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20th-century American artists


Dan Brereton

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Dan Brereton

Daniel Alan "Dan" Brereton[1] (born November 22, 1965, in the San Francisco Bay Area)[2] is an American writer and illustrator who has produced notable work in the comic book field. Biography Early life Dan Brereton attended the California College of the Arts and the Academy of Art College.[1] He stated in a 2014 interview that "One of earliest memories of drawing monsters is from kindergarten. Our teacher asked us one afternoon what we wanted to do with the hour we had left in class and I yelled out, 'Let’s draw monsters!'...So to my mind, anyway, monsters are the purest product of our imaginations, whether they be good or bad or just plain wild. That idea never ceases to inspire me and find its way into my work."[3] Career Comic books He is known for his skills as a painter and his distinctive character designs. His first published work in the comics industry was the story "Lost Causes Chapter 1" in Merchants of Death #1 (July 1988) published by Eclipse Comics[4] and he painted the Black Terror limited

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Henry Boltinoff

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Henry Boltinoff

Henry Boltinoff (February 19, 1914 – April 26, 2001)[1][2] was an American cartoonist who worked for both comic strips and comic books. He drew many of the humor and filler strips that appeared in National Periodical comics from the 1940s through the 1960s. Biography Comic books Born in New York City, Boltinoff created numerous humor features for DC Comics, where his brother Murray Boltinoff was an editor. His most prominent creation for DC was "Dover & Clover" which debuted in More Fun Comics #94 (Nov. 1943).[3][4] Boltinoff's other features include "Abdul the Fire Eater", "Bebe", "Billy", "Buck Skinner", "Cap's Hobby Center", "Casey the Cop", "Charlie Cannonball", "Chief Hot Foot", "Cora the Carhop", "Dexter", "Doctor Floogle", "Doctor Rocket", "Elvin", "Freddie the Frogman", "Hamid the Hypnotist", "Homer", "Honey in Hollywood", "Hy the Spy", "Hy Wire", "Jail Jests", "Jerry the Jitterbug", "King Kale", "Lefty Looie", "Lem 'n' Lime", "Lionel and His Lions", "Little Pete", "Little Pocahontas", "Lucky",

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Marc Hempel

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Marc Hempel

Marc Hempel (born May 25, 1957)[1] is an American cartoonist/comics artist best known for his work on The Sandman with Neil Gaiman. Biography Writer and artist Marc Hempel grew up in the northwest suburbs of Chicago and now lives in Baltimore. He received a B.F.A. in Painting from Northern Illinois University in 1980.[2] He and Mark Wheatley co-created the titles Breathtaker and Mars. In 1994–1995, he collaborated with Neil Gaiman on the climactic story arc "The Kindly Ones" in The Sandman.[3][4] Hempel's own creations Gregory[5] and Tug & Buster were nominated for several industry awards,[6] and his humor anthology Naked Brain was named "Best Comic Book" in the Baltimore City Paper's "Best of Baltimore 2003" issue.[7] His art has also appeared in Marvel Fanfare, Epic Illustrated, Heavy Metal, Jonny Quest, Tarzan the Warrior, Clive Barker’s Hellraiser, Flinch, My Faith in Frankie, The Dreaming, Lucifer, and Disney Adventures.[8] Original art from The Sandman and Breathtaker was included in an exhibiti

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Richard Case

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Richard Case

Richard Case (born 1964)[1] is an American comics artist best known for his work for DC Comics especially the Vertigo imprint. Career After receiving a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Rhode Island School of Design, Richard Case worked as an assistant to comics artist Walt Simonson in 1985.[2] Case's first credited published comic book story appeared in Marvel Comics' Strange Tales vol. 2 #10 (Jan. 1988).[3] He moved to DC Comics and pencilled the majority of issues of Grant Morrison's run on Doom Patrol[4] beginning with issue #19 (Feb. 1989).[5] In 1992, he drew several issues of Darkhold: Pages from the Book of Sins for Marvel. Back at DC, Case inked Marc Hempel's pencils on the Sandman story "The Kindly Ones" and penciled a few pages in Hempel's style.[6][7] He illustrated Jamie Delano's Ghostdancing limited series, the final story arc of Peter Milligan's Shade, the Changing Man, and Hunter: The Age of Magic with Dylan Horrocks.[3] Since leaving the comics industry, he has worked extensively in com

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Kerry Gammill

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Kerry Gammill

Kerry Gammill (born April 26, 1954)[1] is an American artist who has worked in the fields of comic books, special effects, storyboards, and character designs. As a comic book artist, he is best known for his work on Power Man and Iron Fist for Marvel Comics and Superman for DC Comics. Early life Gammill grew up as a fan of the comics of the 1960s and 1970s, particularly the work of Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, John Buscema, Gene Colan, and Jim Steranko.[2] Career Kerry Gammill began working for Marvel Comics with his first published work, a Spider-Man/Daredevil story titled "A Fluttering of Wings Most Foul", appearing in Marvel Team-Up #73 (Sept. 1978).[3] During his time in the comics industry, he illustrated such series as Power Man and Iron Fist, Superman vol. 2, and Action Comics. He collaborated with writer J. M. DeMatteis on the creation of Frog-Man in Marvel Team-Up #121 (Sept. 1982)[4] and featured the character in a storyline in Marvel Fanfare #32 (May 1987).[5] Gammill co-created such other characte

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Jim Mooney

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Jim Mooney

James Noel Mooney[1] (August 13, 1919 – March 30, 2008)[2] was an American comics artist best known for his long tenure at DC Comics and as the signature artist of Supergirl, as well as a Marvel Comics inker and Spider-Man artist, both during what comics historians and fans call the Silver Age of comic books. He sometimes inked under the pseudonym Jay Noel.[3] Biography Mooney's cover for the 1938 fanzine Imagination, containing Ray Bradbury's first published story Early life and career Jim Mooney was born in New York City and raised in Los Angeles.[4] Friends with pulp-fiction author Henry Kuttner and Californian science-fiction fans such as Forrest J. Ackerman, he drew the cover for the first issue of Imagination, an Ackerman fanzine that included Ray Bradbury's first published story, "Hollerbochen's Dilemma".[5] Kuttner encouraged the teenaged Mooney to submit art to Farnsworth Wright, the editor of the pulp magazine for which Kuttner was writing, Weird Tales. Mooney's first professional sale was an

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Ric Estrada

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Ric Estrada

Ric Estrada (February 26, 1928 – May 1, 2009) was a Cuban American comics artist who worked for companies including the major American publisher DC Comics. He also worked in comic strips, political cartoons, advertising, storyboarding, and commercial illustration. Biography Early life and career Ric Estrada was born in Havana, Cuba.[1] He made his first professional sale, an illustration used on the cover of the Cuban magazine Bohemia, at the age of 13.[2] Estrada attended the University of Havana. Through his uncle, Sergio Carbo, Estrada met writer Ernest Hemingway; the two men facilitated Estrada's move to New York City in 1947 to further his artistic studies and start a career.[2] Estrada there attended the New York Art Students League, New York University, and the School of Visual Arts.[1] Estrada's first New York home was in Greenwich Village where he met fellow artists such as Lee J. Ames, Dan Barry, Sy Barry, Frank Frazetta, Andre LeBlanc, Mort Meskin, Pete Morisi, Don Perlin, and George Roussos.[3]

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Bob Hall (comics)

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Bob Hall (comics)

Robert "Bob" Hall (October 16, 1944)[1] is an American comics artist and writer as well as a playwright and theatre director. He is the co-creator of the West Coast Avengers for Marvel Comics and has worked on such series as Armed and Dangerous and Shadowman, which he both drew and wrote for Valiant Comics. Biography Education Hall studied theater at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and earned a bachelor's and master's degree there.[2] Moving to New York in the early 1970s, he took courses at John Buscema's school of comic art and The New School.[3] Comics Hall began working in the comics industry in 1974 and drew horror stories for Charlton Comics.[4] He soon moved to Marvel Comics and drew The Champions[5] and Super-Villain Team-Up.[6] Hall and writer Chris Claremont collaborated on Marvel Team-Up #74 (October 1978) which featured Spider-Man meeting the cast of NBC's Saturday Night Live[7][8] Hall briefly worked as an editor for Marvel from 1978 to 1979[9] under Jim Shooter. Hall later joined Shooter

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Rick Hoberg

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Rick Hoberg

Richard Renick Hoberg[1] (born June 7, 1952) is an American comics artist and animator. Newspaper strips Hoberg began his career in comic books in the mid-1970s, working for Russ Manning on Tarzan comic books for overseas distribution (1975–1976) and later assisted Manning on the Star Wars comic strip (1979–1980).[2] Hoberg also ghosted Sunday pages for Fred Kida on The Amazing Spider-Man strip (1981–1982).[1] Comic books Between 1977 and 1979, Hoberg contributed artwork for Marvel Comics' The Invaders, Kull the Destroyer, Savage Sword of Conan, Star Wars, and What If...?.[2] In the 1980s, Hoberg mainly drew for such DC Comics titles as All-Star Squadron, Batman, The Brave and the Bold, Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew!, Checkmate, Green Arrow, Green Lantern, and Justice League of America Annual.[3] He was one of the contributors to the DC Challenge limited series in 1986.[4] Writer Dennis Mallonee and Hoberg developed the format for Marvel's Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe series.[5] The

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Chuck Patton

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Chuck Patton

Francis Chuck Patton is an African-American comics artist and animator. He is best known for his work on DC Comics' Justice League of America in the 1980s, specifically for the period in which the team relocated to Detroit and was staffed with new, multicultural super-heroes. With writer Gerry Conway, Patton created Gypsy and Vibe, as well as redesigning Vixen and Steel: The Indestructible Man. Career Comics A self-taught comics artist, although with a degree in art,[1] Patton's influences included José Luis García-López, John Buscema, Gil Kane, Neal Adams, and Dick Giordano. Patton was interested in journalism,[1] but was enticed into a comics career in large part thanks to Giordano[2] by then a top executive at DC. Patton entered the comics industry in 1983 by penciling a brief run of Creeper back-up stories in The Flash.[3] After drawing various titles including Green Lantern, The Brave and the Bold, and the "Green Arrow" backup feature in Detective Comics, Patton became the artist of Justice League of

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Tom Lyle

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Tom Lyle

Thomas Lyle (born November 2, 1953)[1] is an American comics artist who is best known as for his work on Starman and Robin for DC Comics as well as Spider-Man for Marvel Comics. Career After drawing Airboy for Eclipse Comics, Tom Lyle first came to prominence as penciler on DC Comics' Starman with writer Roger Stern.[2][3] The creative team introduced the second Blockbuster in Starman #9 (April 1989).[4] Lyle worked on the first Robin limited series with writer Chuck Dixon. The series had many reprintings of the first few issues as well as two sequel miniseries – Robin II: Joker's Wild and Robin III: Cry of the Huntress – by the same creative team.[5] Dixon and Lyle co-created the Electrocutioner in Detective Comics #644 (May 1992)[6] and Stephanie Brown in Detective Comics #647 (August 1992).[7] Lyle's next project was The Comet for DC Comics' Impact Comics imprint, which he pencilled and plotted with writer Mark Waid contributing the scripts.[3] At Marvel Comics, Lyle co-created the character Annex in

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Alan Kupperberg

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Alan Kupperberg

Alan Kupperberg (May 18, 1953 – July 17, 2015) was an American comics artist known for working in both comic books and newspaper strips. Early life Alan Kupperberg was born on May 18, 1953[1] in New York City. He graduated from the High School of Art and Design in 1971.[2] Career Alan Kupperberg entered the comics industry by working at Neal Adams' Continuity Associates[3] and was a member of the Crusty Bunkers.[4] He began writing and drawing for Marvel Comics in 1974,[5] mostly doing fill-ins and one-shots. He later worked on team books such as The Invaders[6] and The Defenders and drew several issues of What If.[7] Occasionally working as a writer, Kupperberg created the 1983 one-shot comic Obnoxio the Clown vs. the X-Men, and handled everything from writing and illustrating to lettering.[8] In 1987, Kupperberg worked on both The Spectacular Spider-Man and The Amazing Spider-Man. His work on those titles included The Amazing Spider-Man #289 (June 1987) which featured the Jack O'Lantern (Jason Macendal

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Robert Edwards (artist)

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Robert Edwards (artist)

Bobby Edwards Robert Edwards (October 4, 1879 – November 2, 1948) was an American artist, musician, and writer, and a prominent figure among New York City's Greenwich Village in the 1920s and '30s. He was editor and publisher of the Greenwich Village Quill, and was known as the "Bard of Bohemia" and the "Village Troubadour" for his many songs he wrote and sang publicly.[1] Edwards was born in Buffalo, New York in 1879, and in 1901 graduated from Harvard University,[2] where he was an editor of the Harvard Lampoon. He studied at the Art Students' League in Buffalo and New York City, the Chase School, and the Eric Pape and Cowles Art Schools in Boston.[3] He became a member of the Society of Illustrators in 1910, and his illustrations appeared in books by Mary Stewart Cutting, Alice MacGowan, and Corra Harris as well as magazines such as [4] He died in New York City at the age of 69.[5][1] References "The Final Curtain". Billboard. November 13, 1948. p. 57. Sarlós, Robert Károly (1982). Jig Cook and

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Lisa Levy (artist)

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Lisa Levy (artist)

Lisa Levy is a contemporary artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY.[1] She is a visual artist,[2] a performance artist,[3] and a radio show host.[4] Levy had a longstanding career as an Art Director and studied illustration. From this, she developed her text paintings that give encouraging messages to the viewer.[5] One of Levy's ongoing art performances is as Dr. Lisa, a self-proclaimed psychotherapist.[6] Stemming from this performance, Levy also hosts a radio show called Dr. Lisa Gives a Sh*t on Radio Free Brooklyn. She has also been crowned Miss Subways 2017.[7] One of her most popular performances is The Artist is Humbly Present (2016).[8] References Brooks, Katherine (6 Dec 2017). "Artist Dr. Lisa Levy Performs Free Psychotherapy Session In 'The Thoughts In Your Head'". Huffington Post. Retrieved 21 July 2019. Cascone, Sarah (8 March 2014). "The Final Brucennial Opens With Beer, Bacon, and Bullish Performance Art". ArtNet. Retrieved 21 July 2019. Boxer, Sarah (27 July 2002). "A Shrink Wi

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Mike DeCarlo

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Mike DeCarlo

Mike DeCarlo (born March 14, 1957)[1][2] is an American comics artist. He is best known for his work for DC Comics in the 1980s inking the artwork of such artists as George Pérez, Greg LaRocque, Keith Giffen, and Jim Aparo. DeCarlo has worked on such diverse titles as Atari Force, Cartoon Network Block Party, Crisis on Infinite Earths, Fantastic Four, and Simpsons Comics as well as adaptations of the Warner Bros. stable of cartoons including Looney Tunes, Animaniacs, Pinky and the Brain and Superman & Bugs Bunny. Comics Mike DeCarlo entered the comics industry as an assistant to Dick Giordano.[3] When Giordano became an editor at DC Comics in 1980, DeCarlo became an inker in his own right.[4] DeCarlo inked the penciled artwork of George Pérez on "The Judas Contract" storyarc in Tales of the Teen Titans with Giordano.[5][6] Pérez critiqued their work in a 2003 interview stating that "While not perfect in getting the same feel [as Pérez inking the art himself], they were closer as far as the crispness t

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Kieron Dwyer

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Kieron Dwyer

Kieron Dwyer (born March 6, 1967) is an American comics artist. He is best known for his work for Marvel Comics and DC Comics as well as for his creator-owned projects. Biography During his career, Dwyer has worked on such comic book titles as Captain America (1987–1990), Danger Unlimited (on the "Torch of Liberty" story) (1994), Action Comics (1995–1996), The Avengers vol. 3 (2001–2003), and his creator-owned series, LCD: Lowest Comic Denominator. Dwyer's first published comics work was the story "The Ghost of Masahiko Tahara" in Batman #413 (Nov. 1987)[1] and he later collaborated with writer Peter Milligan on the "Dark Knight, Dark City" storyarc in Batman #452–454 (Aug.–Sept. 1990).[2] Dwyer was one of the many artists who contributed to the Superman: The Wedding Album one-shot in 1996 wherein the title character married Lois Lane.[3] Cover of first LCD issue, signed by the artists, featuring parody of the Starbucks logo that prompted legal actions from the corporation. Starbucks sued Dwyer in 2000

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Steve Erwin

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Steve Erwin

Steve Erwin (born January 16, 1960)[2] is an American comics artist best known as the co-creator of Checkmate and Gunfire for DC Comics. Career Erwin studied commercial art at Oklahoma State University-Okmulgee.[1] He credits Neal Adams' Batman stories and Gene Colan/Tom Palmer's work on Daredevil as having "won my heart in junior high to aspiring (dreaming) to be a comic book artist."[3] Erwin's first published comic book work appeared in Grimjack #18 (Jan. 1986) [4] published by First Comics. During the 1980s and 1990s, he worked primarily for DC Comics, his first story for that publisher appearing in The Vigilante #48 (Dec. 1987).[4] After that title's cancellation, Erwin co-created the title Checkmate! with writer Paul Kupperberg.[5] In August 1991, Erwin and Marv Wolfman launched the Deathstroke The Terminator title,[6] a series which Erwin would draw from 1991 to 1994.[4] The Gunfire character was created by Len Wein and Erwin in Deathstroke the Terminator Annual #3 (October 1993).[7] Erwin drew the c

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Frank Brunner

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Frank Brunner

Frank Brunner (born February 21, 1949)[1] is an American comics artist and illustrator best known for his work at Marvel Comics in the 1970s. Early life Brunner attended Manhattan's High School of Art and Design. He was in the same graduating class as Larry Hama and Ralph Reese.[2] He studied at the New York University Film School.[3] Career Comics Brunner entered the comics profession as a horror writer-artist for the black-and-white comics magazines Web of Horror, Creepy, Eerie, and Vampirella.[4] His first work for Marvel Comics was inking an 11–page Watcher backup story in The Silver Surfer #6 (June 1969).[4] Brunner's best-known color-comics work is his Marvel Comics collaboration with writer Steve Engelhart on the supernatural hero Doctor Strange in Marvel Premiere #9-14 (July 1973–March 1974)[5] and in Doctor Strange: Master of the Mystic Arts #1–2 and #4–5 (June–August 1974 and Oct.–Dec. 1974). The two killed Dr. Strange's mentor, the Ancient One, and Strange became the new Sorcerer Supreme. Engle

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Bob Brown (comics)

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Bob Brown (comics)

William Robert "Bob" Brown[1] (August 22, 1915 – January 1977)[2] was an American comics artist with an extensive career from the early 1940s through the 1970s. With writers Edmond Hamilton and Gardner Fox, Brown co-created the DC Comics hero Space Ranger, drawing the character's complete run from his debut in the try-out comic Showcase #15 (Aug. 1958) through Mystery in Space #103 (July 1965). Brown also penciled the DC title Challengers of the Unknown, taking over from Jack Kirby, from 1959 to 1968. Early life Brown was born in Syracuse, New York, to a father who managed a vaudeville theater and a mother who worked as a pianist.[3] He attended the Hartford Art School and the Rhode Island School of Design.[4] Following his parents into show business, he performed as youth in a song-and-dance act with his sister and younger brother, starting around 1927. They worked together into the early 1930s. After graduating from high school, Brown and his sister worked in night clubs and theater as a duo. By the latt

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Paris Cullins

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Paris Cullins

Paris Cullins is an American comics artist best known for his work on DC Comics' Blue Devil and Blue Beetle and Marvel Comics' Hyperkind. Career Early career Cullins had sent DC Comics samples of his comic art since 1976, finally meeting with Dick Giordano in the last week of 1979. Cullins recalled in 2007 that, I brought new pages and he loved it. The pages were Batman vs. Manhunter. I did it on a lark. He then told me, ..."Come in the first day after New Year's and I'll have a script for you, and talk to you about the [DC intern] program." I came in on January 2nd and he gave me a script that day. ... When I started with them they had me doing some horror stories ... I also did one feature in particular, called "I, Vampire."[2] Cullins' first known credited comics work was as penciler-inker of the six-page story "Mystic Murder", by writer Steve Skeates, in the DC Comics supernatural anthology Secrets of Haunted House #42 (Nov. 1981). He drew four "I ... Vampire" stories in the House of Mystery series[3

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Ed Hannigan

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Ed Hannigan

Ed Hannigan (born August 6,[1] 1951)[2] is an American comics artist, writer, and editor for both Marvel Comics and DC Comics.[3] Career Ed Hannigan's first credited comics story was published in Marvel Comics' licensed Planet of the Apes #5 (Feb. 1975).[4] His writing credits include work on The Defenders from issue #67 (Jan. 1979) to #91 (Jan. 1981).[5] Hannigan started as the series' artist but, while working on the story arc in issues #66 to #68, "I got in a pinch ... and asked [Hannigan] to help me," writer David Anthony Kraft recalled. "He felt self-conscious ... but I told him he'd be fine. He eventually got into it."[5] Hannigan found it too difficult to both write and draw the series, so by the end of the story arc he was working solely as writer.[5] As the artist on The Spectacular Spider-Man, Hannigan and writer Bill Mantlo co-created the characters Cloak and Dagger,[6] who appear in a live-action television series on Freeform.[7] At DC Comics, Hannigan redesigned the Brainiac character into a c

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Lee Elias

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Lee Elias

Lee Elias (May 21, 1920 – April 8, 1998)[1] was a British-American comics artist. He was best known for his work on the Black Cat comic book published by Harvey Comics in the 1940s. Biography Emigrating to the United States from Manchester, England, when he was a boy, Elias studied art at the Cooper Union and the Art Students League of New York. He started working in comics in 1943 at Fiction House,[1] where his work included features such as "Captain Wings" in Wing Comics, on which he succeeded Bob Lubbers, as well as the Western hero Firehair.[2] Lee Elias cover for Showcase #41 (November–December 1962) After leaving Fiction House in 1946, he worked for several different comics companies, including Timely Comics, Hillman Periodicals and National/DC where he worked on such characters as the Flash, Tommy Tomorrow[3] and Black Canary.[2] He drew three issues of All Star Comics in 1947[4] and co-created the Fiddler and the original Star Sapphire with writer Robert Kanigher in All-Flash #32 (Dec. 1947).[5]

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Homer Davenport

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Homer Davenport

Homer Calvin Davenport (March 8, 1867 – May 2, 1912) was a political cartoonist and writer from the U.S. He is known for drawings that satirized figures of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, most notably Ohio Senator Mark Hanna. Although Davenport had no formal art training, he became one of the highest paid political cartoonists in the world. Davenport also was one of the first major American breeders of Arabian horses and one of the founders of the Arabian Horse Club of America. A native Oregonian, Davenport developed interests in both art and horses as a young boy. He tried a variety of jobs before gaining employment as a cartoonist, initially working at several newspapers on the West Coast, including The San Francisco Examiner, purchased by William Randolph Hearst. His talent for drawing and interest in Arabian horses dovetailed in 1893 at the Chicago Daily Herald when he studied and drew the Arabian horses exhibited at the World's Columbian Exposition. When Hearst acquired the New York Morning Journal

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Greg LaRocque

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Greg LaRocque

Greg LaRocque (born February 24, 1954)[1] is an American comics artist best known for his work on the Legion of Super-Heroes and The Flash. Born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland, LaRocque worked as an assistant teacher at the Professional Institute of Art while still a teenager. He started his art career in the advertising field.[2] Comics career Greg LaRocque began his comics career at DC Comics and his first published work was the story "That Which Conquers All" in Mystery in Space #115 (Jan. 1981). This was followed by a series of OMAC back-up stories in The Warlord #42–47 (Feb.–July 1981). His first work for Marvel Comics appeared in Power Man and Iron Fist #73 (Sept. 1981).[3] He drew several issues of Marvel Team-Up including the last issue of the series.[4] He and writer Louise Simonson then launched a new Spider-Man title, Web of Spider-Man, in April 1985.[5] After returning to DC Comics, LaRocque became prominent for his work illustrating the Legion of Super-Heroes. He stated in a 2013 interview

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William Messner-Loebs

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William Messner-Loebs

William Francis Messner-Loebs (born William Francis Loebs, Jr.,[2] February 19, 1949)[3] is an American comics artist and writer from Michigan, also known as Bill Loebs and Bill Messner-Loebs. His hyphenated surname is a combination of his and his wife Nadine's unmarried surnames. In the 1980s and 1990s he wrote runs of series published by DC Comics, Image Comics, Comico, and other comics publishers, including DC's superhero series Flash and Wonder Woman among others. Additionally he has both written and drawn original creator-owned works, such as Journey: The Adventures of Wolverine MacAlistaire. Biography William Messner-Loebs was born in Ferndale, Michigan.[4] His right arm was amputated above the shoulder in infancy because of a cancerous tumor;[5] he writes and draws with his left hand. Loebs was a friend of Kevin Siembieda, and one of the players in Siembieda's role-playing group in Detroit; in 1981, his mother Frances (Schepeler) Loebs loaned Siembieda the money to print the first role-playing book

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Michael Netzer

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Michael Netzer

Michael Netzer (born Michael Nasser; October 9, 1955)[1] is an American-Israeli artist best known for his comic book work for DC Comics and Marvel Comics in the 1970s,[2] as well as for his online presence.[3][4][5] Early life Michael Nasser was born in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. His father was Adel Nasser a-Din, a Druze doctor of philosophy who worked most of his life in a Ford factory. His mother, Adele Ghazali, is a daughter to a Druze-Lebanese father and a Jewish-Lebanese mother who settled in New York in the 1920s.[6][7] He contracted polio at the age of eight months which partially paralyzed his left hip and leg. After two years of medical treatment, he was sent with his mother and siblings to his father's Druze hometown, Dayr Qūbil in Lebanon.[1][6] In 1967, at the age of 11, he returned to Detroit. In school, he became interested in comic book illustration and storytelling, and began developing skills as an artist.[8] He used his art for a campaign that won him election of vice-president of his senior

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Rick Leonardi

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Rick Leonardi

Rick Leonardi (born August 9, 1957) is an American comics artist who has worked for various series for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, including Cloak and Dagger, The Uncanny X-Men, The New Mutants, Spider-Man 2099, Nightwing, Batgirl, Green Lantern Versus Aliens and Superman. He has worked on feature film tie-in comics such as Star Wars: General Grievous and Superman Returns Prequel #3. Early life Rick Leonardi was born August 9, 1957[1] in Philadelphia, and grew up in Haverhill, Massachusetts. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1979 and started drawing for Marvel Comics the following year.[2] Career Rick Leonardi's first published comics artwork appeared in Thor #303 (Jan. 1981).[3] He collaborated with writer Bill Mantlo on two limited series: The Vision and the Scarlet Witch (Nov. 1982–Feb. 1983)[4] and Cloak and Dagger (Oct. 1983–Jan. 1984). Leonardi's works in the 1980s include various fill-in issues of The Uncanny X-Men and The New Mutants.[3] He is credited, along with fellow illustrator Mike Ze

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Billy Graham (comics)

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Billy Graham (comics)

William Henderson Graham[1] (July 1, 1935 – April 4, 1997)[2][1] was an African-American comics artist best known for his work on the Marvel Comics series Luke Cage, Hero for Hire and the Jungle Action feature "Black Panther". Early career A graduate of New York City's Music & Art High School, Billy Graham was influenced artistically by the work of Al Williamson, Frank Frazetta, Burne Hogarth, and George Tuska.[3] One of his earliest comics projects was illustrating writer Don Glut's "Death Boat!" in Vampirella #1 (Sept. 1969), one of Warren Publishing's influential black-and-white horror-comics magazines. Graham would pencil and self-ink a story in nearly each of the first dozen issues of Vampirella, and an additional tale in issue #32 (April 1970) of its brethren publication Creepy.[4] Publisher James Warren recalled in 1999 that he promoted Graham to art director shortly after recruiting him as an artist: I sensed Billy had the ability to handle it; certain artists and writers are great but they

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Norm Breyfogle

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Norm Breyfogle

Norman Keith Breyfogle (February 27, 1960 – September 24, 2018)[1][2] was an American artist, best known for his comic book art on DC Comics' Batman franchise from 1987 to 1995. During this time, he co-created the villains Ventriloquist and Ratcatcher with writers Alan Grant and John Wagner, and the characters Anarky, Jeremiah Arkham, Victor Zsasz, and Amygdala with Grant alone. He co-created with writers Gerard Jones and Len Strazewski the Malibu Comics Ultraverse flagship hero Prime, and both wrote and drew the Malibu-published series featuring his original character Metaphysique. Early life Norman Keith Breyfogle[3] was born on February 27, 1960 in Iowa City, Iowa.[1] He had a brother Kevin and a sister Penny Duncan.[4] Breyfogle began taking private art lessons at the age of twelve, and won an award at a local art show. His family subsequently moved to Houghton, MI and the local newspaper The Daily Mining Gazette profiled him in 1976 as "Norm Breyfogle: Near Master Cartoonist at 16". While in high scho

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Rafael Kayanan

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Rafael Kayanan

Rafael Kayanan is a Filipino-born naturalised American comics artist and Filipino martial arts master in the Cesar Sayoc Kali system. Biography Comics Rafael Kayanan stated in a 2007 interview that he "grew up with Filipino Komiks masters like Alcala, Coching, and Redondo mixed in with Kirby, Sy Barry's The Phantom, Kubert's Tarzan, and Hal Foster's Prince Valiant. From there I discovered Barry Windsor-Smith, Starlin, Adams, Wrightson, and Gulacy in the 70's. I copied and then drew my own stories on the backs of old xeroxes my mom would bring home from work."[1] He has illustrated for every major comic book publisher. His most notable work has been on Marvel Comics' Conan the Adventurer, Acclaim Comics' Turok, and DC Comics' Firestorm and America vs. the Justice Society.[2] He also inked the Eisner Award-nominated series Chiaroscuro: The Life and Times of Leonardo Da Vinci for Vertigo. Kayanan has illustrated concept designs for comic book, film and game companies.[3] During the late 1990s, he was the cre

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Dave Hoover

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Dave Hoover

David Harold "Dave" Hoover (May 14, 1955 – September 4, 2011) was an American comics artist and animator, most notable for his art on DC Comics' The Wanderers and Starman and Marvel Comics' Captain America. Biography Early life Hoover received his B.S. in Media Arts & Animation from the Art Institute of Philadelphia; and his Associate of Specialized Technology in Visual Communication from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh.[1] Career Animation Hoover started his career in animation, first as a layout artist for Filmation Studios from 1977–1985, and during that time also worked for several other animation studios including Hanna-Barbera and Mihan Productions.[1] Over his career as an animator, Hoover worked on such programs as Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids, The Archie Show, Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle, The New Adventures of Flash Gordon, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, She-Ra: Princess of Power, The Super Friends, The Smurfs, Men in Black: The Series, The Godzilla Power Hour, RoboCop: Alpha Comma

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Dame Darcy

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Dame Darcy

Darcy Megan Stanger[1] (born June 19, 1971, in Caldwell, Idaho),[2] better known by the pen name Dame Darcy is an alternative cartoonist,[3] fine artist, musician, cabaret performer, and animator/filmmaker. Her "Neo-Victorian"[4] comic book series Meat Cake was published by Fantagraphics Books from 1993–2008. The Meat Cake Bible compilation was released in June 2016[5] and nominated for The Eisner Award July 2017.[6] Vegan Love: Dating and Partnering for the Cruelty-Free Gal, with Fashion, Makeup & Wedding Tips, written by Maya Gottfried and illustrated by Dame Darcy, was the Silver Medalist winners of the Independent Publisher Book Awards in 2018.[7] Her self-published Tarot decks went viral world wide in 2012 with a second wave in 2018 for the Dame Darcy Mermaid Tarot Gold Edition deck and Queen Alice Tarot deck and were listed as Etsy Bestsellers in 2018.[8] Dame Darcy's autobiographical graphic novel, Hi Jax & Hi Jinx (Life's a Pitch and Then You Live Forever), was published by Feral House in 20

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Evan Dorkin

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Evan Dorkin

Evan Dorkin (born April 20, 1965)[1] is an American comics artist and cartoonist. His best known works are the comic books Milk and Cheese and Dork. His comics often poke fun at fandom, even while making it clear that Dorkin is a fan himself. Career As well as his comics work, Dorkin and his wife, Sarah Dyer, have written for Space Ghost Coast to Coast. Dorkin drew the cover art for several ska compilation albums in the 1990s.[2] He wrote and produced an animated television pilot for Adult Swim titled Welcome to Eltingville, based on his own characters. He and Dyer wrote some episodes of the Superman: The Animated Series including the episode "Live Wire", which introduced a new character of the same name. Dorkin wrote the Superman and Batman: World's Funnest one-shot in 2000 which was drawn by various artists.[3] Dorkin and Dyer worked as freelance writers on the 2006 English-language version of the anime Crayon Shin-chan, where they wrote material for the show's first six episodes. Dorkin co-created Beasts

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Jesse Marsh

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Jesse Marsh

Jesse Marsh (July 27, 1907 – April 28, 1966)[1] was a comics artist and animator. His main claim to fame is his work on the early Tarzan and related books for Western Publishing that saw print through Dell Comics and later Gold Key Comics.[2] He was the first artist to produce original Tarzan comic books. Up to that time, all Tarzan comics were reprints from the newspaper strips. He also worked on the Gene Autry comic book for many years.[3] Prior to working for Western, he had worked for the Walt Disney Company, doing animation work for Make Mine Music and some Pluto cartoons as well. He would turn the Tarzan series over to Russ Manning in 1965 due to failing health.[2] In 2009, Dark Horse Comics announced an archive reprint series of his work on Tarzan entitled Tarzan: The Jesse Marsh Years. Collected editions Tarzan: The Jesse Marsh Years Volume 1 collects Four Color #134 and 161 and Tarzan #1–4, 256 pages, January 2009, ISBN 1-59582-238-0[4] Volume 2 collects Tarzan #5–10, 224 pages, May 2009,

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Bob Lubbers

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Bob Lubbers

Robert Bartow Lubbers (January 10, 1922 – July 8, 2017) was an American comic strip and comic book artist best known for his work on such strips as Tarzan, Li'l Abner and Long Sam. Biography Born Robert Bartow Lubbers in 1922,[1] he began as an illustrator for his school newspaper. In his teens, he played trombone in a big band five nights a week while studying during the day with George Bridgman and other instructors at the Art Students League.[1] He entered the comic book field when he was 18 years old, as he recalled: My pal Stan Drake and I left Bridgman's life class one day and marched down to Centaur and sold the comic mag features we'd created. Before long I was doing features at Fiction House until the War.[2] For Centaur (aka the Comics Corporation of America), Lubbers drew such features as the Arrow, Reef Kincaid, Red Riley and the Liberty Scouts. After Centaur folded in 1942, he signed on as art director at Fiction House, where he drew Firehair in Rangers Comics, Camilla in Jungle Comics, Señor

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Bill Jaaska

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Bill Jaaska

William C. "Bill" Jaaska (June 22, 1961[1] – November 9, 2009)[2] was an American comics artist. Career Bill Jaaska's first published comics work was a Skywolf story in Airboy #11 (Dec. 1986).[3] He worked with Peter David on The Incredible Hulk. David has commented that Jaaska's art on The Incredible Hulk #380 was crucial to the impact of the story.[4] Jaaska is best known for his work on The New Titans published by DC Comics.[2] After leaving The New Titans with issue #113 (August 1994), Jaaska's final new work in the comics industry appeared in Turok, Dinosaur Hunter #23 (May 1995) published by Acclaim Comics.[3] In 2005, Anthem Pictures used Jaaska's Terminator artwork to create The Terminator: Hunters and Killers a unique "Digital Comic DVD". The product uses art from the original comic books combined with actors reading the dialog, to create a flowing story that does not have actual motion in the traditional sense of animation, but is not static, in that the screen moves across the panels, and focus

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Charles Reid (painter)

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Charles Reid (painter)

Charles Clark Reid (August 12, 1937  – June 1, 2019)[1] was an American painter, illustrator, and teacher notable for his watercolor style. Reid was an oil painter, but it was his watercolor paintings that gave him an international reputation.[1] He won numerous national and international awards, and hosted many workshops in the US and abroad. Early life At the age of 14, Reid became interested in painting. His parents encouraged him and let him use a room in the family home. His father gave him illustrated history books and books about Charles Marion Russell and Frederic Remington, both known for their paintings of the American Old West. Reid's father enrolled him in a correspondence course at the Famous Artists School when he was 16 years old. Reid also attended South Kent School and the University of Vermont (1955-1957).[2] Disillusionment at the University of Vermont led him to Manhattan to enroll in the Art Students League of New York from 1957 to 1959. There, he met Frank J. Reilly who became his tea

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Ed Dodd

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Ed Dodd

Edward Benton "Ed" Dodd (November 7, 1902 – May 27, 1991) was a 20th-century American cartoonist known for his Mark Trail comic strip.[1] Early years Born in Lafayette, Georgia to Reverend Jesse Mercer Dodd and Effie Cook Dodd (the artist Lamar Dodd was his first cousin), Ed Dodd went to work for Dan Beard, founder of the Boy Scouts of America, at the age of 16. Dodd worked at Beard’s camp in Pennsylvania for 13 summers, where he honed his writing and illustration skills under Beard’s guidance. Dodd became a scoutmaster and the first paid Youth and Physical Education Director for the city of Gainesville, Georgia. Back Home Again After studying architecture at Georgia Tech and at the Art Students League of New York, he purchased a ranch in Wyoming in 1926. In 1930, while working as a guide in the national parks, he created Back Home Again, a moderately successful daily single-panel which included characters from Gainesville and North Georgia. The panel, about a hillbilly family, was distributed nationally

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John R. Dilworth

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John R. Dilworth

John Russell Dilworth (born February 14, 1963) is an American animator, actor, director, writer, producer and the creator of the animated television series Courage the Cowardly Dog. His work has mainly appeared on CBS, Showtime, HBO, FOX, Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, Comedy Central and MTV, among others.[1] Early life Dilworth attended the School of Visual Arts in New York, where he graduated in 1985 with a Bachelor of Arts. Influences Many of Dilworth's influences included Bob Clampett, Tex Avery, and Salvador Dalí, as well as Charlie Chaplin. Dilworth also had some contemporary influences as well, including Michael Sporn, as well as Mamoru Oshii's Ghost in the Shell; while not a narrative influence, but was influential just for sheer dynamics of action and technology. Some of that stuff that appeals to him the most are Miyazaki's Porco Rosso and My Neighbor Totoro, giving him the love of the mix between fantasy and innocence. Career After graduation, Dilworth became an art director at Baldi, Bloom an

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Nate Butler (comics)

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Nate Butler (comics)

L Nathan Butler[1] (born February 1, 1954[2]) is an American cartoonist and writer-illustrator of comics, best known for Christian-themed comics. Early career Butler began his full-time professional career at the Albuquerque News/Modern Press organization in 1975, starting in the production department and finishing as advertising art director. He self-published two tabloid-size Desperate Planet comic books in 1976 and 1977.[3][4] In 1979 Butler opened his own studio and began freelancing.[5] While operating his business as Captain Renaissance Studios in the early 1980s, Butler worked almost exclusively with New Mexico-area clients such as the Albuquerque Dukes baseball team. He also contributed cartoon panels to the New Mexico Business Journal, Viva New Mexico, and New Mexico Stockman magazines, and taught cartooning and advertising layout at the Academy of Art & Design in Albuquerque. The company name changed to The Nate Butler Studio, incorporating in 1990. Mainstream comics The Nate Butler Studio

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Al McWilliams

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Al McWilliams

Alden Spurr McWilliams[1] generally credited as Al McWilliams and A. McWilliams (February 2, 1916 – March 19, 1993),[2] was an American comics artist who co-created the first African-American lead character of a comic strip. He won the National Cartoonists Society's 1978 award for Comic Book: Story. Early life and career Al McWillams was born in New York City, the son of chauffeur John and piano teacher Florence L. McWilliams. His sister Faith was born in 1921. By 1929, the family, of Irish ancestry, had moved to Greenwich, Connecticut, where John McWilliams became a radio-company chemist's laboratory assistant. Al McWilliams graduated from Greenwich High School in 1934, and that September began attending the New York School of Fine and Applied Arts, which later became Parsons The New School for Design.[1] Circa 1935, he worked as an art assistant on Lyman Young's newspaper comic strip Tim Tyler's Luck.[3] In 1938, he began illustrating for such pulp magazines as Clues Detective Stories and Flying Aces, wh

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George DiCaprio

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George DiCaprio

George Paul DiCaprio (born October 2, 1943) is an American writer, editor, publisher, distributor, and former performance artist, known for his work in the realm of underground comix. He has collaborated with Timothy Leary and Laurie Anderson. He is the father of American actor Leonardo DiCaprio. Biography DiCaprio was born to George Leon DiCaprio (May 14, 1902 – November 18, 1965) and Olga Anne Jacobs (December 23, 1904 – May 16, 1984). His father was the son of Italian immigrants, Salvatore Di Caprio (1866-1966) and Rosina Cassella (1875-1941), and his mother was of Russian and German descent.[1][2][3] DiCaprio was active in underground comix throughout the 1970s, as a writer, editor, publisher, and distributor.[4] He is known for such titles as Greaser Comics (Half-Ass Press/Last Gasp), Forbidden Knowledge (Last Gasp), and Cocaine Comix (Last Gasp), collaborating with artists such as Laurie Anderson, Pete von Sholly, and Rich Chidlaw. He was also a performance artist. Comics writer Harvey Pekar details

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Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty

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Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty

Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty (born 1969) is a Native American, Assiniboine Sioux bead worker and porcupine quill worker. She creates traditional Northern Plains regalia.[1][2] Background Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty was born in Castro Valley, California in 1969; however, her family comes from the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, where Juanita spent much of her childhood.[3][1] Her mother, Joyce Growing Thunder Fogarty, is also an acclaimed bead and quill artist[4][5] and the only artist to have won best of show three times at the Santa Fe Indian Market.[6] Both artists come from a long line of Plains Indians bead workers.[6] Juanita learned skills from her mother and has been beading since the age of three.[7] At times Juanita will work with her mother Joyce, and her daughter Jessica "Jessa Rae" together beading for larger regalia projects.[2][5] Artwork Fogarty creates traditional Plains clothing and accessories, such as purses, pipe bags, dolls, cradle boards, rifle scabbards, and knife cases – all

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Leo Monahan

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Leo Monahan

Leo Monahan (1933) is an artist who is known for Paper art. Monahan creates paper sculptures with paper which creates a multi-dimensional art work that cannot be represented in two dimensional flat canvas. Monahan was involved with Chouinard Art Institute. Monahan was the first person to receive a Disney Scholarship to attend the Chouinard Art Institute and after graduation he worked for Disney for 50 years.[1] Education Chouinard Art Institute 1954-1958[2] Career Monahan created his first paper sculpture in1960. Since that time he became a pioneer of paper sculpture which he refers to as "paper in dimmesion". [3] Monahan has worked for Toyota, Coca-Cola, and Nintendo.[3] Awards Life Time Achievement award from the Society of Illustrators of Los Angeles Life Time Achievement award California Institute of the Arts (2019)[2] External links Leo Monahan Chouinard foundation References "Leo Monahan Paper In Dimension". leomonahan. leomonahan. Retrieved 22 August 2019. Castleberry, Emma. "O

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Ralph Griffin

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Ralph Griffin

Ralph Griffin (1925–1992) was an African-American sculptor known for his sculptures based on tree roots. Life Ralph Griffin was born on September 22, 1925 in Girard, Burke County, GA on a cotton farm. He began school at Girard Elementary School.[1] He attended school until the ninth grade, then began to work full-time on his family's cotton farm.[2] At 22 years old, on January 13, 1947, he married Loretta Gordon and together they raised five daughters and one son. When he was thirty years old, "'the boll weevils did all of the work' on his family's farm" [1] and Griffin went bankrupt. After he left the farm, he began to travel without destination around the southeast coast of Georgia. After 5-10 years of traveling and working odd construction jobs to support his children, Griffin resettled in Girard, GA and took a second-shift custodian position at Murray's Biscuit Company.[1][3] He retained this job for twenty-three years, finally retiring in 1989 to pursue art full-time.[2] Career Griffin began making s

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Tom Holdman

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Tom Holdman

Tom Holdman (born April 8, 1970) is an art-glass artist located in Lehi, Utah in the United States. Some of his most notable works include the Story Telling stained-glass windows[1] in the Orem City Library in Orem, Utah and the Roots of Knowledge stained-glass window at Utah Valley University in Orem, Utah. His studio, Holdman Studios, of which he is a co-owner with his wife, Gayle Holdman, is located at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi, Utah, and employs[2] about 80 people. Holdman's art-glass is present in 50 countries and in every state in the United States.[3] His work also appears in over 80 temples belonging to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[3] Personal life Tom Holdman was born and raised in Orem, Utah.[4] He has spoken with a stutter since childhood and has since used art to express his thoughts and feelings.[5][6][4][7] Tom Holdman attended Orem High School and later Utah Valley University.[4] Holdman was called to serve a full-time mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day

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Pedro Bell

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Pedro Bell

Pedro Bell (June 11, 1950 – August 27, 2019) was an American artist and illustrator, best known for his elaborate album cover designs and other artwork for numerous Funkadelic and George Clinton solo albums. Bell also wrote many of the liner notes of the records under the name Sir Lleb (his surname spelled backwards).[1]:22[2] The liner notes contributed to P-Funk's literary mythology[3]:238 — a sampling of his contributions include "Thumpasaurus," "Funkapus," "Queen Freakalene," "Bop Gun," and "Zone of Zero Funkativity." Bell's work was preceded and partially inspired by Sun Ra[4] and was a precursor to the modern graphic novel and the Afro-punk movement.[5] Early life Born on June 11, 1950, Bell was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois.[6][7] His family was very religious.[8] Bell had older brothers.[9] Often sick as a child, Bell would read books and comics, especially Ace Comics.[10]:20 Bell said that he gained his artistic talent from his father, whom he described as frustrated artist; and his mother,

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Carlos Luna (artist)

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Carlos Luna (artist)

Carlos Luna in 2011 Carlos Luna (born 1969) is a contemporary Cuban-American painter, sculptor, printmaker, and ceramicist. Born 1969 in Pinar del Río, Cuba. In 1991 he emigrated to Mexico, where he met and married his wife Claudia Catalina Luna. Carlos remained in Mexico for 10 years, and in 2001 Luna was awarded the EB-1 visa from the United States of America. It affords the recipient and his family permanent residence status in the United States of America. On July 23, 2002, Luna moved to Miami, Florida, with his wife, children, and dog, he currently lives and works in Miami, Florida. In the last few years Luna began exploring different mediums and began working with Magnolia Editions [1] making jacquard tapestries. Luna has also appeared in numerous solo[2] and group exhibitions in the United States, Cuba, Mexico, and abroad. Solo Exhibitions Among his solo exhibitions are Flower Power[3] (2018) at the Art of the World Gallery, Houston; Carlos Luna. Deep Line, Drawings by Carlos Luna[4] (2017) at Boca

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Nick Manabat

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Nick Manabat

Nick Manabat (2 September 1972 – 5 November 1995) was a Filipino American comic book artist. He lived and was educated in Brisbane, Australia from 1983 to 1990. Nick co-created Cybernary with writer Steve Gerber in 1992 for Wildstorm Productions. His illustration technique was marked by bold use of blacks in a heavy metal style. Cybernary was launched as a back-up story to Jim Lee's hugely successful Deathblow comic series, but Manabat's blossoming career and life were cut short after losing his fight against Hodgkin's Lymphoma in 1995. External links 2005 Tribute to Nick Manabat Comic Vine Entry for Nick Manabat Nick Manabat in Philippine Comics

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20th-century American artists

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American artists of Filipino descent

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Chad Carothers

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Chad Carothers

Chad Carothers, also known by his artist name Chad Cantcolor, is an American contemporary freehand painter and designer.[1] Career Chad Carothers began customizing articles of clothing for his classmates during his school days.[2] He began his career as an artist in 1998, working in Los Angeles in the field of freehand painting.[3] His work included the creation of custom surfboards and manufacturing designs for surfboard[4] and wakeboard makers.[5] He has also worked on the creation of custom hand-painted and designed trucks,[1] including a 2015 Chevy Silverado Sport Truck.[6] Carothers worked with Adidas to produce limited-edition hand painted cleats for Justin Turner during the 2017 World Series,[7][8] for which Carothers created different themes for each game.[9][10] He has produced hand painted custom shoes for Nike athletes as well.[11] In 2019 Carother's work was shown at the BET Experience festival in Los Angeles.[12] Chad Carothers has also worked as a cover artist for musical albums.[13] Exhibit

Shoemakers

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20th-century American artists

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21st-century American artists

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