iranian calendar

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Tirumala Shanivaralu

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Tirumala Shanivaralu

Purattasi Sani or Tirumala Shanivara (Telugu: తిరుమల శనివారాలు, Tamil: புரட்டாசி சனி) is a Hindu festival celebrated in some parts of South India including Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala. The Hindu deity, Venkateswara, is worshiped during this festival. It is celebrated during the Tamil month of Purattasi, which generally falls in the months of September and October of the Gregorian calendar. Puratasi Masam is of great importance as it is believed that Lord Venkateswara appeared on the earth in this month. Lord Vishnu devotees consider this as the ideal month for thanking Lord Vishnu for preserving the Universe at the end of Kali Yuga. All the Saturdays of this month are treated as holy days and Devotees gather in large number at Lord Vishnu temples and special prayers are offered. Particularly the Odd Saturdays first, third, fifth are of more importance. Tirumala Annual Navarathri Brahmotsavam were also observed during this month where Tirumala will be flooded with lakhs of devotees. Some p

Religious festivals in India

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Tirumala festivals

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Trinidad and Tobago Carnival

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Trinidad and Tobago Carnival

Two revellers dance in the streets. The form of dancing is called "wining" (winding) pronounced wine-ing A Music Truck entertains the crowd on the streets. Trucks are an integral part of the street parade, featuring live performances or deejays The Trinidad and Tobago Carnival is an annual Event held on the Monday and Tuesday before Ash Wednesday in Trinidad and Tobago. The event is well known for participants' colorful costumes and exuberant celebrations. There are numerous cultural events such as "band launch fetes" running in the lead up to the street parade on Carnival Monday and Tuesday. It is said that if the islanders are not celebrating it, then they are preparing for it, while reminiscing about the past year's festival. Traditionally, the festival is associated with calypso music, with its origins formulated in the midst of hardship for enslaved West and Central Africans; however, recently Soca music has replaced calypso as the most celebrated type of music. Costumes (sometimes called "mas"), sti

Carnivals in Trinidad and Tobago

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Carnivals by country

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Tisha B'Av

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Tisha B'Av

Tisha B'Av (Hebrew: תִּשְׁעָה בְּאָב[a] Tish‘āh Be'āv; IPA:  (listen), lit. "the ninth of Av") is an annual fast day in Judaism, on which a number of disasters in Jewish history occurred, primarily the destruction of both Solomon's Temple by the Neo-Babylonian Empire and the Second Temple by the Roman Empire in Jerusalem. Tisha B'Av is regarded as the saddest day in the Jewish calendar and it is thus believed to be a day which is destined for tragedy.[2][3] Tisha B'Av falls in July or August in the Gregorian calendar. The observance of the day includes five prohibitions, most notable of which is a 25-hour fast. The Book of Lamentations, which mourns the destruction of Jerusalem is read in the synagogue, followed by the recitation of kinnot, liturgical dirges that lament the loss of the Temples and Jerusalem. As the day has become associated with remembrance of other major calamities which have befallen the Jewish people, some kinnot also recall events such as the murder of the Ten Martyrs by the Romans, mas

Av observances

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Jewish fast days

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Jewish observances

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Trinity Sunday

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Trinity Sunday

Trinity Sunday is the first Sunday after Pentecost in the Western Christian liturgical calendar, and the Sunday of Pentecost in Eastern Christianity.[2] Trinity Sunday celebrates the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, the three Persons of God: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.[3] Western Christianity Holy Trinity, fresco by Luca Rossetti da Orta, 1738-9 (St. Gaudenzio Church at Ivrea, Torino). Trinity Sunday is celebrated in all the Western liturgical churches: Latin Catholic, Anglican,[4] Lutheran,[5] Presbyterian,[6] United Church of Christ,[7] and Methodist.[8] Church year "Ordinary Time, meaning ordered or numbered time, is celebrated in two segments: from the Monday following the Baptism of Our Lord up to Ash Wednesday; and from Pentecost Monday to the First Sunday of Advent."[9] Sundays and weeks of the liturgical year are numbered continuously from the beginning of Ordinary Time.[10] This makes it the largest season of the Liturgical Year. In the revised Roman rite, Ordinary Time resume

Christian Sunday observances

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Movable June observances

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Movable May observances

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Tu B'Av

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Tu B'Av

Tu B'Av (Hebrew: ט״ו באב‎, lit. 'fifteenth of Av') is a minor Jewish holiday. In modern-day Israel, it is celebrated as a holiday of love (חג האהבה‎ Hag HaAhava), similar to Valentine's Day.[2] It has been said to be a "great day for weddings". Historical significance According to the Mishna, Tu B'Av was a joyous holiday in the days of the Temple in Jerusalem, marking the beginning of the grape harvest. Yom Kippur marked the end of the grape harvest. On both dates the unmarried girls of Jerusalem dressed in white garments, and went out to dance in the vineyards (Babylonian Talmud, tractate Ta'anit 30b–31a).[3] That same section in the Talmud states that there were no holy days as happy for the Jews as Tu B'Av and Yom Kippur.[4] The holiday celebrated the wood-offering brought in the Temple (see Nehemiah 13:31). Josephus refers to it as the Feast of Xylophory ("Wood-bearing").[5] Various reasons for celebrating on Tu B'Av are cited by the Talmud and Talmudic commentators:[6][7] While the Jews wandered in

Av observances

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Non-Gregorian August observances

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Non-Gregorian July observances

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Twelfth Night (holiday)

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Twelfth Night (holiday)

Twelfth Night (also known as Epiphany Eve) is a festival in some branches of Christianity that takes place on the last night of the Twelve Days of Christmas, marking the coming of the Epiphany.[1] Different traditions mark the date of Twelfth Night on either 5 January or 6 January, depending on which day one considers to be the first of the Twelve Days: 25 or 26 December. A superstition, in some English-speaking countries, is that it is unlucky to leave Christmas decorations hanging after Twelfth Night, a tradition also variously attached to the festivals of Candlemas (2 February), Good Friday, Shrove Tuesday and Septuagesima.[2] Other popular Twelfth Night customs include singing Christmas carols, chalking the door, having one's house blessed, merrymaking, as well as attending church services.[3][4] The main event for this holiday was to have a cake in the center of a table. Everyone would take a piece of this cake and two pieces had a dried pea and bean. Whoever had this in their slice would be royalty for

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Christmas-linked holidays

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Christmastide

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Twelve Days of Christmas

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Twelve Days of Christmas

The Twelve Days of Christmas, also known as Twelvetide, is a festive Christian season celebrating the Nativity of Jesus. In most Western ecclesiastical traditions, "Christmas Day" is considered the "First Day of Christmas" and the Twelve Days are 25 December through 5 January, inclusive.[1] For many Christian denominations—for example, the Anglican Communion and Lutheran Church—the Twelve Days are identical to Christmastide,[2][3][4] but for others, e.g., the Roman Catholic Church, Christmastide lasts longer than the Twelve Days of Christmas.[5] History In 567, the Council of Tours "proclaimed the twelve days from Christmas to Epiphany as a sacred and festive season, and established the duty of Advent fasting in preparation for the feast."[6][7][8][9][10] Christopher Hill, as well as William J. Federer, states that this was done in order to solve the "administrative problem for the Roman Empire as it tried to coordinate the solar Julian calendar with the lunar calendars of its provinces in the east."[11][12

List songs

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2014 albums

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RCA Records Christmas albums

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Tynwald Day

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Tynwald Day

Tynwald Day (Manx: Laa Tinvaal) is the National Day of the Isle of Man, usually observed on 5 July (if this is a Saturday or Sunday, then on the following Monday).[1] On this day, the Island's legislature, Tynwald, meets at St John's, instead of its usual meeting place in Douglas. The session is held partly in the Royal Chapel of St John the Baptist and partly in the open air on the adjacent Tynwald Hill (a small artificial mound). The meeting, the first recorded instance of which dates to 1417, is known as Midsummer Court. It is attended by members of the two branches of Tynwald: the House of Keys, and the Legislative Council. The Lieutenant Governor, the representative of the Lord of Mann, presides except on the occasions when the Lord of Mann or another member of the British Royal Family is present. All bills that have received Royal Assent are promulgated on Tynwald Day; any Act of Tynwald which is not so promulgated within 18 months of passage ceases to have effect. Other proceedings include the presen

Royal chapels

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Summer events in the Isle of Man

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Movable July observances

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Udhauli

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Udhauli

Udhauli (उधौली) is festival of the Kirat communities of Sunuwar, Rai, Limbu and Yakkha of Nepal celebrated every year marking the migration phase downwards towards the low-altitude regions when the winter season arrives. The migration from the low-altitude areas upwards to hilly areas is called Ubhauli (upwards), which is also an annual festival of these communities.[1] On the Udhauli festival day, the Kirat people offer thanks to mother nature for providing a good harvest. Udhauli celebration by Kirat people Udhauli festival is celebrated by all Kirat people. It is believed that from this day the winter season starts. So people, birds and animal migrate from cold regions to warmer regions. The Kirat people perform a special kind of dance called Sakela in this festival playing various musical instruments like Dhol, Jhyamta, etc. The Kirat women wear chhit ko guneu (a dress made from a specially patterned cloth) on this festival. This event of the Kirat people has also been stated in the Mundhum (holy book

December observances

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Religious festivals in Nepal

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Observances set by the Nepali calendar

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Ugadi

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Ugadi

Ugadi Pachadi Ugadi (Ugādi, Samvatsarādi, Yugadi) is the New Year's Day for the Hindus of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Karnataka states in India.[1] It is festively observed in these regions on the first day of the Hindu lunisolar calendar month of Chaitra.[2] This typically falls in March or April of the Gregorian calendar.[2] The day is observed by drawing colorful patterns on floor called kolamulus ( Kannada: Rangoli , Telugu: Muggulu, ) mango leaf decorations on doors called torana (kannada : torana,Telugu: Toranalu ), buying and giving gifts such as new clothes, giving charity to the poor, special bath followed by oil treatment, preparing and sharing a special food called pachadi, and visiting Hindu temples.[3][4] The pachadi is a notable festive food that combines all flavors – sweet, sour, salty, bitter, astringent and piquance (spicy hot). In Telugu and Kannada Hindu traditions, it is a symbolic reminder that one must expect all flavors of experiences in the coming new year and make the most of the

New Year celebrations

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Hindu festivals in India

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Spring (season) events in India

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