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Public holidays in Malaysia


Chinese New Year

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Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year[a] (or generally referred to as Lunar New Year globally) is the Chinese festival that celebrates the beginning of a new year on the traditional Chinese calendar. The festival is usually referred to as the Spring Festival in mainland China,[b] and is one of several Lunar New Years in Asia. Observances traditionally take place from the evening preceding the first day of the year to the Lantern Festival, held on the 15th day of the year. The first day of Chinese New Year begins on the new moon that appears between 21 January and 20 February.[2] In 2019, the first day of the Chinese New Year was on Tuesday, 5 February, initiating the Year of the Pig. Chinese New Year is a major holiday in Greater China and has strongly influenced lunar new year celebrations of China's neighbouring cultures, including the Korean New Year (seol), the Tết of Vietnam, and the Losar of Tibet.[3] It is also celebrated worldwide in regions and countries with significant Overseas Chinese populations, including Singapore

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Malaysia Day

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Malaysia Day

Malaysia Day is a public holiday held on 16 September every year to commemorate the establishment of the Malaysian federation on the same date in 1963. The holiday commemorates the union of the existing states of Malaya, North Borneo, Sarawak and Singapore to form the federation of Malaysia; Singapore, however, was expelled from the federation less two years later, on 9 August 1965. History The formation of the new federation was planned to occur on 1 June 1963, but was later postponed to 31 August 1963, to coincide with the sixth Hari Merdeka. Several issues related to objections of neighbouring Indonesia and the Philippines to the formation of Malaysia delayed the declaration to 16 September of the same year. The postponement was also done to allow the United Nations team time to conduct fact-finding mission in North Borneo (now Sabah) and Sarawak regarding the two states participation in a new federation.[1][2] Contrary to popular beliefs, no referendum was ever conducted in both North Borneo and Sarawak

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Malaysian Independence

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Public holidays in Malaysia

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Public holidays in Malaysia

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Public holidays in Malaysia

     States that observe a Saturday–Sunday weekend     States that observe a Friday–Saturday weekend Public holidays in Malaysia are regulated at both federal and state levels, mainly based on a list of federal holidays observed nationwide plus a few additional holidays observed by each individual state and federal territory. The public holidays are a mix of secular holidays celebrating the nation and its history, and selected traditional holidays of the various ethnic and religious groups that make up the country. The legislation governing public holidays in Malaysia includes the Holidays Act 1951 (Act 369) in Peninsular Malaysia and Labuan, the Holidays Ordinance (Sabah Cap. 56) in Sabah and the Public Holidays Ordinance (Sarawak Cap. 8) in Sarawak. The workweek and weekend varies between states, with most states and federal territories observing a Saturday–Sunday weekend, while Johor, Kedah, Kelantan and Terengganu observe a Friday–Saturday weekend. In states and territories with a Saturday–Sunday weeke

Festivals in Malaysia

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Public holidays in Sabah

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Public holidays in Sabah

This is a list of the public holidays of the Malaysian state of Sabah and Sarawak. Dates given are those on which the holidays were celebrated in 2006. Some are Malaysian national holidays, while others are celebrated only in Sabah and Sarawak. List Holidays New Year’s Day, January 1 Chinese New Year, January - February Maal Hijrah (Awal Muharram, or Muslim New Year), 1 Muḥarram Maulidur Rasul (Birthday of the Prophet Muhammad), 12 Rabī‘ al-Awwal Good Friday, Friday in March or April Labour Day, May 1 Wesak Day, May Harvest Festival, May 30–31 (Sabah and Labuan only) Birthday Celebration of SPB Yang di-Pertuan Agong (King's Birthday), Saturday in June Hari Merdeka (National Day), August 31 Malaysia Day September 16 Birthday of Yang di-Pertua Negeri (State governor, Sabah only), Saturday in October Deepavali, October - November Eid Al-Fitr (Hari Raya Puasa), 1 Shawwal Christmas Day, December 25 Eid Al-Adha (Hari Raya Qurban), 10 Dhū al-Ḥijjah See also Public holidays in Malay

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Sabah

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North Borneo Self-government Day

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North Borneo Self-government Day

The first flag of Sabah after achieving a self-government on 31 August 1963. North Borneo Self-government Day is a self-government day celebrated on 31 August every year by the state of Sabah in Malaysia.[1][2][3] Since 2012, the holiday has been received widely by the Sabah state government and the citizens of Sabah, as the Hari Merdeka was not the right celebration day for the state.[4][5][6][7] While North Borneo Self-government Day is often referred to as 'Independence Day', this is strictly speaking incorrect, since British legislation on North Borneo's self-government did not provide for its independence prior to it joining to form the federation of Malaysia.[8] In 2018, the Borneo Heritage Foundation (BHF) has called the state government to gazette the day as "Sabah Day" and declare it as a state holiday.[9] Background After the end of the World War II, the territory was administered by the British Military Administration which later transferred to the Crown Colony government in 1946 as the British

NPOV disputes from June 2017

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August observances

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Public holidays in Malaysia

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Warriors' Day

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Warriors' Day

Warriors' Day (Malay: Hari Pahlawan; Chinese: 国家英雄日) is a day in Malaysia that commemorates the servicemen killed during the two World Wars and the Malayan Emergency. By extension, it honours all individuals who lost their lives in the line of duty throughout Malaysia's history. Until 2010, every year on 31 July, the King and the Prime Minister as well as senior representatives of the Royal Malaysian Police and the Armed Forces gathered at the National Monument in Lake Gardens to lay wreaths and pay homage to Malaysia's fallen heroes. They now gather at Merdeka Square, Kuala Lumpur, or in Kem Perdana in Sungai Besi, also in KL (the 2014 event was held there).

Public holidays in Malaysia

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July observances

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Fixed holidays

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Good Friday

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Good Friday

Good Friday is a Christian holiday commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus and his death at Calvary. It is observed during Holy Week as part of the Paschal Triduum on the Friday preceding Easter Sunday, and may coincide with the Jewish observance of Passover. It is also known as Holy Friday, Great Friday, and Black Friday.[2][3][4] Members of many Christian denominations, including the Anglican, Catholic, Protestant, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran, Methodist, Oriental Orthodox, and Reformed traditions, observe Good Friday with fasting and church services.[5][6][7] The date of Good Friday varies from one year to the next on both the Gregorian and Julian calendars. Eastern and Western Christianity disagree over the computation of the date of Easter and therefore of Good Friday. Good Friday is a widely instituted legal holiday around the world, including in most Western countries and 12 U.S. states.[8] Some countries, such as Germany, have laws prohibiting certain acts, such as dancing and horse racing, that are se

Divine Mercy

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Public holidays in Hungary

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Hari Merdeka

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Hari Merdeka

Hari Merdeka (Malaysian for 'Independence Day'), also known as Hari Kebangsaan ('National Day') is the official independence day of Malaysia as defined in the Article 160 of the Constitution of Malaysia, to commemorate the Malayan Declaration of Independence on 31 August 1957.[1] The day is marked by official and unofficial ceremonies and observances. The annual observation of 31 August as Malaysia's national day, despite being defined in the constitution, does not left unchallenged over the years. There have been calls by certain quarters to prioritize the celebration of Hari Malaysia (Malaysia Day) commemorating the formation of Malaysia in 1963,[2] especially from those of East Malaysia, by arguing that it is illogical to celebrate the 31 August 1957 as the national day when "Malaysia" only existed from 1963.[3][4] This argument is ignorant with the fact that legally, 'the Federation' as defined in the same Article 160 of the Constitution of Malaysia, is 'the Federation' that was established under Federat

Malaysian Independence

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1957 in Malaya

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Public holidays in Malaysia

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Sarawak Independence Day

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Sarawak Independence Day

The flag of the Kingdom of Sarawak used as the first flag of Sarawak after achieving self-government on 22 July 1963. Sarawak Independence Day (also known as Hari Kemerdekaan Sarawak, Hari Sarawak or Sarawak Day) is a holiday observed on 22 July every year by the state of Sarawak in Malaysia, celebrating the establishment of self-government and de facto independence on 22 July 1963.[1][2][3][4][5] The official Sarawak Independence Day public holiday was gazetted by the government of Sarawak in 2016[6][7][8] to raise awareness about Sarawak's past and contributions of its past leaders. Despite this official name, there are those who still avoided using this title, due to lack of awareness of its legality (it is, in fact, officially gazetted),[7] while some still argue about its historical accuracy, citing British legislation did not provide for an official, full independence.[9] Nonetheless, there was indeed a degree of de facto independence in the form of self-government ahead of it taking part in the found

Public holidays in Malaysia

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Sarawak

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July observances

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Gawai Dayak

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Gawai Dayak

Gawai Dayak is an annual festival celebrated by the Dayak people in Sarawak, Malaysia and West Kalimantan, Indonesia on 31 May and 1 June. It is a public holiday in Sarawak and is both a religious and a social occasion recognised since 1957. Gawai Dayak was the concept of the radio producers Tan Kingsley and Owen Liang taken up by the Dayak community. The British colonial government refused to recognise Dayak Day until 1962. They called it Sarawak Day for the inclusion of all Sarawakians as a national day, regardless of ethnic origin. On 1 June 1963, Datuk Michael Buma, a Betong native, hosted the celebrations of the first Gawai Dayak at his home at Siol Kandis, Kuching. [1] On 25 September 1964, Sarawak Day was gazetted as a public holiday acknowledging the formation of the Federation of Malaysia. The holiday was first celebrated on 1 June 1965 and it became a symbol of unity, aspiration and hope for the Dayak community. It is an integral part of Dayak social life. It is a thanksgiving day marking a bounti

Public holidays in Malaysia

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EngvarB from July 2014

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May observances

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Diwali

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Diwali

Diwali, Divali, Deepavali or Dipavali is the festival of lights, which is celebrated by Hindus, Jains, Sikhs and some Buddhists every autumn in the northern hemisphere (spring in southern hemisphere).[5][6] One of the most popular festivals of Hinduism, Diwali symbolises the spiritual "victory of light over darkness, good over evil and knowledge over ignorance." Light is a metaphor for knowledge and consciousness.[7][8][9] During the celebration, temples, homes, shops and office buildings are brightly illuminated.[10] The preparations, and rituals, for the festival typically last five days, with the climax occurring on the third day coinciding with the darkest night of the Hindu lunisolar month Kartika. In the Gregorian calendar, the festival generally falls between mid-October and mid-November.[11] In the lead-up to Diwali, celebrants will prepare by cleaning, renovating, and decorating their homes and workplaces.[12] During the climax, revellers adorn themselves in their finest clothes, illuminate the inte

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Public holidays in Singapore

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New Year's Day

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New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also simply called New Year or New Year's, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar. In pre-Christian Rome under the Julian calendar, the day was dedicated to Janus, god of gateways and beginnings, for whom January is also named. As a date in the Gregorian calendar of Christendom, New Year's Day liturgically marked the Feast of the Naming and Circumcision of Jesus, which is still observed as such in the Anglican Church and Lutheran Church.[2][3] In present day, with most countries now using the Gregorian calendar as their de facto calendar, New Year's Day is probably the most celebrated public holiday, often observed with fireworks at the stroke of midnight as the new year starts in each time zone. Other global New Year's Day traditions include making New Year's resolutions and calling one's friends and family.[1] Fireworks in London on New Year's Day at the stroke of midnight. History In Christendom, under wh

Public holidays in Singapore

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Public holidays in Thailand

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Kaamatan

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Kaamatan

Kaamatan or Pesta Kaamatan is a form of harvest festival celebrated annually in the state of Sabah in Malaysia. It is normally celebrated by the ethnic Kadazan-Dusuns, as well as by other related ethnic groups in the state, and lasts for the whole of the month of May, ending with a public holiday on a date selected by a priestess known as the bobohizan.[1][2]:417 A beauty pageant known as Unduk Ngadau will be held and it ends the harvest festival with a newly crowned Unduk Ngadau in the annual host district, Penampang. The Harvest Festival comes under the ambit of what is known as Momolianism, the belief system and life philosophy of the Kadazan-Dusun. There is also a dance performance called the Sumazau, a singing contest called Sugandoi, a bodybuilding competition, and other arts and crafts performances. Competitions such as hitting the gong and folk sports have also become one of the main events in this festival. Popular drinks during the festival are tapai and Kinomol, which is a traditional alak drink.

Public holidays in Malaysia

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Harvest festivals

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Federal Territory Day

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Federal Territory Day

Federal Territory Day or Hari Wilayah Persekutuan, also known simply as Hari Wilayah, is a state holiday for Federal Territory in Malaysia. It is celebrated on 1 February every year in Kuala Lumpur, Labuan and Putrajaya. The date marks the anniversary of formation of the Kuala Lumpur Federal Territory in 1974, ceded by the state of Selangor to the federal government of Malaysia. History The Federal Territory Day was introduced on 1 February 1974, four days after the Federal Territory Agreement was signed on 28 January 1974 by the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, Tuanku Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah of Kedah and the Sultan of Selangor, Almarhum Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah. On 16 April 1984, Labuan became the second federal territory, and on 1 February 2001, Putrajaya became the third federal territory of Malaysia. In addition, 1 February also have significance as the day of the formation of the Federation of Malaya in 1948. Main Theme and Venue The theme of the Federal Territory Day was introduced on 1 February 20

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Federal Territories in Malaysia

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February observances

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Vesak

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Vesak

Vesak (Pali: Vesākha, Sanskrit: Vaiśākha), also known as Buddha Jayanti,[6] Buddha Purnima and Buddha Day, is a holiday traditionally observed by Buddhists and some Hindus on different days in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tibet, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Mongolia, and in China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam as "Buddha's Birthday" as well as in other parts of the world.[7] The festival commemorates the birth, enlightenment (Buddhahood), and death (Parinirvāna) of Gautama Buddha in the Theravada or southern tradition.[8] History Queen Maya holds onto a branch of a tree while giving birth to the Buddha, who is received by Śakra as other gods look on. The decision to agree to celebrate Vesak as the Buddha's birthday was formalized at the first conference of the World Fellowship of Buddhists held in Sri Lanka in 1950, although festivals at this time in the Buddhist world are a centuries-old tradition. The resolution that was adopted at

Public holidays in Singapore

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Muharram

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Muharram

The Tenth day of Muharram is known as the Day of Ashura. Sometimes, as part of the Mourning of Muharram Shia Muslims practice faka (partial fasting) and Sunni Muslims practice fasting on Ashura. Shia Muslims mourn the death of Ḥusayn ibn ʿAlī and his family, honoring the martyrs by prayer and abstinence from joyous events. Shia Muslims do not fast on the 10th of Muharram, but some will not eat or drink until Zawal (afternoon) to show their sympathy with Husayn.[1] In addition there is an important ziyarat book, the Ziyarat Ashura about Husayn ibn Ali. In the Shia sect, it is popular to read this ziyarat on this date.[2] Muharram and Ashura The sighting of the new moon ushers in the Islamic New Year. The first month, Muharram, is one of the four sacred months mentioned in the Quran, along with the seventh month of Rajab, and the eleventh and twelfth months of Dhu al-Qi'dah and Dhu al-Hijjah, respectively, immediately preceding Muharram. During these sacred months, warfare is forbidden. Before the advent of

Public holidays in Malaysia

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Shia Islam

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Eid al-Fitr

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Eid al-Fitr

Eid al-Fitr ( eed əl FIT-ər; Arabic: عيد الفطر‎ ʻĪd al-Fiṭr, IPA: ),[4] also called the "Festival of Breaking the Fast", is a religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting (ṣawm). This religious Eid (Muslim religious festival) is the first and only day in the month of Shawwal during which Muslims are not permitted to fast. The holiday celebrates the conclusion of the 29 or 30 days of dawn-to-sunset fasting during the entire month of Ramadan. The day of Eid, therefore, falls on the first day of the month of Shawwal. The date for the start of any lunar Hijri month varies based on when the new moon is sighted by local religious authorities, so the exact day of celebration varies by locality. Eid al-Fitr has a particular salat (Islamic prayer) consisting of two rakats (units) and generally offered in an open field or large hall. It may be performed only in congregation (jamāʿat) and has an additional extra six Takbirs (raising of the hands to t

Public holidays in Singapore

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Public holidays in Malaysia

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