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Public holidays in Indonesia


Public holidays in Indonesia

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Public holidays in Indonesia

The following table indicates declared Indonesian government national holidays for the year 2018 only—cultural variants also provide opportunity for holidays tied to local events. Beside official holidays, there are the so-called "libur bersama" or "cuti bersama", or joint leave(s) declared nationwide by the government. In total there are 15 public holidays, and 5 "cuti bersama" or joint holidays. List of public holidays Date English name Local name Remarks 1 January New Year's Day Tahun Baru Masehi New Year of Gregorian calendar January/February Chinese New Year Tahun Baru Imlek Public holiday since 2003. March/April Day of Silence Hari Raya Nyepi Public holiday since 1983. Tahun Baru Saka March/April Good Friday Wafat Yesus Kristus the Friday before Easter Sunday (the first Sunday after the first Paschal Full Moon following the vernal equinox) Jumat Agung 1 May Labour Day Hari Buruh Internasional Public holiday between 1953 and 1968, reinforced since 2014. May/

Lists of public holidays by country

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Indonesian society

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Lebaran

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Lebaran

Family get together to have lebaran feast; ketupat, sayur lodeh, opor ayam, rendang, sambal goreng ati and emping are usually served next to peanuts and candies. Lebaran or Idul Fitri is the popular name for Eid al-Fitr in Indonesia[1] and is one of the major national holidays in the country. Lebaran holiday officially lasts for two days in the Indonesian calendar, although the government usually declares a few days before and after the Lebaran as a bank holiday. Many individuals or families, especially Muslims take paid time off from their workplace during these days. Etymology "Idul Fitri" is Indonesian spelling of Arabic "Eid al-Fitr". While "lebaran" is localized name for this festive occasion, the etymology is not clear. It is suggested derived from Javanese word lebar which means "finished",[1] then the word "lebar" is absorbed into Indonesian language with additional suffix "-an", so it becomes a common vocabulary for a celebration when the fasting ritual is "finished”, or derived from Sundanese wor

Islamic terminology

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Festivals in Indonesia

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Heroes Day (Indonesia)

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Heroes Day (Indonesia)

Heroes' Day or National Heroes' Day may refer to a number of commemorations of national heroes in different countries. It is often held on the birthday of a national hero or heroine, or the anniversary of their great deeds that made them heroes. Angola National Heroes Day in Angola is a holiday in Angola on 17 September, the birthday of the national hero Agostinho Neto. Bahamas National Heroes Day in the Bahamas has been a public holiday since 2013. It replaced Discovery Day, which celebrated the arrival of Christopher Columbus to the Americas. Barbados National Heroes' Day is a public holiday in Barbados on April 28.[1] Cape Verde Heroes' Day is a public holiday in Cape Verde on 20 January. It commemorates the 1973 assassination of Amílcar Cabral, who is remembered as a hero for fighting western colonialism and exploitation. Cayman Islands The fourth Monday in January is National Heroes' Day in the Cayman Islands; it was proclaimed with the National Heroes Law, providing for the declaration of pers

Generic types of holidays

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Public holidays in the United Kingdom

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Hero

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Galungan

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Galungan

Galungan is a Balinese holiday celebrating the victory of dharma over adharma.[1] It marks the time when the ancestral spirits visit the Earth. The last day of the celebration is Kuningan, when they return. The date is calculated according to the 210-day Balinese calendar. It is related to Diwali, celebrated by Hindus in other parts of the world, which also celebrates the victory of dharma over adharma.[2][3] Diwali, however, is held at the end of the year. Significance Galungan marks the beginning of the most important recurring religious ceremonies. The spirits of deceased relatives who have died and been cremated return to visit their former homes, and the current inhabitants have a responsibility to be hospitable through prayers and offerings. The most obvious sign of the celebrations are the penjor - bamboo poles with offerings suspended at the end. These are installed by the side of roads. A number of days around the Kuningan day have special names, and are marked by the organization of particular act

Religious festivals in Indonesia

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February observances

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September observances

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Cuti bersama

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Cuti bersama

Cuti bersama (or the “joint holiday”, literally collective leave) is a collective leave day in Indonesia. Cuti bersama was introduced by the Indonesian government as a means of stimulating tourism within the country and increasing the efficiency of public servants. The holiday is counted in public servants' overall leave. Most private companies and businesses follow suit by adjusting employees' annual leave in line with government policy. During major religious holidays such as Eid-al-Fitr (Idul Fitri or Lebaran at the end of the Ramadan fasting month), the joint-holiday can span an entire working week. References Indonesian Holidays Bali News: Indonesian Public Holidays for 2006 See also Public holidays in Indonesia

Public holidays in Indonesia

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Secular holidays

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Nyepi

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Nyepi

Nyepi is a Balinese "Day of Silence" that is commemorated every Isakawarsa (Saka new year) according to the Balinese calendar (in 2019, it falls on March 7). It is a Hindu celebration mainly celebrated in Bali, Indonesia. Nyepi, a public holiday in Indonesia, is a day of silence, fasting and meditation for the Balinese. The day following Nyepi is also celebrated as New Year's Day.[1][2] On this day, the youth of Bali in the village of Sesetan in South Bali practice the ceremony of Omed-omedan or 'The Kissing Ritual' to celebrate the new year. The same day celebrated in India as Ugadi. Observed from 6 a.m. until 6 a.m. the next morning, Nyepi is a day reserved for self-reflection, and as such, anything that might interfere with that purpose is restricted. The main restrictions are no lighting fires (and lights must be kept low); no working; no entertainment or pleasure; no traveling; and, for some, no talking or eating at all. The effect of these prohibitions is that Bali's usually bustling streets and roads

Non-Gregorian March observances

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Holidays and observances by scheduling (to be d...

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Indonesia National Education Day

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Indonesia National Education Day

Indonesian National Education Day or hari pendidikan nasional abbreviated as HARDIKNASis celebrated on 2 May.[1] It was initiated in remembrance of Ki Hajar Dewantara, the founder of the Taman Siswa education system. His educational philosophy Tut Wuri Handayani means that we can help others learn by coaching and mentoring.And our honorable teachers are celebrate it :) References Reformasi and Teachers' Implementation of Civic Education in West Sumatra, Indonesia. ProQuest. 2008-01-01. ISBN 9781109027686.

Autumn holidays

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Spring holidays

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Buddha's Birthday in Indonesia

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Buddha's Birthday in Indonesia

Buddha's birthday is a holiday traditionally celebrated in most of East Asia to commemorate the birth of the Prince Siddhartha Gautama, later the Gautama Buddha and founder of Buddhism. It is also celebrated in South and Southeast Asia as Vesak which also acknowledges the enlightenment and death of the Buddha. According to the Theravada Tripitaka scriptures (from Pali, meaning "three baskets"), Gautama was born c. 563/480 BCE in Lumbini in modern-day Nepal, and raised in the Shakya capital of Kapilavastu, in the present-day Piprahwa, India or Tilaurakot, Nepal.[2][3] At the age of thirty five, he attained enlightenment (nirvana) underneath a Bodhi tree at Bodhgaya (modern-day India). He delivered his first sermon at Sarnath, India. At the age of eighty, he died at Kushinagar, India.[4] The exact date of Buddha's birthday is based on the Asian lunisolar calendars. The date for the celebration of Buddha's birthday varies from year to year in the Western Gregorian calendar, but usually falls in April or May. In

Holidays and observances by scheduling (to be d...

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Buddhism in Korea

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Observances set by the Burmese calendar

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Good Friday

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Good Friday

Good Friday is a Christian holiday commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus and his death at Calvary. It is observed during Holy Week as part of the Paschal Triduum on the Friday preceding Easter Sunday, and may coincide with the Jewish observance of Passover. It is also known as Holy Friday, Great Friday, and Black Friday.[2][3][4] Members of many Christian denominations, including the Anglican, Catholic, Protestant, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran, Methodist, Oriental Orthodox, and Reformed traditions, observe Good Friday with fasting and church services.[5][6][7] The date of Good Friday varies from one year to the next on both the Gregorian and Julian calendars. Eastern and Western Christianity disagree over the computation of the date of Easter and therefore of Good Friday. Good Friday is a widely instituted legal holiday around the world, including in most Western countries and 12 U.S. states.[8] Some countries, such as Germany, have laws prohibiting certain acts, such as dancing and horse racing, that are se

Divine Mercy

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Public holidays in Hungary

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Public holidays in Singapore

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Indonesian National Armed Forces Day

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Indonesian National Armed Forces Day

Indonesian Army Leopard tanks on parade during the Indonesian National Armed Forces Day ceremony 2017 The Indonesian National Armed Forces Day (Hari Tentara Nasional Indonesia, formerly Hari Angkatan Perang RI/Angkatan Bersenjata RI) abbreviated HUT TNI is a national day of Indonesia that is celebrated on 5 October, the day of foundation of the Tentara Keamanan Rakyat (People's Security Armed Forces), the predecessor of the TNI, in 1945, itself a replacement for the Badan Keamanan Rakyat (People's Security Bureau) established on 29 August the same year. Military parades, fun games, concerts and other events are held nationwide in major cities and provincial capitals in honor of the INAF's serving men and women and military veterans. History of Armed Forces Day The date of October 5 was chosen for the National Armed Forces Day in honor of the 1945 establishment of Southeast Asia's 5th oldest regular and standing armed forces per a government decree of the nascent Republic. The first ever parades, albelt in

Military of Indonesia

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Armed Forces days

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Military parades

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Mawlid

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Mawlid

Mawlid or Mawlid al-Nabi al-Sharif (Arabic: مَولِد النَّبِي‎ mawlidu n-nabiyyi, "Birth of the Prophet", sometimes simply called in colloquial Arabic مولد mawlid, mevlid, mevlit, mulud among other vernacular pronunciations; sometimes ميلاد mīlād) is the observance of the birthday of Islamic prophet Muhammad which is commemorated in Rabi' al-awwal, the third month in the Islamic calendar.[2] 12th Rabi' al-awwal[3] is the accepted date among most of the Sunni scholars, while Shi'a scholars regard 17th Rabi' al-awwal as the accepted date. The history of this celebration goes back to the early days of Islam when some of the Tabi‘un began to hold sessions in which poetry and songs composed to honour Muhammad were recited and sung to the crowds.[4] The Ottomans declared it an official holiday in 1588,[5] known as Mevlid Kandil.[6] The term Mawlid is also used in some parts of the world, such as Egypt, as a generic term for the birthday celebrations of other historical religious figures such as Sufi saints.[7] Most

Kandil

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Holidays and observances by scheduling (to be d...

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New Year's Day

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New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also simply called New Year or New Year's, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar. In pre-Christian Rome under the Julian calendar, the day was dedicated to Janus, god of gateways and beginnings, for whom January is also named. As a date in the Gregorian calendar of Christendom, New Year's Day liturgically marked the Feast of the Naming and Circumcision of Jesus, which is still observed as such in the Anglican Church and Lutheran Church.[2][3] In present day, with most countries now using the Gregorian calendar as their de facto calendar, New Year's Day is probably the most celebrated public holiday, often observed with fireworks at the stroke of midnight as the new year starts in each time zone. Other global New Year's Day traditions include making New Year's resolutions and calling one's friends and family.[1] Fireworks in London on New Year's Day at the stroke of midnight. History In Christendom, under wh

Public holidays in Singapore

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Public holidays in Thailand

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Chinese New Year

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Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year[a] (or generally referred to as Lunar New Year globally) is the Chinese festival that celebrates the beginning of a new year on the traditional Chinese calendar. The festival is usually referred to as the Spring Festival in mainland China,[b] and is one of several Lunar New Years in Asia. Observances traditionally take place from the evening preceding the first day of the year to the Lantern Festival, held on the 15th day of the year. The first day of Chinese New Year begins on the new moon that appears between 21 January and 20 February.[2] In 2019, the first day of the Chinese New Year was on Tuesday, 5 February, initiating the Year of the Pig. Chinese New Year is a major holiday in Greater China and has strongly influenced lunar new year celebrations of China's neighbouring cultures, including the Korean New Year (seol), the Tết of Vietnam, and the Losar of Tibet.[3] It is also celebrated worldwide in regions and countries with significant Overseas Chinese populations, including Singapore

Public holidays in the Philippines

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Public holidays in Singapore

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Muharram

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Muharram

The Tenth day of Muharram is known as the Day of Ashura. Sometimes, as part of the Mourning of Muharram Shia Muslims practice faka (partial fasting) and Sunni Muslims practice fasting on Ashura. Shia Muslims mourn the death of Ḥusayn ibn ʿAlī and his family, honoring the martyrs by prayer and abstinence from joyous events. Shia Muslims do not fast on the 10th of Muharram, but some will not eat or drink until Zawal (afternoon) to show their sympathy with Husayn.[1] In addition there is an important ziyarat book, the Ziyarat Ashura about Husayn ibn Ali. In the Shia sect, it is popular to read this ziyarat on this date.[2] Muharram and Ashura The sighting of the new moon ushers in the Islamic New Year. The first month, Muharram, is one of the four sacred months mentioned in the Quran, along with the seventh month of Rajab, and the eleventh and twelfth months of Dhu al-Qi'dah and Dhu al-Hijjah, respectively, immediately preceding Muharram. During these sacred months, warfare is forbidden. Before the advent of

Public holidays in Malaysia

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Shia Islam

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Vesak

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Vesak

Vesak (Pali: Vesākha, Sanskrit: Vaiśākha), also known as Buddha Jayanti,[6] Buddha Purnima and Buddha Day, is a holiday traditionally observed by Buddhists and some Hindus on different days in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tibet, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Mongolia, and in China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam as "Buddha's Birthday" as well as in other parts of the world.[7] The festival commemorates the birth, enlightenment (Buddhahood), and death (Parinirvāna) of Gautama Buddha in the Theravada or southern tradition.[8] History Queen Maya holds onto a branch of a tree while giving birth to the Buddha, who is received by Śakra as other gods look on. The decision to agree to celebrate Vesak as the Buddha's birthday was formalized at the first conference of the World Fellowship of Buddhists held in Sri Lanka in 1950, although festivals at this time in the Buddhist world are a centuries-old tradition. The resolution that was adopted at

Public holidays in Singapore

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Public holidays in Thailand

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Eid al-Fitr

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Eid al-Fitr

Eid al-Fitr ( eed əl FIT-ər; Arabic: عيد الفطر‎ ʻĪd al-Fiṭr, IPA: ),[4] also called the "Festival of Breaking the Fast", is a religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting (ṣawm). This religious Eid (Muslim religious festival) is the first and only day in the month of Shawwal during which Muslims are not permitted to fast. The holiday celebrates the conclusion of the 29 or 30 days of dawn-to-sunset fasting during the entire month of Ramadan. The day of Eid, therefore, falls on the first day of the month of Shawwal. The date for the start of any lunar Hijri month varies based on when the new moon is sighted by local religious authorities, so the exact day of celebration varies by locality. Eid al-Fitr has a particular salat (Islamic prayer) consisting of two rakats (units) and generally offered in an open field or large hall. It may be performed only in congregation (jamāʿat) and has an additional extra six Takbirs (raising of the hands to t

Public holidays in Singapore

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Public holidays in Malaysia

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Public holidays in Indonesia

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Independence Day (Indonesia)

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Independence Day (Indonesia)

Independence Day (Indonesian: Hari Kemerdekaan, colloquially known as Tujuhbelasan (the seventeenth) is a national holiday in Indonesia commemorating the anniversary of the Indonesia's Proclamation of Independence on 17 August 1945.[1] It was made a national holiday by then-President Sukarno in 1953. Ceremonies and festive events are held throughout the country to celebrate this national day, including flag hoistings, local games and neighbourhood competitions, patriotic and cultural parades.[2] Discounts are offered by participating shopping centres or businesses.[3] On this day, all Indonesian national televisions broadcast the National Independence Day Ceremony live from the Merdeka Palace in Jakarta. Televisions also often air Indonesian patriotic songs, nationalistic-themed films, advertisements, and talkshows. The obligation to hoist the flag The gapura gate in residential area in Jakarta, decorated in patriotic colors to commemorate independence day Republic of Indonesia Law Number 24 of 2009 co

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Festivals in Indonesia

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Independence days

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