Revolvy Brain's folder

Writers from Minnesota


Chanida Phaengdara Potter

topic

Chanida Phaengdara Potter

Chanida Phaengdara Potter (1984) is a Lao American writer, activist and community development strategist in the Lao American and Southeast Asian diaspora communities. She is well known for her work as the founding editor of the internationally acclaimed online publication, Little Laos on the Prairie where voice and visibility of the Lao diaspora experience are amplified. She is the executive director of The SEAD Project (Southeast Asian Diaspora Development), an organization based in Minnesota and Laos aimed at empowering Southeast Asian diaspora communities by bridging the access gap to community, storytelling, languages, heritages and cross-cultural connections and knowledge-sharing through creative workshops and communication tools. She has worked in the nonprofit field on organizing, public affairs, community development, and human rights advocacy. Education Chanida Phaengdara Potter holds a BA in Global Studies and Communications from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities and MPA from Hamline Univers

Laotian women writers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minneapolis, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Stephanie Zvan

topic

Stephanie Zvan

Zvan at Science Online in 2011 Stephanie Zvan is an American skeptic, feminist activist and radio host, blogger, newspaper writer,[1] and fiction author.[2] Her radio show, "Atheists Talk", is produced by Minnesota Atheists and broadcast on KTNF in Minnesota.[2] Her fiction has been published in Nature and Scientific American. Kathleen Raven has noted her as an important science/rational/skeptic blogger.[3] She voiced opposition to harassment of women in the Rebecca Watson elevator incident and following a 2012 Readercon F/SF convention incident,[2] and is involved in research on "collaborative social blocking" of Internet trolls to provide a more inviting social space for women and other minorities.[4][5][6] Bibliography Zvan, Stephanie (2012), "The Unexpected Consequences of Coming Out", in Bill Lehto (ed.), Atheist Voices of Minnesota: an Anthology of Personal Stories, Freethought House, ISBN 978-0615598574 Here be monsters, Nature The Gravity of the Situation, Scientific American References

American atheism activists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Women atheists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

American feminist writers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Arnold Sundgaard

topic

Arnold Sundgaard

Arnold Olaf Sundgaard (October 31, 1909 – October 22, 2006) was an American playwright, librettist, and lyricist. He was also a writer of short stories and children's books as well as a college professor specializing in drama and theatrics. Sundgaard was best known for his role in the production of six Broadway plays. Background Sundgaard was born in Saint Paul, Minnesota, and was of Norwegian descent.[1] He attended Johnson Senior High School in Saint Paul,[2][3] where he played football with Warren E. Burger.[1] He then attended the University of Wisconsin, graduating with a bachelor's degree in English in 1935; he also studied at the Yale Drama School. He taught drama at a number of schools, including Columbia University, Bennington College, and the University of Texas. Sundgaaard was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in the field of music research in 1951.[3][4] Career Poster for the original production of Spirochete, a Living Newspaper play by Arnold Sundgaard produced by the Federal Theatre Project

Writers from Saint Paul, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Songwriters from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

American musical theatre librettists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Maureen Gibbon

topic

Maureen Gibbon

Maureen Gibbon is an American novelist and writer.[1] She also writes short fiction, nonfiction and reviews books. Her works have been published in several print and online publications. Gibbon has three novels, Paris Red, Swimming Sweet Arrow and Thief.[2][3][4][5] Achievements Gibbon's most recent novel, Paris Red, was featured on NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon.[6] It was also translated into French under the title Rouge Paris and published in 2014.[7] The American release was in 2015 under the publisher W.W. Norton.[8] Gibbon also wrote the prose collection Magdalena.[9] She's been published in The New York Times, Huffington Post, Playboy and other publications.[10] Gibbon received a Bush Foundation Artist fellowship in 2001, and a Loft McKnight Artists fellowship in 1992 and 1999. She became an artist in residence of the Mill Foundation at the Santa Fe Arts Institute in 2006.[11] Education Gibbon studied at Barnard College in New York and the Iowa Writers' Workshop.[12] Teaching Gib

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Barnard College alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

21st-century American writers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Nora Burglon

topic

Nora Burglon

Nora Burglon (born April 28, 1896 in Minnesota, died 1976) was an American author of children's literature. She grew up in an Amish community and in 1933, was nominated for the Newbery Medal.[1] Bibliography Children of the Soil: A Story of Scandinavia (1933) Ghost Ship: A Story of Norway (1936) The Gates Swing In: A Story of Sweden (1937) Sticks Across the Chimney: A Story of Denmark (1938) Deep Silver: A Story of the Cod Banks (1938) Lost Island (1939) The Cuckoo Calls: A Story of Finland (1940) Around the Caribbean (1941) Shark Hole (1943) Slave Girl (1947) Christmas: A book of the Stories Old and New (1948) A Christmas Medley (1983) Diego Wins, and Other Caribbean Stories References Lindgren, Louise. "Women's Stories, Women's Lives" ~ The Snohomish County Washington Women's Legacy Project." Women's Stories, Women's Lives" ~ The Snohomish County Washington Women's Legacy Project. Third Age News, 1 Jan. 2006. Web. 31 Mar. 2015.

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Vincent Bugliosi

topic

Vincent Bugliosi

Vincent T. Bugliosi Jr. (August 18, 1934 – June 6, 2015) was an American attorney and New York Times bestselling author. During his eight years in the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office, he successfully prosecuted 105 out of 106 felony jury trials, which included 21 murder convictions, and gained guilty verdicts in each case. He was best known for prosecuting Charles Manson and other defendants accused of the Tate–LaBianca murders of August 9–10, 1969. Although Manson did not physically participate in the murders, Bugliosi used circumstantial evidence to show that he had orchestrated the killings. In 1972 Bugliosi left the District Attorney's (DA) office and started a private practice, which included defense cases for criminal trials. He twice ran for the DA's office, but was not elected. He also began his writing career, exploring notable criminal cases. Bugliosi, with Curt Gentry, wrote the book Helter Skelter (1974), about the investigation, arrest, and prosecution of Charles Manson and the Ma

UCLA School of Law alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Anglo-Catholic church buildings in Merseyside

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

History of Los Angeles

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Erik Jensen (actor)

topic

Erik Jensen (actor)

Erik Jensen is an American actor, playwright, screenwriter and director. Early life Jensen was born and raised in Apple Valley, Minnesota. He graduated from Apple Valley High School.[1] He earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in acting from Carnegie Mellon University. Career An actor, writer and director, Jensen has had over a hundred roles on television, film, and stage, most notably as legendary Thurman Munson of the New York Yankees in the ESPN miniseries The Bronx Is Burning. He portrayed Dr. Stephen Edwards on The Walking Dead, plays conspiracy theorist Frank Cody on Mr. Robot, and appeared alongside Aasif Mandvi in the Pulitzer Prize-winning production of Ayad Akhtars' Disgraced at Lincoln Center. He also appeared as legendary rock critic Lester Bangs in the critically acclaimed one-man play "How to Be A Rock Critic," which he co-wrote with his wife Jessica Blank. "How to Be A Rock Critic" received a completion commission from Center Theatre Group and was produced at the Kirk Douglas Theater, ArtsEmerson,

People from Apple Valley, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

21st-century American dramatists and playwrights

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Carnegie Mellon University College of Fine Arts...

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Peg Lynch

topic

Peg Lynch

Margaret Frances Lynch (November 25, 1916 – July 24, 2015) was an American writer, actress, and creator of the radio and television sitcoms Ethel and Albert, The Couple Next Door, and The Little Things in Life. She created, wrote, starred in and owned her own sitcom; she retained that ownership throughout her life. In total, Lynch wrote nearly 11,000 scripts for radio and television. Early life Lynch was born in Lincoln, Nebraska.[1] Her father died of the Spanish flu when she was two years old, after which she and her mother moved back to Kasson, Minnesota, 15 miles west of Rochester, where her mother resumed her job as an orthopedic nurse at the Mayo Clinic. Lynch graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1937, majoring in English with an emphasis on writing and dramatics. Radio Lynch's start in radio began at age 15 when, working part-time as a receptionist at the Mayo Clinic, she agreed to help out at KROC in Rochester, a radio station belonging to a classmate's father, by writing copy and intervi

Writers from Lincoln, Nebraska

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Actors from Lincoln, Nebraska

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Disease-related deaths in Massachusetts

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


M.A. Larson

topic

M.A. Larson

Mitchell Aaron Larson (born August 3, in Burnsville, Minnesota) is an American screenwriter and author.[1] Larson has written for several animated series, including Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, My Gym Partner's a Monkey, Gravity Falls, Littlest Pet Shop, and most notably My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic. Depending on which series he is working on, he is credited as either Mitch Larson, M.A. Larson (in My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic only), and Mitchell Larson (rarely). Larson had become interested in My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic from previously working with Lauren Faust, the series' original showrunner, on Foster's Home; he was surprised by her characterization of the main characters and started writing for the show.[2] Larson became a popular figure within the latter show's adult and teenage fanbase of "bronies" and has become a frequent guest at various conventions.[1] He also wrote lyrics of a few songs on both Friendship is Magic and Littlest Pet Shop, and acted as story editor duri

Screenwriters from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

People from Rochester, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Wendy Sue Swanson

topic

Wendy Sue Swanson

Wendy Sue Swanson (born 1974)[1] is an American pediatrician, educator and author, known for her Seattle Mama Doc blog.[2] As a doctor and a mother, Swanson advocates the use of online tools, such as blogs, Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites, to strengthen communication between healthcare providers and patients. Swanson asserts that online technologies can assist patients and families in becoming stewards of their own health.[3] Swanson has dedicated her career to helping physicians learn to use online tools more effectively in helping patients make informed decisions based in science.[4] "While we don't have the capability just yet," Swanson states, "my goal is to prove that an empowered and informed patient reduces health care costs and improves outcomes."[5] Education and training Swanson was born and raised in Minnesota. She attended Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, where, in 1996,[6] she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology.[7][8] For two years, she taught bilingual science and

Physicians from Wisconsin

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Wisconsin

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

American women bloggers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Oscar Hallam

topic

Oscar Hallam

Oscar Hallam Oscar Hallam (October 19, 1865 – September 23, 1945) was an American lawyer, judge, and academic from Minnesota. He served as a Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1912 to 1924, and served as a Minnesota state Second District Court judge from 1905 to 1912. Hallam was a member of the faculty (1901–1945), dean (1919–1941) and president until 1945, of William Mitchell College of Law. In 1924, Hallam was a candidate in the Minnesota state primary election for the office of United States Senator. He was also Chairman of the Section on Criminal Law of the American Bar Association. In 1926, he served as Chairman of the Minnesota Crime Commission and originated the Minnesota State Department of Criminal Apprehension and established the full-time Minnesota Board of Parole. He also served as President of the Ramsey County Bar Association, was Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Twin City Unit of the Shriners Hospital for Children, and Chairman of the 4-Minute Men of Minnesota during World W

People from Linden, Wisconsin

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

People from Iowa County, Wisconsin

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Isaac Atwater

topic

Isaac Atwater

Isaac Atwater Isaac Atwater (May 3, 1818 – December 22, 1906) was an American jurist. Born in Homer, New York, Atwater graduated from Yale University and then received his law degree from Yale Law School. Atwater was admitted to the New York bar in 1848. In 1850, Atwater moved to St. Anthony, Minnesota Territory, and continued to practice law. Atwater owned and published the newspaper St. Anthony Express. He helped establish the University of Minnesota while sitting on the board of regents. Atwater served on the Minneapolis City Council and the board of education. He also helped incorporate a business that would build the first bridge between Minneapolis and Saint Paul. Atwater served on the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1858 to 1864. Atwater also wrote about the history of Minnesota. Atwater died in Minneapolis, Minnesota.[1][2][3] Publications History of the City of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Part I (1893) History of the City of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Part II (1893) Notes Minnesota State Law Libr

Writers from New York (state)

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

New York (state) lawyers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Lawyers from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Charles B. Elliott

topic

Charles B. Elliott

Charles Burke Elliot Charles Burke Elliott (January 6, 1861 – September 18, 1935) was an American jurist. Born in Morgan County, Ohio, Elliott moved to Iowa with his parents. He graduated from University of Iowa College of Law in 1881 and was admitted to the Iowa bar. He was the lawyer for a land company in Aberdeen, Dakota Territory. Elliott then moved to Minnesota in 1884. He received his doctorate from University of Minnesota in 1887 with a thesis on "The Northeastern Fisheries" and taught at the university from 1890 to 1899. In 1890, Elliott was appointed the Minneapolis, Minnesota municipal court judge and in 1894 was appointed a Minnesota district court judge. During the Spanish–American War, Elliott was adjutant general of the State of Minnesota. Elliott was a Republican. From 1905 to 1909, Elliott served on the Minnesota Supreme Court. In 1909. President William H. Taft appointed Elliott to the Supreme Court of the Philippines and Elliott served until 1912. He then resumed his law practice in Minnea

Politicians from Aberdeen, South Dakota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Lawyers from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Politicians from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Swati Avasthi

topic

Swati Avasthi

Swati Avasthi is an American writer of fiction and a teacher. Her first young adult novel, Split, receiving several awards including Cybils Young Adult Fiction Award and a Parents’ Choice 2010 Silver Award. In 2009, her short story "Swallow" was nominated for the Pushcart Prize and was listed in 2009 Best American New Voices collection.[1]Chasing Shadows is her second novel, published in 2013. She has taught for Hamline University, at the Anoka-Ramsey Community College, and at the Loft Literary Center in the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) and Master of Fine Arts (MFA) programs.[2][3] Biography Avasthi moved from India to Albuquerque, where she studied till the age of 18 and her desire was to become a fiction writer. She went to the University of Chicago for a bachelors in humanities with an emphasis on theater.[4] Before studying law, she started working at Victory Gardens Theater for a year. For three years she worked for the Pro Bono Advocates in Cook County in the role of a paralegal and coordinator in the

1970s births

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Novelists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

21st-century American women writers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Mona Bell

topic

Mona Bell

Mona Bell (13 January 1890 – 1 June 1981) was an American rodeo rider, newspaper reporter, and the mistress of Pacific Northwest entrepreneur Sam Hill.[1] Early life Born in East Grand Forks, Minnesota, Mona Bell went for one year to the University of North Dakota across the state line in Grand Forks, North Dakota; she apparently stood out there for her skills at basketball. She was a fine horse rider and good with a rifle and a pistol. She was a rodeo rider (she rode broncs in male disguise).[1][2] By her own account, she appeared in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show (although her biographer John A. Harrison was unable to verify that).[3][1] She later became a reporter for various U.S. newspapers. Relationship with Sam Hill In 1910 she met Sam Hill.[1] He was a prominent entrepreneur 33 years her senior and was by then almost entirely estranged from his wife,[4] although they never divorced.[5] She moved to Portland, Oregon, in 1920 to be near him,[1] and in 1928 he bought her 35 acres (140,000 m2) o

Saddle bronc riders

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Rodeo performers (other)

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Female long-distance swimmers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Mara Hvistendahl

topic

Mara Hvistendahl

Mara Hvistendahl is an American writer. Her book Unnatural Selection was a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction. Life She graduated from Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania and Columbia University in New York City. She is an editor for Science magazine. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, Popular Science, and Foreign Policy.[1] Works Unnatural Selection: Choosing Boys Over Girls, and the Consequences of a World Full of Men. PublicAffairs. 2011. ISBN 1-58648-991-7. [2][3][4] And The City Swallowed Them, Deca[5] References http://news.sciencemag.org/author/mara-hvistendahl Showalter, Elaine (July 1, 2011). "Mara Hvistendahl's 'Unnatural Selection,' about a world with too many men". The Washington Post. Retrieved 3 September 2014. Is Hvsitendahl a whistleblower, warning us of a terrible disaster we must take action to avert — and if so, what kind of action would that be? Or is she a Cassandra, describing an unavoidable destiny for humankind

American essayists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

American science writers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Gary Amdahl

topic

Gary Amdahl

Gary Byrdelle Amdahl is an American author, born August 4, 1956, in Jackson, Minnesota. He attended public schools, graduating from Robbinsdale High School in 1974. Amdahl has published six books, and produced nine plays. He was awarded two Jerome Fellowships at The Playwrights' Center in Minneapolis, and was a participant in Midwest Playlabs in 1985. His stories, essays, poetry (original, translated, and set to music), book and theater reviews, literary feature articles, and interviews have appeared in Agni, A Public Space, The Massachusetts Review, The Gettysburg Review, Fiction, The Quarterly, Santa Monica Review, Spolia, Third Bed, Minnetonka Review, New York Times Book Review, Los Angeles Times Book Review, Los Angeles Review of Books, The Nation, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, Zyzzyva, Rain Taxi, and many other monthlies, weeklies, and dailies. Amdahl has been married to author Leslie Brody since 1989. Books Much Ado About Everything: Oration on the Dignity of the Novelist (2016, Massachuse

People from Jackson, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

People from Jackson County, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Shawn Lawrence Otto

topic

Shawn Lawrence Otto

Otto in 2017 Shawn Lawrence Otto (born April 21, 1961) is an American novelist, nonfiction author, filmmaker, political strategist, speaker, science advocate, and screenwriter and co-producer of the movie House of Sand and Fog. Biography Otto in 2011 Otto lives on a hobby farm near Marine on St. Croix with his wife, Rebecca Otto, a former Minnesota State Auditor and 2018 candidate for Governor.[1][2] Their home, called "Breezy", is passive and active solar, geothermal, wind-powered, and super-insulated. Otto designed it, and the couple built it with their own hands. Otto's family forefather, C.D. Gilfillan, co-founded the Republican Party of Minnesota.[3] Otto is a past (2009–2011) Board Chair of the Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis. Works Otto is the author of Sins of Our Fathers[4] ( ISBN 978-1571311092), a critically acclaimed novel published in 2014 that received a starred review by Publishers Weekly[5] and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize.[6] Otto is the screenwriter and

Screenwriters from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

American filmmakers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

People from Washington County, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Peg Kerr

topic

Peg Kerr

Peg Kerr (born 28 April of undisclosed year) is an American fantasy author. Biography She was born in a suburb of Chicago and moved to Minnesota to attend St. Olaf College. She received an M.A. in English Literature in 1990, specializing in speculative fiction. She lives with her two daughters in Minneapolis; she and her daughters are students of the martial arts. Her husband, Robert F. Ihinger, died in 2018.[1] Kerr has been publishing short fiction since 1987 and attended the Clarion Workshop in 1988; her stories have been published in Tales of the Unanticipated, Amazing Stories, Weird Tales, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and several anthologies. Kerr's first novel Emerald House Rising was published in 1997 by Warner Aspect, and received praise for the degree of care and detail with which it treated the subjects of jewelry crafting and gemcutting, as well as the unusual sociology she constructed around them. Her second novel The Wild Swans, based in part on Hans Christian Andersen's class

Novelists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Novelists from Illinois

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Jim Banke

topic

Jim Banke

Jim Banke is a former aerospace journalist and current owner of MILA Solutions LLC, a media consulting company. Career Banke has written for Florida Today, Space.com and served as director of communications for the Space Foundation[1] and worked as a Space Launch Development Analyst for SAIC. He was appointed to the Florida Governor’s Commission on the Future of Aeronautics and Space in 2006 leading to the creation of Space Florida.[2] In 2007, Banke was awarded the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal for his contributions to the aerospace industry in Florida.[3] Banke also serves on the board of directors of the Air Force Space & Missile Museum Foundation and the National Space Club Florida Committee. From 2009 to 2013, Banke hosted Space Talk a weekly radio program on WMMB in Melbourne, Florida discussing the nation's space program.[4] He continues to provide live commentary for WMMB of rocket launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In 2014, Banke was

American journalists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

American male journalists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Stan Tekiela

topic

Stan Tekiela

Stan Tekiela is a naturalist, author and wildlife photographer[1][2] with a Bachelor of Science degree in Natural History from the University of Minnesota.[3][4] He has been an active professional naturalist for more than 25 years and is a member of the Minnesota Ornithologists' Union, North American Nature Photography Association and Canon Professional Services. Stan studies and photographs wildlife throughout the United States and has received various national and regional awards for his books and photographs. A columnist and radio personality, his syndicated column appears in more than 25 newspapers and he can be heard on a number of Midwest radio stations. References Timmons, Bob (15 April 2016). "Bear vs. wolf, and other stunning photos from Minnesota's Stan Tekiela". Star Tribune. Retrieved 30 May 2016. Dickinson, Phil (9 December 2008). "Bird's-Eye View: Big, red, flies at night? A book might offer insight". Winston Salem Journal. Retrieved 30 May 2016. "About Stan". NatureSmart. Retrieved 3

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

People from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

University of Minnesota alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Will Weaver

topic

Will Weaver

Will Weaver (born William Weller; 1950 in Park Rapids, Minnesota), is an American author.[1] Background Weaver was raised on a dairy farm near Park Rapids, Minnesota, where his parents, who were of Scandinavian descent, farmed 150 acres. In Weaver's youth, he enjoyed fishing and participating in sports (he was the captain of his high school basketball team). At 16 years of age, he once finished second in a demolition derby.[2] One of three children, he attended the local country school. Weaver attended Saint Cloud State University, 1968–69; University of Minnesota, B.A., 1972; Stanford University, M.A., 1979. Career His debut was Red Earth, White Earth, about a native Minnesotan returning to his home town due to conflicts between white farmers and local Native Americans. It was made into a CBS-TV movie in 1989. His 1989 short story collection, A Gravestone Made of Wheat and Other Stories, won many awards, including the Minnesota Book Award for Fiction. The title story was produced in 2006 as the independe

People from Park Rapids, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

People from Hubbard County, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Eliza Wheeler

topic

Eliza Wheeler

Eliza Wheeler is an American author-illustrator of Miss Maple Seeds (Penguin), which debuted on the New York Times Bestseller list, and the illustrator of Holly Black's 2014 Newbery Medal Honor Book Doll Bones (McElderry Books), Alison McGhee's 'Tell Me A Tattoo Story', Pat Zietlow-Miller's 'Wherever You Go', and Mara Rockliff's The Grudge Keeper (Peachtree). She lives in Los Angeles, California.[1] She is a 2006 graduate of the University of Wisconsin–Stout with a BFA in Graphic Design.[2][3] Works List Writer and illustrator Miss Maple's Seeds (Nancy Paulsen, Apr 2013), ISBN 9780399257926 Illustrator The Left-Handed Fate, by Kate Milford, (Aug 2016), ISBN 9780805098006 Cody and the Fountain of Happiness, by Tricia Springstubb (Candlewick, Apr 2015), ISBN 9780763658571 Wherever You Go, by Pat Zietlow Miller (Little, Brown, Apr 2015), ISBN 9780316400022 The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place series by Maryrose Wood (Balzer + Bray) Book I: The Mysterious Howling paperback reprint editio

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

American women illustrators

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

People from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Scott William Carter

topic

Scott William Carter

Scott William Carter is an American fiction writer. He writes in multiple genres, including fantasy, mystery, and young adult. Biography Carter was born in Minnesota and raised in Oregon's Willamette Valley. Before becoming a professional writer, Carter owned a bookstore, worked as a ski instructor, and a computer trainer.[1] Carter attended the University of Oregon, graduating in 1994 with a Bachelor of Arts in English.[2] Currently living in Oregon, he is married and is a father of two children, a daughter and a son.[3] He won the 2011 Oregon Book Award for Young Adult Literature for his novel, The Last Great Getaway of the Water Balloon Boys. He is also the author of the highly acclaimed Garrison Gage mystery series, among other books. Bibliography Novels (Garrison Gage Series) The Gray and Guilty Sea (2010) A Desperate Place for Dying (2012) The Lovely Wicked Rain (2014) A Shroud of Tattered Sails (2015) A Lighthouse for the Lonely Heart (2017) Bury the Dead in Driftwood (2019) Novels

Oregon Book Award winners

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Novelists from Oregon

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Novelists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Carol M. Highsmith

topic

Carol M. Highsmith

Carol McKinney Highsmith (born Carol Louise McKinney on May 18, 1946) is an American photographer, author, and publisher who has photographed in all the states of the United States, as well as the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. She photographs the entire American vista (including landscapes, architecture, urban and rural life, and people in their work environments) in all fifty U.S. states as a record of the early 21st century. Highsmith is donating her life's work of more than 100,000 images, royalty-free, to the Library of Congress, which established a rare, one-person archive.[1][2] Early life and studies Childhood Carol Louise McKinney was born to Luther Carlton McKinney and Ruth Ragsdale Carter in Leaksville, North Carolina near the large tobacco farm owned by her maternal grandparents, Yancey Ligon Carter and Mary Elizabeth Morton. Her mother's family were planters descending from the colonist Thomas Carter. Her father was a manufacturer representative and her mother worked for Billy Graham.[

People from Eden, North Carolina

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

20th-century American women artists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

21st-century American women artists

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Arthur W. Saha

topic

Arthur W. Saha

Arthur William Saha (October 31, 1923 – November 19, 1999) was an American speculative fiction editor and anthologist, closely associated with publisher Donald A. Wollheim. Life Saha was the son of William and Henrikka Saha, a Finnish-American couple. After serving in the Merchant Marine during World War II, he enrolled in and graduated from Columbia University. Saha worked as a research chemist and is credited with the patent for the first fire resistant ironing board cover, and for various paints and pigments used on the exteriors of the first space satellites. At one time he was a resident of Minnesota; in his later years Saha resided in Cooperstown, Otsego County, New York. While living in New York City, he was an early associate of the beatniks. Saha was a long-standing member of Mensa. He died of cancer.[1] Career in speculative fiction Saha became active in New York City science fiction fandom, becoming a member of the Futurians and First Fandom, and was a close associate and ally of Wollheim and F

Novelists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Beat Generation people

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

20th-century American short story writers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Ernest Pickering

topic

Ernest Pickering

Ernest Dinwoodie Pickering (December 14, 1928 – October 16, 2000) was a fundamentalist Christian pastor, author, college administrator, and mission board representative. Life Pickering was born in St. Petersburg, Florida, the oldest son of Ernest Joseph and Evelyn Ida Pickering, officers in the Salvation Army. The family lived and ministered in Florida, Maryland, West Virginia, Alabama, and Texas. Ernest was converted to fundamentalist Christianity as a teenager in Dallas and immediately began to participate in street meetings, including some at which he dodged rocks and tomatoes.[1] He graduated with a B. A. in Bible from Bob Jones University in 1948, when he was nineteen; and he earned his Th.M. and Th.D. degrees from Dallas Theological Seminary in 1952 and 1957 respectively.[2] In 1952, Pickering married Ariel Yvonne Thomas, whom he had met as an intern pastor in Colorado City, Texas, and the couple shortly moved to New Kensington, Pennsylvania, where Pickering pastored Maranatha Bible Church. After co

Dallas Theological Seminary alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from St. Petersburg, Florida

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Leon C. Snyder

topic

Leon C. Snyder

Leon Carleton Snyder[1] (March 11, 1908 – August 8, 1987) was an American professor, writer, and radio personality and co-founder of the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. Through his work, research, broadcasts, and books he changed the way Minnesotans viewed the possibilities of gardening in a northern climate.[2] Early life In 1908 Leon C. Snyder was born in Shepherd, Michigan, U.S. He received both his B.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Washington. He taught botany for a while at South Dakota State College where he met a minister's daughter Vera Ferch, who would become his wife in 1934.[3] In 1945 the couple moved to Minnesota. He began his career at the University of Minnesota as an extension horticulturalist, by 1953 he was promoted to head of the Department. Minnesota Landscape Arboretum In 1956 the Men's Garden Club of Minneapolis met with the Minnesota State Horticultural Society with the desire to create an arboretum.[4] In 1958 after raising monies from local garden clubs a 160 acres (0.65 km2) o

People from Isabella County, Michigan

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

South Dakota State University faculty

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Elise Matthesen

topic

Elise Matthesen

Elise Matthesen (née Krueger; born 1960)[1] is an American essayist, journalist, poet, and fiction writer (primarily of science fiction and fantasy; she is an active supporter of the interstitial arts movement), a maker of art jewelry and a long time Bisexual Rights activist. For 13 years she was the companion of the late John M. Ford, until his death in September 2006.[2] She lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota and is a member of the First Universalist Church there. Early life Matthesen was born in Wisconsin. Career She is an anorexia nervosa survivor[3] as well as a speaker, facilitator, and activist on issues of body acceptance, bisexuality,[4][5][6] polyamory,[7] and issues of self-esteem. She was one of the original contributors to the groundbreaking 1991 bisexual anthology Bi Any Other Name,[8] has written for local GLBT magazine Lavender, and is an active member of science fiction fandom. In 1993 Jane Yolen published Matthesen's short story The Stone Girl in the Xanadu anthology together with works by

Writers from Wisconsin

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

American women short story writers

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Novelists from Wisconsin

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


David Housewright

topic

David Housewright

David Housewright is an Edgar Award winning author[1] of crime fiction and past President of the Private Eye Writers of America. [2] Housewright won the Edgar from the Mystery Writers of America as well as a nomination from the PWA for his first novel "Penance." He has also earned three Minnesota Book Awards.[3] Best known for the Rushmore McKenzie and Holland Taylor series set most often in and around the greater St. Paul and Minneapolis area of Minnesota, USA,[4] Housewright's books have been favorably compared to Raymond Chandler, Ross MacDonald [5] and Robert B. Parker.[6] Biography Housewright was born and raised in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is the son of Eugene Housewright, Sr., a businessman, and Patricia Langevin Housewright. He attended Cretin High School where he was editor of the school newspaper until he was fired for printing an editorial opposing the Vietnam War. “I attended an all-boys Catholic military school during the height of Vietnam war. Of course they fired me. You would have fired me, t

Novelists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Saint Paul, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

University of St. Thomas (Minnesota) alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Tami Hoag

topic

Tami Hoag

Tami Hoag (born Tami Mikkelson on January 20, 1959) is an American novelist, best known for her work in the romance and thriller genres. More than 22 million copies of her books are in print. Biography Hoag was born in Cresco, Iowa and raised in the small town of Harmony, Minnesota, where her father sold insurance.[1][2] From childhood, she knew she wanted to be a writer. "I had to spend a lot of time entertaining myself," she told an interviewer in 2016. "I found books at a really young age and fell in love with books."[3] Hoag's first job after graduating from high school was in the La Crosse Tribune circulation department.[3] Before publishing her first novel, she also worked as a photographer's assistant, trained show horses, and sold designer bathroom accessories. She married and divorced Daniel Hoag, whom she dated in high school.[1] Hoag began her career as an author in 1988, writing category romances for the Bantam Books Loveswept Line. After several years of success in that field, Hoag switched h

Novelists from Iowa

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Novelists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Novelists from California

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Marchette Chute

topic

Marchette Chute

Marchette Gaylord Chute (1909-1994) was an American writer. As a biographer, she specialized in English literary figures; she published biographies of Geoffrey Chaucer, Ben Jonson, and William Shakespeare. As a children's writer, she specialized in tales written during the periods described in her biographies, and in rhyming verses for children.[1] Biography Marchette Chute was born in Wayzata, Minnesota to an upper-middle-class family. Her father William Chute was a realtor, and her mother Edith Mary Pickburn Chute had been a hospital nurse. She attended Central High School in Minneapolis, and was then a student at the University of Minnesota. Over a seven-year period from 1946 through 1953, Chute published the trade biographies that established her reputation. Geoffrey Chaucer of England was published in 1946, Shakespeare of London in 1950, and Ben Jonson of Westminster in 1953. In each case, Chute attempted to write as an independent scholar with the ability to revisit and develop holistic portraits of h

People from Wayzata, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

University of Minnesota alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


David Oppegaard

topic

David Oppegaard

Oppegaard in 2011 David Oppegaard (born in Lake Crystal, Minnesota, 19 August 1979)[1] is an American novelist. In 2008, Oppegaard wrote The Suicide Collectors. It was his first novel. He was nominated for the Bram Stoker Award for Best First Novel by the Horror Writers Association.[2] One year later, he published his second work, Woormwood, Nevada. Biography Oppegaard attended Saint Olaf College, Northfield and Hamline University, Saint Paul. Both are in Minnesota. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Saint Olaf. He has a Master of Fine Arts degree from Hamline.[3] Bibliography 2008 The Suicide Collectors 2009 Woormwood, Nevada 2012 The Ragged Mountains 2014 And the Hills Opened Up 2015 The Firebug of Balrog County References "Authors : Oppegaard, David". www.sf-encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2019-08-04. "Horror Writers Association announces 2008 Stoker Nominations". Horror Writers Association. Archived from the original on 2010-06-13. David Oppegaard's profile in Goodreads.com, Goo

Novelists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

People from Blue Earth County, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Hamline University alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Jessica Hopper

topic

Jessica Hopper

Jessica Hopper (born September 5, 1976) is an American writer. She published The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic, a compilation of her essays, reported pieces, zines, and reviews, in May 2015.[1][2][3][4] In 2018, she published a memoir, Night Moves. Early life Jessica Hopper was born in Indiana and grew up in Minneapolis.[3] Her mother was a newspaper editor, her father a journalist and her stepfather a prosecutor, all of which Hopper has described as fueling her interest in journalism and investment in finding the truth more generally.[5] She began writing criticism as a teenager, spurred by a frustrated sense that a magazine had misunderstood one of her favorite bands, Babes in Toyland—the piece, Hopper recalled later, characterized the music as "caustic and shrieky" where Hopper found "these aesthetics...really empowering"—at 15 Hopper called the magazine to argue she should be allowed to write a new review. The magazine didn't respond, but Hopper started her own fanzine.[6]

Journalists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Women critics

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

American music critics

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Barbara Carlson

topic

Barbara Carlson

Barbara Carlson (June 21, 1938 – July 9, 2018) was an American politician and radio host from Minneapolis, Minnesota. Her father, Harry Duffy, made a successful business of running the local lumber yard in Anoka, Minnesota. She was married to Minnesota Representative Arne Carlson from 1965 until they divorced in 1977. Arne Carlson was later elected Governor of Minnesota in 1991. They are the parents of two children: Tucker and Anne.[1] Carlson married Martin "Pete" Anderson in 1983. Carlson, a self-described conservative, served on the Minneapolis City Council as an Independent-Republican, and later as an Independent. She ran a campaign as a candidate for mayor of Minneapolis against Sharon Sayles Belton in 1997. Carlson was a radio talk show host on KSTP.[2] She wrote two books, including her 1996 autobiography, This Broad's Life.[3] She died of lung cancer on July 9, 2018, aged 80.[4][5] References "Gov. Arne Carlson is a significant figure in "This Broad's Life," despite his written warning to the

People from Mitchell, South Dakota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Radio personalities from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from South Dakota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Ed Henry (Minnesota politician)

topic

Ed Henry (Minnesota politician)

Edward L. Henry (March 30, 1921 – September 30, 2010) was an American Democratic politician and academic. Henry was mayor of St. Cloud, Minnesota, for two terms, from 1964 to 1971.[1] He later served as the president of several colleges and universities. Henry was the first lay and male president of Saint Mary's College, a Catholic women's college in Indiana, from 1972 to 1974.[1] He then became president of Saint Michael's College (in Colchester, Vermont), serving from 1976 to 1985.[1][2] Henry later became the 8th president of Marian University (Fond du Lac, Wisconsin), then called Marian College of Fond du Lac, serving from 1986 to 1989.[3] He also served as president of Belmont Abbey College in North Carolina from 1989 to 1990.[2] Biography Early life and education Henry was born in St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1921.[1] He graduated from Cathedral High School[2] and in 1943 received his bachelor's degree from St. John's University, an all-male college in Collegeville, Minnesota.[1][2] He attended Harvard U

University of Chicago alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Belmont Abbey College people

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Disease-related deaths in Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Todd Otis

topic

Todd Otis

Todd H. Otis (born June 22, 1945) is an American businessman and politician. From Minneapolis, Minnesota, Otis received his bachelor's degree in American history in 1967 from Harvard University. He then served in the Peace Corps from 1967 to 1969 and was stationed in Senegal. In 1970, Otis then received his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University. Otis worked in corporate community affairs. He also wrote about nuclear energy and renewable energy. Otis served in the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1979 to 1991 and was a Democrat. Otis served as chair of the Minnesota Democratic Farmer Labor party from 1990 to 1993. In 1994, he ran for Minnesota Governor and Minnesota Auditor and lost the elections. His father was James C. Otis who served on the Minnesota Supreme Court.[1][2] Notes InnerCityTennis-Todd Otis Minnesota Legislators Past and Present-Todd Otis

Columbia University Graduate School of Journali...

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Businesspeople from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Politicians from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


George P. Hammond

topic

George P. Hammond

George Peter Hammond (September 19, 1896 – December 3, 1993) was an American professor of Latin American studies. He published works related to the founding of New Mexico and other Spanish settlements in the United States. He was the director of the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley for 17 years. Early life and education Hammond was born on September 19, 1896 in Hutchinson, Minnesota, the son of Danish immigrants Niels Peter Jensen Hammond (né Haumann) and his wife Christiane (née Svendsen). When he was 13 years old, his family moved to California. He attended the University of California, Berkeley in the fall of 1916, graduating in 1920 as a history major under Herbert E. Bolton. Hammond received a M.A. in 1921.[1] Hammond married Carrie Nelson, who was also of Danish ancestry, in 1921 while studying for his Ph.D. Hammond traveled to Spain for a year in the summer of 1922 through a graduate program at UC Berkeley. He received his doctorate in 1924.[1] Teaching career Hammond beg

American historians

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

People from Hutchinson, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

University of California, Berkeley faculty

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Scott Nimerfro

topic

Scott Nimerfro

Scott Nimerfro (July 12, 1961 – April 17, 2016) was an American writer and producer, best known for the television series Pushing Daisies, Hannibal and for serving as an associate producer on Bryan Singer's 2000 film X-Men.[1] Television work Episodes of Pushing Daisies "Smell of Success" (1.07) "The Norwegians" (2.10) Episodes of Ringer "What We Have Is Worth the Pain" (1.17) "It's Called Improvising, Bitch!" (1.21) Episodes of Hannibal "Coquilles" (1.06) (with Bryan Fuller) "Rôti" (1.11) (with Steve Lightfoot and Bryan Fuller) "Savoureux" (1.13) (with Steve Lightfoot and Bryan Fuller) "Takiawase" (2.04) (with Bryan Fuller) "Su-zakana" (2.08) Episodes of Once Upon A Time "Breaking Glass" (4.05) (with Kalinda Vazquez) "Shattered Sight" (4.10) (with Tze Chun) "Heart of Gold" (4.17) (with Tze Chun) Awards and nominations In 2008, Nimerfro was nominated for a Writers Guild of America award for his work on Pushing Daisies.[2] Death Nimerfro died on April 17, 2016, aged 54 after a year

Screenwriters from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Deaths from angiosarcoma

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Charles William Mayo

topic

Charles William Mayo

Charles William Mayo (July 28, 1898 – July 28, 1968) was an American surgeon, and a member of the board of governors of the Mayo Clinic beginning in 1933. He was the son of Mayo Clinic co-founder Charles Horace Mayo and Edith (Graham) Mayo. In addition to his skill as a surgeon, he was also known as a medical administrator whose work was key in the development of group medical practice. He chaired the Mayo Foundation, and the board of regents at the University of Minnesota. He also had a role in the United Nations, appointed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower,[1] and was elected president of the American Association for the United Nations in February 1954.[2] Born in Rochester, Minnesota, Mayo graduated from Princeton University in 1921. He then received his medical degree from University of Pennsylvania in 1926 and his master's degree in surgery from University of Minnesota in 1931. He (and his son) trained at Robert Packer Hospital in Sayre, Pennsylvania.[3][4] Mayo taught at University of Minnesota and wa

Mayo Clinic people

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

The Hill School alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Military personnel from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Andrea Jenkins

topic

Andrea Jenkins

Andrea Jenkins (born 1961) is an American policy aide, politician, writer, performance artist, poet, and transgender activist. She is known for being the first African-American openly transgender woman elected to public office in the United States,[1] serving since January 2018 on the Minneapolis City Council. Jenkins moved to Minnesota to attend the University of Minnesota in 1979 and was hired by the Hennepin County government, where she worked for a decade. Jenkins worked as a staff member on the Minneapolis City Council for 12 years before beginning work as curator of the Transgender Oral History Project at the University of Minnesota's Jean-Nickolaus Tretter Collection in Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Studies. Early life Born in 1961, Andrea Jenkins was raised in North Lawndale, Chicago.[2][3] She has said she grew up in "a low-income, working-class community" and "lived in some pretty rough places." She was raised by a single mother, Shirley Green, who was "very loving and very much concerne

African-American transgender and transsexual women

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Politicians from Chicago

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Artists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Thomas Dubay

topic

Thomas Dubay

Father Thomas Edward Dubay (December 30, 1921 – September 26, 2010), S.M., was an American Catholic priest, author, and retreat director. He wrote over 20 books on Catholic spirituality, in which he emphasized the importance of renewed conversion and contemplative prayer, and he traveled worldwide to teach at parishes, seminaries, and monasteries.[1][2][3][4] Early life and education Dubay was born on December 30, 1921, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, one of seven children. His father, Elie Albert Dubay, was also born in Minneapolis, while his mother, Leah Caron Dubay, was born in Superior, Wisconsin. He attended DeLaSalle High School (Minneapolis), a school run by the Christian Brothers, and graduated in 1939. That year, he began his post-secondary education at St. Mary’s Manor, the minor seminary of the Society of Mary (Marists), in South Langhorne, Pennsylvania.[1] After two years at St. Mary’s Manor, Dubay entered the Marist novitiate in Staten Island, and took first vows after one year, on September 8, 194

Clergy from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minneapolis, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Jim Northrup (writer)

topic

Jim Northrup (writer)

Jim Northrup (April 28, 1943 – August 1, 2016) was an Anishinaabe (Native American) newspaper columnist, poet, performer, and political commentator from the Fond du Lac Indian Reservation in Minnesota. His Anishinaabe name was "Chibenashi" (from Chi-bineshiinh "Big little-bird"). Summary Northrup's regular column, the Fond du Lac Follies, was syndicated through several Native American papers, such as The Circle, The Native American Press and News From Indian Country. It won many awards (see below) and was known for a warm humour with a sharply political undertone. Northrup often told stories through the perspective of his immediate family, most of whom, like he did, live a traditional Anishinaabe lifestyle and uses a folksy style to make points about United States-Native American interactions. Fond du Lac Follies was named Best Column at the 1999 Native American Journalists Association convention. In 1990-1992, Jim worked as a roster artist for the COMPAS Writer in the Schools Program. He was a Mentor in th

Novelists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Novelists from Montana

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Comedians from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Barry Silesky

topic

Barry Silesky

Barry Silesky (born 1949) is a Minneapolis-native poet, biographer, and non-fiction writer. He moved to Chicago where he studied for a BA from Northwestern University and an MA from the University of Illinois.[1] He is the author of a collection of poetry, biographies, and prose, such as The New Tenants, One Thing That Can Save Us, This Disease: Poems, Ferlinghetti: The Artist in His Time, and John Gardner, Literary Outlaw. He was the founding editor of ACM (Another Chicago Magazine) and previously taught at the Art Institute of Chicago and Loyola University Chicago.[1] He is widely held in libraries worldwide.[2] References "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-08-09. Retrieved 2016-08-22.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) "Silesky, Barry". worldcat.org. Retrieved August 22, 2016.

Northwestern University alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Poets from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

University of Illinois at Chicago alumni

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Ben Bowman

topic

Ben Bowman

Ben Bowman is an American film director and screenwriter.[1] He made his feature debut with the drama Knucklehead.[2] The film premiered as the opening night film at the 2015 BAMcinématek New Voices in Black Cinema Festival. It went on to win awards at film festivals across the U.S.[3][4][5][6] and earned positive reviews.[2][7] A North American release was scheduled for October 2016.[8] Career Bowman began his career in Minneapolis, where he grew up, editing music video footage for Prince. He later studied directing under Spike Lee at NYU.[2][9] Novelist Jonathan Lethem's "The Mad Brooklynite" was adapted for the stage by Bowman, who also directed the original production at The 45th Street Theater in New York City.[10][11] Bowman’s debut as a feature writer and director was the Brooklyn set independent drama Knucklehead. Together with Bryan Abrams, he wrote the screenplay, which went on to draw the attention of Emmy winning and Oscar nominated actor Alfre Woodard. She had received the script from her co-

Artists from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minneapolis

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minneapolis, Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Louie Anderson

topic

Louie Anderson

Louis Perry Anderson (born March 24, 1953) is an American stand-up comedian,[1] actor and television host. Anderson created the cartoon series Life with Louie and has written four books, including Hey Mom: Stories for My Mother, But You Can Read Them Too, which was published in 2018. He was the initial host of the third revival of the game show Family Feud from 1999 to 2002.[2] For his performance on the FX comedy television series Baskets, Anderson received three consecutive Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series nominations and won once in September 2016. Early life Anderson was born and raised in Saint Paul, Minnesota, the son of Ora Zella (née Prouty) and Louis William Anderson.[3] Anderson is the second youngest of 11 children in his family. In a 2016 interview on WTF with Marc Maron, Anderson revealed that his mother actually gave birth to 16 children, but five of them—the first baby and then two sets of twins—died in childbirth.[4] Anderson has described his father

Las Vegas Shows

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Comedians from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

21st-century American comedians

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


John A. Ryan

topic

John A. Ryan

John Augustine Ryan (May 25, 1869 – September 16, 1945) was a leading Catholic priest who was a noted moral theologian, professor, author and advocate of social justice. Ryan lived during a decisive moment in the development of Catholic social teaching within the United States. The largest influx of immigrants in America's history, the emancipation of American slaves, and the industrial revolution had produced a new social climate in the early twentieth century, and the Catholic Church faced increasing pressure to take a stance on questions of social reform.[1] Ryan saw the social reform debate of the early twentieth century as essentially an argument between libertarian individualists and collectivists concerned with equality, and thus contended that an emphasis on human welfare framed in natural law theory provided the most promising means to combine conflicting concerns over individual and social welfare.[2] Ryan's influential response was the development of a Catholic critique of the American capitalist

Economists from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Catholics from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Writers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Dennis Shryack

topic

Dennis Shryack

Dennis Shryack (August 25, 1936 – September 14, 2016) was an American screenwriter whose credits included The Gauntlet in 1977, Code of Silence (1985), starring Chuck Norris, and Turner & Hooch (1989), which stars Tom Hanks and Beasley the Dog. Shryack also co-wrote the screenplay for Pale Rider in 1985, directed by Clint Eastwood, which became the highest grossing Western film of the 1980s, taking in the $41 million (the equivalent of nearly $92 million in 2016).[1] Shryack often collaborated on screenplays with other writers, including penning seven films with Michael Butler, as well as partnerships with Michael Blodgett on Turner & Hooch and Run in 1991.[1] Shryack, who was born and raised in Duluth, Minnesota, began his career as a singer in The Escorts quartet, which toured as an opening act for well-known artists such as Sammy Davis Jr. and Sophie Tucker.[1] Following his time with The Escorts, Shryack was hired as a mailroom worker at Universal Pictures.[1] Shryack's first produced screenpl

Film producers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Screenwriters from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Singers from Minnesota

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Todd Boss

topic

Todd Boss

Todd (Ryan) Boss (born 6 December 1968) is an American poet, installation artist, and film producer based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He has published several collections of poetry and contributed to literary journals. He has also produced a large body of poetry intended for musical setting, most frequently in collaboration with the composer Jake Runestad. Biography Boss was born in Marshfield, Wisconsin,[1][2][3] but raised until age six on a dairy farm in Colby, Wisconsin, when his parents moved to a cattle farm in Fall Creek, Wisconsin. He attended St. Olaf College from 1987 to 1991, earning a B.A. in English and speech-theater. He then pursued graduate studies at the University of Alaska Anchorage between 1992 and 1994, earning an M.F.A. in creative writing. In Minneapolis, he teaches at the Loft Literary Center and has been an artist-in-residence at the Weisman Art Museum of the University of Minnesota. He is the father of two children. Activities and awards Collections of poetry authored by Todd Boss

21st-century American poets

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Film producers from Wisconsin

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

People from Colby, Wisconsin

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User



No more pages
Javascript Version
Revolvy Server https://www.revolvy.com
Revolvy Site Map