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Members of the American Philosophical Society


Myles Cooper

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Myles Cooper

Myles Cooper (1735 – May 1, 1785) was a figure in colonial New York. An Anglican priest, he served as the President of King's College (predecessor of today's Columbia University) from 1763 to 1775, and was a public opponent of the American Revolution. Early life Cooper was educated at The Queen's College, Oxford where he later served as chaplain. Ordained as a priest in the Church of England in 1761, he attracted the influence of several high clergymen, including Thomas Secker, Archbishop of Canterbury, who recommended him for service in the American colonies. Cooper was thereby sent to New York in 1762 to assist Samuel Johnson, president of King's College, which was an Anglican establishment. Cooper was appointed professor of mental and moral philosophy, and a year later he had assumed the college presidency. Presidency of King's College Cooper was chosen to replace his predecessor in the position of College President primarily because the Governors of the institution believed he would be far easier to c

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Donald Berwick

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Donald Berwick

Donald M. Berwick (born September 9, 1946) is a former Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Prior to his work in the administration, he was President and Chief Executive Officer of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement[1] a not-for-profit organization. On July 7, 2010, President Barack Obama appointed Berwick to serve as the Administrator of CMS through a recess appointment. On December 2, 2011, he resigned because of heavy Republican opposition to his appointment and his potential inability to win a confirmation vote.[2] On June 18, 2013, Berwick declared his candidacy for governor of Massachusetts, but lost the Democratic Party nomination to Attorney General Martha Coakley.[3] Berwick has studied the management of health care systems, with emphasis on using scientific methods and evidence-based medicine and comparative effectiveness research to improve the tradeoff among quality, safety, and costs.[4][5][6] Among IHI's projects are online courses for health care profe

Jewish American community activists

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Harvard College alumni

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Roger W. Ferguson Jr.

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Roger W. Ferguson Jr.

Roger W. Ferguson Jr. (born October 28, 1951 in Washington, D.C.) is an American economist, who was Vice Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1999 to 2006, and has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association – College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA) since April, 2008. In June, 2016, Alphabet Inc. appointed Roger W. Ferguson Jr. to its board of directors.[1] Education Ferguson received a B.A. in economics magna cum laude in 1973, a J.D. cum laude in 1979, and a Ph.D. in economics in 1981, all from Harvard University. From 1973 to 1974, he attended Pembroke College at Cambridge University on a Frank Knox Memorial Fellowship. In 2004 Ferguson was elected to an Honorary Fellowship there. In addition, he has honorary degrees from Lincoln College (Illinois),[2] Webster University, Washington and Jefferson College, Michigan State University, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, St. Lawrence University, University of Maryland, Baltim

African-American economists

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African-American politicians

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African-American lawyers

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Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

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Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

Risa J. Lavizzo-Mourey (born 1954) is an American doctor and executive who served as president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation from 2003 to 2017.[1][2] She was the first woman and the first African-American to head the foundation, which has an endowment of about $8 billion and distributes more than $400 million a year.[3] She has been named one of the 100 Most Powerful Women by Forbes several times, and one of The Grio's History Makers in the Making.[4][5][6] She was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2016.[7] Education and early career Born in Seattle, Washington, in 1954, Risa Lavizzo-Mourey attended The Bush School and obtained an undergraduate degree at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, her M.D. at Harvard Medical School and completed her internship and residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. In 1984, she was named a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, and received her Master of Business Admin

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Physicians from Seattle

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People from Seattle

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Jane Mayer

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Jane Mayer

Jane Meredith Mayer[2] (born 1955)[3][4] is an American investigative journalist who has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1995.[1] In recent years, she has written for that publication regarding: money in politics; government prosecution of whistleblowers; the United States Predator drone program; Donald Trump's ghostwriter, Tony Schwartz;[5] and Trump's financial backer, Robert Mercer.[6] In 2016, Mayer's book Dark Money—in which she investigated the history of the right-wing billionaire network centered on the Koch brothers—was published to critical acclaim.[7] Early life and education Mayer was born in New York City.[1] Her mother, Meredith (née Nevins), is a painter, print-maker and former president of the Manhattan Graphics Center. Her father, William Mayer, was a composer.[8] Her paternal great-great-grandfather was Emanuel Lehman, one of the founders of Lehman Brothers. Her maternal grandparents were Mary Fleming (Richardson) and Allan Nevins, a historian and John D. Rockefeller, Jr.'s au

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Journalists from New York City

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People from New York City

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Irene J. Winter

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Irene J. Winter

Irene J. Winter (born 1940 in New York City[1]) is an American art historian. Life BA Barnard College, Anthropology, 1960; MA University of Chicago, Near Eastern Studies, 1967; PhD Columbia University, Art History and Archaeology. She has taught at Queens College, CUNY, 1971-1976, The University of Pennsylvania, 1976-1988, and Harvard University since 1988, chairing the department of Fine Arts from 1993-1996, and served on the Faculty Council, 2006-2009; retired June 2009. Slade Professor, University of Cambridge, 1997.[2] She was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2016.[3] Awards 2009 The Barnard College Medal of Distinction 2005 Mellon Lecturer, The National Gallery of Art, Washington DC 2003-2004 Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study fellows[4] 1983 MacArthur Fellows Program Works On Art in the Ancient Near East, 2 Vols. Brill Academic Publishers, 2010, ISBN 978-90-04-17500-6 Marian Feldman, Jack Cheng, eds. (1 June 2007). Ancient Near Eastern Art in Context: Stu

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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American art historians

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Women art historians

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Helen Abbott Michael

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Helen Abbott Michael

Helen Cecilia De Silver Abbott Michael (December 23, 1857 – November 29, 1904) was an American scientist who was among the first to "in a systematic way study the relation of chemical composition to species of plants and to plant growth."[1] Michael theorized that the chemical composition of plants over the course of their development provided an illustration for the theory of evolution.[2] She also was a student of Tufts, and later Harvard, and worked with organic chemist Arthur Michael (known for the Michael reaction), who she subsequently married. Life and work Helen Cecilia De Silver Abbott was born in Philadelphia in 1857 to James Abbott and Caroline Montelius. Helen originally focused on being a pianist, studying extensively under the guidance of Miss Mary F. Howell. But in 1881, upon returning to America after performing in Paris, she turned to science after purchasing a copy of Helmholtz's Treatise on Physiological Optics. The scientific thoughts engulfed her and thus began her interest in optics an

Phytochemicals

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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American women scientists

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Charles Conrad Abbott

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Charles Conrad Abbott

Charles Conrad Abbott (June 4, 1843 – July 27, 1919) was an American archaeologist and naturalist. Biography He was born at Trenton, New Jersey, and studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.[1] During the American Civil War, he served as a surgeon in the Union Army. He received his M.D. degree from UPenn in 1865. In 1876, he announced the discovery, later confirmed by other archaeologists, of traces of human presence in the Delaware River Valley dating from the first or "Kansan" ice age, and inferentially from the pre-glacial period when humans are believed to have entered upon the North American continent.[2] However, today the consensus of archaeologists is that most of Abbott's "Trenton Gravel Implements" date from the Middle Woodland period of about A.D. 300–900.[3] From 1876 to 1889, he was assistant curator of the Peabody Museum in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to which he presented a collection of 20,000 archaeological specimens; he freely gave also to other archaeological c

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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American military doctors

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Writers from Trenton, New Jersey

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Palmer C. Ricketts

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Palmer C. Ricketts

Palmer Chamberlain Ricketts (January 17, 1856 – December 9, 1934) was the ninth president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He served as president for 33 years and oversaw a period of major expansion and development of the university. Personal life Palmer C. Ricketts was born in Elkton, Maryland, on January 17, 1856, and was educated privately at Princeton, New Jersey. His father, also named Palmer Chamberlain Ricketts, was the founder of the local newspaper, the Cecil Whig.[1] His brother, Louis Davidson Ricketts, achieved prominence as a mining engineer and in finance in Arizona. He was married in 1902 to Vjera Renshaw of Baltimore.[2] Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Ricketts first arrived at RPI in 1871, at only fifteen years of age, where he joined the Alpha chapter of Theta Xi Fraternity as their 84th brother. He was an average student and participated in few campus activities, the exception being his membership on the editorial board of the 1874 edition of the Transit, the school yearbook. His g

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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People from Elkton, Maryland

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Presidents of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

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George Washington Goethals

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George Washington Goethals

George Washington Goethals ( GOH-thəlz June 29, 1858 – January 21, 1928) was a United States Army General and civil engineer, best known for his administration and supervision of the construction and the opening of the Panama Canal. He was the State Engineer of New Jersey and the Acting Quartermaster General of the United States Army.[1] Early life and education Goethals was born in Brooklyn, New York to Flemish immigrants from Stekene, Belgium,[2][3][4] Johannes Baptista (John Louis) Goethals, a carpenter, and wife Marie Le Barron. Aged 14, he entered the College of the City of New York. In April 1876, after three years of college, he won an appointment to the United States Military Academy at West Point. He graduated second in his class in 1880,[4] and was commissioned as second lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers. Military career Goethals remained at the military academy during the summer and fall of 1880 as an assistant instructor in practical astronomy. In 1881, he attended the Engineer School

Engineers from New York City

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Engineers from New York (state)

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Bushrod Washington

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Bushrod Washington

Bushrod Washington (June 5, 1762 – November 26, 1829) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1798 to 1829. On the Supreme Court, he was a staunch ally of Chief Justice John Marshall. Washington was also a co-founder and the president of the American Colonization Society, which intended to promote emigration of freed slaves and free blacks to Africa. The nephew of American founding father and President George Washington, he inherited his uncle's papers and Mount Vernon, taking possession in 1802 after the death of Martha Washington, his uncle's widow. Early life Bushrod Washington was born on June 5, 1762, at Bushfield Manor, a plantation home located at Mount Holly in Westmoreland County, Virginia.[1][2] He was a son of John Augustine Washington (1736–1787), who was a younger brother of George Washington, and John's wife, Hannah Bushrod (1735–1801).[2][3] Washington graduated from the College of William & Mary in 1778 and as an alumnus became in 1780 the 41st member of

American colonization movement

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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18th-century American judges

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Washington Townsend

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Washington Townsend

Washington Townsend (January 20, 1813 – March 18, 1894) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. Washington Townsend was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania. He attended a private school and West Chester Academy. He was engaged as a bank teller from 1828 to 1844. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1844 and commenced practice in West Chester. He served as prosecuting attorney of Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1848. He served as deputy attorney under Attorneys General James Cooper and Cornelius Darragh. He was cashier of the Bank of Chester County from 1849 to 1857. He was a delegate to the Whig National Convention in 1852, and a delegate to the 1860 Republican National Convention. Townsend was elected as a Republican to the Forty-first and to the three succeeding Congresses. He served as chairman of the United States House Committee on Public Lands during the Forty-third Congress. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1876. He again resumed the practice of

County district attorneys in Pennsylvania

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Burials at Oaklands Cemetery

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Alfred D. Chandler Jr.

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Alfred D. Chandler Jr.

Alfred DuPont Chandler Jr. (September 15, 1918 – May 9, 2007) was a professor of business history at Harvard Business School and Johns Hopkins University, who wrote extensively about the scale and the management structures of modern corporations. His works redefined business and economic history of industrialization. He received the Pulitzer Prize for History for his work, The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business (1977). He has been called "the doyen of American business historians".[1] Family and life Chandler was the great-grandson of Henry Varnum Poor. "Du Pont" was apparently a family name given to his grandfather because his great-grandmother was raised by the Du Pont family, and there are other connections as well.[2] Chandler graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1936 and Harvard College in 1940. After World War II, he returned to Harvard, finished his M.A. in 1946, and earned his doctorate in 1952 under the direction of Frederick Merk. He taught at M.I.T. and Johns Hopki

Tower Hill School alumni

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Harvard College alumni

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Phillips Exeter Academy alumni

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Charles F. Chandler

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Charles F. Chandler

Charles Frederick Chandler (December 6, 1836 – August 25, 1925) was an American chemist, best known for his regulatory work in public health, sanitation, and consumer safety in New York City, as well as his work in chemical education—first at Union College and then, for the majority of his career, at Columbia University, where he taught in the Chemical Department, the College of Physicians and Surgeons, and served as the first Dean of Columbia University's School of Mines. Early life Charles Frederick Chandler was born in Lancaster, Massachusetts on December 6, 1836. His family moved shortly after his birth to New Bedford, Massachusetts, where he spent most of his formative years and engaged in his earliest formal education. As a child he devoted nearly all of his free time to scientific and geological explorations and attending public lectures on scientific subjects. These public lectures at the New Bedford Lyceum, and in particular a series of lectures given by the geologist and naturalist Louis Agassiz,

Scientists from New York (state)

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Century Association members

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Makri, Bulandshahr

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Makri, Bulandshahr

Makri, also known as Mankri,[2] is a village in Syana tehsil of the Bulandshahr district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. It is located approximately 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) from Syana and 38 kilometres (24 mi) east of Bulandshahr. References https://www.census2011.co.in/data/village/120889-makri-uttar-pradesh.html http://geonames.nga.mil/namesgaz/: select "India" from the country list, type "Mankri" in the "Name" text box and then click "Search database". External links Aerial view

Charles University in Prague faculty

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Jewish American scientists

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Andrew Allen (Pennsylvania)

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Andrew Allen (Pennsylvania)

Andrew Allen. Andrew Allen (June 1740 – March 7, 1825) was a lawyer and official from the Province of Pennsylvania. Born into an influential family, Allen initially favored the colonial cause in the American Revolution, and represented Pennsylvania in the Second Continental Congress from 1775 to 1776. Like many other wealthy elites in Pennsylvania, however, he resisted radical change, and became a Loyalist after the Declaration of Independence and the Pennsylvania Constitution of 1776. Biography Allen was born into a prominent Philadelphia family. His father, William Allen, was a successful merchant and lawyer, and would later be the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Andrew graduated from the City College of Philadelphia (later the University of Pennsylvania) in 1759, read law under Benjamin Chew, and then went to London to complete a legal education at the Inner Temple. He returned to Philadelphia in 1765, was admitted to the bar, and began to practice law. That same year Allen was elect

Loyalists in the American Revolution from Penns...

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Charles Elmer Allen

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Charles Elmer Allen

Charles Elmer Allen (October 4, 1872 in Horicon, Wisconsin – June 25, 1954) was an American botanist and cell biologist whose discoveries include the first documentation of sex chromosomes in plants.[1] He was a member of the United States National Academy of Sciences, and held presidencies of the Botanical Society of America (1921), the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters (1931-1933), the American Society of Naturalists (1936), and the American Microscopical Society (1948). Allen was a professor at the University of Wisconsin for over 20 years.[2] References Anderson, Lewis E. (2000). "Charles E. Allen and Sex Chromosomes". The Bryologist. 103 (3): 442–448. doi:10.1639/0007-2745(2000)103[0442:CEAASC]2.0.CO;2. JSTOR 3244131. Smith, Gilbert M. (1956). "Charles Elmer Allen, 1872-1954" (PDF). Biological Memoirs, National Academy of Sciences. 29: 1–15.

People from Horicon, Wisconsin

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Cell biologists

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George Allen (Vermont)

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George Allen (Vermont)

1868 portrait George Allen (December 17, 1808 – May 28, 1876) was a noted college professor and clergyman. Formative years Born in Milton, Vermont in 1808, George Allen was the son of U.S. Congressman Heman Allen (of Milton) and Sarah Ann (Prentiss) Allen. A graduate of the University of Vermont in 1827, Allen became a professor of languages at that school in 1828. After leaving his position in 1830, he was admitted to the Vermont bar in 1831, and married Mary Hancock Withington, with whom he would have four children. Ordained as a minister in the Episcopal Church in 1834, Allen became professor of languages at Delaware College in 1837, remaining at that post through 1845 when he became professor of Latin and Greek at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia. He then published a "Life of Philidor," the chess-player (Philadelphia, 1863). Religion Allen converted to Roman Catholicism in 1847. Death and interment Allen died in Worcester, Massachusetts on May 28, 1876, and was interred at Philadel

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People from Milton, Vermont

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Anglican priest converts to Roman Catholicism

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Harrison Allen

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Harrison Allen

Harrison Allen (1841–1897) was an American physician and anatomist, born in Philadelphia. He graduated from the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1861,[1] and in 1862 became a surgeon in the United States Army and served until the conclusion of the Civil War in 1865. Doctor Allen should not be confused with the Union Army officer who was colonel of the 151st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment, who was mustered out July 31, 1863 and later was awarded the grade of brevet brigadier general.[2][3] In 1865 he was made professor of comparative anatomy and medical zoölogy at the University of Pennsylvania. He was transferred in 1878 to the chair of physiology, which he occupied until 1895. Publications In addition to many papers contributed to medical journals, he authored a number of books: Outlines of Comparative Anatomy and Medical Zoölogy (1867) Studies in the Facial Region (1874) An Analysis of the Life Form in Art (1875) System of Human Anatomy (1880) References  K

American male non-fiction writers

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Perelman School of Medicine at the University o...

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Allen V. Astin

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Allen V. Astin

Allen Varley Astin (June 12, 1904 – January 28, 1984) was an American physicist who served as director of the United States National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology) from 1951 until 1969. During the Second World War he worked on the proximity fuse. He was an advocate for introduction of metric weights and measures to the United States.[1] Early years Allen Astin was the eldest of three children of a school teacher in Utah. Astin's father died when he was only four years old. He graduated from the University of Utah physics program and in 1928 was granted a PhD in physics from New York University.[2] That same year, Astin obtained a two-year fellowship for studies at Johns Hopkins University. Upon completing the fellowship he secured a staff position at the National Bureau of Standards, eventually working his way up to his appointment as Director in May, 1952.[3] AD-X2 controversy The National Bureau of Standards (NBS) began researching electric batteries in 1917

20th-century American physicists

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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University of Utah alumni

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Charles Henry Wharton

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Charles Henry Wharton

Charles Henry Wharton (June 5, 1748 – July 22, 1833), who grew up Catholic and became a Catholic priest, converted to Protestantism and became one of the leading Episcopal clergyman of the early United States, as well as briefly served as president of Columbia University. Early life The family plantation, Notley Hall, was presented to his grandfather by Lord Baltimore.[1] In 1760 he was sent to the English Jesuit College at St Omer,[2] where he was very studious, and became fluent in Latin, so as to even be able to converse in it. He was ordered deacon in June, 1772, and priest the following September, both in the Roman Catholic Church. At the close of the American Revolution Wharton resided at Worcester, England, as chaplain to the Roman Catholics in that city. There he addressed a poetical epistle to George Washington, with a sketch of his life, which was published for the benefit of American prisoners in England (Annapolis, 1779; London, 1780). American Ministry Wharton returned to what had become the

Catholics from Maryland

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Burials in New Jersey

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Samuel Stanhope Smith

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Samuel Stanhope Smith

Samuel Stanhope Smith (March 15, 1751 – August 21, 1819) was a Presbyterian minister, founding president of Hampden–Sydney College and the seventh president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) from 1795 to 1812. His stormy career ended in his enforced resignation. His words - "If reason and charity cannot promote the cause of truth and piety, I cannot see how it should ever flourish under the withering fires of wrath and strife" - epitomize his career.[1] Early life Smith was born in Pequea, Pennsylvania on March 15, 1751. He was the son of Robert Smith (1723–1793) and Elizabeth (née Blair) Smith (1725–1777). In 1769, he graduated as a valedictorian from the College of New Jersey (name later changed to Princeton University), and went on to study theology and philosophy under John Witherspoon.[2] Career In his mid-twenties, he worked as a missionary in Virginia, and from 1775 to 1779, he served as the founder and rector of Hampden–Sydney College, which he referred to in his advertisemen

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Burials at Princeton Cemetery

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People of colonial Pennsylvania

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Michael T. Clegg

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Michael T. Clegg

Michael Tran Clegg (born August 1, 1941) is an American plant geneticist. He is professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine). Early life and education Clegg was born on August 1, 1941 in Pasadena, California.[1] His father and grandfather were biologists, and his great-grandfather was a doctor. Despite his family's scientific background, Clegg originally worked for a crop duster, served in the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army from 1960 to 63 and later worked in the sugar industry, before entering college.[2] He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis in 1972.[3] Academic career Clegg served on the faculty of Brown University from 1972 until 1976 when he assumed a faculty appointment as associate professor at the University of Georgia. In 1984, he joined the faculty of the University of California, Riverside as Professor of Genetics, and subsequently served as Dean of the College of

Plant geneticists

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American geneticists

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University of California, Irvine faculty

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Pierre Hohenberg

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Pierre Hohenberg

Pierre C. Hohenberg (3 October 1934 – 15 December 2017[1]) was a French-American theoretical physicist, who worked primarily on statistical mechanics.[2] Hohenberg studied at Harvard, where he earned his bachelor's degree in 1956 and a master's degree in 1958 (after a stay during 1956/57 at École Normale Supérieure), and his doctorate in 1962. From 1962-1963, he was at the Institute for Physical Problems in Moscow, followed by a stay at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. From 1964 to 1995 he was at Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill. From 1985 to 1989, he was director of the department of theoretical physics and from 1989 to 1995 he was "Distinguished Member of Technical Staff". From 1974 to 1977, he was also professor of theoretical physics at the TU München, where he had previously been a 1972-1973 guest professor. From 1995 to 2003 he was "Deputy Provost of Science and Technology" at Yale University. Subsequently, he was the Yale "Eugene Higgins Adjunct Professor of Physics and Applied Physics". Hohenber

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Technical University of Munich faculty

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American physicists

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Walter Samuel Hunter

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Walter Samuel Hunter

Walter Samuel Hunter (March 22, 1889 – August 3, 1954) contributed to psychology by leading an effort to develop psychology as a science.[1] Hunter was one of the first scholars of the time to focus not on the study of subjective mental processes but rather on the observation of animal behavior. In 1912, Hunter completed his doctoral dissertation on Delayed Reaction in Animals and Children.[2] He was a pioneer in the effort of scientific documentation, having created Psychological Abstracts in 1927, which contained documents from psychologists in the U.S. and abroad.[1] Biography Walter Samuel Hunter was born in Decatur, Illinois, on March 22, 1889. His mother died when he was 12 years old.[3] After his mother’s death, his father, George Hunter, moved him and his brother to Fort Worth, Texas.[3] In January 1913, Hunter married his first wife, Katherine Pratt. The couple had a daughter named Thayer.[3] Katherine Pratt died at the age of 27, shortly after the birth of their daughter.[3] Hunter married his sec

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Presidents of the American Psychological Associ...

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Clark University faculty

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Francis Gilman Blake

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Francis Gilman Blake

Francis Gilman Blake (22 February 1887–1 February 1952) was a leading American immunologist. He served as dean of the Yale University School of Medicine, president of the American Association of Immunologists, and physician-in-chief of the Yale–New Haven Hospital. Early life and family Blake was a native of the small Pennsylvania town of Mansfield Valley. His father, a mining engineer, died when he was three years old. He spent much of his childhood in Massachusetts, where he was an enthusiastic observer of nature; at the age of 15, along with one of his brothers, he submitted an ornithological paper which was published in The Auk in 1902.[1] He received his A.B. from Dartmouth in 1908, after which he spent a year as a tutor to save enough money to pay for his further education. He then enrolled in Harvard Medical School, where he received his MD in 1913. While completing his medical internship at Peter Bent Brigham, he met Dorothy P. Dewey, a nurse; they married in 1916 and had three sons.[2] During his ti

Harvard Medical School alumni

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Saul Perlmutter

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Saul Perlmutter

Saul Perlmutter (born September 22, 1959) is a U.S. astrophysicist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2003. He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Perlmutter shared the 2006 Shaw Prize in Astronomy, the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, and the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics with Brian P. Schmidt and Adam Riess for providing evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. Education Saul Perlmutter was born one of three children in the Ashkenazi Jewish family of Daniel D. Perlmutter, professor emeritus of chemical and biomolecular engineering at University of Pennsylvania, and Felice (Feige) D. Perlmutter (née Davidson), professor emerita of Temple University’s School of Social Administration.[2][3] His maternal grandfather, the Yiddish tea

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory people

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Germantown Friends School alumni

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Robin Jon Hawes Clark

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Robin Jon Hawes Clark

Robin Jon Hawes Clark CNZM FRS (16 February 1935 – 6 December 2018) was a New Zealand-born chemist. Clark was born in Rangiora, New Zealand on 16 February 1935, to parents Reginald Hawes Clark and Marjorie Alice Clark. He attended Marlborough College, Blenheim, and Christ's College, Christchurch before pursuing bachelor's and master's at the University of Canterbury. Clark was a research and teaching fellow under William Fyfe at the University of Otago in 1958. From 1958 to 1961, Clark worked toward a doctorate advised by Ronald Sydney Nyholm and Jack Lewis at University College London. The University of London awarded Clark a DSc in 1969.[1][2] Clark began teaching at University College London in 1962 as an assistant lecturer. He was appointed Sir William Ramsay Professor in 1989, and served until retirement in 2009. Over the course of his career, Clark delivered several named lectures and received multiple awards. In 1969, he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. In 1989, he was granted

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Robin Clark (chemist)

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Robin Clark (chemist)

Robin Jon Hawes Clark CNZM FRS (16 February 1935 – 6 December 2018) was a New Zealand-born chemist initially noted for research of transition metal and mixed-valence complexes, and later for the use of Raman spectroscopy in determining the chemical composition of pigments used in artworks. Early life and education Clark was born in Rangiora, New Zealand on 16 February 1935, to parents Reginald Hawes Clark and Marjorie Alice Clark. He attended Marlborough College, Blenheim, and Christ's College, Christchurch before pursuing bachelor's and master's at Canterbury University College. Clark was a research and teaching fellow under William Fyfe at the University of Otago in 1958. From 1958 to 1961, Clark worked toward a doctorate advised by Ronald Sydney Nyholm and Jack Lewis at University College London and was awarded a PhD degree for his work on titanium complexes in 1961. The University of London later awarded Clark a DSc in 1969.[1][2] Career Clark began teaching at University College London in 1962 as an

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Amy Gutmann

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Amy Gutmann

Amy Gutmann (born 1949) is the eighth president of the University of Pennsylvania. In November 2016, the school announced that her contract had been extended to 2022 which will make her the longest-serving president in the history of the University of Pennsylvania. In 2018, Fortune magazine named Gutmann one of the "World's 50 Greatest Leaders". (She fell off the list in 2019.)[1] Her professional biography includes more than two decades at Princeton including as that university's provost and Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Politics. While there, she founded Princeton's ethics center, the University Center for Human Values. Her published works span the fields of politics, ethics, education, and philosophy. Early life and education She was born on November 19, 1949, in Brooklyn, New York, the only child of Kurt and Beatrice Gutmann. She was raised in Monroe, New York, a small town outside New York City.[2] Her father was the youngest of five children in an Orthodox Jewish family in Feuchtwa

Women political scientists

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Samuel H. Preston

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Samuel H. Preston

Samuel Hulse Preston (born December 2, 1943) is an American demographer and sociologist. He is one of the leading demographers in the United States. He received his Ph.D in economics from Princeton University in 1968. Preston is a Professor Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA. He is the former Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at Penn as well as a member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1987.[1] The Preston curve is named after him. Preston's major research interest is in the health of populations. He has written primarily about mortality trends and patterns in large aggregates, including twentieth century mortality transitions and black/white differentials in the United States. Publications Preston, Samuel H., & Michael Haines. (1991), Fatal Years: Child Mortality in Late Nineteenth Century America., Princeton: Princeton University PressCS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link) Gribble, James N., & Preston, Samuel H. (editors) (1993), The Epid

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American demographers

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Carol J. Greenhouse

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Carol J. Greenhouse

Carol J. Greenhouse (born January 4, 1950) is an American anthropologist. She is currently professor emerita in the Department of Anthropology at Princeton University, where she previously served as Arthur W. Marks Professor of Anthropology and Chair.[1] She is also the former president of the American Ethnological Society, former editor of its peer-review journal, American Ethnologist, and former president of the Law and Society Association. In 2012, Greenhouse was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[2][3] She is a member of the American Philosophical Society (since 2011). She is a sister of Linda Greenhouse.[4] Education and career Greenhouse received her Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from Radcliffe College in 1971 and her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Harvard University in 1976. At Harvard, she studied under legal anthropologist Klaus-Friedrich Koch and Mesoamericanist anthropologist Evon Z. Vogt.[5] Following the completion of her Ph.D., Greenhouse joined the faculty at Cornell

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Keith Michael Baker

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Keith Michael Baker

Keith Michael Baker (born 7 August 1938) is a British-born historian. Baker received his bachelor's and master's degrees at Peterhouse, Cambridge, and completed a doctorate at University College London.[1] He began his academic career in the United States as a history instructor at Reed College and joined the University of Chicago faculty in 1965. While at Chicago, Baker was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1978. He left Chicago for Stanford University in 1988, the same year the government of France named him a Knight of the Order of Academic Palms. Baker was elected to membership of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and American Philosophical Society in 1991 and 1997 respectively. He served as president of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies in 2000.[2] At Stanford, Baker has held the J. E. Wallace Sterling Professorship in the Humanities as well as the Anthony P. Meier Family Professorship in the Humanities.[3] He was one of three recipients of the American Historical Association'

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Cyril Norman Hugh Long

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Cyril Norman Hugh Long

Cyril Norman Hugh Long (June 19, 1901 – July 6, 1970) was an English-American biochemist and academic administrator. He was Sterling Professor of physiological chemistry at Yale University for 31 years during the middle part of the 20th century. Background Cyril Long was born in Wiltshire, England, the first of two sons of John Edward Long and Rose Fanny Long, née Langward.[1] As a young man, he did not plan to study to become a scientist. He instead experimented with diverse areas such as perfume making and working with wood. Long devoted much of his time to literature and history. As a child he enjoyed playing soccer and cricket and many times his father needed to remind him to come back home to study. He always performed well during his school years and was ranked among the best of his graduating class. He appeared to have a natural talent for chemistry and once said, "I was attracted from an early age to chemistry, largely by my own fortunate contact in an English school with a science master ... whose

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Stephen Harriman Long

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Stephen Harriman Long

Stephen Harriman Long (December 30, 1784 – September 4, 1864) was a U.S. army explorer, topographical engineer, and railway engineer. As an inventor, he is noted for his developments in the design of steam locomotives. He was also one of the most prolific explorers of the early 1800s, although his career as an explorer was relatively short-lived.[1][2] He covered over 26,000 miles in five expeditions, including a scientific expedition in the Great Plains area, which he famously confirmed as a "Great Desert" (leading to the term "the Great American Desert"). Biography Long was born in Hopkinton, New Hampshire, the son of Moses and Lucy (Harriman) Long. He received an A.B. from Dartmouth College in 1809 and an A.M. from Dartmouth in 1812. In 1814, he was commissioned a lieutenant of engineers in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Upon the reorganization of the Army in 1816, he was appointed a Major on 16 April and assigned to the Southern Division under Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson as a topographical engineer.[3]

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John von Neumann

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John von Neumann

John von Neumann (Hungarian: Neumann János Lajos, pronounced ; December 28, 1903 – February 8, 1957) was a Hungarian-American mathematician, physicist, computer scientist, and polymath. Von Neumann was generally regarded as the foremost mathematician of his time[2] and said to be "the last representative of the great mathematicians";[3] who integrated both pure and applied sciences. He made major contributions to a number of fields, including mathematics (foundations of mathematics, functional analysis, ergodic theory, representation theory, operator algebras, geometry, topology, and numerical analysis), physics (quantum mechanics, hydrodynamics, and quantum statistical mechanics), economics (game theory), computing (Von Neumann architecture, linear programming, self-replicating machines, stochastic computing), and statistics. He was a pioneer of the application of operator theory to quantum mechanics in the development of functional analysis, and a key figure in the development of game theory and the conce

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Minecraft

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Mary Maples Dunn

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Mary Maples Dunn

Mary Maples Dunn (April 6, 1931 – March 19, 2017) was an American historian. Born in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, Dunn graduated from William and Mary College in 1954 and received her Ph.D. from Bryn Mawr College in 1959, where she taught and served as Dean from 1978 to 1985. She served as the eighth president of Smith College, for ten years beginning in 1985. Dunn was also the Director of the Schlesinger Library from 1995 to 2000. She was acting president when Radcliffe College merged with Harvard University, and she became the acting Dean of the newly created Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study after the merger.[1] Retired, Dunn became a Radcliffe Institute Fellow.[2] She was the co-Executive Officer of the American Philosophical Society from 2002 to 2007. Personal life Mary Maples was born on April 6, 1931, in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin to Eva Moore Maples and Frederic Maples who owned a clothing store. She was the second of four children and the only daughter.[3] While in Wisconsin she attended a two-room s

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Richard Slator Dunn

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Richard Slator Dunn

Richard Slator Dunn, author and historian, was born 9 August 1928 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. He completed his B. A. in 1950 at Harvard College, his M. A. from Princeton University in 1952, and received his Ph. D. in history from Princeton University in 1955. He joined Phi Beta Kappa in 1950.[1] Upon retirement from his position at University of Pennsylvania in 1996, he was named the Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor Emeritus of American History.[2] He was married to Mary Maples Dunn; together they raised two daughters. Academic career Dunn began his teaching career at Princeton University in 1954, moving to University of Michigan in 1955, then joined the History Department at University of Pennsylvania in 1957, where he eventually became chair of the department. He founded and was the first director of the Philadelphia Center for Early American Studies, now called the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, according to his biography at the Penn Archives.[2] Awards and prizes[1] American Co

American historians

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Baruch Samuel Blumberg

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Baruch Samuel Blumberg

Baruch Samuel Blumberg (July 28, 1925 – April 5, 2011) — known as Barry Blumberg — was an American physician, geneticist, and co-recipient of the 1976 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (with Daniel Carleton Gajdusek), for his work on the hepatitis B virus while an investigator at the NIH.[3] He was President of the American Philosophical Society from 2005 until his death. Blumberg received the Nobel Prize for "discoveries concerning new mechanisms for the origin and dissemination of infectious diseases." Blumberg identified the hepatitis B virus, and later developed its diagnostic test and vaccine.[3][4] Biography Early life and education Blumberg was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Ida (Simonoff) and Meyer Blumberg, a lawyer.[5][6] He first attended the Orthodox Yeshivah of Flatbush for elementary school, where he learned to read and write in Hebrew, and to study the Bible and Jewish texts in their original language. (That school also had among its students a contemporary of Blumberg, Eric Kand

Jewish immunologists

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Toni Morrison

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Toni Morrison

Chloe Anthony Wofford Morrison (born Chloe Ardelia Wofford;[2] February 18, 1931 – August 5, 2019), known as Toni Morrison, was an American novelist, essayist, book editor, and college professor. Her first novel, The Bluest Eye, was published in 1970. The critically acclaimed Song of Solomon (1977) brought her national attention and won the National Book Critics Circle Award. In 1988, Morrison won the Pulitzer Prize for Beloved (1987); she gained worldwide recognition when she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993.[3] Born and raised in Lorain, Ohio, Morrison graduated from Howard University in 1953 with a B.A. in English and just two years from Cornell University with a master's in American Literature.[4] She later taught English at Howard University, was married, and had two children before divorcing in 1964. In the late 1960s, she became the first black female editor in fiction at Random House in New York City. In the 1970s and 1980s, she developed her own reputation as an author, and her perh

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Judith Shapiro

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Judith Shapiro

Judith R. Shapiro (born January 24, 1942) is a former President of Barnard College, a liberal arts college for women affiliated with Columbia University; as President of Barnard, she was also an academic dean within the university. She was also a professor of anthropology at Barnard. Shapiro became Barnard's 6th president in 1994 after a teaching career at Bryn Mawr College where she was Chair of the Department of Anthropology. After serving as Acting Dean of the Undergraduate College in 1985-6, she was Provost, the chief academic officer, from 1986 until 1994. Debora L. Spar was appointed to replace Shapiro, effective July 1, 2008. Education and career A native of New York City, Shapiro was the first Barnard president educated in the New York public schools. Her mother taught Latin and was a librarian in the school system. Judith Shapiro is a magna cum laude graduate of Brandeis University in Massachusetts. She received her Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University in New York. She began her teaching

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Ruth Arnon

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Ruth Arnon

Ruth Arnon Ruth Arnon (Hebrew: רות ארנון) is an Israeli biochemist and codeveloper of the multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone. She is currently the Paul Ehrlich Professor of Immunology at the Weizmann Institute of Science, where she is researching anti-cancer and influenza vaccinations. Early life Arnon's father, Alexander Rosenberg[1] was interested in science from a young age. After serving in the Jewish Legion during World War I, Rosenberg attended Technische Hochschule in Vienna. He realized his own interest in electricity in 1929 and moved with his wife and two children to Toulouse to complete studies in electrical engineering as well as earn a master's in mathematics. Rosenberg then returned to Palestine and worked for the Electrical Corporation until the mid-1960s. Ruth Arnon attributes her own love for science to her relationship with her father. Ruth Rosenberg was born in Tel Aviv, June 1, 1933[1]. Because her older siblings had already taught Ruth basic reading and arithmetic, she started school in

Israeli women chemists

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George Beadle

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George Beadle

George Wells Beadle (October 22, 1903 – June 9, 1989) was an American geneticist. In 1958 he shared one-half of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Edward Tatum for their discovery of the role of genes in regulating biochemical events within cells.[2][3] He also served as the 7th President of the University of Chicago.[4] Beadle and Tatum's key experiments involved exposing the bread mold Neurospora crassa to x-rays, causing mutations. In a series of experiments, they showed that these mutations caused changes in specific enzymes involved in metabolic pathways. These experiments led them to propose a direct link between genes and enzymatic reactions, known as the One gene-one enzyme hypothesis.[5][6][7] Education and early life George Wells Beadle was born in Wahoo, Nebraska. He was the son of Chauncey Elmer Beadle and Hattie Albro, who owned and operated a 40-acre (160,000 m2) farm nearby.[8] George was educated at the Wahoo High School and might himself have become a farmer if one of his teach

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Modern synthesis (20th century)

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Leslie C. Aiello

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Leslie C. Aiello

Leslie Crum Aiello (born May 26, 1946 in Pasadena, California) is an American paleoanthropologist and professor emeritus of the University College London. She has been the President of Axel Lennart Wenner-Gren donated Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research from 2005 to 2017.[1] In 2014 Dr. Aiello was elected to the American Philosophical Society[1]. She is currently President of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.[2] Biography Beginning in 1964, Aiello studied anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles, earning a bachelor's degree, and later a master's degree (completed in 1970), in Anthropology.[3] Also while working on her BA, she spent a year (1965–66) studying abroad at the University of Göttingen. She later received her PhD from the University of London in human evolution and anatomy.[3] Aiello remained at the University of London where she became a professor of biological anthropology starting in 1995. Also during this time, she served as the co-managing e

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John Avise

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John Avise

John Charles Avise (born 1948) is an American evolutionary geneticist, conservationist, ecologist and natural historian. He is a Distinguished Professor of Ecology & Evolution, University of California, Irvine, and was previously a Distinguished Professor of Genetics at the University of Georgia. Born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, he received his B.S. in 1970 in Natural Resources from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; his M.A.in 1971 in Zoology from the University of Texas, Austin; and his Ph.D. in 1975 in Genetics from the University of California, Davis. Avise's research entails the use of molecular markers to analyze ecological, behavioral, and evolutionary processes in nature.[1] It covers a broad spectrum of topics: genetic parentage, reproductive modes, population structure, speciation, hybridization, introgression, phylogeography, systematics, and phylogenetics. He has conducted research on diverse animal taxa ranging from corals and sponges to representatives of all the major vertebrate groups

University of Michigan School of Natural Resour...

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Cynthia Beall

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Cynthia Beall

Cynthia M. Beall is an American physical anthropologist at the Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. Four decades of her research on people living in extremely high mountains became the frontier in understanding human evolution and high-altitude adaptation. Her groundbreaking works among the Andean, Tibetan and East African highlanders are the basis of our knowledge on adaptation to hypoxic condition and how it influences the evolutionary selection in modern humans. She is currently the Distinguished University Professor, and member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society.[1] Education and career Cynthia Beall completed a BA in biology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1970. She entered Pennsylvania State University to obtain MA in anthropology in 1972, and PhD in anthropology in 1976. She joined the faculty of the Department of Anthropology at the Case Western Reserve University as Assistant Professor in 1976. She became an Associate Professor in 198

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May Berenbaum

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May Berenbaum

May Roberta Berenbaum (born 1953) is an American entomologist whose research focuses on the chemical interactions between herbivorous insects and their host plants, and the implications of these interactions on the organization of natural communities and the evolution of species. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and was named editor-in-chief of its journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2019[1]; she is also a member of the American Philosophical Society (1996), and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1996). In 2014, she was awarded the National Medal of Science. Early life and education Berenbaum graduated summa cum laude, with a B.S. degree and honors in biology, from Yale University in 1975; she attended graduate school at Cornell University and received a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology in 1980.[2] Career Since 1980, Berenbaum has been a member of the faculty of the department of entomology at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Cham

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Frederic L. Holmes

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Frederic L. Holmes

Frederic Lawrence Holmes (6 February 1932, Cincinnati, Ohio – 21 March 2003, New Haven, Connecticut) was an American historian of science, specifically for chemistry, medicine and biology. Holmes earned his bachelor's degree in biology from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1954 and then began graduate study in the history department of Harvard University, where he graduated with MA in 1958. His graduate study was interrupted by two years of service in the United States Air Force and when he returned to Harvard he transferred to the department of the history of science, graduating with PhD in 1962 with thesis Claude Bernard and the concept of internal environment. For his dissertation, he reconstructed Claude Bernard's path of discovery of basic physiological functions, such as those of the liver, on the basis of Bernard's laboratory books from the 1840s. Mirko Grmek referred the laboratory books to Holmes.[1] He then spent two years at MIT as a postdoc. At Yale University he became in 1964 an a

University of Western Ontario faculty

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American historians of science

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Gano Dunn

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Gano Dunn

Gano Dunn (October 18, 1870[6] – April 10, 1953[7]) was President of Cooper Union, and an early Chairman and CEO of the United States National Research Council.[2]:8[8] Early life and education Son of Civil War veteran General N. Gano Dunn and Amelia Sillick,[9][10] Gano Dunn was born in Yorkville, New York. With a prospering law practice, General Dunn raised Gano and his younger brother Harris, across from Central Park, as befitted one of the "best-known lawyers in the city".[11] Inspired by his paternal grandfather, schoolteacher and inventor Nathaniel Dunn, young Gano was encouraged in both scholarship and practical invention.[1]:31[12] In 1883, when Gano was twelve, he accompanied the former Mrs. Maria G. Robins Caswell to Europe. They were there met by General Dunn. With the General and Maria masquerading as man and wife, Gano traveled Europe for a year and half. By 1886, General Dunn's whereabouts were unknown to his wife Amelia and New York Society.[13] At the age of fifteen, while attending City C

Presidents of Cooper Union

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Nathan Dunn

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Nathan Dunn

Portrait of Dunn by George Chinnery, 1830s Nathan Dunn (1782 in Salem County, New Jersey – 1844 in Switzerland) was an American businessman and philanthropist notable for his vast collection of Chinese artifacts of significant educational value. It was displayed as Chinese Museum in Philadelphia in 1838, and in London in 1842 and 1851, where it was auctioned, finding its way to British artists and designers eager to employ new ideas. Biography Nathan Dunn was one of 4 children in the farming family of Nathan Dunn and Rhoda, née Silvers. His father died in 1782 at the age of 39. In 1788 Rhoda married Thomas Osborn and had 3 more children, of them Rhoda Osborn married Restore S. Lamb. Rhoda and Restore S. Lamb were noted ministers of the Religious Society of Friends.[1] In 1816, Nathan Dunn was disowned by Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of the Society of Friends for bankruptcy. However, John Field, one of his creditors, decided that the way to return his money was to create a joint business, posting N. Dunn i

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