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People convicted of obstruction of justice


Mario Biaggi

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Mario Biaggi

Mario Biaggi (October 26, 1917 – June 24, 2015) was a U.S. Representative from New York (served from 1969 to 1988) and former New York City police officer. He retired from the force as one of the most decorated police officers in New York Police Department (NYPD) history after being injured 11 times in the line of duty. He was elected as a Democrat from The Bronx in New York City. In 1987 and 1988, he was convicted in two separate corruption trials, and he resigned from Congress in 1988.[1] Early years Biaggi was born in East Harlem, New York, on 26 October 1917, to poor Italian immigrants from Piacenza[2] in northern Italy. His father, Salvatore Biaggi, was a marble setter. His mother, Mary, worked as a charwoman. At age 18, Biaggi became a substitute letter carrier for the U.S. Post Office. Later, he became a regular letter carrier; his mail route included the home of one of his heroes, New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia. He served nearly six years with the Post Office and, in a preview of things to

American police officers convicted of crimes

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People from East Harlem

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Politicians from the Bronx

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Christine Beatty

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Christine Beatty

Christine Rowland Beatty (born May 1970) served as the Chief of Staff from 2002 to 2008 to Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick. In January 2008, Beatty resigned amid an emerging political-sex scandal and criminal charges of perjury related to a whistleblower trial for lying under oath about her extramarital affair with disgraced former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick. Beatty and Kilpatrick sought to mislead jurors when they testified that they did not fire Deputy Police Chief Gary Brown. Kilpatrick pleaded guilty September 4, 2008, to two felony obstruction of justice charges, and was sentenced to four months in jail on October 28, 2008. Beatty was offered several plea bargains from Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy—one for as little as 150 days of prison time—but she refused.[1] Beatty was a respondent in a $25,000 settled slander lawsuit initiated by two police officers. On December 1, 2008, Beatty agreed to plead guilty to two felony counts, serve 120 days in jail, pay $100,000 in restitution, and be on proba

People from Detroit

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Howard University alumni

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People convicted of obstruction of justice

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Conrad Black

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Conrad Black

Conrad Moffat Black, Baron Black of Crossharbour,[3] KCSG (born August 25, 1944), is a Canadian-born British former newspaper publisher, author, and convicted felon. Black controlled Hollinger International, once the world's third-largest English-language newspaper empire,[4] which published The Daily Telegraph (UK), Chicago Sun-Times (U.S.), The Jerusalem Post (Israel), National Post (Canada), and hundreds of community newspapers in North America, before controversy erupted over the sale of some of the company's assets. In 2007, he was convicted on four counts of fraud in U.S. District Court in Chicago. While two of the criminal fraud charges were dropped on appeal, a conviction for felony fraud and obstruction of justice were upheld in 2010 and he was re-sentenced to 42 months in prison and a fine of $125,000. In 2018, Black wrote a flattering biography of Donald Trump. On May 15, 2019, he was granted a full pardon by President Donald Trump.[5] Early life and family Black was born in Montreal, Quebec, to

Recipients of American presidential pardons

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Canadian socialites

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Canadian male non-fiction writers

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Barry Bonds

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Barry Bonds

Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former professional baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants.[1] He received a record seven NL MVP awards, eight Gold Glove awards, a record 12 Silver Slugger awards, and 14 All-Star selections. He is considered to be one of the greatest baseball players of all time.[2][3][4][5][6] Bonds was regarded as an exceptional hitter: he led MLB in on-base plus slugging six times, and placed within the top five hitters in 12 of his 17 qualifying seasons.[7][8] He holds many MLB hitting records, including most career home runs (762), most home runs in a single season (73, set in 2001) and most career walks.[9] Bonds was also known as a talented all-around baseball player. He won eight Gold Glove awards for his defensive play in the outfield.[10] He stole 514 bases with his baserunning speed, becoming the first and only MLB player to date with at least 500 home runs and 500 stole

Baseball coaches from California

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Major League Baseball players with retired numbers

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African-American baseball coaches

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John Dean

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John Dean

John Wesley Dean III (born October 14, 1938) is a former attorney who served as White House Counsel for United States President Richard Nixon from July 1970 until April 1973. Dean is known for his role in the cover-up of the Watergate scandal and his subsequent testimony to Congress as a witness.[1] His guilty plea to a single felony in exchange for becoming a key witness for the prosecution ultimately resulted in a reduced sentence, which he served at Fort Holabird outside Baltimore, Maryland. After his plea, he was disbarred as an attorney. According to the FBI, Dean was the "master manipulator" of the Watergate affair. Shortly after the Watergate hearings, Dean wrote about his experiences in a series of books and toured the United States to lecture. He later became a commentator on contemporary politics, a book author, and a columnist for FindLaw's Writ. Dean had originally been a proponent of Goldwater conservatism, but he later became a critic of the Republican Party.[2][3][4] Dean has been particularl

American male non-fiction writers

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People from Flossmoor, Illinois

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People from Marion, Ohio

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Charles Colson

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Charles Colson

Charles Wendell Colson (October 16, 1931 – April 21, 2012), generally referred to as Chuck Colson, served as Special Counsel to President Richard Nixon from 1969 to 1970. Once known as President Nixon's "hatchet man", Colson gained notoriety at the height of the Watergate scandal, for being named as one of the Watergate Seven, and pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice for attempting to defame Pentagon Papers defendant Daniel Ellsberg.[1] In 1974 he served seven months in the federal Maxwell Prison in Alabama, as the first member of the Nixon administration to be incarcerated for Watergate-related charges.[2] Colson became an evangelical Christian in 1973. His mid-life religious conversion sparked a radical life change that led to the founding of his non-profit ministry Prison Fellowship and, three years later, Prison Fellowship International, to a focus on Christian worldview teaching and training around the world. Colson was also a public speaker and the author of more than 30 books.[3] He was the founde

People who have been pied

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Southern Baptists

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1988 books

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