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Sports deaths in California


Bob Burman

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Bob Burman

Robert R. Burman (23 April 1884 – 8 April 1916) was an American racecar driver who participated in the 1911 Indianapolis 500. Biography Burman was born in Imlay City, Michigan on April 23, 1884. He was the winner of the Prest-O-Lite Trophy Race in 1909. He competed at the inaugural Indianapolis 500 in 1911. Racing for racing promoter Ernest Moross, Burman set world records in his 200-horsepower Blitzen Benz racecar on the sands of Daytona Beach and at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1911.[1] He was killed in a road race in Corona, California on April 8, 1916 along with his riding mechanic Erick Schrader and a policeman on duty, when he rolled over in his open-cockpit Peugeot car.[2] Three spectators were also killed, and five others were seriously injured.[3] His death caused his friends Barney Oldfield and Harry Arminius Miller to join forces to build a race car that incorporated a roll cage inside a streamlined driver's compartment that completely enclosed the driver. It was called the Golden Submarin

AAA Championship Car drivers

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20th-century American racing drivers

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People from Imlay City, Michigan

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Frankie Campbell

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Frankie Campbell

Frankie Campbell (born Francesco Camilli; 1904 – August 25, 1930) was an Italian-American boxer who fought professionally as a heavyweight. He won 33 of his 40 career fights, losing four, drawing twice, and fighting to a no-contest in another. Campbell was killed in the ring by future heavyweight champion Max Baer on August 25, 1930, in San Francisco, California. Campbell was the brother of former Major League Baseball player Dolph Camilli. Last fight Max Baer was knocked down in the 2nd round, which enraged him, and he rose from the canvas to put all his power behind a solid right-hand punch that hit Campbell flush in the chin. Campbell later received a beating in the 5th round and then eventually died from the punch. An alternate take on this second round exchange is offered in the San Francisco Examiner from August 26, 1930. The article reads: Irwin [the referee] ruled that Baer had slipped and had not been dropped. He motioned Baer to his feet. In the meantime Campbell had walked the far side of the

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American male boxers

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Deaths due to injuries sustained in boxing

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Ray Cariens

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Ray Cariens

Raymond L. Cariens (May 1, 1896 – December 1, 1925) was an American racing driver from Evansville, Indiana who competed in the AAA Championship Car series. He made his debut in 1924 at Altoona Speedway. He then was a relief driver for Bennett Hill in the 1925 Indianapolis 500. Later that year he was killed in an accident during his second champ car start on the 1.25 mile (2.01 km) board oval in Culver City, California. External links Ray Cariens at ChampCarStats.com

20th-century American racing drivers

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Sports deaths in California

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Sportspeople from Evansville, Indiana

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Bob Carey (racing driver)

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Bob Carey (racing driver)

Bob Carey (28 September 1904 Anderson, Indiana – 16 April 1933 Los Angeles, California) was an American race car driver. He died in a qualifying crash at Legion Ascot Speedway, apparently due to a stuck throttle. Career Carey's first National Championship race was the 1932 Indianapolis 500. According to Speedway historian Donald Davidson, Carey endured a blown right rear tire (causing him to spin three times without hitting the wall or another car), and later a damaged shock absorber; in total he lost over 12 minutes to the leader, Fred Frame. Having led 36 laps earlier, he ultimately erased 4 minutes of the interval and finished 4th. Later that year he won at the one-mile dirt tracks in Detroit and Syracuse, and won the National Championship by 115 points over Indianapolis 500 champion Fred Frame. No driver since would win the National Championship in their first season until reigning F1 Champion Nigel Mansell in 1993. After finishing second to Bill Cummings at the Oakland Speedway one-mile dirt track in

20th-century American racing drivers

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Sportspeople from Anderson, Indiana

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Sports deaths in California

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Gaston Chevrolet

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Gaston Chevrolet

Gaston Chevrolet (4 October 1892 – 25 November 1920) was a French racecar driver and automobile manufacturer. Early life Born near Beaune, in the Côte-d'Or region of France where his Swiss parents had emigrated to a few years earlier, he was the younger brother of Louis (1878–1941, founder of the Chevrolet car company) and Arthur Chevrolet (1884–1946). After brother Louis emigrated to the United States and earned enough money, he sent for Gaston and Arthur to join him. Once there, Gaston worked as an automotive mechanic and joined his brothers in auto racing. In 1916, the year after older brother Louis left the Chevrolet car company, Gaston Chevrolet became a partner with Louis and Arthur in the new Frontenac Motor Corporation. Indianapolis 500 Driving a Frontenac race car, Chevrolet competed in the 1919 Indianapolis 500, finishing in tenth place while brother Louis finished seventh. Chevrolet broke the dominance of European built cars in the 1920 Indianapolis 500, winning the race in a redesigned Monro

People from Beaune

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20th-century American racing drivers

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Burials at Holy Cross and Saint Joseph Cemetery

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Billy Foster

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Billy Foster

William A. Foster (September 18, 1937 – January 20, 1967) was a Canadian racecar driver. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, Foster died in a crash during practice for a NASCAR Grand National stock car race at Riverside International Raceway in Riverside, California.[1] Foster won the 1963 CAMRA (Canadian American Modified Racing Association) in 1963 in the first year of the series. He also won the Utah Copper Cup race in 1963 and 1964. Foster also drove in the USAC Championship Car series, racing in the 1964-1966 seasons, with 28 career starts, including the 1965 and 1966 Indianapolis 500 races. He finished in the top ten 10 times, with his best finish in 2nd position in 1966 at Atlanta. Foster and Mario Andretti became best of friends, building a close relationship which Andretti claimed he would never do again with a fellow racer because Foster's death so significantly affected him. Foster was cousins with musician, producer, composer, arranger David Foster and with Canadian stock car driver Jim Steen

Sports deaths in California

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Racing drivers from British Columbia

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Sportspeople from Victoria, British Columbia

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Sonny Easley

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Sonny Easley

Lynwood Lacey "Sonny" Easley (June 5, 1939 - January 15, 1978) was an American racecar driver who is best known for competing in the NASCAR Winston West Series and a handful of Winston Cup Series events. Easley tallied nine Winston West victories over his career, including a victory in the first stock car race ever held at the Laguna Seca Raceway road course.[2] He finished 2nd in Winston West points on two different occasions, in 1973 and 1975. In 19 career Cup starts, Easley had a best finish of 5th place at the January 16, 1977 Winston Western 500 at Riverside International Raceway. During practice for a NASCAR modified sportsman race at Riverside on January 15, 1978, Easley was killed when his 1968 Camaro slid across the track into a trailer and pickup truck near pit road. A pit crew member for Tiny Keith, Douglas Grunst, was also killed in the incident.[3][4] Easley lived in Van Nuys, California. Easley was a 2003 inductee into the West Coast Stock Car Hall of Fame.[5] External links Race Results

People from Van Nuys, Los Angeles

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20th-century American racing drivers

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Sports deaths in California

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Mark Foo

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Mark Foo

Mark Sheldon Foo (February 5, 1958 – December 23, 1994) was a professional surfer. Foo drowned while surfing at Mavericks, Half Moon Bay, California. Early life Mark Foo was born in Singapore on February 5, 1958 to Colonel Charlie and Lorna Foo, Chinese photojournalists for the U.S. Information Agency. The family relocated to Hawaii when Foo was 10 years old. He spent his early childhood surfing the South Shore of O'ahu, and continued surfing throughout his teenage years. His family moved several times during his adolescence, but ultimately returned to Hawaii just before Foo finished high school. He studied for two years at the University of Hawaii.[1] Career In 1977, Foo joined the IPS World Tour, a professional surfing tour. In the early 1980s, Foo quit the IPS World Tour and stopped competing. Foo's passion for surfing big waves led him to surf larger and larger swells. In 1983, he surfed Waimea Bay, a famous big wave surfing spot on the North Shore of O'ahu, for the first time.[2] But it was on Januar

Big wave surfers

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World Surf League surfers

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Sportspeople of Chinese descent

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Walt Faulkner

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Walt Faulkner

Walt Faulkner (February 16, 1918[1] – April 22, 1956) was an American racing driver from Tell, Texas. He moved to Milledgeville, Georgia at the age of two-and-a-half, and to Lake Wales, Florida at the age of eight. He then moved to Los Angeles, California in 1936. Faulkner competed mainly in the National Championship and in stock car races. In 1950 Faulkner became the first rookie to win pole position at the Indianapolis 500. He died in 1956 after a qualifying crash at a USAC Stock Car event in Vallejo, California. Earlier in his career, Faulkner raced motorcycles and then midget cars for the Edelbrock dirt track racing team. He had great success in midget car racing and was inducted into the National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame in 2007. Faulkner was also inducted into the West Coast Stock Car Hall of Fame in 2006.[2] World Championship career summary The Indianapolis 500 was part of the FIA World Championship from 1950 through 1960. Drivers competing at Indy during those years were credited with World

Sportspeople from Los Angeles

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20th-century American racing drivers

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People from Childress County, Texas

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Nick Gabaldon

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Nick Gabaldon

Nicolás Rolando Gabaldón (February 23, 1927 – June 6, 1951) was an early surfer who is credited by surfing experts with being California's first documented surfer of African-American and Latino descent at a time when many beaches were segregated and opportunities for minorities more limited than today.[1][2] Despite being an amateur recreational surfer rather than a professional competitive surfer, he is widely considered a role model for his part in the history of surfing and African American history in the areas of Santa Monica and California.[3][4][5][6] Gabaldón was born February 23, 1927 in Los Angeles, California. His mother was Black and his father was Latino. Very little is known of his childhood. He lived most of his life in Santa Monica, California and was one of 50 black students at Santa Monica High School during the 1940s. Gabaldón taught himself how to surf at a 200-foot roped off stretch of demarcated beach which was part of Santa Monica State Beach. This area of beachfront was informally refe

People from Los Angeles

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Sports deaths in California

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American surfers

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Hank Gathers

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Hank Gathers

Eric "Hank" Gathers (February 11, 1967 – March 4, 1990) was an American college basketball player for the Loyola Marymount Lions who died after collapsing during a game. He was the second player in NCAA Division I history to lead the nation in scoring and rebounding in the same season. He originally played for the USC Trojans, but transferred with teammate Bo Kimble to Loyola Marymount after his freshman year. Gathers was born in Philadelphia, and was listed as 6 feet 7 inches (2.01 m) tall. High school Gathers played prep ball with Kimble at Dobbins Technical High School in Philadelphia with the pair leading the team to the Public League City championship in 1985.[1] College career USC Both Gathers and Kimble were recruited to the University of Southern California by head coach Stan Morrison and his top assistant, David Spencer. They were joined by high school All-American, Tom Lewis, and Rich Grande as the "Four Freshmen" star recruiting class.[2][3] Following an 11–17 season coaching the Trojans, Morri

Burials in Pennsylvania

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Deaths from cardiomyopathy

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Sportspeople from Philadelphia

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Derek Hersey

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Derek Hersey

Derek Hersey (right) and friends making PBJ sandwiches, Yosemite Valley, California Hersey's business card Hersey bouldering in Zion Derek Geoffrey Hersey (26 October 1956 – 28 May 1993)[1][2][3][4] was a British rock climber and for many years an active participant in the Boulder, Colorado climbing scene. Climbing specialization Hersey specialized in unroped "free solo" climbing, often in the 5.10–5.11 range; he died during such a free solo climb.[3][5] Few climbers have tried to repeat his achievements, which include many of Colorado's hardest traditional routes. Background Originally from Stretford, Greater Manchester, England, Hersey referred to Eldorado Canyon as his 'office', where he could be seen on any day of the week,[2][6] if not on a road trip to Yosemite National Park or elsewhere. He also referred to Boulder, Colorado's Liquor Mart as 'The Shrine', and described his climbing-chalk bag as 'my bag of courage'. Hersey was featured in Climbing Magazine[7][8] and posthumously in the film F

Deaths in Yosemite National Park

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Accidental deaths in California

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Sports deaths in California

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Harris Insinger

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Harris Insinger

Alfred Harris Insinger, Jr. (1 July 1909 Blue Bell, Pennsylvania – 8 September 1935 Oakland, California) was an American racecar driver. He was killed in a racing accident. Biography He was born on July 1, 1909 in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania to Alfred Harris Insinger, Sr. (1877-1918) and Catherine L. Meehan. He was killed in a racing accident on September 8, 1935 at Oakland Speedway in Oakland, California.[1] Indy 500 results Year Car Start Qual Rank Finish Laps Led Retired 1935 62 31 111.729 30 14 185 0 Flagged Totals 185 0 Starts 1 Poles 0 Front Row 0 Wins 0 Top 5 0 Top 10 0 Retired 0 References "Harris Insinger Dies In Crash At Oakland. Philadelphia Dare-devil Crushed as Car Tangles With Mount Piloted by Al Gordon in North". Los Angeles Times. Sep 9, 1935. Retrieved 2012-10-09. Harris Insinger, Los Angeles and Germantown (Pa.) driver, was fatally injured in the inaugural event of the racing season at Oakland Speedway today when his

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Sports deaths in California

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Racing drivers killed while racing

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Joe James (racing driver)

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Joe James (racing driver)

Joe James (May 23, 1925 – November 5, 1952) was an American racecar driver. He was born in Saucier, Mississippi, and was killed during a Champ Car race at San Jose Speedway, San Jose, California.[1] Indy 500 results Year Car Start Qual Rank Finish Laps Led Retired 1950 63/82 - - - - - - Did not qualify 1951 26 30 134.098 10 33 8 0 Drive shaft 1952 14 16 134.953 22 13 200 0 Running Totals 208 0 Starts 2 Poles 0 Front Row 0 Wins 0 Top 5 0 Top 10 0 Retired 1 World Championship career summary The Indianapolis 500 was part of the FIA World Championship schedule from 1950 through 1960. Drivers competing at Indy during those years were credited with World Championship points and participation. Joe James participated in 2 World Championship races but scored no World Championship points. Award He was inducted in the National Sprint Car Hall of Fame in 1997. References Gates, Bob. "California's Joe James Made His Ma

People from Harrison County, Mississippi

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Sports deaths in California

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Racing drivers killed while racing

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Al Lucas

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Al Lucas

Albert or Al Lucas may refer to: Al Lucas (American football) (1978–2005), professional American football player (NFL, AFL) Albert Lucas (athlete) (1899–1967), French hurdler Al Lucas (basketball) (1922–1995), professional basketball player who played one season for the Boston Celtics Al Lucas (musician) (1916–1983), Canadian jazz bassist and studio musician Albert Lucas (Jewish activist) (1859–1923), British-born American activist in global charity and Orthodox Judaism Albert Lucas (juggler) (born 1960), American juggler who has set several world records Albert Pike Lucas (1862–1945), American painter and sculptor

African-American players of American football

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American football defensive tackles

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Carolina Panthers players

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C. R. Johnson

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C. R. Johnson

Charles Russell Johnson III ( August 10, 1983 – February 24, 2010) was a professional skier and a pioneer in the freeskiing movement.[1] He became a top competitor and a favorite in ski films and was known for his progression, fearlessness, and passion for skiing.[2] Johnson died in 2010 in a ski accident. Childhood C.R. Johnson was born and raised in Truckee, Lake Tahoe California.[3] He grew up skiing Squaw Valley Resort, a world-class ski area that is known for its extreme terrain.[3] At Squaw Valley, Johnson spent his time lapping the terrain park and charging difficult chutes and bowls.[2] Johnson quickly developed a large range of tricks and excellent big mountain skills.[2] In addition to skiing, Johnson enjoyed surfing, fly-fishing, traveling, and spending time with close friends and family.[4] Career In 1999, Johnson emerged on the freeskiing scene when he successfully landed a 1440.[1] The skiing community quickly recognized CR as a talented young star who could help progress free skiing.[2] CR

American freeskiers

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Sports deaths in California

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Rex Mays

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Rex Mays

Rex Houston Mays, Jr. (March 10, 1913 – November 6, 1949) was a former AAA Championship Car race driver. He was a two-time AAA champion and won 8 points-scoring races. He made his Indianapolis 500 debut in 1934 and won the pole in 1935, 1936, and again in 1940 and finished second, he returned the next year and finished second again. Mays won the AAA National Championship in 1940 and 1941. However, World War II suspended racing until 1946, denying Mays of what likely would have been the peak of his career. After the war, Mays again won the Indy pole in 1948 but was knocked out by a mechanical problem. He was killed at the age of 36 in a crash during the only Champ Car race held at Del Mar Fairgrounds race track in Del Mar, California in November 1949. In this accident, Mays swerved to miss a car that had crashed in front of him. His car went out of control and flipped, throwing Mays to the track surface, where he was hit by a trailing car. In a race at Milwaukee, a fellow driver, Duke Dinsmore, was thrown f

Sports deaths in California

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AAA Championship Car drivers

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Racing drivers from California

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Conrad McRae

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Conrad McRae

Conrad Bastien McRae (January 11, 1971 – July 10, 2000) was an American professional basketball player, who had a successful career in Europe, for teams in France, Italy, Greece and Turkey. He was also selected by the Washington Bullets, in the second round (38th pick overall) of the 1993 NBA draft. High school McRae attended Brooklyn Technical High School, where he excelled at basketball. He earned the nickname "McNasty", while playing in the Entertainers Basketball Classic in Harlem's Rucker Park. In high school, McRae was named PSAL High School All-City from 1986–89, selected to the 1989 McDonald's All-American Team, and participated in the Junior Olympics. College career McRae accepted a scholarship to Syracuse University, where he would play college basketball under head coach Jim Boeheim, with the Syracuse Orange. Though he did not immediately garner many minutes of playing time, his tenacity, athleticism, and defensive skills turned him into a second round NBA draft pick in 1993, by the Washington

Brooklyn Technical High School alumni

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Pallacanestro Trieste players

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Lega Basket Serie A players

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Davey Moore (boxer, born 1933)

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Davey Moore (boxer, born 1933)

David "Davey" S. Moore (November 1, 1933 – March 25, 1963) was an American featherweight world champion boxer who fought professionally 1953–63. A resident of Springfield, Ohio, Moore was one of two world champions to share the name in the second half of the 20th century. The second, Davey Moore (born 1959) boxed during the 1980s. Moore died on March 25, 1963, aged 29, as a result of injuries sustained in a match against Sugar Ramos. Career highlights Moore first gained wide attention from his performance on the 1952 U.S. Olympic boxing team, as a bantamweight amateur.[1][2] Moore made his professional debut on May 11, 1953, aged 19, beating Willie Reece by a decision in six rounds. He boxed 8 times in 1953, with a total record that year of 6 wins, 1 loss and 1 no contest.[3] From the beginning of his career through 1956 Moore fought a total of 29 bouts, with a total record of 22–5–1, and 1 no contest. Beginning with his April 10, 1957 fight against Gil Cadilli, Moore had an 18-bout winning streak, endin

Boxers at the 1952 Summer Olympics

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Olympic boxers of the United States

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Sportspeople from Springfield, Ohio

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Ken Miles

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Ken Miles

Ken Miles stepping intoDolphin Mk 2., March 1961. Kenneth Henry Miles (1 November 1918 – 17 August 1966) was a British sports car racing engineer and driver best known for his motorsport career in the US and with American teams on the international scene. He is an inductee to the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America. Life and career Miles was born on 1 November 1918 in Sutton Coldfield, a short distance from the city of Birmingham.[1] He was the son of Eric Miles and Clarice Jarvis.[2] After a failed attempt to run away to the United States,[3] Miles left school at the age of 15 to work as an apprentice at Wolseley Motors,[2] who sent him to a technical school to broaden his knowledge of vehicle construction.[3] He raced motorcycles before he served as a tank commander in the British Territorial Army in World War II.[2] Miles spent the next seven years working in machinery and was promoted to the rank of staff sergeant in 1942. He was stationed in a tank unit that took part in the Normandy landings in 1944.

Accidental deaths in California

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12 Hours of Sebring drivers

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Sports deaths in California

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Greg Moore (racing driver)

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Greg Moore (racing driver)

Gregory William Moore (April 22, 1975 – October 31, 1999) was a Canadian race car driver who competed in the Indy Lights and Championship Auto Racing Teams (CART) from 1993 to 1999. He began competitive karting at the age of ten and achieved early success, before progressing to open-wheel car racing in the Canadian Formula Ford Championship in 1991. Moore won the 1992 USAC FF2000 Western Division Championship and the 1995 Indy Lights Championship. He began competing in CART with Forsythe Racing in 1996, finishing ninth in the drivers' championship and was second to Alex Zanardi in the Rookie of the Year standings. The following year, Moore claimed the first two victories of his career to finish seventh in the points' standings. He improved on his performance to place fifth overall with a further two wins in 1998. In 1999, he took another win as his form lowered and fell to tenth. At the season-ending Marlboro 500 at California Speedway, Moore was killed in a violent airborne collision with a concrete barrier

USF2000 drivers

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Accidental deaths in California

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FIA GT Championship drivers

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Eddie O'Donnell

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Eddie O'Donnell

Edward Francis O'Donnell (22 June 1887 – 26 November 1920) was an American racecar driver. He died of injuries sustained in a crash during a National Championship AAA race.[1] O'Donnell started his career as a riding mechanic for Duesenberg racecar driver Eddie Rickenbacker. When Rickenbacker left the Duesenberg Team to join the Peugeot Team, O'Donnell took over as driver. He served as Captain of the Duesenberg team and was highly successful on the dirt tracks and board tracks around the United States, also having raced on the road circuits. Death O'Donnell was fatally injured when he and Gaston Chevrolet collided during the Thanksgiving Day Beverly Hills Speedway Classic race. Chevrolet was killed as well as O'Donnell's mechanic Lyall Jolls. He died the next morning.[2] Indianapolis 500 results Year Car Start Qual Rank Finish Laps Led Retired 1915 15 11 88.930 12 5 200 0 Running 1919 10 5 97.300 13 22 60 0 Piston 1920 29 12 88.200 14 14 149 0 Oil line

People from Whitewater, Wisconsin

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Racing drivers from Wisconsin

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People from Faribault, Minnesota

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Parry O'Brien

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Parry O'Brien

William Patrick "Parry" O'Brien (January 28, 1932 – April 21, 2007) was an American shot put champion. He competed in four consecutive Summer Olympics where he won two gold medals (1952, 1956) and one silver medal (1960). In his last Olympic competition (1964) he placed fourth. For all of these accomplishments, O'Brien was inducted into the IAAF and U.S. Olympic halls of fame. Biography Born in Santa Monica, California, O'Brien was very active in sports at Santa Monica High School, playing end on the football team that won the California state championship in 1948. He was then awarded an athletic scholarship in football to the University of Southern California. He also won the (non-standard for high schoolers) 16-pound shot put competition at the 1949 CIF California State Meet. He also finished in third place that year putting the standard 12-pound shot for high schoolers.[4] O'Brien enrolled in college at U.S.C., where he continued to play football as a freshman until he was kicked in the stomach during p

Sportspeople from Santa Monica, California

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World record setters in athletics (track and fi...

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Track and field athletes from California

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Johnny Owen

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Johnny Owen

John Richard Owens (7 January 1956 – 4 November 1980) was a Welsh professional boxer who fought under the name Johnny Owen. His seemingly fragile appearance earned him many epithets, including 'the Bionic Bantam' and 'the Merthyr Matchstick'. He began boxing at the age of eight and undertook a long amateur career, competing in more than 120 fights and representing Wales. He turned professional in September 1976 at the age of 20, winning his debut bout against George Sutton. Owen would beat Sutton again in his sixth professional fight to win his first title, the vacant Welsh bantamweight championship. Three further victories led Owen to challenge for the British bantamweight championship in only his tenth professional fight. He defeated champion Paddy Maguire in the eleventh round to win the title, becoming the first Welshman in more than 60 years to hold the belt. Owen recorded five further victories, including a defence of his British title against Wayne Evans, before meeting Paul Ferreri for the Commonweal

EngvarB from August 2016

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Filmed deaths in sports

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Welsh male boxers

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Dan Osman

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Dan Osman

Daniel Eugene Osman (February 11, 1963 – November 23, 1998)[1] was an American extreme sport practitioner, known for the dangerous sport of free-soloing, rock climbing without ropes or other safety gear. He participated in rope free-flying or rope jumping, falling several hundred feet from a cliff then being caught by a safety rope, for which his record was over 1,000 feet (300 m). He lived a bohemian lifestyle, working as a part-time carpenter and living in Lake Tahoe, California. He was the subject of several rock climbing videos, which brought free-soloing to a wider audience. Dan was also instrumental in the development of the Cave Rock climbing area at Tahoe and many other areas in the Carson City area. Dan had one daughter, Emma Osman.[2] Climbing films Osman appeared in Eric Perlman's Masters of Stone series, free soloing Fire in the Hole (5.12b, now closed) on Cave Rock near Lake Tahoe, Atlantis (5.11+) on The Sorcerer in The Needles in the Sequoia National Forest, and Airy Interlude (5.10b, then 5

American sportspeople of Japanese descent

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BASE jumping deaths

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Deaths in Yosemite National Park

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Gonzalo Rodríguez (racing driver)

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Gonzalo Rodríguez (racing driver)

Gonzalo "Gonchi" Rodríguez Bongoll (January 22, 1971 – September 11, 1999) was a Uruguayan racing driver. He was killed in an accident at Laguna Seca Raceway during qualifying for a CART race. Career He showed promise in Formula 3000 for three seasons, taking two wins in 1998 at Spa-Francorchamps and Nürburgring, winning the following season in Monaco and finishing third in both championships. Following a rotation of drivers as team mates to Al Unser Jr. in CART Penske Racing's second car, he was given his opportunity at the Detroit Grand Prix in 1999 and scored a point in his only race. Death At the Laguna Seca Raceway during the qualification session for his second CART race (in 5th place while qualifying), he was fatally injured in a crash. A stuck throttle was initially thought to be the cause for his car to overshoot the braking point, leave the track and slam into a concrete barrier at the entry of the Corkscrew corner. Review of the in-car telemetry refuted this supposition. The impact caused his c

Burials at Cementerio del Buceo, Montevideo

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Uruguayan racing drivers

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Álvaro Pineda

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Álvaro Pineda

Álvaro Pineda (November 9, 1945 – January 18, 1975) was a Mexican jockey who competed in thoroughbred horse racing in the United States.[1] A top jockey in California, in 1966 Álvaro Pineda finished second in wins at Del Mar Racetrack to Donald Pierce then was the track's leading rider in 1968. He made one appearance in the Kentucky Derby, finishing 13th in 1967. Pineda's best mount may have been the Argentina-bred colt Figonero which he rode to victory in the Hollywood Gold Cup and to a new world record for nine furlongs in the Del Mar Handicap. In 1974, Álvaro Pineda's peers voted him the prestigious George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award, awarded annually to a jockey in American racing who demonstrates high standards of personal and professional conduct, on and off the racetrack. In 1975, while competing at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, California, Álvaro Pineda was killed in a freak accident from a blow to his head when his horse, Austin Mittler, reared in the starting gate and flipped over, crushing his hea

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Bryan Saulpaugh

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Bryan Saulpaugh

William Bryan Saulpaugh (1905 – 22 April 1933) was an American racecar driver. Saulpaugh relieved Chet Miller in the 1931 Indianapolis 500 for 49 laps and qualified for the 1932 race in a Miller in the third position but was knocked out after 55 laps by a broken oil line and was credited with 32nd. He made two other National Championship starts that season and finished 19th in the championship.[1] He was killed by a crash in a sprint car race in Oakland, California. Biography He was born 1905 in Taylor Ridge, Illinois to Frederik U. Saulpaugh and Giralda M. Mosher. He died on 22 April 1933 in Oakland, California. Award Saulpaugh was inducted in the National Sprint Car Hall of Fame in 2004. Indy 500 results Year Car Start Qual Rank Finish Laps Led Retired 1932 27 3 114.369 4 32 55 0 Oil line Totals 55 0 Starts 1 Poles 0 Front Row 1 Wins 0 Top 5 0 Top 10 0 Retired 1 References Bryan Saulpaugh, Champ Car Stats, Retrieved 2011-02-21

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Herman Schurch

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Herman Schurch

Herman Schurch (April 7, 1903 in Sumiswald, Switzerland – November 10, 1931 Los Angeles) was a Swiss-American racecar driver. His family had emigrated to the United States when he was a boy. He made five starts in AAA Championship Car from 1929 to 1931. He had previously failed to qualify for the 1928 Indianapolis 500 but made the race in 1929. He served as a relief driver for Shorty Cantlon in the 1930 race. He also drove in the 1931 Indianapolis 500 but his transmission failed after 5 laps. His best finish in AAA Championship racing came later that year at the New York State Fairgrounds Raceway where he finished sixth.[1] Schurch excelled in Big Car racing (Sprint Car), where he won many races on the Eastern circuit (in the Northeast United States). He was killed in practice for a dirt track race at Legion Ascot Speedway in California.[2] Schurch was elected to the National Sprint Car Hall of Fame in 2010. Indianapolis 500 results Year Car Start Qual Rank Finish Laps Led Retired 1929 31

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Bob Simmons (surfer)

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Bob Simmons (surfer)

Robert Wilson "Bob" Simmons (March 29, 1919 – September 26, 1954) was an American surfer and surfboard shaper, considered to be the father of the modern surfboard. Simmons was born in Los Angeles, California. During his early teens, he developed a tumor on his left ankle which nearly caused his leg to be amputated. After beating the cancer, Bob was involved in a serious bicycle collision. While staying in the hospital he was advised to try surfing. He first rode a surfboard at age 20 at Newport Beach, California. In 1954, Simmons drowned while surfing at Windansea Beach in San Diego, California. References

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Todd Skinner

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Todd Skinner

Todd Richard Skinner (October 27, 1958 – October 23, 2006)[1] was an American free climber. His climbing achievements included the first free ascents of many routes around the world and the world's first free ascent of a grade 7 climb. Skinner was born in Pinedale, Wyoming, and planned to "take a little while off to climb" after gaining a degree in finance from the University of Wyoming in 1982. Instead, he became a full-time free climber and motivational speaker. In 1990, he settled in Lander, Wyoming, in part because he considered the dolomite cliffs there to be the ultimate training ground for free climbing. He opened the Wild Iris Mountain Sports store in Lander, and encouraged visits by climbers from around the world. He was married with three children. Todd Skinner was attempting to free climb the "Jesus Built My Hotrod" route up the face of Leaning Tower in Yosemite National Park on October 23, 2006. While rappelling down, he fell 500 feet and died. The cause of death was the failure of the belay loo

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Andrew Simpson (sailor)

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Andrew Simpson (sailor)

Andrew James "Bart" Simpson, MBE (17 December 1976 – 9 May 2013), was an English sailor who won a gold medal at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, as crew for skipper Iain Percy in the Star class representing Great Britain. Simpson died in the capsize of the catamaran he was crewing on 9 May 2013, while training for the America's Cup in San Francisco Bay.[2] Career Simpson and Iain Percy competing in the 2012 Summer Olympics. Simpson started his competitive sailing career in the Laser class, before switching to the heavier Finn class.[3][4] He claimed the bronze medal at the 2003 ISAF Sailing World Championships in Cadiz in the Finn class; his training partner Ben Ainslie took the gold, with Great Britain topping the medal table.[5] He sailed with +39 Challenge in the 2007 Louis Vuitton Cup. Simpson then moved to the two-man Star class, partnering lifelong friend Iain Percy; they won a bronze medal at the 2007 ISAF Sailing World Championships in Cascais to qualify for the 2008 Summer Olympics.[3][6] T

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Barbara Warren

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Barbara Warren

Barbara Warren (April 9, 1943 – August 26, 2008) was an Austrian-American counselor, model, actress, author, and triathlete.[1][2] Early life and education Born Barbara Müller in St. Johann in Tirol, Austria to Hans and Ingrid Mueller, she and her identical twin sister, Angelika Drake, left their farmhouse at 14 for high school at the Tyrolean capital of Innsbruck and then, at age 17, went on to study art history at the Accademia di Belle Arti Firenze in Florence, Italy.[3] Career The sisters occasionally modeled before moving to Mexico City in 1965, where they began modeling full-time, eventually opening a school, agency and design boutique. Warren began performing under the stage name Barbara Angely,[4] abruptly ending that career out of dissatisfaction with a jet-set lifestyle. Warren eventually married importer Armando Alvarez, which led to a four-year separation from her sister. Warren's family in 1980 moved to Brownsville, Texas. In 1983, Warren began running recreationally. By 1985, Drake and her

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Rolf Stommelen

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Rolf Stommelen

Rolf Johann Stommelen[1] (11 July 1943 – 24 April 1983) was a racing driver from Siegen, Germany. He participated in 63 Formula One World Championship Grands Prix, achieving one podium, and scored a total of 14 championship points. He also participated in several non-Championship Formula One races. One of the best endurance sports car racing drivers of the 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s, Stommelen won the 24 Hours of Daytona 4 times; in 1968, 1978, 1980 and 1982 and the Targa Florio in 1967 in a Porsche 910. Career Stommelen driving for Brabham at the 1976 German Grand Prix. Stommelen driving a Porsche for Georg Loos in 1977. Stommelen won the pole position for the 1969 24 Hours of Le Mans in a Porsche 917 a year after finishing third in a Porsche 908. In this year, he became the first man to reach speeds exceeding 350 km/h (217 mph) on the Le Mans circuit's Mulsanne Straight in his Porsche 917 LH. In 1970, he made his Formula One debut with Brabham with sponsorship obtained from the German magazine Au

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Ernie Triplett

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Ernie Triplett

Ernie Triplett (1906 Barry, Illinois[1] – 5 March 1934 El Centro, California) was an American racecar driver. He was American Automobile Association Pacific Southwest champion in 1931 and 1932. Triplett died from injuries sustained in a crash during a AAA Pacific Southwest "big car" race at Imperial, California. Career awards Triplett was named to the National Sprint Car Hall of Fame in 1991. Indianapolis 500 results Year[2] Car Start Qual Rank Finish Laps Led Retired 1929 47 20 114.789 7 26 48 0 Rod 1930 17 6 105.618 9 17 125 0 Piston 1931 25 5 111.034 10 7 200 0 Running 1932 7 31 114.935 3 22 125 14 Clutch 1933 16 5 117.685 5 33 61 0 Piston Totals 559 14 Starts 5 Poles 0 Front Row 0 Wins 0 Top 5 0 Top 10 1 Retired 4 References The Talk of Gasoline Alley, Network Indiana, May 25, 2006 Ernie Triplett Indy 500 Race Stats External links Ernie Triplett at Find a Grave

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Billy Vukovich III

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Billy Vukovich III

William John Vukovich III (August 31, 1963, Fresno, California, United States – November 25, 1990, Bakersfield, California, United States) was an American race car driver. He was a three-time starter of the Indianapolis 500. The grandson of two-time Indianapolis 500 winner Bill Vukovich and the son of Bill Vukovich II, Vukovich III was the 1988 Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year. Billy was killed in practice for a CRA race at Mesa Marin Raceway,[1] in Bakersfield California, when his throttle stuck open which caused his car to swerve into the wall. He was 27 years old. Vukovich became the first third-generation driver to qualify in Indy 500 history. His grandfather was killed while leading the 1955 Indianapolis 500. He got his start in racing driving for the John Runjavac racing team. Motorsports career results American open–wheel results (key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) CART/Indy Car Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Rank Points 1988 Gohr Racing P

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Joe Weatherly

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Joe Weatherly

Joseph Herbert "Joe" Weatherly (May 29, 1922 – January 19, 1964) was an American stock car racing driver. Weatherly was inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America in 2009 after winning NASCAR's Grand National Series championships in 1962 and 1963, three AMA Grand National Championships, and two NASCAR Modified championships. Personality Weatherly enjoyed behaving outrageously. He once took practice laps wearing a Peter Pan suit. Moreover, he frequently stayed out partying until the early hours, usually with fellow driver and friend Curtis Turner. This behavior earned him the nickname the "Clown Prince of Racing". In 1956 at Raleigh, while racing in the convertible series, Weatherly's engine blew. With the help of Ralph Liguori pushing from behind, he displayed showmanship to the fullest extent by crossing the finish line while standing in a "chariot of fire".[2] Motorcycle career He won three American Motorcycle Association (AMA) nationals between 1946 and 1950, including the prestigious Laconi

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Denny Williams

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Denny Williams

Evon Daniel "Denny" Williams (December 13, 1896 – March 23, 1929) was a professional baseball player whose career spanned eight seasons, three of which were spent in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Cincinnati Reds (1921) and Boston Red Sox (1924–25, 1928). Over his MLB career, Williams batted .259 with 46 runs scored, 85 hits, four doubles, three triples, and 18 runs batted in (RBIs) in 120 games played. Williams spent the majority of his career in the minor leagues with the Moose Jaw Robin Hoods (1920), Joplin Miners (1921), Mobile Bears (1922–24, 1926–27) and Baltimore Orioles (1928). During spring training in 1929, Williams was a member of the minor league Portland Beavers when he was killed in an automobile accident. He stood at 5 feet 8 inches (173 cm) and weighed 150 pounds (68 kg). Williams batted left-handed, while throwing right. Early and personal life Evon Daniel "Denny" Williams was born on December 13, 1896 in Portland, Oregon. His father, Daniel Williams, who was from Ohio, worked for th

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Jack Westrope

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Jack Westrope

Jack Gordon Westrope (January 18, 1918 – June 19, 1958)[1] was an American Hall of Fame jockey in Thoroughbred horse racing. Born in Baker, Montana, Westrope was the son of racehorse owner/trainer W. T. Westrope. Jack was only 12 years old when he rode his first winner on a small track in Lemmon, South Dakota. By age 15, while still officially an apprentice jockey, he was the leading rider in the U.S. for 1933. Westrope scored 301 victories from the 1,224 races he competed in that year, giving him a 25% win rate, the highest for any national title holder during the past twenty-four years.[2] Although based on the West Coast of the United States, Jack Westrope won races across the United States and in Cuba. During his career, he rode 2,467 winners including in numerous important graded stakes races such as the Santa Anita Derby, Blue Grass Stakes, and the Hollywood Gold Cup. During the running of the 1958 Hollywood Oaks at Hollywood Park Racetrack in Inglewood, California, Westrope was severely injured when

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George Woolf

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George Woolf

George Monroe Woolf (May 31, 1910 – January 4, 1946), nicknamed "The Iceman", was a Canadian-born thoroughbred race horse jockey. An annual jockey's award given by the United States Jockeys' Guild is named in his honor. He became known for riding the people's champion Seabiscuit to victories in 1938. After his early death resulting from a racing accident, Woolf was inducted into newly founded honorary institutions: the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame. Early life and education Woolf was born on a ranch in Cardston, Alberta to horse people - his mother had been a trick rider in a circus and his father rode in rodeos. Woolf learned to ride horses as a child and as a teenager he rode in horse races and competed in rodeo events in Alberta and Montana. George's mother, Rosina Parker, was born in Wales, and his maternal grandmother was from England. His father, Frank Henry Woolf, was a Utah pioneer born before 1869 and an Alberta

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Al Lucas (American football)

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Al Lucas (American football)

Albert Lucas (September 1, 1978 – April 10, 2005) was an American football player in the National Football League (NFL) and Arena Football League (AFL) who died from a game-related spinal cord injury while playing for the Los Angeles Avengers. Early life and college career Lucas was born in Macon, Georgia; his father was Georgia State Representative David Lucas and his mother was Macon City Councilwoman Elaine Lucas. He attended and played football for Northeast Health Science Magnet High School.[1] While there, he set the school record with a 440-pound (200-kg) bench press. Nicknamed "Big Luke", he went on to play college football at Troy State University. Lucas also served as an assistant football coach at Northeast High. He was married to De'Shonda Lucas with one daughter, Mariah.[2] He was a member of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity. At Troy State, Lucas was a standout player. In his senior year (1999), he won the Buck Buchanan Award as the most outstanding defensive player in NCAA Division I-AA. He was a

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Tom Blackaller

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Tom Blackaller

Thomas David Blackaller, Jr. (January 6, 1940 – September 7, 1989) was a world-champion American yachtsman, America's Cup helmsman, sailmaker, and racecar competitor. He was a two-time world champion in the Star class keelboat, a world champion in the international Six metre class, raced in three separate America's Cup campaigns, and influenced the careers of many other sailors. Early life Blackaller was born January 6, 1940, in Seattle, Washington. He moved with his parents to the San Francisco Bay area as a child and began sailing when he was 10 years old.[1] Sailing career Tom Blackaller initially rose to prominence sailing Star class keelboats. He bought his first Star boat in 1957, a chubby hull #2482, named "Spirit." Seeking a faster boat, Blackaller ordered a new boat that winter from boatmaker Carl Eichenlaub. This became boat hull #3938, which he named Good Grief! He later obtained a second, newer boat hull (#5150), retaining the boat name Good Grief! Sailing this second boat in 1968 he won his f

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Al Gordon (racing driver)

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Al Gordon (racing driver)

Al Gordon (1903 Redlands, California – 26 January 1936 Alhambra, California) was an American racecar driver. Gordon made nine AAA Championship Car starts from 1932 to 1935 and made two non-points paying starts after that, winning an exhibition race in Oakland, California in 1936. Gordon drove in the Indianapolis 500 in 1932, 1934, and 1935, but never successfully finished the race. He qualified second in 1935. Gordon was fatally injured in a crash during a non-championship race at Legion Ascot Speedway in Alhambra, California in 1936. His riding mechanic Spider Matlock was also killed in the crash.[1] The crash is said to have ended racing at Legion Ascot. Then the grandstands burned down in April, putting an end to the facility.[2] Indianapolis 500 results Year Car Start Qual Rank Finish Laps Led Retired 1932 26 37 111.290 17 40 3 0 Crash T4 1934 51 17 116.273 5 22 66 0 Crash T1 1935 6 2 119.481 2 30 17 0 Crash T4 Totals 86 0 Starts 3 Poles 0 Front Row 1 W

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Malcolm Baldrige Jr.

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Malcolm Baldrige Jr.

Howard Malcolm "Mac" Baldrige Jr. (October 4, 1922 – July 25, 1987) was an American businessman. He served as the United States Secretary of Commerce from 1981 until his death in 1987. He was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1988. Biography Early life and career Baldrige was born on October 4, 1922 in Omaha, Nebraska. He was the son of H. Malcolm Baldrige, Sr. (1894–1985), a congressman from Nebraska, and the former Regina Katherine Connell (1896–1967). He had a brother, Robert Connell Baldridge (he alone returned the second "d" to his last name, which had been dropped in previous generations), and a sister, Letitia Baldrige. He attended The Hotchkiss School and Yale University. At Yale, he was a member of a Delta Kappa Epsilon. Baldrige began his career in the manufacturing industry in 1947, as the foundry hand in an iron company in Connecticut and rose to the presidency of that company by 1960. During World War II, Baldrige served in combat in the Pacific as Captain in the 27th Infantry Divisi

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Miroslav Šmíd

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Miroslav Šmíd

Memorial to Miroslav "Míra" Šmíd Miroslav Šmíd, Ing. (1952, Police nad Metují, Czechoslovakia – 11 September 1993, Lost Arrow, Yosemite National Park, USA) was a Czech rock climber, solo climber, mountaineer, mountain cinematographer and photographer.[1] He also organized climbing and cultural events. In 1981 he founded The International Festival of Mountaineering Films (Czech: Mezinárodní horolezecký filmový festival) in Teplice nad Metují. He also wrote several books. Life and climbing career He started climbing in the Ostaš climbing area and continued in Adršpach-Teplice Rocks, where he climbed a number of famous first ascents. In the High Tatras, Slovakia, he completed 230 ascents (80 of which were in winter and 25 first ascents, including a solo ascent of the Poslední dostih route on Veľká Javorová veža in 1976). In Scotland he completed the first winter ascent of the Glover’s Chimney route on Ben Nevis in 1981. He also completed several solo climbs in Caucasus. He tried to make his solo climbs a secr

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Herb Gorman

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Herb Gorman

Herbert Allen Gorman (December 19, 1924 – April 5, 1953) was an American professional baseball player. He had only one Major League at bat in one game played for the St. Louis Cardinals in 1952. The following season, he died at age 28 after he was stricken with a fatal heart attack while he was playing a minor league game. Career Born in San Francisco to Jewish parents, and Jewish himself,[1] Gorman threw and batted left-handed. He stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 180 pounds (82 kg). His minor league career spanned eleven seasons, from 1943 until 1953, with 1944–45 missed during Gorman's military service in the United States Coast Guard during World War II.[2] He began his career as a first baseman and he moved to the outfield in 1949. In Gorman's one MLB at bat, on April 19, 1952 at Wrigley Field, he pinch hit for Cardinals' pitcher Willard Schmidt, and grounded out to second base against Cubs' starter Turk Lown.[3] He was playing left field for the San Diego Padres of the Pacific Coast Le

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Pete Robinson (drag racer)

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Pete Robinson (drag racer)

Lew Russell Robinson (2 June 1933 – 6 February 1971[1]), nicknamed "Sneaky Pete", was an American drag racer. Biography Robinson was born in Atlanta, Georgia.[2] Career Gassers He started drag racing in 1950, at the wheel of a Buick-engined B/Gas 1940 Ford, which he continued to campaign until 1961.[3] Dragsters Robinson purchased his first slingshot rail from a wealthy friend, who was unable to persuade his father it was merely a go kart. Robinson, obsessive about lightening his cars (once quipping, "Anything that falls to the ground when you let it go from your hand is way too heavy to be on my race car."[4] ) immediately began trimming weight off the car, reducing it from 1,256 to 1,120 lb (570 to 508 kg) over the course of three months.[5] He improved its performance from a previous quickest pass of 9.50 seconds to a 9.13.[6] It was the focus on weight reduction that prompted him to switch to a 289 cu in (4,740 cc) Cobra engine, which was 50 lb (23 kg) lighter than the Chevrolet.[7] He gained nati

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Adrianne Wadewitz

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Adrianne Wadewitz

Adrianne Wadewitz (January 6, 1977 – April 8, 2014) was an American feminist scholar of 18th-century British literature, and a noted Wikipedian and commenter upon Wikipedia, particularly focusing on gender issues. In April 2014, Wadewitz died from head injuries from a fall while rock climbing. Early life The only child of Betty M., a nurse and attorney, and Nathan R. Wadewitz, a Lutheran pastor, Adrianne Wadewitz was born on January 6, 1977, in Omaha, Nebraska.[2] She graduated from North Platte High School in 1995.[3] Wadewitz studied English literature and received a degree in English from Columbia University in 1999.[1] In 2011, she obtained a Ph.D. from Indiana University and became a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Digital Learning and Research at Occidental College. She was chosen as a Mellon Digital Scholarship Postdoctoral Fellow and a HASTAC scholar.[4] Academic career Editing Wikipedia featuring Wadewitz as the face of Wikipedia Education Wadewitz graduated magna cum laude from Columb

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Michael J. Ybarra

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Michael J. Ybarra

Michael J. Ybarra Michael Jay Ybarra (September 28, 1966 – June 30 or July 1,[1] [2] [3] [4] 2012) was an American journalist, author and adventurer whose non-fiction work appeared in various national publications. In 2004, his book about McCarthyism, Washington Gone Crazy: Senator Pat McCarran and the Great American Communist Hunt,[5] won the D.B. Hardeman Prize. As the extreme sports correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, Ybarra wrote articles about outdoor adventure, providing the genre with a wider audience than it typically receives. Life and career Born and raised in Los Angeles, Ybarra graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1990 with a B.A. in political science. It was during his undergraduate years at UCLA that he started writing professionally for the Los Angeles Times, followed by the Chicago Tribune. During his brief stint at the Chicago Tribune, he interviewed future President Barack Obama.[6] After graduating from UCLA, Ybarra moved to Washington, D.C., where he wrote

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Alan Thicke

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Alan Thicke

Alan Thicke (born Alan Willis Jeffrey; March 1, 1947 – December 13, 2016) was a Canadian actor, songwriter, game and talk show host. He is the father of singer Robin Thicke. In 2013, Thicke was inducted into Canada's Walk of Fame. Thicke was best known for playing Dr. Jason Seaver on the 1980s sitcom Growing Pains. Thicke died on December 13, 2016, in the Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, California, U.S. Early life Thicke was born on March 1, 1947, in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, the son of Shirley "Joan" Isobel Marie (née Greer), a nurse, and William Jeffrey, a stockbroker.[1][2] They divorced in 1953. His mother remarried to Brian Thicke, a physician, and they moved to Elliot Lake.[3] Alan Thicke graduated from Elliot Lake Secondary School in 1965,[4] and was elected homecoming king.[5] He went on to attend the University of Western Ontario, where he joined the Delta Upsilon fraternity.[6] Career Hosting Game shows Thicke hosted a Canadian game show on CFCF-TV in Montreal called First Impre

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