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Members of the American Philosophical Society


David Jackson (Pennsylvania)

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David Jackson (Pennsylvania)

David Jackson (1747 – September 17, 1801) was an American apothecary and physician from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a delegate for Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress in 1785. Jackson was born in Newtown-Limavady, County Londonderry, Ireland, the son of Samuel Jackson. He attended the Philadelphia City College (now the University of Pennsylvania) and graduated in 1768 with a bachelor's degree in medicine. He settled in Chester, Pennsylvania and practiced there before opening a practice in Philadelphia. In 1776, following the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, Jackson worked on behalf of the Continental Congress as a manager of a lottery held to raise funds for the Continental Army. He also served as paymaster for the Pennsylvania militia. He was forced to leave Philadelphia when British forces occupied the city in 1777. In 1779 he briefly served in the field with the militia as a surgeon and quartermaster. Afterwards he returned to Philadelphia to resume his medical practice and also op

Perelman School of Medicine at the University o...

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Burials in Pennsylvania

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Physicians in the American Revolution

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Samuel Eliot (banker)

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Samuel Eliot (banker)

Samuel Eliot was an American banker and businessman from the prominent Eliot family of Boston. He served as president of Massachusetts Bank, and was a highly successful Boston merchant, owning and operating what was then the precursor to 19th- and 20th-century style department stores. At the time of his death, he had amassed one of the largest fortunes in Boston.[2] He was descended from the Eliot family of South England. He was born to Samuel Eliot, a Boston publisher and bookseller; and Elizabeth Marshall, from the West Indies.[3] Eliot married Elizabeth Barrell of Boston, and married a second time in 1786 to Catherine Atkins, daughter of Dudley and Sarah (née Kent) Atkins of Newburyport, Massachusetts. The second marriage produced six children, one being Samuel Atkins Eliot.[4][5] He was the grandfather of Samuel Eliot, Charles Eliot Norton and Charles William Eliot. His granddaughter, Mary Elizabeth Bray (1810–86), was married to Hamburg banker Johann Heinrich Gossler III (1805–1879), owner of Berenbe

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Businesspeople from Boston

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Businesspeople from Boston, Massachusetts

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William Wulf

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William Wulf

William Allan Wulf (born December 8, 1939) is a computer scientist notable for his work in programming languages and compilers. Until June 2012, he was a University Professor and the AT&T Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Virginia. Early life and education Born in Chicago, he attended the University of Illinois, receiving a BS in engineering physics in 1961 and an MS in electrical engineering in 1963. He then achieved the first Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Virginia in 1968. Career In 1970, while at Carnegie Mellon University, he designed the BLISS programming language and developed a groundbreaking optimizing compiler for it. With his wife Anita K. Jones, Wulf was a founder and vice president of Tartan Laboratories, a compiler technology company, in 1981. He served as president of the National Academy of Engineering[1] from 1996 to 2007. He chaired the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the Nati

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Computer science educators

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Scientists from Chicago

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Fabiola Gianotti

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Fabiola Gianotti

Fabiola Gianotti (Italian: ; born October 29, 1960) is an Italian particle physicist, the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) Director-General, and the first woman to hold this position.[3][4] Her mandate began on 1 January 2016 and runs for a period of five years. At its 195th Session, the CERN Council selected Fabiola Gianotti, as the Organization’s next Director-General, for her second term of office. The appointment will be formalised at the December Session of the Council, and Gianotti’s new five-year term of office will begin on 1 January 2021. This is the first time in CERN’s history that a Director-General has been appointed for a full second term.[5] Early life and education From an early age, Gianotti was interested in nature and the world around her. Her father, an acclaimed geologist encouraged her early love of learning. “It is from him I have inculcated my passion and love for nature,” she said in an interview with the Humans of Science.[6] Gianotti found her passion for scienti

Foreign Members of the Russian Academy of Sciences

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Foreign associates of the National Academy of S...

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Kerry Emanuel

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Kerry Emanuel

Kerry Andrew Emanuel (born April 21, 1955) is an American professor of meteorology currently working at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. In particular he has specialized in atmospheric convection and the mechanisms acting to intensify hurricanes. He was named one of the Time 100 influential people of 2006.[1] In 2007, he was elected as a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.[2] He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. He hypothesized in 1994 about a superpowerful type of hurricane which could be formed if average sea surface temperature increased another 15C more than it's ever been (see "hypercane"). In a March 2008 paper published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, he put forward the conclusion that global warming is likely to increase the intensity but decrease the frequency of hurricane and cyclone activity.[3] Gabriel Vecchi, of NOAA said of Emanuel's announcement, "While his results don't rule out the possibility that

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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People from Cambridge, Massachusetts

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American meteorologists

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David Donoho

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David Donoho

David Leigh Donoho (born March 5, 1957) is a professor of statistics at Stanford University, where he is also the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the Humanities and Sciences.[1] His work includes the development of effective methods for the construction of low-dimensional representations for high-dimensional data problems (multiscale geometric analysis), developments of wavelets for denoising and compressed sensing. He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Academic biography Donoho did his undergraduate studies at Princeton University, graduating in 1978.[2] His undergraduate thesis advisor was John W. Tukey.[3] Donoho obtained his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1983, under the supervision of Peter J. Huber.[4] He was on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley from 1984 to 1990 before moving to Stanford. He has been the Ph.D. advisor of at least 20 doctoral students, including Jianqing Fan and Emmanuel Candès.[4] Awards and honors In 1991, Donoho was

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Princeton University alumni, 1970-1979

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Stanford University Department of Statistics fa...

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Adi Shamir

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Adi Shamir

Adi Shamir (Hebrew: עדי שמיר‎; born July 6, 1952) is an Israeli cryptographer. He is a co-inventor of the Rivest–Shamir–Adleman (RSA) algorithm (along with Ron Rivest and Len Adleman), a co-inventor of the Feige–Fiat–Shamir identification scheme (along with Uriel Feige and Amos Fiat), one of the inventors of differential cryptanalysis and has made numerous contributions to the fields of cryptography and computer science.[3] Education Born in Tel Aviv, Shamir received a Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree in mathematics from Tel Aviv University in 1973 and obtained his Master of Science (MSc) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees in Computer Science from the Weizmann Institute in 1975 and 1977 respectively.[2] Career and research After a year as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Warwick, he did research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1977–1980 before returning to be a member of the faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science at the Weizmann Institute. Starting from 2006, he

Foreign associates of the National Academy of S...

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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International Association for Cryptologic Resea...

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David A. Tirrell

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David A. Tirrell

David A. Tirrell (born 1953) is an American chemist and the Ross McCollum-William H. Corcoran Professor and Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).[1] A pioneer in the areas of polymer synthesis and protein biosynthesis, his research has a wide range of applications, including coatings, adhesion, lubrication, bioengineering and biomedical intervention. From 2012 to 2018, Tirrell was the Director of the Beckman Institute at Caltech.[2] As of 2017, he serves as Caltech's Provost.[3] He is one of very few American scientists to have been elected to all three branches of the United States National Academies: the National Academy of Science (2006),[4] the National Academy of Engineering (2008),[5] and the Institute of Medicine (2011).[6] He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Early life and education Dr. Tirrell earned a B.S. in Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1974. He received a Ph.D. in

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Fellows of the American Chemical Society

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California Institute of Technology faculty

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Xiaowei Zhuang

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Xiaowei Zhuang

Xiaowei Zhuang (simplified Chinese: 庄小威; traditional Chinese: 莊小威; pinyin: Zhuāng Xiǎowēi; born January 1972) is a Chinese-American biophysicist, and the David B. Arnold Jr. Professor of Science, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Professor of Physics at Harvard University,[1][2][3] and an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.[4] She is best known for her work in the development of Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) ,[5][6][7] a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy method, and the discoveries of novel cellular structures using STORM. She received a 2019 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences for developing super-resolution imaging techniques that get past the diffraction limits of traditional light microscopes, allowing scientists to visualize small structures within living cells.[8] She was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019, and was awarded a Vilcek Foundation Prize in Biomedical Science in 2020[9]. Early life and education Zhuang'

People from Rugao

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Chinese science writers

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Writers from Nantong

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Larry Bartels

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Larry Bartels

Larry Martin Bartels (born May 16, 1956)[1] is an American political scientist and the Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions and Shayne Chair in Public Policy and Social Science at Vanderbilt University. Prior to his appointment at Vanderbilt, Bartels served as the Donald E. Stokes Professor of Public Policy and International Relations and founding director of the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Biography Bartels received his B.A. in political science with distinction from Yale College in 1978, his M.A. in political science, also from Yale, in 1978, and his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1983. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1995.[1] He has published three books, Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of The New Gilded Age (P

Yale College alumni

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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American social sciences writers

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James Anaya

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James Anaya

Stephen James Anaya is an American lawyer and the 16th Dean of the University of Colorado Boulder Law School.[1] He was formerly the James J. Lenoir Professor of Human Rights Law and Policy at the University of Arizona's James E. Rogers College of Law[2] and previously served for more than ten years on the faculty at the University of Iowa College of Law. In March 2008, he was appointed by the United Nations as its Special Rapporteur on the situation of the human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people, replacing Rodolfo Stavenhagen.[3] He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Education and work Anaya is a graduate of the University of New Mexico (B.A., 1980) and Harvard Law School (J.D., 1983). At Harvard Law School, he was a member of the Board of Student Advisers. He teaches and writes in the areas of international human rights, constitutional law, and issues concerning indigenous peoples.[2] Anaya has served as a consultant for organizations and government age

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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American officials of the United Nations

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Native American lawyers

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Karine Chemla

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Karine Chemla

Karina Chemla between Antoni Malet and Eberhard Knobloch, at Oberwolfach, 2009 Karine Chemla (born February 8, 1957) is a French historian of mathematics and sinologist who works as a director of research at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS).[1] She is also a senior fellow at the New York University Institute for the Study of the Ancient World.[2] She was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Education Chemla studied at Paris Diderot University and the École normale supérieure de jeunes filles, earning an agrégation in mathematics in 1978 and a diploma of advanced studies in 1979.[3] At this time, her work was in pure mathematics. However, in 1980, influenced by the work of Ilya Prigogine, she won a Singer–Polignac scholarship to travel to China and study the history of Chinese mathematics.[4] Returning to France, she earned her Ph.D. in the history of mathematics from Paris 13 University in 1982, and began working for CNRS at that time.[3] Contributions Ch

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Members of Academia Europaea

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French sinologists

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David Cannadine

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David Cannadine

Sir David Cannadine FBA FRSL FSA FRHistS FRSA (born 1950) is a British author and historian, who specialises in modern history and the history of business and philanthropy. He is currently a Dodge Professor of History at Princeton University,[1][2] a Visiting Professor of History at Oxford University, and the editor of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. He is also President of the British Academy[3], the UK's national academy for the humanities and social sciences. He also serves as the Chairman of the Trustees of the National Portrait Gallery in London and Vice-Chair of the Editorial Board of Past & Present. Cannadine is married to fellow historian Linda Colley.[4] Education and early career David Cannadine was born in Birmingham on 7 September 1950 and attended King Edward VI Five Ways School. He was educated at Clare College, Cambridge, where he took a double first in history, at St John's College, Oxford, where he completed his DPhil, and at Princeton University[5] where he was a Jane El

Fellows of the Royal Society of Arts

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Dictionary of National Biography

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Catherine Dulac

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Catherine Dulac

Catherine Dulac is the Higgins Professor in Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University, where she served as department chair from 2007 to 2013.[2] She is also an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She was born in 1963 in France. She came to the United States for her postdoctoral study in 1991. She is most notable for her research on the molecular biology of olfactory signaling in mammals, particularly including pheromones,[3] and downstream brain circuits controlling sex-specific behaviors.[4] She developed a novel screening strategy based on screening cDNA libraries from single neurons and a new method of cloning genes from single neurons. As a postdoc, Dulac discovered the first family of mammalian pheromone receptors when working in Nobel laureate Richard Axel's laboratory at Columbia University.[5] Biography Dulac grew up in Montpellier, France, graduated from the École Normale Supérieure de la rue d'Ulm, Paris, and earned a Ph.D. in developmental biology from the University

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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21st-century American biologists

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American women biologists

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Bill Drayton

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Bill Drayton

William "Bill" Drayton (born 1943 in New York City) is a social entrepreneur. Drayton was named by U.S. News & World Report as one of America's 25 Best Leaders in 2005.[1] He is responsible for the rise of the phrase "social entrepreneur", a concept first found in print in 1972.[2] Drayton is the founder and current chair of Ashoka: Innovators for the Public, a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to finding and fostering social entrepreneurs worldwide. Drayton also chairs two other 501(c)(3) organizations, namely Youth Venture and Get America Working! Drayton's philosophy of social entrepreneurs are individuals with innovative solutions to society's most pressing social problems. To quote Drayton, "Social entrepreneurs are not content just to give a fish or teach how to fish. They will not rest until they have revolutionized the fishing industry." He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Early Years Drayton's mother emigrated to the United States from Australia. His father

Ashoka USA Fellows

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Alumni of Balliol College, Oxford

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Kamaljit S. Bawa

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Kamaljit S. Bawa

Kamaljit Singh Bawa, FRS (born 7 April 1939 in Punjab, India) is an evolutionary ecologist, conservation biologist and a distinguished professor of Biology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He is also the founder of Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and Environment (ATREE). In 2012, Bawa received the first Gunnerus Sustainability Award, the world's major international award for work on sustainability. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[1] He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Academic career Bawa received B.S., M.S., and PhD degrees from Panjab University, Chandigarh, India. After receiving his PhD in 1967, he came to the United States as a postdoctoral research associate and instructor at College of Forest Resources, University of Washington. He received the Maria Moors Cabot and the Charles Bullard Research Fellowships at Harvard University in 1972 and worked as a research fellow at the Grey Herbarium, Harvard University from

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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EngvarB from August 2017

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Scientists from Punjab, India

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Jean-Louis Ferrary

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Jean-Louis Ferrary

Jean-Louis Ferrary (5 May 1948, Orléans) is a French historian, a specialist of ancient Rome. Biography Born in 1948, Jean-Louis Ferrary entered the École Normale Supérieure in 1967 and obtained his agrégation in classical letters in 1970. A member of the École française de Rome from 1973 until 1976, it was then elected a lecturer at the Sorbonne and continued his career at the École pratique des hautes études, where he has been a lecturer (1983) and director of studies (since 1989). His lecture title was « Histoire des institutions et des idées politiques du monde romain ». He received his doctorate of Letters in 1987 after working under the direction of Pierre Grimal and Claude Nicolet. His thesis, published under the title Philhellénisme et impérialisme : aspects idéologiques de la conquête romaine du monde hellénistique, is a milestone in the study of relations between Rome and the Greek world.[1] Jean-Louis Ferrary is interested in the history of institutions, law and the laws of ancient Rome, in the

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Knights of the National Order of Merit (France)

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French scholars of Roman history

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Laurie Glimcher

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Laurie Glimcher

Laurie Hollis Glimcher is an American physician-scientist who was appointed president and CEO of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in October 2016.[1] She was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Work Glimcher's research has focused on the immune system; she is known for early work with T cell differentiation, her discovery that Schnurri-3 regulates osteoblasts which led to a collaboration with Merck & Co., and her discovery of the role played by XBP-1 in lipogenesis and the unfolded protein response.[2][3] Glimcher's role helped discover Schnurri-3 (Shn3 for short) is a large zinc finger protein distantly related to Drosophila. Shn is a potent and essential regulator of adult bone formation.[4] Her research has had implications for understanding asthma, HIV, inflammatory bowel disease, and osteoporosis, and around 2016, on cancer immunotherapy.[5] She joined the board of directors of Bristol-Myers Squibb in 1997 and retired from the board in 2017.[6][7][8] Her research laborator

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Winsor School alumni

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Winsor School alumnae

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Martin Jay

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Martin Jay

Martin Evan Jay (born 1944) is the Sidney Hellman Ehrman Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley. He is an intellectual historian whose research interests have connected history with other academic and intellectual activities, such as the critical theory of the Frankfurt School, social theory, cultural criticism, and historiography. He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Career Jay received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Union College in 1965. In 1971, he completed his Doctor of Philosophy degree in history at Harvard University under the tutelage of H. Stuart Hughes. His dissertation was later revised into the book The Dialectical Imagination, which covers the history of the Frankfurt School from 1923 to 1950. While he was conducting research for his dissertation, he established a correspondence and friendship with many of the members of the Frankfurt School. He was closest to Leo Löwenthal, who had provided him access to personal letters and documen

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Scholars of Marxism

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Intellectual historians

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Annette Gordon-Reed

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Annette Gordon-Reed

Annette Gordon-Reed (born November 19, 1958)[1] is an American historian and law professor. She is currently the Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History at Harvard University, where she is also the Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and a professor of history in the university's Faculty of Arts & Sciences. Gordon-Reed is noted for changing scholarship on Thomas Jefferson regarding his relationship with Sally Hemings and her children. She was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for History and the National Book Award for Nonfiction and 15 other prizes in 2009 for her work on the Hemings family of Monticello. In 2010, she received the National Humanities Medal and a MacArthur Fellowship also known as the MacArthur "Genius Award."[2] Since 2018, she has served as a trustee of the National Humanities Center in Research Triangle Park, NC. She was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Background and education Gordon-Reed was born in Living

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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21st-century American historians

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People from Livingston, Texas

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Jennifer Higdon

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Jennifer Higdon

Jennifer Elaine Higdon (born December 31, 1962)[1] is an American composer of classical music professor. She has received many awards including the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Music for her Violin Concerto[2][3] and three Grammy Awards for Best Contemporary Classical Composition, in 2010, 2018, and 2020. She was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Biography Higdon was born in Brooklyn, New York. She spent the first 10 years of her life in Atlanta, Georgia before moving to Seymour, Tennessee. Her father, Charles Higdon, was a painter and made efforts to expose his children to different types of art. He took them to various exhibitions of new and experimental art that gave her her earliest exposure to art and helped her to form an idea of what art was.[4] She also developed an interest in photography and writing at an early age.[5] Despite her early introduction to art, she received very little exposure to classical music in her home. Instead, her early musical education came from list

20th-century American women musicians

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21st-century American women musicians

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Charles Ives Prize winners

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Jonathan Lear

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Jonathan Lear

Jonathan Lear is the John U. Nef Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee on Social Thought, professor of philosophy, and Roman Family Director of the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society at the University of Chicago.[1] Education and career Lear was educated at Yale and Cambridge, and earned his Ph.D. in philosophy at Rockefeller University with a dissertation on Aristotle's logic directed by Saul Kripke. He also trained at the Western New England Institute for Psychoanalysis. He subsequently won the Gradiva Award from the National Association for Psychoanalysis three times for work that advances psychoanalysis. Before moving to Chicago permanently in 1996, Lear taught philosophy at Cambridge University (1979-1985), where he was a Fellow of Clare College and Yale University (1978–79, 1985-1996). He was previously married to the political scientist Cynthia Farrar, of the Farrar publishing dynasty, and is currently married to Gabriel Richardson Lear, a fellow member of the philosophy departmen

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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21st-century American philosophers

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Philosophers of psychology

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Brian Joseph

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Brian Joseph

Brian D. Joseph (born November 22, 1951) is an American linguist specializing in historical linguistics. He is a Distinguished University Professor of Linguistics and the Kenneth E. Naylor Professor of South Slavic Linguistics at The Ohio State University.[1] His research interests include language change, Greek linguistics, Balkan linguistics, and morphological theory. He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Joseph received an A.B. in linguistics from Yale University, and his A.M. and PhD in linguistics from Harvard University. He has spent his entire professional career at Ohio State University.[2] Joseph was the Vice-President of the Linguistic Society of America in 2018 and is currently serving as the organization's President. [3] He was previously President of the North American Association for the History of the Language Sciences and currently serves as co-editor of the Journal of Greek Linguistics.[4] References "Brian D. Joseph". Ohio State University. Retrieved 2

Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Ohio State University faculty

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Linguists from the United States

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Roger Myerson

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Roger Myerson

Roger Bruce Myerson (born 1951) is an American economist and professor at the University of Chicago. He holds the title of the David L. Pearson Distinguished Service Professor of Global Conflict Studies at The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts in the Harris School of Public Policy, the Griffin Department of Economics, and the College.[1] Previously, he held the title The Glen A. Lloyd Distinguished Service Professor of Economics.[2] In 2007, he was the winner of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel with Leonid Hurwicz and Eric Maskin for "having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory."[3] He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.[4] Biography Roger Myerson was born in 1951 in Boston. He attended Harvard University, where he received his A.B., summa cum laude, and S.M. in applied mathematics in 1973. He completed his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University in 1976.[5] His doctorate thesis

Jewish Nobel laureates

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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20th-century American economists

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Erin K. O'Shea

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Erin K. O'Shea

Erin K. O'Shea Ph.D. is President of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). In 2013, she was named HHMI's Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer. Prior to that, she was a Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. In 2016, her appointment as future, and first woman, President of HHMI was announced.[1] She has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator since 2000.[2] Early life and education Erin O'Shea is one of five children, born in Leroy, New York.[3] O'Shea earned her A.B. in Biochemistry from Smith College in 1988 and her Ph.D. in Chemistry from MIT in 1992 at age 26[4][3] working with Peter S. Kim studying leucine zippers. She was a post doctoral fellow at University of California, Berkeley from 1992 to 1993.[4] Career and Research During her post doctoral fellowship, O'Shea worked with Robert Tjian and Ira Herskowitz studying chromatin regulation of transcription in yeast.[5] When she was joined by her graduate sc

American women biochemists

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Members of the American Philosophical Society

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Howard Hughes Medical Investigators

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Naomi Oreskes

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Naomi Oreskes

Naomi Oreskes (born November 25, 1958)[1] is an American historian of science. She became Professor of the History of Science and Affiliated Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University in 2013, after 15 years as Professor of History and Science Studies at the University of California, San Diego.[2] She has worked on studies of geophysics, environmental issues such as global warming, and the history of science. In 2010, Oreskes co-authored Merchants of Doubt which identified some parallels between the climate change debate and earlier public controversies.[3] Background Oreskes is the daughter of Susan Eileen (née Nagin), a teacher,[4] and Irwin Oreskes, a professor of medical laboratory sciences and former dean of the School of Health Sciences at Hunter College in New York.[5][6][7][8][9] She has three siblings: Michael Oreskes, a journalist; Daniel Oreskes, an actor; and Rebecca Oreskes, a writer and former U.S. Forest Service ranger.[7] She has worked as a consultant for the United St

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Romila Thapar

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Romila Thapar

Romila Thapar (born 30 November 1931) is an Indian historian as well as an emerita professor whose principal area of study is ancient India. She is the author of several books including the popular volume, A History of India, and is currently Professor Emerita at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) in New Delhi. She has been offered the Padma Bhushan award twice but has declined it both times. Early life, family and education Romila is the daughter of army doctor Daya Ram Thapar, who served as the Director General of the Indian Armed Forces Medical Services. The late journalist Romesh Thapar was her brother while Karan Thapar is a cousin.[1] As a child, she attended schools in various cities in India depending on her father's military postings. Later she attended intermediate of arts at Wadia College, Pune. After graduating from Panjab University in English literature, Thapar obtained a second bachelor's honors degree and a doctorate in Indian history under A. L. Basham from the School of Oriental and African

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Clifford Tabin

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Clifford Tabin

Clifford James Tabin (born 1954)[11] is chairman of the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School.[9][12] Education Tabin was educated at the University of Chicago where he was awarded a BS in physics in 1976.[9] He went on to graduate school at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was awarded a PhD in 1984 for work on the regulation of gene expression in the Ras subfamily of oncogenes supervised by Robert Weinberg based in the MIT Department of Biology.[13] In Weinberg's lab, Tabin constructed murine leukemia virus,[8] the first recombinant retrovirus that could be used as a eukaryotic vector.[12] Career Following his PhD, Tabin did postdoctoral research with Douglas A. Melton at Harvard University, then moved to Massachusetts General Hospital where he worked on the molecular biology of limb development. He was appointed to the faculty in the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School in 1989, and promoted to full professor in 1997 and chairman of the department in January 2007.[14][15]

Charles H. Revson Foundation

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Chris Stringer

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Chris Stringer

Christopher Brian "Chris" Stringer FRS (born 1947), is a British physical anthropologist noted for his work on human evolution. Biography Growing up in a working-class family in the East End of London, Stringer's interest in anthropology began in primary school, where he undertook a project on Neanderthals.[1] Stringer studied anthropology at University College London,[2] holds a PhD in Anatomical Science and a DSc in Anatomical Science (both from Bristol University.[3] Stringer joined the permanent staff of the Natural History Museum in 1973. He is currently Research Leader in Human Origins. Research Stringer is one of the leading proponents of the recent African origin hypothesis or ″Out of Africa″ theory, which hypothesizes that modern humans originated in Africa over 100,000 years ago and replaced, in some way, the world's archaic humans, such as Homo floresiensis and Neanderthals, after migrating within and then out of Africa to the non-African world within the last 50,000 to 100,000 years. He alway

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Recent African origin of modern humans

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Philip E. Tetlock

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Philip E. Tetlock

Philip E. Tetlock (born 1954) is a Canadian-American political science writer, and is currently the Annenberg University Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is cross-appointed at the Wharton School and the School of Arts and Sciences. He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. He has written several non-fiction books at the intersection of psychology, political science and organizational behavior, including Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction; Expert Political Judgment: How Good Is It? How Can We Know?; Unmaking the West: What-if Scenarios that Rewrite World History; and Counterfactual Thought Experiments in World Politics. Tetlock is also co-principal investigator of The Good Judgment Project, a multi-year study of the feasibility of improving the accuracy of probability judgments of high-stakes, real-world events. Biography Tetlock was born in 1954 in Toronto, Canada and completed his undergraduate work at the University of British Columbia an

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Gary Ruvkun

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Gary Ruvkun

Gary Bruce Ruvkun (born 26 March 1952, Berkeley, California)[1] is an American molecular biologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School in Boston.[2] Ruvkun discovered the mechanism by which lin-4, the first microRNA (miRNA) discovered by Victor Ambros, regulates the translation of target messenger RNAs via imperfect base-pairing to those targets, and discovered the second miRNA, let-7, and that it is conserved across animal phylogeny, including in humans. These miRNA discoveries revealed a new world of RNA regulation at an unprecedented small size scale, and the mechanism of that regulation. Ruvkun also discovered many features of insulin-like signaling in the regulation of aging and metabolism. He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Education Ruvkun obtained his undergraduate degree in 1973 at the University of California, Berkeley. His PhD work was done at Harvard University in the laboratory of Frederick M. Ausubel, where h

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Patricia J. Williams

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Patricia J. Williams

Patricia J. Williams (born August 28, 1951) is an American legal scholar and a proponent of critical race theory, a school of legal thought that emphasizes race as a fundamental determinant of the American legal system.[1] Early life Williams received her bachelor's degree from Wellesley College in 1972, and her Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School in 1975. Career Williams worked as a consumer advocate in the office of the City Attorney in Los Angeles, was a fellow in the School of Criticism and Theory at Dartmouth College and served as associate professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School and its department of women's studies. She was formerly the James L. Dohr Professor of Law at Columbia University where she has taught since 1991.[2] As of July 1 2019, she is the incoming Director of Law, Technology, and Ethics at Northeastern University.[3] Williams has served on the advisory council for the Medgar Evers College for Law and Social Justice of the City University of New York, the board of trus

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Judith Jarvis Thomson

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Judith Jarvis Thomson

Judith Jarvis Thomson (born October 4, 1929) is an American moral philosopher. She was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. Childhood and education Born in New York City, on October 4, 1929, Judith (Jarvis) Thomson was the second child of Theodore Jarvis (Javitz), an accountant, and Helen (Vostrey) Jarvis, an English teacher. Her mother was of Catholic Czech extraction, and her father was descended from a line of Eastern European rabbis, including Rabbi Hayyim Eliezer Wachs of Kalish and Rabbi Jacob Emden. Raised in an observant family on the Lower East Side, Theodore Javitz changed his name to Jarvis in 1918. His relationship with his wife, which began at socialist summer camp, was a source of tension for both their families.[1] Helen Jarvis died when Judith was six, and Theodore Jarvis remarried two years later. His second wife had two children. She was a successful interior designer and an arts and antique dealer and importer.[2] Judith attended elementary school in New York

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Thomas Cooper (American politician, born 1759)

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Thomas Cooper (American politician, born 1759)

Thomas Cooper (October 22, 1759 – May 11, 1839) was an Anglo-American economist, college president and political philosopher. Cooper was described by Thomas Jefferson as "one of the ablest men in America" and by John Adams as "a learned ingenious scientific and talented madcap." Dumas Malone stated that "modern scientific progress would have been impossible without the freedom of the mind which he championed throughout life."[1] His ideas were taken very seriously in his own time: there were substantial reviews of his writings, and some late eighteenth-century critics of materialism directed their arguments against Cooper, rather than against the better-known Joseph Priestley. Early life in Europe Cooper was born in Westminster, England. He attended University College, Oxford, but did not graduate, supposedly refusing the religious test. He then studied law at the Inner Temple, medicine and the natural sciences. He travelled the northern court circuit for a few years; it is unclear in the records whether he

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Noel Swerdlow

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Noel Swerdlow

Noel Mark Swerdlow (born 1941) is a professor emeritus of history, astronomy and astrophysics at the University of Chicago. He is currently a visiting professor at the California Institute of Technology. Career Swerdlow specializes in the history of exact sciences, astronomy in particular, from antiquity through the 17th century.[1] In 1988 Swerdlow received the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, often referred to as the "genius grant."[2] In the same year he published the book The Babylonian Theory of the Planets (Princeton University Press). In 1988 he was also elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society, the oldest learned society in the United States, dating to 1743.[3] References "Noel M. Swerdlow" "Fellows List - August 1988 - MacArthur Foundation" Archived February 12, 2010, at the Wayback Machine "Members Search: Noel Swerdlow." American Philosophical Society. See also Hipparchus On Sizes and Distances

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Geoffrey R. Stone

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Geoffrey R. Stone

Geoffrey R. Stone (born 1946) is an American law professor and noted First Amendment scholar. He is currently the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. Biography Stone completed a B.S. degree in 1968 at the University of Pennsylvania, and a J.D. degree in 1971 at the University of Chicago Law School, where he was editor-in-chief of the University of Chicago Law Review. He clerked for Judge J. Skelly Wright of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in 1971-72, and then for Justice William J. Brennan Jr. of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1972-73.[1] Stone has been a law professor at Chicago since 1973. He served as dean of the Law School from 1987 to 1994, and as provost of the University of Chicago from 1994 to 2002. He also served as Interim Dean of the Law School from July 1, 2015 to November 1, 2015 while the School searched for a replacement for Michael H. Schill.[2] Stone is a member of the Board of Directors of the American C

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Witmer Stone

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Witmer Stone

Witmer Stone (September 22, 1866 – May 24, 1939) was an American ornithologist, botanist, and mammalogist, and was considered one of the last of the “great naturalists.”[1] Stone is remembered principally as an ornithologist. He was president of the American Ornithologists’ Union (AOU) 1920–23, and was editor of the AOU's periodical The Auk 1912–1936. He spearheaded the production of the 4th edition of the AOU checklist, published in 1931. He worked for over 50 years in the Ornithology Department at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, eventually serving as Director of the institution. Stone was one of the founding members of the Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) in 1890 and was actively involved in the organization for the remainder of his life. Stone was one of only two scientists (Joseph Grinnell was the other) to serve as president of both the AOU and the American Society of Mammalogists, and he co-authored two popular books about mammals. His outstanding botanical contribution was Th

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Harlan F. Stone

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Harlan F. Stone

Harlan Fiske Stone (October 11, 1872 – April 22, 1946) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1925 to 1941 and then as the Chief Justice of the United States from 1941 until his death in 1946. He also served as the U.S. Attorney General from 1924 to 1925 under President Calvin Coolidge, with whom he had attended Amherst College as a young man. His most famous dictum was: "Courts are not the only agency of government that must be assumed to have capacity to govern."[1] Born in Chesterfield, New Hampshire, Stone practiced law in New York City after graduating from Columbia Law School. He became the dean of Columbia Law School and a partner with Sullivan & Cromwell. During World War I, he served on the War Department Board of Inquiry, which evaluated the sincerity of conscientious objectors. In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge appointed Stone as the Attorney General. Stone sought to reform the Department of Justice in the aftermath of several scan

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Alan Hodgkin

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Alan Hodgkin

Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin OM KBE PRS[1] (5 February 1914 – 20 December 1998) was an English physiologist and biophysicist, who shared the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Andrew Huxley and John Eccles. Early life and education Hodgkin was born in Banbury, Oxfordshire, on 5 February 1914. He was the oldest of three sons of Quakers George Hodgkin and Mary Wilson Hodgkin. His father was the son of Thomas Hodgkin and had read for the Natural Science Tripos at Cambridge where he had befriended electrophysiologist Keith Lucas.[2] Because of poor eyesight he was unable to study medicine and eventually ended up working for a bank in Banbury. As members of the Society of Friends, George and Mary opposed the Military Service Act of 1916 and had to endure a great deal of abuse from their local community, including an attempt to throw George in one of the town canals.[3] In 1916 George Hodgkin travelled to Armenia as part of an investigation of distress. Moved by the misery and suffering of Armenian refugee

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Alejandro Ramírez (economist)

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Alejandro Ramírez (economist)

Alejandro Ramírez y Blanco (February 25, 1777–May 20, 1821 [1]) was a Spanish economist. Born in Alaejos, Ramírez studied Economy at the University of Alcalá, then immigrated to Guatemala in 1795. In 1802, he served as secretary to Guatemala's Captain general, Antonio González Mollinedo y Saravia. On December 12, 1812, Ramírez was sworn in as intendant of Puerto Rico. He established a series of economical reforms that helped reduce government expenses and established a fairer income tax, allowing the island's municipalities major control of their finances and making Puerto Rico self-sufficient. Ramírez was one of the founders of Sociedad Económica de Amigos del País, and published Diario Económico de Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico's second-ever newspaper. In 1814, he founded the Real Lotería de Puerto Rico, the oldest lottery in the Americas. He also created an economical system to promote agricultural development. In 1815, he was named Supervisor of the Finances of the Crown in Cuba, then Superintendent of Cuba

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Elizabeth Cropper

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Elizabeth Cropper

Marjorie Elizabeth Cropper (born 11 August 1944) is a British-born art historian with a special interest in Italian and French Renaissance and Baroque art and art literature. Dean of the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) since December 2000, she previously held positions as Professor of Art History at Johns Hopkins University and director of the university’s Charles S. Singleton Center for Italian Studies at Villa Spelman in Florence. Early life Born on 11 August 1944,[1] Cropper was educated at Wakefield Girls' High School, winning a place at Newnham College, Cambridge. After studying History (Part I) and Architecture and Fine Arts (Part II) she graduated with a BA (Hons), subsequently converted to an MA. She was awarded an English Speaking Union and Fulbright Fellowship for graduate study at Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania, where, in 1972, she completed her Ph.D dissertation on the Italian printmaker and draftsman Pietro Testa.[2] Career Following a Leverhulm

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Joel E. Cohen

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Joel E. Cohen

Joel Ephraim Cohen (born February 10, 1944) is a mathematical biologist. He is currently Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of Populations at the Rockefeller University in New York City and at the Earth Institute of Columbia University, where he holds a joint appointment in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, and the School of International and Public Affairs. He is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.[1] Education Cohen grew up in Washington DC and Michigan and graduated from Cranbrook School in 1961. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree in applied mathematics from Harvard University in 1965, and earned a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard in 1970.[2] In 1973, he received from Harvard another doctorate in population sciences and tropical public health.[3] He received an honorary master's degree from the University of Cambridge UK in 1974. Research Cohen has since taught or lectured at Harvard University,

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Judith Lean

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Judith Lean

Judith L. Lean is an Australian-American solar and climate scientist. She is a senior scientist at the United States Naval Research Laboratory. Lean is a three time recipient of the NASA Group Achievement Award and an elected member and fellow of several academic societies. Education Lean completed a bachelor's degree in physics, with honors, at the Australian National University in 1974 and her doctorate in atmospheric physics at the University of Adelaide in 1980.[1] Her dissertation was titled Atmospheric ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy.[2] Career Lean worked at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and the Applied Research Research Corporation in Maryland. In 1988, she joined the United States Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as a research physicist in the Space Science Division. She is a senior scientist for Sun-Earth System Research at the NRL.[1] Research Lean's research focuses on the mechanisms, measurements, modeling, and forecasting of variations in the Sun's rad

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Charles Francis Adams Sr.

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Charles Francis Adams Sr.

Charles Francis Adams Sr. (August 18, 1807 – November 21, 1886) was an American historical editor, writer, politician, and diplomat.[1] He was a son of President John Quincy Adams and grandson of President John Adams, about whom he wrote a major biography. Adams served two terms in the Massachusetts State Senate before running unsuccessfully as vice-presidential candidate for the Free Soil Party in the election of 1848 on a ticket with former president Martin Van Buren. During the Civil War, Adams served as the United States Minister to the United Kingdom under Abraham Lincoln, where he played a key role in keeping the British government neutral and not diplomatically recognizing the Confederacy. Adams became an overseer of Harvard University and built Adams National Historical Park, a library in Quincy, Massachusetts honoring his father. Early life Adams was born in Boston on August 18, 1807. He was one of three sons and a daughter born to John Quincy Adams (1767–1848) and Louisa Catherine Johnson (1775–

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Alexander Nehamas

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Alexander Nehamas

Alexander Nehamas (Greek: Αλέξανδρος Νεχαμάς; born 22 March 1946) is a Greek-born American philosopher. He is Professor of Philosophy and Edmund N. Carpenter, II Class of 1943 Professor in the Humanities at Princeton University, where he has taught since 1990, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and Member of the American Philosophical Society (since 2016[1]), the Academy of Athens since 2018. He works on Greek philosophy, aesthetics, Friedrich Nietzsche, Michel Foucault, and literary theory. Biography Nehamas was born in Athens, Greece in 1946. In 1964, he enrolled to Swarthmore College. He graduated in 1967 and completed his doctorate (titled Predication and the Theory of Forms in the 'Phaedo') under the direction of Gregory Vlastos at Princeton University in 1971. He taught at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pennsylvania before joining the Princeton faculty in 1990.[2] Philosophical work His early work was on Platonic metaphysics and aesthetics as well as the phi

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Michael Bloomberg

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Michael Bloomberg

Michael Rubens Bloomberg[2] (born February 14, 1942) is an American politician, businessman, and author. He is the CEO and majority owner of Bloomberg L.P., which he co-founded. Bloomberg was the mayor of New York City from 2002 to 2013. He is currently a candidate in the Democratic Party primaries for the 2020 United States presidential election. Bloomberg grew up in Medford, Massachusetts and attended Johns Hopkins University and Harvard Business School. He began his career at the securities brokerage Salomon Brothers, before forming his own company in 1981, Bloomberg L.P., a financial services, software, and mass media company that is known for its Bloomberg Terminal, a computer software system providing financial data widely used in the financial industry. He spent the next twenty years as its chairman and CEO. As of February 2020, this made him the ninth-richest person in the United States and the twelfth-richest person in the world; his net worth was estimated at $61.8 billion.[1] Since signing The Giv

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Jonathan Fanton

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Jonathan Fanton

Jonathan F. Fanton (born 1943) is the immediate past president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[1] He previously served as the president of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation from 1999 to 2009 and as the president of The New School for Social Research from 1982 to 1999.[2] He has served as board chair for several organizations, including Human Rights Watch,[3] the Security Council Report,[4] and the New York State Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities.[5] He currently chairs the board of Scholars At Risk[6] and serves on the board of the Asian Cultural Council,[7] the board of the Benjamin Franklin House,[8] and the advisory board of the Newman’s Own Foundation.[9] He was elected a fellow of the American Academy in 1999.[10] Early life and career Born in Mobile, Alabama, Fanton grew up in Trumbull and Weston, Connecticut. In 1961, he graduated from Choate School. At Yale University, he earned a baccalaureate degree in 1965, and a Ph.D. in American history in 1978.[1

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Menahem Yaari

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Menahem Yaari

Menahem E. Yaari (מנחם יערי; born in 1935) is an Israeli economist who has been the S.A. Schonbrunn Professor of Mathematical Economics at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and was the President of the Open University of Israel from 1992 to 1997. [1] He was awarded the Israel Prize in 1987, the Rothschild Prize in the Social Sciences in 1994, and the EMET Prize in the Social Sciences in 2012. Biography Yaari was born in Jerusalem.[1] He obtained a B.A. in Economics and Philosophy from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1958, and a Ph.D. in Economics and Statistics from Stanford University in 1962.[1] From 1962 to 1967 Yaari was an Assistant Professor and Associate Professor at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, and a member of the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics at the university.[1][2] From 1967 to 1970 he was a Senior Lecturer and Associate Professor of Economics and Philosophy of Science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.[1] Since 1971 Yaari has been the S.A. Schonbrunn Pr

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John V. Fleming

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John V. Fleming

John V. Fleming John V. Fleming is an American literary critic and the Louis W. Fairchild, '24 Professor of Literature and Comparative Literature, emeritus, at Princeton University. Career Fleming graduated from The University of the South in 1958. After studying at Jesus College, Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, Fleming earned his Ph.D. from Princeton in 1963, where his dissertation director was D. W. Robertson, Jr. He spent two years as an Instructor in English at the University of Wisconsin–Madison before returning to Princeton as an assistant professor of English in 1965. Beginning in 1978 he took up a joint appointment in the Department of Comparative Literature. His fields of expertise included medieval English, French, and Latin literatures, and the history and culture of the Franciscan Order in the Middle Ages. He is perhaps best known in Princeton for his popular and erudite lecture course on Geoffrey Chaucer. From 1995 to 2006, he authored a weekly column in The Daily Princetonian, titled "Gladly Ler

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Claudia Goldin

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Claudia Goldin

Claudia Goldin (born May 14, 1946) is the Henry Lee Professor of Economics at Harvard University and director of the Development of the American Economy program at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Goldin was the president of the American Economic Association in 2013–14. In 1990, she became the first woman to be tenured at the Harvard economics department. Her research includes topics such as female labor force, income inequality, education, and the economic gender gap.[1] Education and work Goldin was born in New York City in 1946 to a Jewish family. She attended the Bronx High School of Science and Cornell University and completed her doctorate in economics at the University of Chicago in 1972.[2] Goldin is best known for her work on women in the U.S. economy. Her research interests include economic history, labor economics, gender and economics, and the economics of work, family, and education. Some of her more recent papers include "The Quiet Revolution that Transformed Women's Employment, Educ

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