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Holidays and observances by scheduling (to be d...


Vaikuntha Chaturdashi

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Vaikuntha Chaturdashi

Vaikuntha Chaturdashi is a Hindu holy day, which is observed on chaturdashi, the 14th lunar day of the waxing moon fortnight (shukla paksha) of the Hindu month of Kartik (November–December). The day is sacred to Lord Vishnu and Lord Shiva. They are worshipped individually or together in different temples in Varanasi, Rishikesh, Gaya and Maharashtra. The holy day of Vaikuntha Chaturdashi is also observed in Maharashtra by the Marathas as per the custom set by Shivaji and his mother Jijabai for this occasion and by the Gaud Saraswat Brahmins, though in a slightly different format.[2] Legend According to Shiva Purana, Once, Lord Vishnu, Lord of Vaikuntha, left his abode and went to Varanasi to worship Lord Shiva on this day. He pledged to worship Shiva with one thousand lotuses. While singing hymns in glorification of Shiva, Lord Vishnu found the last or 'thousandth' lotus missing. Vishnu, whose eyes are often compared to lotuses, plucked one of them and offers it to Shiva. Lord Shiva becoming intensely pleas

Hindu festivals

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Observances set by the Hindu calendar

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Non-Gregorian November observances

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Vaikuntha Ekadashi

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Vaikuntha Ekadashi

Vaikunta Ekadashi is the Shukla Paksha Ekadashi that occurs during the Dhanu/Margazhi month in the Hindu calendar (corresponding to late December - early January in English calendar).[3] The Vaishnava (Worshipers/Followers of Vishnu) sect believes that ‘Vaikunta Dwaram’ or ‘the gate to the Lord's Inner Sanctum’ is opened on this day. The Margashirsha Shukla Paksha Ekadashi in the Lunar calendar is known as a 'Mokshada Ekadashi.' Special prayers, yagnas, discourses and speeches are arranged at Vishnu temples across the world on this auspicious day. The Shaiva sect observes the day as Trikoti Ekadashi, a religious observance where all the deities in the Hindu pantheon pay obeisance to Lord Sri Shiva at once. Legend According to the Vishnu Purana, fasting on Vaikuntha Ekadashi is equivalent to fasting on the remaining 23 Ekadashis of the (Hindu) year.[4] However, according to Vaishnava tradition fasting is mandatory on all Ekadashis of both Shukla paksha and Krishna paksha. Fasting on Ekadashi is considered h

Hindu festivals

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Observances set by the Hindu calendar

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Non-Gregorian January observances

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Vaisakhi

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Vaisakhi

Vaisakhi (IAST: visākhī), also known as Baisakhi, Vaishakhi, or Vasakhi is a historical and religious festival in Hinduism and Sikhism. It is usually celebrated on 13 or 14 April every year,[4][5][6][7] which commemorates the formation of Khalsa panth of warriors under Guru Gobind Singh in 1699.[1][2][8][9] In Hinduism, Vaisakhi celebrates the Solar new year, based on the Vikram Samvat calendar. Vaisakhi marks the first day of the month of Vaisakha. It is additionally a spring harvest festival for Hinduism and Sikhs.[8] In Sikhism, Vaisakhi marks the start of the Khalsa. This was in 1699 that the Khalsa was created so this is the beginning of the Khalsa. Vaisakhi observes major events in the history of Sikhism and the Indian subcontinent that happened in the Punjab region.[10][11] The significance of Vaisakhi as a major Sikh festival marking the birth of Sikh order started after the persecution and execution of Guru Tegh Bahadur for refusing to convert to Islam under the orders of the Mughal Emperor Aurang

Rajasthani culture

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Spring (season) events in Pakistan

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Observances set by the Punjabi calendar

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Valentine's Day

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Valentine's Day

Saint Valentine Valentine's Day, also called Saint Valentine's Day or the Feast of Saint Valentine,[1] is celebrated annually on February 14. It originated as a Western Christian feast day honoring one or two early Christian martyrs named Saint Valentine and is recognized as a significant cultural, religious, and commercial celebration of romance and love in many regions of the world. There are a number of martyrdom stories associated with various Valentines connected to February 14,[2] including an account of the imprisonment of Saint Valentine of Rome for ministering to Christians persecuted under the Roman Empire in the third century.[3][4] According to an early tradition, Saint Valentine restored sight to the blind daughter of his jailer.[5] Numerous later additions to the legend have better related it to the theme of love: an 18th-century embellishment to the legend claims he wrote the jailer's daughter a letter signed "Your Valentine" as a farewell before his execution;[6] another addition posits that

Love

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Summer holidays

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International observances

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Varalakshmi Vratam

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Varalakshmi Vratam

Varamahalakshmi Vrata (ಶ್ರೀ ವರಮಹಾಲಕ್ಷ್ಮೀ ವ್ರತ) is a festival to propitiate the Goddess Lakshmi, the consort of Lord Vishnu, one of the Hindu Trinity. Varalakshmi is one who grants boons ("Vara"). It is an important pooja performed by many women in the states of Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Tamil Nadu, Maharastra and Uttar Pradesh. The Hindu festival going by the name 'Vara MahaLakshmi Vrata' is celebrated on the Second Friday or the Friday before the day of the full moon - Poornima - in the month of Shravana, which corresponds to the Gregorian months of July–August. Varamahalakshmi Vrata is performed by a married woman (sumangalis) for the well being of all their family members, especially the husband, to get progeny etc. It is believed that worshipping the Goddess Varalakshmi on this day is equivalent to worshipping Ashtalakshmi – the eight goddesses of Wealth, Earth, Wisdom, Love, Fame, Peace, Contentment, and Strength. Due to the rising popularity of this holy day in some states, it is now being

Hindu festivals

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Observances set by the Hindu calendar

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Non-Gregorian August observances

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Varuthini Ekadashi

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Varuthini Ekadashi

Varuthini Ekadashi, also known Baruthani Ekadashi, is a Hindu holy day, which falls on the 11th lunar day (ekadashi) of the fortnight of the waning moon in the Hindu month of Chaitra (per the South Indian Amavasyant calendar, every month ends with a new moon) or Vaishakha (per the North Indian Purnimant calendar, every month ends with a full moon). By both schemes, Varuthini Ekadashi falls on the same day in April or May.[3] Like all ekadashis, the God Vishnu, especially his fifth avatar Vamana, is worshipped. In scripture The greatness about Varuthini Ekadashi is narrated by the god Krishna to the King Yudhishthira in the Bhavishya Purana. The ekadashi will turn a lame person to walk normally, an unfortunate woman into a lucky one, animal would be released from its cycle of birth and death. King Mandata was enlightened. The Ikshvaku king Dhundhumara was freed was from a curse by the god Shiva. All human beings are assured of prosperity in this life and the next. In the order of donations made on this day,

Hindu festivals

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Observances set by the Hindu calendar

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Non-Gregorian May observances

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Vasant Panchami

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Vasant Panchami

Vasant Panchami also spelled Basant Panchami, is a festival that marks the preparation for the arrival of spring. The festival is celebrated by people in various ways depending upon the region in the life in the Indian subcontinent. Vasant Panchami also marks the start of preparation for Holika and Holi, which take place forty days later.[6] The Vasant Utsava (festival) on Panchami is celebrated forty days before Spring, because any season's transition period is 40 days, and after that, the season comes into full bloom. Nomenclature and date Vasant Panchami is celebrated every year on the fifth day of the bright half of the Hindu lunisolar calendar month of Magha, which typically falls in late January or February. Spring is known as the "King of all Seasons", so the festival commences forty days in advance. (It is generally winter-like in northern India, and more spring-like in central and western parts of India on Vasant Panchami, which gives credence to the fact that Spring is actually in full bloom 40 da

Hindu festivals in India

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Spring (season) events in Nepal

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Festivals in Indonesia

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Vernal Equinox Day

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Vernal Equinox Day

Vernal Equinox Day (春分の日, Shunbun no Hi) is a public holiday in Japan that occurs on the date of the Northward equinox in Japan Standard Time (the vernal equinox can occur on different dates in different time-zones), usually March 20 or 21. The date of the holiday is not officially declared until February of the previous year, due to the need for recent astronomical measurements. Vernal Equinox Day became a public holiday in 1948. Prior to that it was the date of Shunki kōreisai (春季皇霊祭), an event relating to Shintoism. Like other Japanese holidays, this holiday was repackaged as a non-religious holiday for the sake of separation of religion and state in Japan's postwar constitution. Pre-1945 State Shinto or Kokka Shinto is defined as the Shinto activities surrounding the support of government ideals that the government would have control over. These include day to day worship at public shrines and their messages, traditional ceremony (Kokutai Cult) and rites performed among the Imperial households, and shrin

Movable September observances

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Movable March observances

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Public holidays in China

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Veneralia

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Veneralia

The Veneralia was an ancient Roman festival celebrated April 1 (the Kalends of Aprilis) in honor of Venus Verticordia ("Venus the changer of hearts") and Fortuna Virilis ("Manly" or "Virile Fortune"). The cult of Venus Verticordia was established in 220 BC, just before the beginning of the Second Punic War, in response to advice from a Sibylline oracle,[1] when a series of prodigies was taken to signify divine displeasure at sexual offenses among Romans of every category and class, including several men and three Vestal Virgins.[2] Her statue was dedicated by a young woman, chosen as the most pudica (sexually pure) in Rome by a committee of Roman matrons. At first, the statue was probably housed within the temple to Fortuna Virilis. This cult, older than that to Venus Verticordia but possibly perceived as weak or gone to seed, may have benefited from the moral and religious support of Venus as a relatively new but senior deity; for Ovid, Venus's acceptance of the epithet and its responsibilities represented

Religious festivals in Italy

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Venus (mythology)

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Non-Gregorian April observances

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Vesak

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Vesak

Vesak (Pali: Vesākha, Sanskrit: Vaiśākha), also known as Buddha Jayanti,[8] Buddha Purnima and Buddha Day, is a holiday traditionally observed by Buddhists and some Hindus on different days in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tibet, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Mongolia, and in China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam as "Buddha's Birthday" as well as in other parts of the world.[9] The festival commemorates the birth, enlightenment (Buddhahood), and death (Parinirvāna) of Gautama Buddha in the Theravada or southern tradition.[10] History Queen Maya holds onto a branch of a tree while giving birth to the Buddha, who is received by Śakra as other gods look on. The decision to agree to celebrate Vesak as the Buddha's birthday was formalized at the first conference of the World Fellowship of Buddhists held in Sri Lanka in 1950, although festivals at this time in the Buddhist world are a centuries-old tradition. The resolution that was adopted at

Buddhist festivals in India

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Buddhist festivals in Nepal

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Public holidays in Singapore

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Veterans Day

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Veterans Day

Veterans Day (originally known as Armistice Day) is a federal holiday in the United States observed annually on November 11, for honoring military veterans, that is, persons who have served in the United States Armed Forces (and were discharged under conditions other than dishonorable).[1][2] It coincides with other holidays including Armistice Day and Remembrance Day which are celebrated in other countries that mark the anniversary of the end of World War I. Major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect. At the urging of major U.S. veteran organizations, Armistice Day was renamed Veterans Day in 1954. Veterans Day is distinct from Memorial Day, a U.S. public holiday in May. Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans, while Memorial Day honors those who have died while in military service.[3] There is another military holiday, Armed Forces Day, a U.S. remembrance that als

Recurring events started in 1919

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Started in 1919 in the United States

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Annual events in the United States

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Veterans' Day (Netherlands)

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Veterans' Day (Netherlands)

Veteranendag (Veterans' Day) is the Netherlands' annual day of remembrance for the country's servicemen.[1] Since 2005 it has been organized on the birthday of the late Prince Bernhard.[2] It is held on the last Saturday of June. References Robert Beeres, Jan van der Meulen, Joseph Soeters - Mission Uruzgan: Collaborating in Multiple Coalitions 2012 Page 331 "At home, Dutch veterans received increasingly more acknowledgement and 'respect' because of their deployment to Afghanistan. Veterans Day has become a nationwide broadcast event, and this is new in the Netherlands." Jolande Withuis, Annet Mooij -The Politics of War Trauma: The Aftermath of World War II in ... 2010 "Since the rise of ptsd Dutch soldiers have become the objects of psychological care. ... given due attention and honor in the annual Veteranendag (Veterans' Day) that from 2005 has been organized on the birthday of the late prince Bernhard.

Movable June observances

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Military of the Netherlands

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Veterans days

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Victoria Day (Scotland)

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Victoria Day (Scotland)

Victoria Day (Scottish Gaelic: Latha Victoria) is a public holiday in parts of Eastern Central Scotland, chiefly the cities of Dundee and Edinburgh, although it was formerly more widespread. It is celebrated on the last Monday before or on 24 May and commemorates Queen Victoria's birthday (24 May 1819). Traditionally schools, and some offices and shops, are closed on Victoria Day, but it is not a bank holiday, meaning that government offices and banks remain open.[1][2] Because of its proximity to the Spring Bank Holiday a week later, Victoria Day is often marked on that date. As with many public holidays very few shops in Scotland now observe it. In 2017, the City of Dundee council lists the Spring Bank Holiday (29th May) as Victoria Day,[2] whilst the City of Edinburgh lists Victoria Day as being 22nd May.[3] It is no longer listed as a recognised public holiday in areas where it was formerly observed, including Renfrewshire and Perth and Kinross. It is also a holiday in Canada, celebrated at the same ti

Spring (season) events in Scotland

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Movable May observances

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Spring holidays

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Victory in Europe Day

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Victory in Europe Day

Victory in Europe Day, generally known as VE Day (Great Britain) or V-E Day (North America), or simply as V-Day, is a day celebrating the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces on May 8, 1945. On 30 April 1945, Adolf Hitler, the Nazi leader, committed suicide during the Battle of Berlin. Germany's surrender was authorised by his successor, Reichspräsident Karl Dönitz. The administration headed by Dönitz was known as the Flensburg Government. The act of military surrender was first signed at 02:41 on 7 May in SHAEF HQ at Reims,[1] and a slightly modified document was signed on May 8th in Berlin. Most European countries celebrate the end of World War II on the 8th of May. Russia, Belarus, and Serbia celebrate on May 9th, as did several former Soviet bloc countries. Israel marks VE Day on May 9th, as well, as a result of the large number of immigrants from the former Soviet bloc, although it is not a public holiday. The term VE Day existed

Holidays and observances by scheduling (to be d...

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1945 in Europe

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Aftermath of World War II

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Vidovdan

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Vidovdan

Saint Vitus was a Christian saint from Sicily. He died as a martyr during the persecution of Christians by co-ruling Roman Emperors Diocletian and Maximian in 303. Vitus is counted as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers of medieval Roman Catholicism. Saint Vitus' Day is celebrated on 15 June. In places where the Julian Calendar is used, this date coincides, in the 20th and 21st centuries, with 28 June on the Gregorian Calendar. In the late Middle Ages, people in Germany celebrated the feast of Vitus by dancing before his statue. This dancing became popular and the name "Saint Vitus Dance" was given to the neurological disorder Sydenham's chorea. It also led to Vitus being considered the patron saint of dancers and of entertainers in general.[1] Vitus is considered the patron saint of actors, comedians, dancers, and Jayden's epileptics, similarly to Genesius of Rome. He is also said to protect against lightning strikes, animal attacks and oversleeping. Vitus is the patron saint of the city of Rijeka in Croatia;

Remembrance days

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Serbian traditions

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Bulgarian traditions

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Vijayadashami

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Vijayadashami

Vijayadashami (IAST: Vijayadaśamī, pronounced ) also known as Dussehra or Dashain is a major Hindu festival celebrated at the end of Navaratri every year. It is observed on the tenth day in the Hindu calendar month of Ashvin or Kartik, the sixth and seventh month of the Hindu Luni-Solar Calendar respectively, which typically falls in the Gregorian months of September and October.[4][5][6] Vijayadashami is observed for different reasons and celebrated differently in various parts of the Indian subcontinent.[7][1][8][4] In the southern, eastern, northeastern, and some northern states of India, Vijayadashami marks the end of Durga Puja, remembering goddess Durga's victory over the buffalo demon Mahishasura to restore and protect dharma.[4][9] In the northern, central and western states, the festival is synonymously called Dussehra (also spelled Dasara, Dashahara). In these regions, it marks the end of "Ramlila" and remembers God Rama's victory over the Ravan. On the very same occasion, Arjuna alone decimated mo

September observances

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Hindu festivals in India

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Religious festivals in India

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Vinalia

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Vinalia

The Vinalia were Roman festivals of the wine harvest, wine vintage and gardens, held in honour of Jupiter and Venus. The Vinalia prima ("first Vinalia"), also known as the Vinalia urbana ("Urban Vinalia") was held on 23 April to bless and sample last year's wine and ask for good weather until the next harvest. The Vinalia rustica ("Rustic Vinalia") was on 19 August, before the harvest and grape-pressing. Vinalia Urbana Fragment of the Fasti Praenestini showing the April Vinalia (VIN) The Vinalia Urbana was held on 23 April. It was predominantly a wine festival, shared by Venus as patron of "profane" wine (vinum spurcum) intended for everyday human use, and Jupiter as patron of the strongest, purest, sacrificial grade wine (temetum). In honour of Venus, whose powers had provided humankind with ordinary wine, men and women alike sampled the vinum spurcum of the previous autumn's pressing. As god of the weather on which the wine-harvest depended, Jupiter was offered a special libation of the previous year'

Venus (mythology)

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Non-Gregorian August observances

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Non-Gregorian April observances

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Vishu

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Vishu

Vishu (Malayalam: Viṣu, Tulu: Bisu) is an Indian festival natively celebrated in one of the Indian state Kerala, Mangalore and Tulu Nadu, coastal Kanyakumari nearby regions and their diaspora communities.[1][2][3] The festival follows the solar cycle of the lunisolar as the first day of month called Medam.[4] It therefore always falls in the middle of April in the Gregorian calendar on or about 14 April every year.[5][6][7][8] Vishu (from Sanskrit-Malayalam Vishuva) literally means equal, [9] and in the festival context it connotes the completion of spring equinox.[4] The festival is notable for its solemnity and the general lack of pomp [4][10] The festival is marked by family time, preparing colorful auspicious items and viewing these as the first thing on the Vishu day. In particular, Malayali seek to view the golden blossoms of the Indian laburnum (Kani Konna), money or silver items (Vishukkaineetam), and rice.[4][10][11] The day also attracts firework play by children,[4][12] wearing new clothes (Puthuk

Hindu festivals in Kerala

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Observances set by the Malayalam calendar

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Non-Gregorian April observances

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Vivaha Panchami

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Vivaha Panchami

Vivah Panchami is a festival celebrating the wedding of Rama and Sita. It is observed on the fifth day of the Shukla paksha or waxing phase of moon in the Agrahayana month (November – December) as per Maithili calendar. The day is observed as the Vivah Utsav of Sita and Rama in temples and sacred places associated with Sri Rama in Mithila region of India and Nepal. Observances The day is of great importance at Janakpurdham in Nepal, where thousands of pilgrims arrive many from India and from other part of the country, as it is believed that Sita married Lord Ram (Prince of Ayodhya) here.[3] See also Ram Navami Mithila List of Hindu festivals References "2015 Vivah Panchami". DrikPanchang. Retrieved 20 February 2015. http://www.festivalsofindia.in/Vivaha-Panchami/ Naresh Chandra Sangal; Prakash Sangal (1998). Glimpses of Nepal. APH Publishing. p. 24. ISBN 81-7024-962-7.

Observances set by the Hindu calendar

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Characters in the Ramayana

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Non-Gregorian November observances

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Volkstrauertag

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Volkstrauertag

Volkstrauertag (German for "people's day of mourning") is a commemoration day in Germany two Sundays before the first day of Advent. It commemorates members of the armed forces of all nations and civilians who died in armed conflicts, to include victims of violent oppression. It was first observed in its modern form in 1952.[1] History Commemoration ceremony in the Reichstag, March 1928 A memorial to First and Second World War German soldiers in Tannheim, Baden-Württemberg In 1893, the Kingdom of Prussia consolidated many days of repentance and prayer celebrated by various Protestant denominations and in various German-speaking regions into Buß- und Bettag, a national work-holiday celebrated on the Wednesday before November 23.[2] In 1919, the German War Graves Commission (Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge) proposed a Volkstrauertag for German soldiers killed in the First World War. It was first held in 1922 in the Reichstag. In 1926, Volkstrauertag became a feature on what Catholics considere

Veterans days

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Movable November observances

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Moveable Christian observances

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Vulcan (mythology)

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Vulcan (mythology)

Vulcan (Latin: Volcānus or Vulcānus ) is the god of fire[1] including the fire of volcanoes, deserts, metalworking, and the forge in ancient Roman religion and myth. He is often depicted with a blacksmith's hammer.[2] The Vulcanalia was the annual festival held August 23 in his honor. His Greek counterpart is Hephaestus, the god of fire and smithery. In Etruscan religion, he is identified with Sethlans. Vulcan belongs to the most ancient stage of Roman religion: Varro, the ancient Roman scholar and writer, citing the Annales Maximi, records that king Titus Tatius dedicated altars to a series of deities including Vulcan.[3] Etymology The origin of the name is unclear. Roman tradition maintained that it was related to Latin words connected to lightning (fulgur, fulgere, fulmen), which in turn was thought of as related to flames.[4] This interpretation is supported by Walter William Skeat in his etymological dictionary as meaning lustre.[5] It has been supposed that his name was not Latin but related to tha

Volcano deities

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Hephaestus

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Walk to Work Day

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Walk to Work Day

Walk to Work Day is an annual, national event in Australia encouraging people to walk to work. The event is an initiative of the Pedestrian Council of Australia, and supported by the Australian Government. In 2015, it was held on Friday 13 November. Event details and history Through Walk to Work Day, the Pedestrian Council of Australia draw attention to the health and wellbeing benefits of walking.[2] Since 2000 Walk to Work Day has been a national event supported by the Australian Government.[3] 2003 was the first time the event was held on the same date across all Australian states and territories.[4] Several non-government organisations also promote the day, including the Australian Medical Association[5] and the Health Services Union.[6] Herb Elliott led a celebrity walk across Sydney Harbour Bridgt for the event in 1999.[7] In 2001, distance swimmer Grant Hackett backed the event in national media, including in The Sunday Telegraph.[8] In 2003, Prime Minister John Howard featured in national Walk to W

November observances

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Annual events in Australia

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White House Hanukkah Party

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White House Hanukkah Party

White House, South Facade The White House Hanukkah Party is an annual reception held at the White House and hosted by the U.S. President and First Lady to recognize and celebrate the Jewish festival of Hanukkah. The tradition was established in 2001, during the administration of George W. Bush. The guest list includes hundreds of American Jewish politicians, organization heads, and school and yeshiva deans.[1] The reception has become one of a number of ways the president recognizes the holiday, along with a proclamation/message, and participation by the president or a member of his staff in the lighting of the National Menorah (Hanukkiyah, special 9-branch Hanukkah candelabra) on the National Mall. Additionally, in 1996, 2004 and 2009, the United States Postal Service issued Hanukkah themed postage stamps in honor of the holiday. Pre-White House story: George Washington and Hanukkah Although the truth of the story is impossible to prove, there is an account about George Washington and the meaning of Hanu

Presidency of George W. Bush

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Presidency of Donald Trump

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Presidency of Barack Obama

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Whuppity Scoorie Day

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Whuppity Scoorie Day

Whuppity Scoorie is a traditional festival dating from the early 19th century observed by people in Lanark, Scotland, on 1 March to celebrate the approach of spring. Local children gather around the local St Nicholas kirk where at 6 pm the wee bell is rung. This is the starting sign for the children to run around the church in a clockwise[1] direction, making noise and swinging paper balls on strings above their heads as they run.[2] It is no longer a race for safety reasons[3][4] and to increase fairness for the younger participants.[5] After three laps, they scramble for coins thrown by members of the Community Council who host the event.[6] The Community Council also hosts a "Whuppity Scoorie Storytelling Festival"[2] and art workshops after the event until 7 March.[7] Origins While the origins of Whuppity Scoorie are unknown, there are several theories which try to explain how the ancient custom evolved. The most common theory is that Whuppity Scoorie came from a festival that was intended to celebrate

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Festivals in Scotland

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Winter solstice

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Winter solstice

The winter solstice, hiemal solstice or hibernal solstice, also known as midwinter, occurs when one of the Earth's poles has its maximum tilt away from the Sun. It happens twice yearly, once in each hemisphere (Northern and Southern). For that hemisphere, the winter solstice is the day with the shortest period of daylight and longest night of the year, when the Sun is at its lowest daily maximum elevation in the sky.[1] At the pole, there is continuous darkness or twilight around the winter solstice. Its opposite is the summer solstice. The winter solstice occurs during the hemisphere's winter. In the Northern Hemisphere, this is the December solstice (usually 21 or 22 December) and in the Southern Hemisphere, this is the June solstice (usually 20 or 21 June). Although the winter solstice itself lasts only a moment, the term sometimes refers to the day on which it occurs. Other names are "midwinter", the "extreme of winter" (Dongzhi), or the "shortest day". Traditionally, in many temperate regions, the winte

Movable December observances

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Winter phenomena

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International observances

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Whitsun

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Whitsun

Whitsun (also Whitsunday or Whit Sunday) is the name used especially in Britain and Ireland,[2] and throughout the world among Catholic, Anglicans and Methodists,[3] for the Christian festival of Pentecost, the seventh Sunday after Easter, which commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon Christ's disciples (Acts 2). In England it took on some characteristics of Beltane, which originated from the pagan celebration of Summer's Day, the beginning of the summer half-year, in Europe.[4] Whitsuntide, the week following Whitsunday, was one of three vacation weeks for the medieval villein;[5] on most manors he was free from service on the lord's demesne this week, which marked a pause in the agricultural year.[6] Whit Monday, the day after Whitsun, remained a holiday in Britain until 1971[7] when, with effect from 1972, it was replaced with the Spring Bank Holiday on the last Monday in May. Whit was the occasion for varied forms of celebration. In the North West of England, church and chapel parades called whi

May observances

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June observances

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Christian Sunday observances

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Workers' Memorial Day

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Workers' Memorial Day

Workers' Memorial Day, International Workers' Memorial Day or International Commemoration Day (ICD) for Dead and Injured or Day of Mourning takes place annually around the world on April 28, an international day of remembrance and action for workers killed, disabled, injured or made unwell by their work.[1] Workers' Memorial Day is an opportunity to highlight the preventable nature of most workplace incidents and ill health and to promote campaigns and union organisation in the fight for improvements in workplace safety. The slogan for the day is Remember the dead – Fight for the living.[1] Although April 28 is used as the focal point for remembrance and a day of international solidarity, campaigning and other related activities continue throughout the year right around the world. Origins Workers' Memorial Day ribbon In 1989, the AFL-CIO declared April 28 "Workers' Memorial Day" to honour the hundreds of thousands of working people killed and injured on the job every year. April 28th is the anniversary

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Labor monuments and memorials

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Occupational safety and health

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Women of Aviation Worldwide Week

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Women of Aviation Worldwide Week

Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week {WOAW} is a global aviation awareness week for girls of all ages observed to mark the anniversary of the world’s first female pilot licence (March 8, 1910). The week is a call to address gender imbalance in the air and space industry. It is not country or group specific Since March 2010, Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week's activities have been organized in 47 countries on 5 continents. 314,000 individuals have directly participated in the week's activities. 61,265 girls and women have reported their first flight in a small aircraft in response to The Week's Fly It Forward® call to action. History In January 2010, Mireille Goyer, an airline-rated pilot and aviation educator, launched an international grassroots initiative to celebrate the centennial of the first female pilot license worldwide earned by Raymonde de Laroche on March 8, 1910. Her Fly It Forward® call to action encouraged pilots from around the world to introduce record numbers of girls of any age to aviation du

Awareness weeks

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Movable March observances

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World Asthma Day

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World Asthma Day

World Asthma Day is an annual event organized by the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) to improve asthma awareness and care around the world. World Asthma Day takes place on the first Tuesday of May. The theme of 2012's event was "You Can Control Your Asthma". The inaugural World Asthma Day was held in 1998.[1] References "World Asthma Day 2011: "You Can Control Your Asthma"". Medical News Today. www.medilexicon.org. May 3, 2011. Retrieved 2012-04-14. External links World Asthma Day Case Studies in Environmental Medicine (CSEM): Environmental Triggers of Asthma – Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. World Asthma Day Themes

Movable May observances

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Health awareness days

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World AIDS Day

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World AIDS Day

World AIDS Day, designated on 1 December every year since 1988,[1] is an international day dedicated to raising awareness of the AIDS pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection and mourning those who have died of the disease. Government and health officials, non-governmental organizations, and individuals around the world observe the day, often with education on AIDS prevention and control. World AIDS Day is one of the eight official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization (WHO), along with World Health Day, World Blood Donor Day, World Immunization Week, World Tuberculosis Day, World No Tobacco Day, World Malaria Day and World Hepatitis Day.[2] As of 2017, AIDS has killed between 28.9 million and 41.5 million people worldwide, and an estimated 36.7 million people are living with HIV,[3] making it one of the most important global public health issues in recorded history. Thanks to recent improved access to antiretroviral treatment in many regions of the world, the death ra

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Health awareness days

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Public health education

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World Book Day

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World Book Day

World Book Day, also known as World Book and Copyright Day, or International Day of the Book, is an annual event organized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to promote reading, publishing, and copyright. World Book Day was first celebrated on 23 April 1995, and continues to be recognized on that day. A related event in the United Kingdom and Ireland is observed in March. Date selection The original idea was of the Valencian writer Vicente Clavel Andrés as a way to honour the author Miguel de Cervantes, first on 7 October, his birth date, then on 23 April, his death date. In 1995 UNESCO decided that the World Book and Copyright Day would be celebrated on 23 April, as the date is also the anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, as well as that of the birth or death of several other prominent authors.[1] (In a historical coincidence, Shakespeare and Cervantes died on the same date — 23 April 1616 — but not on the same day, as

Recurring events started in 1995

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Copyright law events

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World Compassion Day

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World Compassion Day

World Compassion Day, often abbreviated to WCD, is an idea based on Ahimsa and Compassion. It is a day for global icons to share their ideologies, values and principles on how to make the Gandhian ideals of Ahimsa and Compassion relevant to our times. India is the first nation to drive this initiative, given the fact that it has been the crucible of religions like Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism - all committed to the ideals of compassion and ahimsa. WCD 2012 had a special focus on animal welfare and the growing importance of vegetarianism for reasons of both healthcare and to discourage killing of other species. Speaking about World Compassion Day, The Dalai Lama says, “Today, more than ever before, life must be characterized by a sense of Universal responsibility, not only nation to nation and human to human but also human to other forms of life.” Pritish Nandy says, “Eventually, WCD will be a global forum for inspiring and supporting change across social, political and environmental platforms to

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November observances

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World Environment Day

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World Environment Day

World Environment Day in India World Environment Day (WED) is celebrated on 5 June every year, and is the United Nations' principal vehicle for encouraging awareness and action for the protection of our environment. First held in 1974, it has been a flagship campaign for raising awareness on emerging from environmental issues to marine pollution, human overpopulation, and global warming, to sustainable consumption and wildlife crime. World Environment Day has grown to become a global platform for public outreach, with participation from over 143 countries annually. Each year, WED has a new theme that major corporations, NGOs, communities, governments and all celebrities worldwide adopt to advocate environmental causes. History World Environment Day [WED] was established by the UN General Assembly in 1972[1] on the first day of the Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment, resulting from discussions on the integration of human interactions and the environment. Two years later, in 1974 the first WED was

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Recurring events started in 1973

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June observances

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World Radio Day

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World Radio Day

World Radio Day (in French, Le jour mondial de la radio) is celebrated on 13th of February each year. The Day was decided by UNESCO on 3 November 2011 during its 36th conference. Background Following a request from the Spanish Radio Academy on 20 September 2010, Spain proposed that the UNESCO Executive Board include an agenda item on the proclamation of a World Radio Day. UNESCO's Executive Board the agenda item in its provisional agenda for the proclamation of a "World Radio Day" on 29 September 2011. UNESCO carried out a wide consultation in 2011 with diverse stakeholders, such as broadcasting associations, UN agencies, funds and programmes, relevant NGOs, foundations and bilateral development agencies, as well as UNESCO Permanent Delegations and National Commissions for UNESCO. Among the answers, 91% were in favour of the project, including official support from the Arab States Broadcasting Union (ASBU), the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union (ABU), the African Union of Broadcasting (AUB), the Caribbean Bro

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United Nations days

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Radio organizations

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World Religion Day

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World Religion Day

World Religion Day is an observance initiated in 1950 by the National Spiritual Assembly of the Baháʼís of the United States, celebrated worldwide on the third Sunday in January each year. Though initiated in the United States, World Religion Day has come to be celebrated internationally.[1] Described as a "Baháʼí-inspired idea that has taken on a life of its own",[2] the origins of World Religion Day lie in the Baháʼí principles of the oneness of religion and of progressive revelation, which describe religion as evolving continuously throughout the history of humanity.[3][4] The purpose of World Religion Day is to highlight the ideas that the spiritual principles underlying the world's religions are harmonious, and that religions play a significant role in unifying humanity.[1][2] Purpose Initially a Baháʼí observance, World Religion Day was inspired by the Baháʼí principles of the oneness of religion and of progressive revelation, which describe religion as evolving continuously throughout the history of

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Started in 1949 in the United States

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World Space Week

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World Space Week

World Space Week (WSW) is an annual holiday observed from 4 to 10 October in various parts of the world, including Europe and Asia. World Space Week is officially defined as "an international celebration of science and technology, and their contribution to the betterment of the human condition".[1] History On December 6, 1999, The United Nations General Assembly declared World Space Week as an annual event celebration to be commemorated between October 4 and 10. The choice of dates was based on recognition of two important dates in space history: the launch of the first human-made Earth satellite, Sputnik 1, on October 4, 1957; and the signing of the Outer Space Treaty on October 10, 1967.[2] World Space Week is the largest annual space event in the world.[3] In 2017, World Space Week was celebrated with over 3,700 events in 80 countries. Events included school activities, exhibitions, government events, and special activities at planetaria around the world. Annual themes Each year, a theme for World Spa

Awareness weeks

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Space advocacy

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World Smile Day

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World Smile Day

World Smile Day® is celebrated on the first Friday in the month of October every year. The idea of was coined and initiated by Harvey Ball, a commercial artist from Worcester, Massachusetts. He is known to have created the Smiley Face in 1963.[1] The World's first World Smile Day was held in the year 1999 and has been held annually since. Harvey Ball World Smile Foundation After Harvey died in 2001, the Harvey Ball World Smile Foundation was created to honor his name and memory, with the slogan "improving this world, one smile at a time." The Foundation continues as the official sponsor of World Smile Day® each year. Goal The organization states that their goal is to "make as many people as possible aware of World Smile Day® by using the web, social media, and your help to encourage smiles and acts of kindness around the world." World Smile Day® Events World Smile Day® continues to be celebrated every year in Worcester with a hot air balloon, sidewalk chalk activities, and the worlds largest human smile

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1999 introductions

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Worcester, Massachusetts

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World Statistics Day

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World Statistics Day

World Statistics Day was an international day celebrated for the first time on 20 October 2010 worldwide. World Statistics Day is celebrated every five years.[1] The United Nations Statistical Commission declared the day.[2] As of 2010, 103 countries celebrate a national Statistics Day, including 51 African countries that jointly celebrate African Statistics Day annually on 18 November.[3] India celebrates its statistics day on 29 June, the birthday of the legendary statistician Prasanta Chandra Mahalanobis.[4] The next World Statistics Day will be celebrated on 20 October 2020.[5] The Royal Statistical Society in the UK also launched its getstats statistical literacy campaign on the same day at 20:10 (on 20.10.2010).[6] References "World Statistics Day". www.timeanddate.com. Retrieved 2018-10-13. http://unstats.un.org/unsd/wsd/docs/PaulCheungOnWSD.pdf http://unstats.un.org/unsd/dnss/statistics_day/Statistics_Day.htm http://pib.nic.in/newsite/PrintRelease.aspx?relid=180211 "World Statistics

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United Nations days

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World UFO Day

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World UFO Day

World UFO Day is an awareness day for people to gather together and watch the skies for unidentified flying objects. The day is celebrated by some on June 24, and others on July 2. June 24 is the date that aviator Kenneth Arnold reported what is generally considered to be the first widely reported unidentified flying object sighting in the United States,[1] while July 2 commemorates the supposed UFO crash in the 1947 Roswell UFO Incident.[2][3] The stated goal of the July 2 celebration is to raise awareness of "the undoubted existence of UFOs"[4] and to encourage governments to declassify their files on UFO sightings.[5] See also World Contact Day References "Out of This World, Out of Our Minds". New York Times. 3 July 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-03. "Why don't you? Go alien?". The Scotsman. 2 July 2004. Retrieved 2009-06-24. "Can you answer the UFO questions?". BBC News. 2 July 2003. Retrieved 2003-07-02. http://www.worldufoday.com/about-world-ufo-day/whatwherewhywhen/ "July 2: World UFO Day,

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June observances

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July observances

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World Usability Day

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World Usability Day

Established in 2005 by the Usability Professionals Association, (now the User Experience Professionals Association), World Usability Day (WUD) or Make Things Easier Day[1] occurs annually to promote the values of usability, usability engineering, user-centered design, universal usability, and every user's responsibility to ask for things that work better. The day adopts a different theme each year. Organizations, groups, or individuals are encouraged to hold events to mark the day, optionally according to that year's theme. World Usability Day started as an idea springing from a discussion in the fall of 2004 between two UPA board member, Elizabeth Rosenzweig and Nigel Bevan. They worked together with the UPA board to start World Usability Day and over the years, Elizabeth Rosenzweig kept it running. World Usability Day Charter Human error is a misnomer. Technology today is too hard to use. A cell phone should be as easy-to-use as a doorknob. In order to humanize a world that uses technology as an infrastr

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Usability

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November observances

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Yenya

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Yenya

Indra Jātrā, most commonly known as Yenyā (Nepal Bhasa: येँयाः) is the biggest religious street festival in Kathmandu, Nepal. Ye means "Kathmandu" and Ya means "celebration", together it means "celebration inside Kathmandu" in Nepal Bhasa. The celebrations consist of two events, Indra Jātrā and Kumāri Jātrā. Indra Jātrā is marked by masked dances of deities and demons, displays of sacred images and tableaus in honor of the deity Indra, the king of heaven. Kumāri Jātrā is the chariot procession of the living goddess Kumari. Family members deceased in the past year are also remembered during the festival. The main venue of the festivities is Kathmandu Durbar Square. The celebrations last for eight days from the 12th day of the bright fortnight to the 4th day of the dark fortnight of Yanlā (ञला), the eleventh month in the lunar Nepal Era calendar.[1][2] Indra Jatra was started by King Gunakamadeva(गुणकामदेव) to commemorate the founding of the Kathmandu city in the 10th century.[3] Kumari Jatra began in the mid

Buddhist festivals in Nepal

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October observances

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September observances

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Yaldā

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Yaldā

Shab-e Yalda ("Yalda night" Persian: شب یلدا‎) or Shab-e Chelleh ("night of forty", Persian: شب چله‎)[1] is an Iranian[2] festival celebrated on the "longest and darkest night of the year", Yalda is a winter solstice celebration,[rs 1] that is, in the night of the Northern Hemisphere's winter solstice. Calendrically, this corresponds to the night of December 20/21 (±1) in the Gregorian calendar, and to the night between the last day of the ninth month (Azar) and the first day of the tenth month (Dey)[rs 2] of the Iranian civil calendar.[rs 2] The longest and darkest night of the year is a time when friends and family gather together to eat, drink and read poetry (especially Hafez) until well after midnight. Fruits and nuts are eaten and pomegranates and watermelons are particularly significant. The red color in these fruits symbolizes the crimson hues of dawn and glow of life. The poems of Divan-e Hafez, which can be found in the bookcases of most Iranian families, are read or recited on various occasions su

December observances

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Non-Gregorian December observances

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Winter events in Iran

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Yom Ha'atzmaut

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Yom Ha'atzmaut

Independence Day (Hebrew: יום העצמאות‎ Yom Ha'atzmaut, lit. "Day of Independence") is the national day of Israel, commemorating the Israeli Declaration of Independence in 1948. The day is marked by official and unofficial ceremonies and observances. Because Israel declared independence on 14 May 1948, which corresponded with the Hebrew date 5 Iyar in that year, Yom Ha'atzmaut was originally celebrated on that date. However, to avoid Sabbath desecration, it may be commemorated one or two days before or after the 5th of Iyar if it falls too close to the Jewish Sabbath. Yom Hazikaron, the Israeli Fallen Soldiers and Victims of Terrorism Remembrance Day is always scheduled for the day preceding Independence Day. In the Hebrew calendar, days begin in the evening.[2] The next occurrence of Yom Haatzmaut will take place on 28–29 April 2020.[3] History Independence Day is founded on the declaration of the establishment of the State of Israel by the Jewish leadership headed by future Prime Minister David Ben-Gurio

Iyar observances

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Jewish observances

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Yhyakh

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Yhyakh

Yhyаkh (Yakut: Ыhыах) is the New Year holiday in Sakha Republic. Celebration Sakha people celebrate the New Year twice a year – in winter with the rest of citizens of Russia, and in summer – according to the ancient traditions. Yakutia is the largest region of Russia. The winter temperatures sometimes reach −60 °C, while the summer is very short, lasting only three months. The holiday is celebrated in the middle of June, at the beginning of summer. The Sakha Yhyakh festival (literally meaning "abundance") is related to a cult of a solar deity, with a fertility cult. Before the German invasion of the Soviet Union it was held on 22 June, the longest day of the year. Hoever, after 1941, as the date of Yhyakh had coincided with the beginning of Operation Barbarossa, it began to be celebrated in the period between 10 and 25 June. Ancient Sakha celebrated the New Year at the Yhyаkh festival. Its traditions include women and children decorating trees and tethering posts with "salama" (nine bunches of horse hair

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Summer holidays (Northern Hemisphere)

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Summer traditions

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Yom Hazikaron

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Yom Hazikaron

Yom HaZikaron (Hebrew: יוֹם הַזִּכָּרוֹן‎, lit. 'Memorial Day'), in full Yom HaZikaron LeHalalei Ma'arakhot Yisrael ul'Nifge'ei Pe'ulot HaEivah (Hebrew: יוֹם הזִּכָּרוֹן לַחֲלָלֵי מַעֲרָכוֹת יִשְׂרָאֵל וּלְנִפְגְעֵי פְּעוּלוֹת הָאֵיבָה‎, lit. 'Memorial Day for the Fallen Soldiers of Israel and Victims of Terrorism'[2]), is Israel's official remembrance day,[3] enacted into law in 1963.[4] While Yom HaZikaron has been traditionally dedicated to fallen soldiers, commemoration has also been extended to civilian victims of terrorism.[5] History An IDF officer places new flags, each with a black ribbon, on the graves of IDF soldiers for Yom HaZikaron. IDF soldiers at a Yom HaZikaron ceremony in 2007 Bedouin Soldiers Memorial. In 1949 and 1950, the first two years after the declaration of the State, memorial services for soldiers who fell in the 1947–1949 Palestine war were held on Independence Day.[6] Services at military cemeteries were coordinated between the IDF and the Ministry of Defense. A conce

Spring (season) events in Israel

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Remembrance days

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Public holidays in Israel

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Yom Kippur

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Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur ([1] Hebrew: יוֹם כִּיפּוּר, IPA: , or יום הכיפורים), also known as the Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year in Judaism.[2] Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Jews traditionally observe this holy day with an approximate 25-hour period of fasting and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services. Etymology Yom (יוֹם) means 'day' in Hebrew and Kippur (כִּפּוּר) comes from a root that means 'to atone'. Yom Kippur is usually expressed in English as "Day of Atonement". Kippur can also mean to cleanse, with the Yom Kippur procedures in the Temple cleansing the people of sin. Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur Yom Kippur is "the tenth day of [the] seventh month"[3] (Tishrei) and is regarded as the "Sabbath of Sabbaths". Rosh Hashanah (referred to in the Torah as Yom Teruah) is the first day of that month according to the Hebrew calendar. On this day forgiveness of sins is also asked of God. Yom Kippur completes the annual period known in Judaism as the Hi

Tishrei observances

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Jewish observances

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Autumn events in Israel

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Yomari punhi

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Yomari punhi

Yomari Punhi is a Newari festival marking the end of the rice harvest. It takes place in November/December during the full moon day of Thinlā (थिंला), the second month in the lunar Nepal Era calendar.[1][2] Festival Yomari Punhi, meaning the full moon of yomari, is one of the most popular Newar festivals and is observed every year during the full moon of December. A yomari is a confection of rice flour (from the new harvest) dough shaped like fish and filled with brown cane sugar and sesame seeds, which is then steamed. This delicacy is the chief item on the menu during the post-harvest celebration of Yomari Punhi. On this full moon day, people of the Kathmandu Valley offer worship to Annapurna, the goddess of grains, for the rice harvest. Groups of kids go around neighborhood to beg yomari cakes from housewives in the evening. Sacred masked dances are performed in the villages of Hari Siddhi and Thecho at the southern end of the Valley to mark the festival.[3][4] In a yomari people keep chaku a chocolate-

November observances

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Observances held on the full moon

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Observances set by the Nepal Sambat calendar

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Yule

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Yule

Yule or Yuletide ("Yule time" or "Yule season") is a festival historically observed by the Germanic peoples. Scholars have connected the original celebrations of Yule to the Wild Hunt, the god Odin, and the pagan Anglo-Saxon Mōdraniht. Later departing from its pagan roots, Yule underwent Christianised reformulation, resulting in the term Christmastide. Many present-day Christmas customs and traditions such as the Yule log, Yule goat, Yule boar, Yule singing, and others stem from pagan Yule traditions. Terms with an etymological equivalent to Yule are still used in Nordic countries and Estonia to describe Christmas and other festivals occurring during the winter holiday season. Today, Yule is celebrated in Heathenry and other forms of Neopaganism, as well as in LaVeyan Satanism. Etymology Yule is the modern version of the Old English words ġēol or ġēohol and ġēola or ġēoli, with the former indicating the 12-day festival of "Yule" (later: "Christmastide") and the latter indicating the month of "Yule", whereb

Early Germanic calendar

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Early Germanic festivals

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Eating parties

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Yukka Nu Hii

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Yukka Nu Hii

Yukka nu hii (Okinawan: 四日ぬ日 or 四日の日, ユッカヌヒー) is an annual festival of the Okinawa Islands of southwestern Japan, which is traditionally celebrated on the 4th day of the 5th month of the lunisolar calendar. It centers on the traditional dragon boat (haarii, or haaree in Itoman) races. The festival dates back to circa 1400, where it is said to have been adopted from the Chinese. The dragon boat races are a form of giving thanks to the sea and agricultural gods and asking for their continued help for the future.[2] Currently, Naha is host to the largest dragon boat race, although Itoman and Tamagusuku are also known for holding large races.[3] Like many other elements that characterize modern Okinawan culture, yukka nu hii used to have a limited geographic distribution. In northern Okinawa, it was seen as a festival of south–central Okinawa. The dragon boat race is said to have been introduced to Unten, Nakijin Village in the mid-Meiji period, or from the end of the 19th century to the early 20th century.[4]

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Zatra

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Zatra

Zatra is the Konkani language term for the pilgrimage festivals celebrated at Hindu temples in Goa; the Hindi, Marathi and Nepali language equivalents are Yatra and Jatra respectively.In Maharashtra the alternative term Urus is used as well.[2] During the Zatra, the idol(s) or murtis of the Hindu deity or deities are taken out on special procession either in a "Palkhi" (sort of a Palanquin) or in a large, multi-storied chariot called the Rath. Traditionally, every temple observes this festival once a year on the traditional day.[3] All zatras usually occur after Diwali in October and continues until the Shigmo or Holi festival in March. The most famous Zatra of Goa is that of the temple of the Hindu deity Lairai at Shirgao, a place located roughly 30 km away from Panaji when people walk on burning coals with bare legs and that of deity Goddess Shantadurga at Village Fatorpa in Quepem Taluka; approx 50 km from Panaji and 18 km from Madgao. These Zatras can be compared to Mela (Hindi) for its other commercia

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Religious festivals in India

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