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The Second City


Compass Players

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Compass Players

Original announcement in Chicago's Hyde Park Herald shows first performance scheduled for Friday, July 8, 1955 at The Compass tavern, formerly at 1152 E. 55th (not to be confused with Jimmy's Woodlawn Tap to the east). The Compass Players (or Compass Theater) was an improvisational cabaret revue active from 1955 to 1958 in Chicago and St. Louis.[1] Several members went on to form The Second City Theater in 1959. History Founded by Paul Sills and David Shepherd, Compass Players began on the University of Chicago campus theater. The two had founded Playwrights Theatre Club, with Eugene Troobnick, in June 1953, where, during rehearsal, Shepherd had noticed that Sills employed improvisational theater forms, named Theater Games, highly specific structures designed to create spontaneous theatrical play between actors that had been developed and named by Sills' mother, Viola Spolin. (Spolin would later author the "bible" of Theater Games, Improvisation for the Theater, published by Northwestern Press.) Shepherd b

1950s in comedy

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Improvisational troupes

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Quincy Hawks football coaches

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Edith Prickley

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Edith Prickley

Edith Prickley was a character in all six seasons of the Canadian sketch comedy series SCTV. Created and played by Andrea Martin, the character took over as the station manager for the fictional television station Second City Television, based out of a city called Melonville, and serving the "tri-city area". Her character, visibly distinct by her leopard-print clothing and hat, and rhinestone studded glasses,[1] served the station's president and owner, Guy Caballero. The character of Edith Prickley was created for and played by comedian Andrea Martin, when the series debuted in 1976. Along with Caballero, Prickley was one of the few characters to appear throughout the entire run of the series, which ended in 1984. The character perhaps remains Martin's best known;[2] she was a relative unknown performer before the series debut. Martin was nominated in 1982 for the "Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Variety or Music Series" Emmy Award. Personality According to the book "Women in Comedy", one w

SCTV characters

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The Second City

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Eric Forsberg

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Eric Forsberg

Eric Forsberg (born December 16, 1959) is American writer. He wrote and directed the feature film Mega Piranha, as well as the writer of the feature film Snakes on a Train, one of the first mockbusters produced and released by The Asylum.[1] He also wrote the screenplays for 30,000 Leagues Under the Sea and War of the Worlds 2: The Next Wave, also for The Asylum.[2] He directed the film Alien Abduction which aired on Sci Fi Channel, as well as Night of the Dead which aired on Chiller TV. Other writer and director credits include the political thriller Torture Room, and the stoner comedy Sex Pot as well as Monster, Almighty Thor, Arachnoquake, and Age of the Hobbits. He also worked as a Co-Producer and assistant director on numerous films for Christopher Coppola and Alain Silver, including White Nights, Bel Air, and Palmer's Pickup. In his early years Forsberg was an improvisational comedy instructor at The Players Workshop and The Second City Training Center in Chicago.[2] Biography Eric Forsberg was born i

Screenwriters from Illinois

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Writers from Chicago

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20th-century American dramatists and playwrights

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Josephine Forsberg

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Josephine Forsberg

Josephine Forsberg (28 January 1921 – 3 October 2011), ex-wife of film director Rolf Forsberg, was hired by Paul Sills and Viola Spolin to join the original Second City in 1959 as the female understudy and Spolin's teaching assistant.[1] She became an expert in improvisational techniques for the theater, and by the mid 1960s she had taken over most of Spolin's and Sills's classes, as well as Spolin's children's theater company. From that point on most of the young performers that wanted to go onto the Second City stage studied with Forsberg for at least a year. These included Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, Betty Thomas, Shelley Long, George Wendt, David Mamet, and Robert Townsend. In 1971, Forsberg opened up an official school of improvisation called Players Workshop,[2] hiring her nephew Martin de Maat and her daughter Linnea Forsberg to teach alongside her. In terms of accepting students who were not necessarily Second City actors learning the art of improvisation, but also including students from all walks of

Comedians from Illinois

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People from Chicago

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American women writers

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Godshow

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Godshow

Poster for Godshow Tim O'Malley in 2007 Godshow is an autobiographical play written and starred by Tim O'Malley. Godshow is the story of actor Tim O'Malley's life at Chicago's The Second City Theater in the 90's. The show covers O'Malley's battle with bitterness, alcoholism, and cocaine addiction, back to his life through recovery and his stage, feature film and television success. Between 2003 and 2006, Godshow had sold-out runs at Second City Chicago and the Improv Olympics,[1] as well as sold-out performances at the Beverley Arts Center in 2003[2] and 2004. It was featured on WTTW's Artbeat Chicago, was a Chicago Reader "Theatre Critic's Choice" in 2004,[3] and was number two in the Chicago Sun Times "Top Ten Cool Things to Do" in January 2004.[4] References Shellberg, Tim (September 19, 2010). "Beverly comic brings North Side laughs to South Side". NWI Times. Archived from the original on January 30, 2013. Retrieved May 29, 2018. Shellberg, Tim (November 26, 2004). "Playing with God". nwiti

American dramatists and playwrights

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American theatre directors

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American comedians

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Strange Brew (soundtrack)

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Strange Brew (soundtrack)

Strange Brew is the soundtrack album to the 1983 cult comedy film, Strange Brew. It was released in August 1983 by PolyGram and Anthem Records of Canada (ANR 1-1042). (Full title: The Adventures of Bob and Doug McKenzie Strange Brew Excerpts from the Original Soundtrack). Unlike most soundtrack tie-ins, the album featured continuing comedy sketches by the title duo, Bob and Doug McKenzie. Most of the album was sketches and film dialogue, while the music sampling was usually accompanied by the characters' commentary. The main title theme was performed by Thomas' brother, Ian Thomas. The album was produced by Marc Giacomelli, Rick Shurman and Ian Thomas. The album was only available for a short amount of time and currently remains out of print. This was the last album released by the duo.[1][2][3] Awards The soundtrack won the Juno Award (Canadian-style Grammy) for Best Comedy Album in 1984. Bob and Doug accepted the award in person at the awards ceremony, held 5 December 1984, which also happened to be hoste

1980s comedy albums

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Anthem Records albums

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1983 albums

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The Great White North (album)

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The Great White North (album)

The Great White North is a Canadian comedy album by the fictional television characters Bob and Doug McKenzie (portrayed by actors Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas), released in 1981 by Anthem Records (ANR-1-1036) and distributed in the United States by Mercury Records (SRM-1-4034). The title is a popular nickname for Canada; the nickname was used for the title of a Second City Television (a.k.a. SCTV) sketch featuring the Bob and Doug characters. This album was released as a tie-in with SCTV at the height of the popularity of Bob and Doug, and a screenshot from the show was used on the album cover. Sales and charting At least one million copies of the album were sold in North America, 350,000 of these in Canada alone, which earned a triple-platinum certification from the Canadian Recording Industry Association.[1][2] The Great White North entered the RPM Canadian album charts at #3 on 12 December 1981[3] and rose to the #1 position the following week where it remained until 23 January 1982.[4][5] Overall, RPM

Second City Television

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1980s comedy albums

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Anthem Records albums

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M.I.'s Westside Comedy Theater

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M.I.'s Westside Comedy Theater

M.I.'s Westside Comedy Theater (Formerly Westside Eclectic[1] ) is a comedy club, theater, bar, and comedy training center located in Santa Monica, California.[2] Company history In 1998, six improvisers from the improv group Mission IMPROVable at UMASS Amherst moved to Chicago, Illinois to train and perform.[3] By the year 2000, the group began touring their short form comedy show and in 2001 they performed at NACA (National Association for Campus Activities). They began performing shows at colleges all across the country. Soon thereafter, the group grew, hiring more improvisers so that they could perform more widely, travelling in their van nicknamed "Vanarky".[4] In 2002 the first handful of M.I. performers came out to Los Angeles, California to develop a sketch pilot for MTV, but were not picked up in favor of Human Giant. However, they continued to be permanent fixtures on many of LA's most popular comedy stages.[5] M.I.'s Westside Theater Entrance in Santa Monica, California The theater was open

NPOV disputes from January 2014

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Tourist attractions in Santa Monica, California

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Theatre companies in Los Angeles

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Paul McDowell (actor)

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Paul McDowell (actor)

Paul William McDowell (15 August 1931 – 2 May 2016) was an English actor and writer who appeared in numerous television productions over a 40-year period.[1] Early life and career After leaving school, he trained to be a painter at Chelsea Art College. He later attended St Edmund Hall, Oxford. In the early 1960s as "Whispering" Paul McDowell he was a vocalist with the British 1920s-style jazz band The Temperance Seven, who had a No. 1 hit in Britain. He was a member of the pop group 'Guggenheim' which he formed with Granada TV producer and singer Chris Pye, and guitarist Jules Burns. The album Guggenheim was released in 1972 on Indigo Records, and distributed by the British Decca label. He worked at the Establishment Club as an actor/writer, then became a member of the improvisational group the Second City in the United States and was a writer on The Frost Report. Television actor His television roles include: Mr. Collinson, a sour-faced prison officer in Porridge, Churchill’s butler in Winston Churchill:

Alumni of St Edmund Hall, Oxford

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The Second City

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Male actors from London

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My Talk Show

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My Talk Show

My Talk Show is a daily comedic parody talk/variety television program that ran in first-run syndication from September 1990 to March 1991 in the United States and Canada. The series was produced by SCTV Productions, Imagine Entertainment and MCA Television. Details The series, set in the fictional town of Derby, Wisconsin ("The Hat Capital of the World"), featured a local talk show aptly titled "My Talk Show", which was created by housewife and talk television fan Jennifer Bass, which aired on cable access. The program became a hit with viewers, leading to the series being picked up for syndication. The shows' setting took place in Bass' home with the garage being converted into an area for the studio audience, since the local television station in Bass' home town (possibly Milwaukee, since a channel 65 was circled as the station in the credits that showed a newspaper TV listings that also featured actual TV channels from Madison, Rockford and Chicago) could not accommodate any space for the production, so

Second City Television

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1990s American television talk shows

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1990s American satirical television series

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The Old Fire Hall

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The Old Fire Hall

The Old Fire Hall in 2007 The Old Fire Hall is the name given to the original home of The Second City company in Toronto, and it is located at 110 Lombard Street. The company performed there from 1977 until 1997, when it moved to 56 Blue Jays Way (in 2005, the company moved to 51 Mercer Street). Dan Aykroyd, John Candy, Joe Flaherty, Eugene Levy, Andrea Martin, Mike Myers, Catherine O'Hara, Gilda Radner, Martin Short and Dave Thomas, among others, all got their starts there. From 2001 until 2011, the Old Fire Hall was the home of Gilda's Club Toronto. Named after Gilda Radner, who had performed with Second City at the Old Fire Hall prior to joining Saturday Night Live, Gilda's Club is a support group and meeting place for people living with cancer. In 2012, the Old Fire Hall became the new home of the Complections College of Makeup Art and Design.[1] References "Everything old is new again - The Old Fire Hall returns to its creative roots as the NEW home of Complections College of Makeup Art and Desi

Defunct fire stations in Canada

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Comedy clubs in Canada

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Theatres in Toronto

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The Second City Detroit

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The Second City Detroit

The Second City Detroit was a comedy theatre and training center located in the Detroit suburb Novi, Michigan. It was the Second City's third mainstage theatre in North America following the Second City Chicago and Toronto.[1] Originally established in September 1993 in downtown Detroit, Michigan,[1] the theatre relocated to a strip mall in Novi in 2005, where it remained until it was disbanded in 2009. The original downtown Detroit theater, within the Hockeytown Cafe complex, is now named the City Theater (Detroit), and the Novi location is now named the Andiamo Novi Theatre. Notable alumni (1993) Colin Ferguson (Eureka) (1993) Jerry C. Minor (SNL, Mr. Show) (1993) Suzy Nakamura (The West Wing, Curb Your Enthusiasm) (1993) Angela Shelton (Frangela, Best Week Ever) (1995) Joshua Funk (Wild 'N Out) (1996) Larry Joe Campbell (According to Jim) (1997) Keegan-Michael Key (MADtv, The Planet's Funniest Animals, Key & Peele) (1998) Nyima Funk (Wild 'N Out, Thank God You're Here) (1998) Marc Evan Jack

Michigan articles missing geocoordinate data

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Tourist attractions in Oakland County, Michigan

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Ended in 2009 in Michigan

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The Second City's Next Comedy Legend

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The Second City's Next Comedy Legend

The Second City's Next Comedy Legend was a summer reality show that aired on Canada's CBC Television in 2007. Contestants improvise and create characters for their chance to win a spot on the Second City Canadian Touring Company. Judges are Joe Flaherty, Mick Napier, Dave Thomas and Elvira Kurt and the show is hosted by Trish Stratus. Current Second City Toronto performers Matt Baram, Paul Bates, Anand Rajaram and Naomi Snieckus act as mentors. The show is co-executive produced by Second City CEO Andrew Alexander and producer Morgan Elliot.[1] Auditions for the 2007 show took place March 20 in Vancouver, March 24 in Calgary, March 27 in Halifax and April 4 in Toronto. The show premiered on July 10, 2007. See also The Second City Second City Television Reality television References "Second City's Next Comedy Legend Announces Stars" (PDF). CBC News. Retrieved 2007-03-23. External links The Second City Official Website Official Myspace Page The Second City'sNext Comedy Legend on IMDb

Second City Television

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2007 Canadian television series debuts

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2007 Canadian television series endings

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Second City Television

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Second City Television

Second City Television, commonly shortened to SCTV, is a Canadian television sketch comedy show that ran between 1976 and 1984. It was created as an offshoot from Toronto's Second City troupe. It is a rare example of a Canadian show that moved successfully to American TV. SCTV Network is available on terrestrial network, cable, and satellite. Premise The show's premise is the broadcast day of a fictitious TV station (later network) in the town of Melonville. Melonville's location is left unspecified; the very earliest episodes imply it is in Canada, but most later episodes place it in the US. A typical episode of SCTV presents a compendium of programming seen on the station throughout its broadcast day. A given episode could contain SCTV news broadcasts, sitcoms, dramas, movies, talk shows, kid shows, commercial send-ups hawking nonexistent products, and game shows. Several "shows" are seen regularly on SCTV, including SCTV News; soap opera The Days of the Week; late night movie features Monster Chiller Ho

Cinemax original programming

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Second City Television

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Cultural depictions of Indira Gandhi

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The Players Workshop

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The Players Workshop

Created in 1971 by Josephine Forsberg, The Players Workshop was Chicago's only official school of improvisation for over a decade.[1] Although it was never officially a part of The Second City cabaret theater, The Players Workshop was often referred to as Players Workshop Of The Second City, due to the school's close affiliation with the famous sketch comedy stage. From 1971 through the mid-1990s, performers flocked to The Players Workshop to study improv with Josephine Forsberg, Linnea Forsberg, Martin de Maat, or one of the school's many other instructors, in the hopes of eventually getting onto The Second City mainstage.[2] Players Workshop was also one of Chicago's largest family entertainment production companies, producing original plays and musicals for The Children's Theater of The Second City for over 30 years. Its production of the one-act musical Knat Scatt Private Eye later went on to be expanded into a full Broadway-style two-act musical which was mounted at The Theater Building and featured an

1970s in comedy

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1980s in comedy

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1990s in comedy

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Tim Sims Playhouse

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Tim Sims Playhouse

The Tim Sims Playhouse was the second stage or cabaret space located within The Second City's new building in Toronto, after the company moved from The Old Fire Hall on Lombard Street. The theatre was named for Tim Sims, a well-known and respected member of the Toronto theatre and comedy communities as an actor, improviser, writer and director. It no longer exists since financial troubles forced The Second City to close its theatre and move, but they plan to re-open a second theatre and name it for Tim Sims. Sims was also widely known for helping younger comedians get their start, and had the Tim Sims Award named for him as well. The award is given out annually to Toronto's most promising new comedy act, and when the Tim Sims Theatre was open the annual Fresh Meat showcase (for the award) took place there, with the actual awards show (produced by The Comedy Network) taking place on the main stage. For almost its entire run in Toronto, Tony n' Tina's Wedding was produced in the Tim Sims Playhouse.

The Second City

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Amy Poehler

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Amy Poehler

Amy Meredith Poehler ((born September 16, 1971) is an American actress, comedian, writer, producer, and director. After studying improv at Chicago's Second City and ImprovOlympic in the early 1990s, she co-founded the improvisational-comedy troupe Upright Citizens Brigade. The group moved to New York City in 1996 where their act became a half-hour sketch comedy series on Comedy Central in 1998. Along with other members of the comedy group, Poehler is a founder of the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre. In 2001 she joined the cast of the NBC television series Saturday Night Live. She became co-anchor of SNL's Weekend Update in 2004 until she left the series in 2008 to star as Leslie Knope in the NBC sitcom Parks and Recreation. She has also performed voice acting roles including the lead role in Inside Out, as well as parts in Shrek the Third, and Horton Hears a Who!. Poehler is an executive producer on the televisions series Welcome to Sweden, Broad City, Difficult People, and Russian Doll. In December 2015,

Screenwriters from Massachusetts

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People from Highnam

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Feminist comedians

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Ashley Nicole Black

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Ashley Nicole Black

Ashley Nicole Black (born June 15, 1985)[1][2] is an American comedian, actress, and writer from Los Angeles, California. In 2016, she became a writer and correspondent for Full Frontal with Samantha Bee.[3][4][5] She left the show in February 2019 to write and act in A Black Lady Sketch Show on HBO. Early life Black was born in Los Angeles, and grew up in Walnut, California, a suburb of said city.[6] Black graduated from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in 2007 with a degree in theatre arts. She then attended Northwestern University, where she earned a master's degree in performance studies.[7] Black was four years into a PhD program at Northwestern University when she decided to drop out and pursue her dream of working in comedy.[7] Career Black's comedy career began at the Second City, where she first attended an improv class that her parents paid for her to attend.[4][7] Black earned an Emmy for Outstanding Writing For A Variety Special in 2017 for her work as one of the writers on Not the

American women writers

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People from Walnut, California

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University of California, Santa Cruz alumni

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Kelly Leonard

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Kelly Leonard

Kelly Leonard (born 1966) is an author, public speaker and theater producer. He is the son of radio personality Roy Leonard. The Second City In 1988, Leonard started working in the kitchen of The Second City, a Chicago comedy theater.[1] He later became the executive vice president and president of theatricals and oversaw and lead the expansion of the comedy troupe in the 1990s and 2000s.[1] Leonard was also responsible for hiring Tina Fey, Stephen Colbert, Amy Poehler, and Steve Carell to perform there.[1][2] In 2015, he stepped down from the day-to-day management of The Second City.[1] In 2017, Leonard became the "executive director of insights and applied improvisation", overseeing a partnership with the Booth School of Business (University of Chicago) to study behavioral science through the lens of improvisation. Writing and other endeavors In 2015, Leonard's first book "Yes And", co-written with Tom Yorton, was published by Harper Collins. He also hosts the podcast, "Getting to Yes, And" for Secon

American producers

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The Second City

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American writers

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Jenny Hagel

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Jenny Hagel

Jenny Hagel is an American comedian and comedy writer. She is currently a writer and performer for Late Night with Seth Meyers, where she is known for performing on the recurring segment "Jokes Seth Can't Tell", along with host Seth Meyers and fellow writer-performer Amber Ruffin.[1][2][3] Career Hagel received a MFA in Writing for the Screen and Stage from the Northwestern University School of Communication in 2009, where she was taught by David E. Tolchinsky.[1] She performed improv and sketch comedy at The Second City in Chicago for five years before moving to New York City. In addition to Late Night with Seth Meyers, she has written for multiple other comedy TV shows, including Impractical Jokers, the Big Gay Sketch Show, Lady Gaga & The Muppets Holiday Spectacular, and the MTV show 10 on Top, for which she was formerly the head writer.[4] Personal life Hagel is of Puerto Rican descent. She lives in Brooklyn, NY[5] with her wife Jennifer Vanasco and their son.[6] References "Alums in late-ni

Late Night with Seth Meyers

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LGBT Hispanic and Latino American people

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Late Night (NBC)

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The Second City Training Center

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The Second City Training Center

The Second City Training Center was founded in the mid-1980s to facilitate the growing demand for workshops and instruction from the world famous The Second City theatre. Training Centers are located in Chicago,[1] Toronto[2] and Los Angeles.[3] Satellite centers formerly existed in Metro Detroit, Las Vegas, Cleveland and New York City.[4] History The centers offer a variety of classes for different ages. Programs of study include improvisation, comedy writing, acting & scene study, stand-up, clowning, music improvisation, and teen and youth courses. The flagship program is the Conservatory which trains performers in the Second City style of creating sketch comedy through a process of improvisational techniques. The Conservatory requires an audition to enter the program and culminates with a show written and performed for several weeks by the graduating class. Chicago Conservatory Graduates are eligible to audition and perform with the Training Center House Teams. Each center also offers specialized w

Education in Chicago

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The Second City

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Education in Toronto

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John Candy

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John Candy

John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994)[1] was a Canadian actor and comedian known mainly for his work in Hollywood films. Candy rose to fame as a member of the Toronto branch of the Second City and its related Second City Television series, and through his appearances in such comedy films as Stripes, Splash, Cool Runnings, Summer Rental, Home Alone, The Great Outdoors, Spaceballs, and Uncle Buck, as well as more dramatic roles in Only the Lonely and JFK. One of his most renowned onscreen performances was as Del Griffith, the talkative shower-curtain ring salesman in the John Hughes comedy Planes, Trains and Automobiles. In addition to his work as an actor, Candy was a co-owner of the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League from 1991 until his death, and the team won the 1991 Grey Cup under his ownership. While filming the Western parody Wagons East, Candy died of a heart attack in Durango, Mexico on March 4, 1994, aged 43. His final two films, Wagons East and Canadian Bacon, are ded

The Second City

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20th-century Canadian comedians

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Deaths from myocardial infarction

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Robin Duke

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Robin Duke

Robin Duke (born March 13, 1954) is a Canadian actress, comedian, and voice actress. Duke may be best known for her work on the television comedy series SCTV and, later, Saturday Night Live. She co-founded Women Fully Clothed, a sketch comedy troupe which toured Canada. She teaches writing as a faculty member at Humber College in Toronto and has a recurring role playing Wendy Kurtz in the sitcom Schitt's Creek.[1] Life and career Duke was born in Etobicoke, Ontario.[2] She went to high school with Catherine O'Hara at Burnhamthorpe Collegiate Institute in Etobicoke; they first met in homeroom class. In 1976 Duke joined O'Hara as part of the Toronto version of the stage comedy troupe The Second City, while also making several appearances in the troupe's television series, SCTV. Duke became a regular on SCTV from 1980–81. She joined the cast of Saturday Night Live in 1981 when O'Hara suddenly dropped out of that show. NBC's Saturday Night Live (SNL) (1981–1984) Duke was an actor and writer on SNL from 1981

The Second City

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Canadian expatriate actresses in the United States

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21st-century Canadian actresses

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Amy Sedaris

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Amy Sedaris

Amy Louise Sedaris ([1] born March 29, 1961) is an American actress, comedian, and writer. She is the creator and star of her show At Home with Amy Sedaris on truTV, in which she plays various characters and focuses on her love of crafts.[2] She voices the character Princess Carolyn in the Netflix animated series BoJack Horseman. Her breakout role was Jerri Blank in the Comedy Central television series Strangers with Candy. Early life Sedaris was born in Endicott, New York to Sharon Elizabeth (née Leonard) and Louis Harry "Lou" Sedaris,[3] and grew up in Raleigh, North Carolina, with her five siblings. Her father is of Greek descent and her mother was an Anglo-American.[4] Her family was Greek Orthodox .[5][6] Her older brother is author David Sedaris. As a teenager, Sedaris worked at her local Winn-Dixie supermarket. She would make fake announcements over the loudspeaker, and the head cashier would threaten to fire her. After work, she egged the cashier's car in protest. Later, as a cocktail waitress at

Comedians from North Carolina

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The Second City

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Actors from Binghamton, New York

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Eugene Levy

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Eugene Levy

Eugene Levy, CM (born December 17, 1946) is a Canadian actor, comedian, producer, director, and writer. He is the only actor to have appeared in all eight of the American Pie films, in his role as Noah Levenstein. He often plays flustered and unconventional figures. He is a regular collaborator of actor-director Christopher Guest, appearing in and co-writing four of his films, commencing with Waiting for Guffman (1996). Levy received the Governor General's Performing Arts Award, Canada's highest honour in the performing arts, in 2008.[1] He was appointed to the Order of Canada on June 30, 2011.[2] He currently stars as Johnny Rose in Schitt's Creek, a comedy series that he co-created with his son and co-star, Dan Levy. In 2019, he was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. Early life Levy was born to a Jewish family[3] in Hamilton, Ontario. His mother was a homemaker and his father was a foreman at an automobile plant.[4] He went to Westdale Secondary School a

The Second City

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Best Actor in a Comedy Series Canadian Screen A...

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Canadian people of Russian-Jewish descent

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Andrea Martin

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Andrea Martin

Andrea Louise Martin (born January 15, 1947) is a Canadian-American actress, singer, author and comedian,[1][2] best known for her work in the television series SCTV and Great News. She has appeared in films such as Black Christmas (1974), Wag the Dog (1997), Hedwig and the Angry Inch (2001), My Big Fat Greek Wedding (2002), My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (2016), and Little Italy (2018). She has also lent her voice to the animated films Anastasia (1997), The Rugrats Movie (1998) and Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius (2001). Martin has been equally prolific in the world of theater, winning Tony Awards for both My Favorite Year and the 2013 revival of Pippin. Martin also appeared on Broadway in Candide, Oklahoma!, Fiddler on the Roof, Young Frankenstein, Exit the King and Act One. She has received five nominations for the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical, more than any other actress in the award's history. She received her first nomination for the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Play for the 201

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Ethnic Armenian actresses

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Canadian people of Armenian descent

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Harold Ramis

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Harold Ramis

Harold Allen Ramis (November 21, 1944 – February 24, 2014) was an American actor, comedian, director and writer. His best-known film acting roles were as Egon Spengler in Ghostbusters (1984) and Ghostbusters II (1989) and Russell Ziskey in Stripes (1981); he also co-wrote those films. As a director, his films include the comedies Caddyshack (1980), National Lampoon's Vacation (1983), Groundhog Day (1993), and Analyze This (1999). Ramis was the original head writer of the television series SCTV, on which he also performed, as well as a co-writer of Groundhog Day and National Lampoon's Animal House (1978). The final film that he wrote, produced, directed, and acted in was Year One (2009). Ramis's films influenced subsequent generations of comedians comedy writers actors and singers.[1] Filmmakers and actors including Jay Roach, Jake Kasdan, Adam Sandler, Peter and Bobby Farrelly have cited his films as among their favorites.[1] Along with Danny Rubin, he won the BAFTA Award for Best Original Screenplay for Gro

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Screenwriters from Illinois

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Jewish American comedians

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Catherine O'Hara

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Catherine O'Hara

Catherine Anne O'Hara OC (born March 4, 1954) is a Canadian-American actress, writer, and comedian. She first drew notice as an actress in 1974 as a member of The Second City improvisational comedy troupe in Toronto. She landed her first significant television role in 1975 starring opposite John Candy and Dan Aykroyd in the main cast of the Canadian sitcom Coming Up Rosie (1975–1978). The following year, she and Candy began work on the sketch comedy series Second City Television (1976–84), where she drew critical acclaim for both her work as a comedic actress and writer, winning a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series in 1981. O'Hara has appeared in several films directed by Tim Burton, beginning with the role of Delia Deetz in the 1988 fantasy comedy film Beetlejuice. Other roles she has portrayed in Burton films include the voices of Sally/Shock in The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) and Susan Frankenstein in Frankenweenie (2012). O'Hara has also frequently collaborated with d

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Best Actress in a Comedy Series Canadian Screen...

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Comedians from Toronto

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Ryan Stiles

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Ryan Stiles

Ryan Lee Stiles (born April 22, 1959) is an American-Canadian actor, comedian, and producer whose work is often associated with improvisational comedy. He is best known for his work on the American and British versions of Whose Line Is It Anyway?, and the role of Lewis Kiniski on The Drew Carey Show. He also played Herb Melnick on the CBS comedy Two and a Half Men and was a performer on the show Drew Carey's Improv-A-Ganza. Early life and career The youngest of five children, Ryan Stiles was born in Seattle, Washington, to Canadian parents, Irene and Sonny Stiles. He grew up with his mother, a homemaker, and his father, a supervisor at a Vancouver-based Canadian fish processing plant. When he was 10, his family moved to Vancouver, British Columbia. Ryan Stiles attended R.C. Palmer Junior Secondary School and Richmond Senior Secondary in Richmond, British Columbia. Although he was a good student, Stiles has admitted that "being a high-school senior gave [him] too much freedom." He got so carried away with hi

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20th-century Canadian comedians

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21st-century Canadian comedians

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Joe Flaherty

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Joe Flaherty

Joe Flaherty (born June 21, 1941) is an American actor, writer and comedian. He is best known for his work on the Canadian sketch comedy SCTV from 1976 to 1984 (on which he also served as a writer), and as Harold Weir on Freaks and Geeks. Biography Joseph O'Flaherty[1] was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, but moved to Chicago, where he started his comedy career with the Second City Theater as Joe O'Flaherty. Along with several other Second City performers, he began appearing on the National Lampoon Radio Hour from 1973 to 1974. After seven years in Chicago, he moved to Toronto to help establish the Toronto Second City theatre troupe.[2] During those years, he was one of the original writer/performers on SCTV, where he spent eight years on the show, playing such characters as Big Jim McBob (of Farm Film Report fame), Count Floyd/Floyd Robertson, and station owner/manager Guy Caballero who goes around in a wheelchair only for respect. Other memorable Flaherty characterizations included emotional talk show h

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Shelley Long

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Shelley Long

Shelley Lee Long (born August 23, 1949) is an American actress and comedian. She is best known for her role as Diane Chambers on the hit sitcom Cheers,[1] for which she received five Emmy nominations, winning in 1983 for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series.[2] She won two Golden Globe Awards for the role.[3] Long reprised her role as Diane Chambers in four episodes of the spin-off Frasier, for which she received an additional guest star Emmy nomination. In 2009, she began playing a recurring role as DeDe Pritchett on the ABC comedy series Modern Family. Long has also starred in several films, notably Night Shift (1982), Irreconcilable Differences (1984), The Money Pit (1986), Outrageous Fortune (1987), Hello Again (1987), Troop Beverly Hills (1989), The Brady Bunch Movie (1995), A Very Brady Sequel (1996), and Dr. T & the Women (2000). Early life Shelley Long was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1949.[4] She is the daughter of Ivadine, a school teacher, and Leland Long, who worked in the rubber

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Northwestern University School of Communication...

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Actors from Fort Wayne, Indiana

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Jayne Eastwood

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Jayne Eastwood

Jayne Eastwood (born December 17, 1946), also credited as Jane Easton or Jane Eastwood, is a Canadian film, voice, and television actress. Early life Eastwood was born and raised in Hoggs Hollow of York Mills Road, in Toronto, Ontario. Her childhood was spent at a cottage in Muskoka, skiing in Collingwood, Ontario during winter and attending Northern Secondary School. She had attended a short class at the York Mills Collegiate Institute.[1] Career Eastwood's career was initially a painter. She ventured into acting when a commercial artist and friend of hers had invited her to play a role in a local play, Suddenly, Last Summer. A teacher, who was in the audience and who turned out to be an acting agent, realized her potential.[2] Her very first noticeable acting roles were in various commercials for Sani Flush, Scope, Facelle Royale, Paris Pat, Toyota, Wintario, and Molson Golden gang commercials with friends Gilda Radner and Andrea Martin.[1] A veteran character actor who has appeared in films since 197

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Comedians from Toronto

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Canadian sketch comedians

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Debra McGrath

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Debra McGrath

Debra McGrath (born July 5, 1954) is a Canadian actress and comedian. Education Debra McGrath was born in Toronto in 1954. She studied theatre at Ryerson University. Career McGrath first started her career with three years as a member of The Second City Toronto, Ontario, from 1983-1985,[1] where she was a writer and actress, and eventually a director.[2] She was best known for a take-off of Marilyn Monroe,[3] and the song Condoms are a Girl's Best Friend.[4] During the late 1980s, she appeared with Second City at anniversary, comedy festival and Club Soda performances.[3][4] In 1987, McGrath starred in Spoof, a comedy pilot written by Brian Cooke and Perry Rosemond.[5] In 1989, she had a major role in Allan King's film Termini Station.[6][7] She also appeared in Eugene Levy's 1992 TV film Partners 'N Love, in which she played a lawyer whose client's divorce was found to be invalid.[8] In 1990, with Linda Kash, McGrath co-created My Talk Show,[9][10] a sitcom featuring a talk show broadcast from the host'

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Colin Mochrie

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Colin Mochrie

Colin Andrew Mochrie (born November 30, 1957) is a Scottish-born Canadian actor, writer, producer and improvisational comedian, best known for his appearances on the British and US versions of the improvisational TV show Whose Line Is It Anyway? Mochrie honed his comedic talents with Vancouver's TheatreSports League and Toronto's Second City theatre. He has appeared in dozens of television series and films, as well as theatrical shows. With his wife, comedian Debra McGrath, Mochrie co-wrote, co-produced and co-starred in Getting Along Famously and She's the Mayor. He has written for numerous other series and events, and wrote and performed for the White House Correspondents' Association dinner. Mochrie's work has been recognized with numerous awards, including two Canadian Comedy Awards, a Gemini Award, and a Writers Guild of Canada award. He was named Canadian Comedy Person of the Year at the 2013 Canadian Comedy Awards. Early life Colin Mochrie was born in Kilmarnock, Scotland, the oldest of three child

Canadian male voice actors

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Rick Moranis

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Rick Moranis

Frederick Allan "Rick" Moranis (born April 18, 1953), is a Canadian actor, comedian, screenwriter, and film director. He appeared in the sketch comedy series Second City Television (SCTV) in the 1980s and several Hollywood films, including Strange Brew (1983), Ghostbusters (1984) and Ghostbusters II (1989), Little Shop of Horrors (1986), Spaceballs (1987), Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989, and its 1992 and 1997 sequels), Parenthood (1989), My Blue Heaven (1990), and The Flintstones (1994). In 1997, Moranis began a long break from acting to dedicate his time to his two children as a widower.[3] He wouldn't appear in a live-action film for decades thereafter, although he provided voice-over work for a few animated films, notably Disney's Brother Bear (2003) and also released comedy albums and made appearances at fan conventions. Following his nearly 23 year hiatus from live-action films, it was confirmed in early 2020 that Moranis has signed to appear in a new sequel to Honey, I Shrunk the Kids. Early life Mor

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Canadian people of Hungarian-Jewish descent

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Bob and Doug McKenzie

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Bob and Doug McKenzie

Bob and Doug McKenzie are a pair of fictional Canadian brothers who hosted "Great White North", a sketch which was introduced on SCTV for the show's third season when it moved to CBC Television in 1980. Bob is played by Rick Moranis and Doug is played by Dave Thomas. Although created originally as filler to both satisfy and mock network Canadian content demands, the duo became a pop culture phenomenon in both Canada and the United States. The characters were later revived for an animated series, Bob & Doug, which premiered on Global in 2009.[1] History "Great White North" (originally known as "Kanadian Korner") is a panel show that played upon Canadian stereotypes. Bob and Doug, two dim-witted beer-swilling brothers wearing heavy winter clothing and tuques, would comment on various elements of Canadian life and culture, frequently employing the interjection "Eh?" and derisively calling each other "hoser." Among the topics discussed were snow routes, the Canadian-built robot arm on the Space Shuttle, t

Television characters introduced in 1980

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Bob and Doug McKenzie

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Juno Award for Comedy Album of the Year winners

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Nia Vardalos

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Nia Vardalos

Antonia Eugenia "Nia" Vardalos (born September 24, 1962; Greek: Νία Βαρντάλος) is a Canadian-American actress, screenwriter, and producer. Her most notable work is the 2002 film My Big Fat Greek Wedding, which was based on a one-woman stage play she dramatized and in which she starred. Early and personal life Vardalos was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, on September 24, 1962. She is the daughter of Greek Canadian parents Doreen Christakis, a bookkeeper and homemaker, and Constantine "Gus" Vardalos, a land developer who was born in Kalavryta, Greece.[1][2][3] She attended St. George School and Shaftesbury High School in Winnipeg and Ryerson University[4] in Toronto. She married the American actor Ian Gomez in September 1995.[5] Gomez converted to Greek Orthodoxy prior to marrying her. She became a U.S. citizen in 1999. In 2008, they adopted a daughter and named her Ilaria. Vardalos posted an advice column about the adoption process in The Huffington Post.[6] It was announced on July 3, 2018, that Vardalos had f

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Canadian women screenwriters

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Deborah Theaker

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Deborah Theaker

Deborah Theaker (born April 6, 1964) is a Canadian actress.[1] Theaker was born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. She is best known as Casey Edison on the Lucasfilm science fiction satire Maniac Mansion which ran from 1990 until 1993. In 1985, Theaker graduated from the University of Saskatchewan and later moved to Toronto, where she became a member of The Second City's resident company. Since 1987, She has played roles in various television shows and movies, including The Kids in the Hall, Joey, Howie Mandel's Sunny Skies, Desperate Housewives, Rat Race, Entourage, Bones, and Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events as well as the Stargate SG-1 season-eight episode entitled "Citizen Joe." She is a member of Christopher Guest's cinematic repertory company and has appeared in four films and multiple commercials for director Guest. Theaker guest starred in the third season of the acclaimed sitcom Husbands.[2] Awards and accolades Best Supporting Actress nomination at the Down Beach Film Festival for

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People from Moose Jaw

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Actresses from Saskatchewan

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Dave Thomas (actor)

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Dave Thomas (actor)

David William Thomas (born May 20, 1949) is a Canadian comedian, actor and television writer. He is best known for portraying Doug McKenzie on SCTV as well as in the film Strange Brew, which he also co-directed. Early life David William Thomas was born May 20, 1949, in St. Catharines, Ontario. He is the eldest son of Moreen Duff (Muir), a Scottish-born church organist for thirty years, and composer of church music, and John E. Thomas (1926–1996), a Welsh-born medical ethicist, head of the Philosophy Department at McMaster University, and the author of several books. His younger brother Ian is a Canadian singer-songwriter. The family moved to Durham, North Carolina, where his father attended Duke University and earned a PhD in Philosophy. Thomas attended George Watts and Moorehead elementary schools. The family moved back to Dundas, Ontario in 1961 where Thomas attended Dundas District high school, and later graduated with an honours Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature from McMaster University in H

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Canadian male comedians

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Howard Alk

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Howard Alk

Howard Alk (1930 – January 1982) was a Chicago-based filmmaker, and an original co-founder of The Second City theater troupe. In the 1960s he began to work in film with the Chicago Film Group, filming and directing documentaries, completing American Revolution 2 (1969) and The Murder of Fred Hampton (1971). He also collaborated for years with singer/songwriter Bob Dylan, producing films with him through 1978. Early life and education Born and raised in Chicago, Howard Alk attended local public schools. An advanced student, he enrolled in the University of Chicago (U of C) at the age of 14.[1] He was a member of the student-run Compass Players cabaret troupe, with Elaine May and Mike Nichols]]. Career After the troupe disbanded, Alk joined fellow Compass players and U of C graduates Paul Sills and Bernie Sahlins as a co-founder of The Second City.[2][1][3][4] They developed this theater troupe, based on improvisation, from Viola Spolin's theatre games. Alk had previously worked with Spolin's son, Sills, at

Film directors from Illinois

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American filmmakers

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Alan Arkin

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Alan Arkin

Alan Wolf Arkin (born March 26, 1934) is an American actor, director and screenwriter. With a film career spanning eight decades, Arkin is known for his performances in The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming (1966), Wait Until Dark (1967), The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (1968), Popi (1969), Catch-22 (1970), The In-Laws (1979), Edward Scissorhands (1990), The Rocketeer (1991), Glengarry Glen Ross (1992), Thirteen Conversations About One Thing (2001), Little Miss Sunshine (2006), Get Smart (2008), Sunshine Cleaning (2008) and Argo (2012). He has been nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor twice, for his performances in The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming and The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter. He won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Little Miss Sunshine[1] and received a Best Supporting Actor nomination for his performance in Argo. Early life Arkin was born in Brooklyn, New York City, on March 26, 1934, the son of David I. Arkin, a painter and writer, a

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Male actors of Russian descent

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Male actors of German descent

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Barbara Harris (actress)

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Barbara Harris (actress)

Barbara Densmoor Harris (July 25, 1935 – August 21, 2018) was an American actress. She appeared in such movies as A Thousand Clowns, Plaza Suite, Nashville, Family Plot, Freaky Friday, Peggy Sue Got Married, and Grosse Pointe Blank. Harris won a Tony Award and was nominated for an Academy Award. She also received four Golden Globe Award nominations. Early life Harris was born in Evanston, Illinois, the daughter of Natalie (née Densmoor), a pianist, and Oscar Graham Harris, an arborist who later became a businessman. In her youth, Harris attended Wilbur Wright College. She began her stage career as a teenager at the Playwrights Theatre in Chicago. Her fellow players included Edward Asner, Elaine May and Mike Nichols. She was also a member of the Compass Players, the first ongoing improvisational theatre troupe in the United States, directed by Paul Sills, to whom she was married at that time.[2] Though the Compass Players closed in disarray, a second theatre directed by Sills called The Second City opened i

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Wilbur Wright College alumni

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Bernard Sahlins

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Bernard Sahlins

Bernard "Bernie" Sahlins (August 20, 1922 – June 16, 2013) was an American writer, director and comedian best known as a founder of The Second City improvisational comedy troupe with Paul Sills and Howard Alk in 1959.[1] Sahlins also opened the Second City Theatre in Toronto in 1973. Biography Born in Chicago, Sahlins graduated from University of Chicago in 1943. His brother is anthropologist Marshall Sahlins. When Sahlins received an honorary doctorate from Columbia College Chicago in 2006, theatre department professor Sheldon Patinkin wrote: In 1953, he became a producer of Playwrights Theatre Club, the first professional theater company in Chicago in many years. It featured such budding actors and directors as Ed Asner, Mike Nichols, Elaine May, Paul Sills, and Byrne and Joyce Piven. In 1956, he took over the empty downtown Studebaker Theatre and did a year of plays which included the Chicago premiere of Waiting for Godot and then in 1959, with Paul Sills and Howard Alk, he opened The Second City wher

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Joseph Jefferson Award winners

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American theatre directors

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Martin Short

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Martin Short

Martin Hayter Short OC (born March 26, 1950[1]) is a Canadian-American actor, comedian, singer and writer.[2] He is known for his work on the television programs SCTV and Saturday Night Live. He has starred in comedy films such as Three Amigos (1986), Innerspace (1987), Three Fugitives (1989), Father of the Bride (1991), Pure Luck (1991), Captain Ron (1992), Father of the Bride Part II (1995), Mars Attacks! (1996), Jungle 2 Jungle (1997), and The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause (2006). He created the characters Jiminy Glick and Ed Grimley. In 1999, he won a Tony Award for his lead performance in a Broadway revival of Little Me. Early life Short was born in Hamilton, Ontario, the youngest of five children of Olive Grace (née Hayter; 1913–1968), a concertmistress of the Hamilton Symphony Orchestra,[3] and Charles Patrick Short (1909–1970), a corporate executive with Stelco, a Canadian steel company. He and his siblings were raised as Catholics.[4] He had three older brothers, David (now deceased), Michael,

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Paul Sand

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Paul Sand

Paul Sand (born Paul Stone Sanchez; March 5, 1932)[1] is an American actor and comedian. Background Sand was born Paul Stone Sanchez[2] in Santa Monica, California, United States, in 1932 of Mexican and Russian descent, the son of Ernest Rivera Sanchez, an aerospace tool designer,[3] and Sonia Stone. Career At the age of 11, he started at Viola Spolin's Children's Theatre Company. From here, he attended Los Angeles State College before moving to Paris aged 18. In Paris, Sand met one of his heroes, Marcel Marceau, who was so impressed by his talents that he asked Sand to join his touring mime troupe.[4] In 1960, along with Alan Arkin and others, Sand was a cast member of The Second City improvisational comedy troupe in Chicago. In 1966 he co-starred with Linda Lavin and Jo Anne Worley in the off-Broadway hit production The Mad Show, inspired by Mad Magazine. Sand's film credits include The Hot Rock, The Second Coming of Suzanne (in which he had a sex scene with Sondra Locke), and The Main Event. In 1974-7

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American male actors of Mexican descent

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Hispanic and Latino American male actors

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Paul Sills

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Paul Sills

Paul Silverberg (November 18, 1927 – June 2, 2008), better known as Paul Sills, was an American director and improvisation teacher, and the original director of Chicago's The Second City. Life and career Sills was born Paul Silverberg in Chicago, Illinois, to a family who believed in the teachings of modern-day Judaism. His mother was teacher and writer Viola Spolin, who authored the first book on improvisation techniques, Improvisation for the Theater.[1] Spolin in turn was the student of play therapy theorist Neva Boyd.[2] In 1948, Sills enrolled in the University of Chicago, where he established himself as a director, co-founding Playwright's Theater Club. There, with fellow actors Edward Asner, Byrne Piven and Zohra Lampert,[3] they blended Spolin's improvisational techniques with established theater training. In 1955, Sills and David Shepherd founded the Compass Players, the first improvisational theater in the United States, where he directed Shelley Berman, Mike Nichols and Elaine May.[4] In 1959,

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People from Door County, Wisconsin

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Male actors from Chicago

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Strange Brew

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Strange Brew

Strange Brew (also known as The Adventures of Bob & Doug McKenzie: Strange Brew) is a 1983 Canadian comedy film starring the popular SCTV characters Bob and Doug McKenzie, portrayed by Dave Thomas and Rick Moranis, who also served as co-directors. Co-stars include Max von Sydow, Paul Dooley, Lynne Griffin and Angus MacInnes. Loosely based on elements of Shakespeare's Hamlet, most of the film was shot in Toronto, Scarborough, Kitchener and Hamilton, Ontario. Parts were also filmed in Prince George, British Columbia. Plot Two unemployed brothers, Bob and Doug McKenzie (Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas), place a live mouse in a beer bottle in an attempt to blackmail the local beer store into giving them free Elsinore beer, but are told to take up the matter with management at the Elsinore brewery. The brothers are given jobs on the bottling line inspecting for mice in the bottles. Meanwhile, the evil Brewmeister Smith (Max von Sydow) is perfecting a secret plan to take over the world by placing a mind-contr

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Bob and Doug McKenzie

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Brad Morris

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Brad Morris

Brad Morris (born August 16, 1975) is an American actor and television writer. He starred in Playing House and had recurring roles in Jerry on Cougar Town from 2013 to 2015, for which he also wrote five episodes,[1] Great News from 2017 to 2018 and Dice from 2016 to 2017. Morris was born in Chicago[2] and is a 1998 alumnus of Skidmore College.[3] He was working for The Second City before his TV career, writing and performing in up to eight live shows a week for several years.[1] At The Second City, Morris also co-founded the comedy troupes the Reckoning, Stubs, and Uncle's Brother.[3] References Metz, Nina (February 21, 2013). "Second City vets making it behind scenes". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on February 27, 2019. Retrieved 2019-03-07. Sims, Robert (December 30, 2005). "Be Ready for Anything". Palm Beach Daily News. Retrieved 2019-03-07 – via Newspapers.com. "Alumni comics return for 20th National College Comedy Fest". www.skidmore.edu. Retrieved 2019-03-07. External links

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