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Writers from Minnesota


William Felker

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William Felker

William Felker (born June 26, 1940) is a former professor of Central State University and published author from Ohio, United States. Life William Felker was born in Hennepin County, Minnesota to Robert Felker and Mary Keefe.[1] Felker went to college at University of Minnesota and got his B.A in Philosophy and M.A in foreign languages and area studies.[2] Felker also went on to get his Ph.D in foreign languages and history at the University of Tennessee.[2] In mid-1978, Felker moved to Yellow Springs, Ohio this is where he began to write Poor Will's Almanack.[3] Throughout his career he has won three awards including one from the Ohio Newspaper Association. Poor Will's Almanack Felker's Poor Will's Almanack currently appears in fifteen regional and national publications including the Yellow Springs News[3] In the almanac Felker writes about everything from phenology to gardening and animal husbandry.[4] The almanac began in 1972 with the gift of a barometer from his wife. Felker began to graph and record

American writers

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People from Hennepin County, Minnesota

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Writers from Minnesota

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Aswar Rahman

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Aswar Rahman

Aswar Rahman is an American filmmaker, UX designer, and 2017 Minneapolis mayoral candidate.[1][2] Rahman is the founder of Cineapolis[3][4] and its annual film festival, the Mespies.[5][6] A member of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor party,[7] Rahman ran for the mayoralty of the state's largest city, Minneapolis. He suspended his campaign on November 2, 2017, and subsequently endorsed Jacob Frey.[8] Rahman's platform has emphasized the lowering of the municipal property tax rate.[9][10] Mayoral Candidacy In his 2017 candidacy for mayor, he focused his campaign on ending poverty and policing. He is an outspoken in his advocacy for small businesses, especially for immigrant communities.[11] He worked for the mayor's office for three years and focused his campaign on the details of his plans as mayor, especially the budget.[9] Filmography Year Film Functioned as Notes Director Writer Producer Actor Role 2014 Dorja Yes Yes Yes Yes Bombardier Self-shot 2015 Mehdi+Priya Y

Immigrants to the United States

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Minnesota Democrats

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Marion Craig Wentworth

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Marion Craig Wentworth

Marion Craig Wentworth (1872–1942) was an American playwright, poet, and suffragist. She is best known for her feminist anti-war play, War Brides, which was made into a silent film starring Alla Nazimova in 1916. Early life and education She was born in Minnesota in 1872 and graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1894. She later studied at the Curry School of Expression (now Curry College), and stayed on in Boston to teach expression. She married in 1900, had a son, and divorced in 1912.[1] Career Wentworth was a socialist and a feminist whose writing often addressed social issues. Her 1912 play, The Flower Shop, takes up the cause of women's suffrage. In the years leading up to World War I, she traveled the country to raise support for the suffrage movement by giving dramatic readings. She often read from Votes for Women!, a pro-suffrage play by Elizabeth Robins, portraying multiple characters that ranged from "the doughty women's trade union leader with the cockney dialect" to "the bright, little

Writers from Minnesota

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American women dramatists and playwrights

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American suffragists

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Stuart Timmons

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Stuart Timmons

Stuart Timmons (January 14, 1957 – January 28, 2017) was an American journalist, activist, historian, and award-winning author specializing in LGBT history based in Los Angeles, California. He was the author of The Trouble With Harry Hay: Founder of the Modern Gay Movement and the co-author of Gay L.A.: A History of Sexual Outlaws, Power Politics, and Lipstick Lesbians with Lillian Faderman. Early life Timmons was born on January 14, 1957, in Cottagewood Hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota.[1][2] He has two sisters, Gay and Emily Timmons, both in the SF Bay Area.[3] While he was still a toddler, his family moved to Santa Barbara due to his father getting a new job.[1] Timmons received his Bachelor of Arts in Film from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).[2] While he was a student at UCLA, he co-founded the gay festival on campus with John Ramirez in 1979; it later became known as Outfest.[4] Career Through his career Timmons wrote and edited for magazines, documentary  films and non-fiction l

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Radical Faeries

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LGBT people from Minnesota

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David M. Pletcher

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David M. Pletcher

David Mitchell Pletcher (June 14, 1920 – February 22, 2004) was an American historian, considered an expert in his field.[3][4] He was a history professor at Indiana University from 1965 to 1990.[2] Biography Pletcher was born June 14, 1920 in Faribault, Minnesota[1] He attended the University of Chicago, earning three degrees in history: a B.A. and an M.A. in 1941, and a Ph.D. in 1946.[1] Pletcher's initial academic post was as a history instructor at the University of Iowa, from 1944 to 1946. He served as an associate professor, first at Knox College from 1946 to 1956, then at Hamline University from 1956 to 1965. In 1965 he joined Indiana University as a full professor; he remained there until his retirement in 1990.[1] Pletcher served as an advisor for the 1999 PBS documentary U.S.-Mexican War (1846–1848).[5] He was a member of the Organization of American Historians and the American Historical Association, as well as the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, where he served as vice p

Knox College (Illinois) faculty

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Hamline University faculty

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Historians of the United States

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Leo K. Thorsness

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Leo K. Thorsness

Leo Keith Thorsness (February 14, 1932 – May 2, 2017) was a Colonel in the United States Air Force who received the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Vietnam War. He was awarded the medal for an air engagement on April 19, 1967. He was shot down two weeks later and spent six years in captivity in North Vietnam as a prisoner of war. After his military service, Thorsness served one term in the Washington State Senate. Early career Thorsness was born in Walnut Grove, Minnesota, where his family had a farm.[3] There, he earned the Eagle Scout award from the Boy Scouts of America.[4] He is one of only nine known Eagle Scouts who also received the Medal of Honor. The others are Aquilla J. Dyess and Mitchell Paige of the U.S. Marine Corps, Robert Edward Femoyer and Jay Zeamer, Jr. of the U.S. Army Air Forces, Arlo L. Olson, Benjamin L. Salomon of the United States Army, and Eugene B. Fluckey and Thomas R. Norris of the United States Navy. In 2010, Thorsness received the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award.[5] He

American air force personnel of the Vietnam War

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People from Walnut Grove, Minnesota

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Margaret Culkin Banning

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Margaret Culkin Banning

Margaret Frances Culkin Banning (March 18, 1891 – January 4, 1982) was a best-selling American author of thirty-six novels and an early advocate of women's rights. Banning was born in Buffalo, Minnesota, the daughter of William E. Culkin, who served in the Minnesota state senate from 1895 to 1899. She graduated from Vassar College in 1912. She was also the first woman admitted to the Duluth Hall of Fame. She died in 1982, at age 90, in Tryon, North Carolina.[1] She purchased the Friendly Hills estate near Tryon, North Carolina in 1936, and enjoyed the property seasonally for the remainder of her life.[2] It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1998.[3] Selected works Country Club People The First Woman Half Loaves A Handmaid of the Lord Letters from England, Summer 1942 Lifeboat Number Two Mesabi Salud!: A South American Journal Spellbinders Women for Defense The Women of the Family References Stuhler, Barbara (ed.) (1998). Women of Minnesota (Rev. ed.). St. Paul, Minn.

Novelists from Minnesota

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People from Buffalo, Minnesota

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Dan Jurgens

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Dan Jurgens

Dan Jurgens ([1] born June 27, 1959[2]) is an American comic book writer and artist. He is known for his work on the DC comic book storyline "The Death of Superman" and for creating characters such as Doomsday, Hank Henshaw and Booster Gold. Jurgens had a lengthy run on the Superman comic books including The Adventures of Superman, Superman vol. 2 and Action Comics. At Marvel, Jurgens worked on series such as Captain America, The Sensational Spider-Man and was the writer on Thor for six years. Career 1980s After graduating from Minneapolis College of Art and Design in 1981, Jurgens' first professional comic work was for DC Comics on The Warlord #63 (Nov. 1982).[3] He was hired due to a recommendation of Warlord creator Mike Grell who was deeply impressed by Jurgens' work after being shown his private portfolio at a convention.[4] In 1984, Jurgens was the artist for the Sun Devils limited series (July 1984 – June 1985), with writers Gerry Conway and Roy Thomas. Jurgens would make his debut as a comic book wr

21st-century American writers

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Comics creator BLP pop

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Robert Schadewald

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Robert Schadewald

Robert J. (Bob) Schadewald (1943 in Rogers, MN – 2000)[1] was an author, researcher, and former president of the National Center for Science Education (NCSE).[2] An internationally recognized expert on pseudoscience, Schadewald penned numerous articles on creationism, perpetual motion, flat earthism, and other pseudoscience for such magazines as Science 80, Technology Illustrated, Smithsonian, and Science Digest. He wrote one book, a computer guide titled The dBASE (II) Guide for Small Business, and contributed chapters to six others, including the reference text The History of Science and Religion in the Western Tradition: An Encyclopedia, edited by Gary B. Ferngren. Much of his published work deals with unorthodoxies of science and scholarship. Studying Unorthodox Ideas and People Schadewald studied and wrote about unorthodox ideas and the people who promote them. He attended at least a dozen national creationism conferences, interviewed Immanuel Velikovsky, investigated perpetual motion machines, and go

Critics of creationism

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People from Rogers, Minnesota

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Pseudoscience literature

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Tim Penny

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Tim Penny

Timothy Joseph Penny (born November 19, 1951) is an American author, musician, and former politician from Minnesota. Penny was a Democratic-Farmer-Labor member of the United States House of Representatives, 1983–1995, representing Minnesota's 1st congressional district in the 98th, 99th, 100th, 101st, 102nd and 103rd congresses. Early life Penny was born in Albert Lea, Minnesota, and was educated at Winona State University, receiving a bachelor's degree in political science in 1974. He was a member of the Minnesota State Senate, 1976–1982. Political career In 1982, Penny won the DFL nomination for the 1st District and upset four-term 2nd District Republican Tom Hagedorn, becoming only the third Democrat to ever represent this district. Leading up to the election, Republicans were divided after the conservative Hagedorn narrowly defeated two-term First District moderate incumbent, Rep. Arlen Erdahl, in a contentious Republican Convention endorsement contest after redistricting; in addition, Democrats made

American libertarians

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Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget

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Aurilla Furber

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Aurilla Furber

Aurilla Furber (October 19, 1847 – April 13, 1898) was a 19th-century American author, editor, and activist from Minnesota. Furber is remembered as an author of poetry from the Mississippi Valley. Her poems were included in publications such as the Magazine of Poetry and Women in Sacred Song. She also contributed articles of prose for the Pioneer Press and Church Work, and was a contributing editor for the Woman's Record. Furber was an officer in the Woman's Christian Temperance Union's (WCTU) local, county and district organizations. Early years and education Aurilla Furber was born in a log cabin in Cottage Grove, Minnesota, October 19, 1847.[1] Her father was Joseph Warren Furber, who was well-known among the pioneers and founders of the Minnesota Territory, served in its legislature as well as several of the early Minnesota State legislatures. Her mother, Sarah Maria Minkler Furber (1816–1901), descended from the Minklers and Showermans of eastern New York, who were of Holland Dutch ancestry, although

A Woman of the Century

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People from Cottage Grove, Minnesota

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19th-century American women writers

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Linda LeGarde Grover

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Linda LeGarde Grover

Linda LeGarde Grover is an Anishinaabe novelist and short story writer. An enrolled member of the Bois Forte Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, she is a professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth,[1] as well as a columnist for the Duluth News Tribune.[2] Biography Grover's debut collection of short stories,The Dance Boots, won the Flannery O'Connor Award and the 2011 Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize,[3] her poetry collection The Sky Watched: Poems of Ojibwe Lives the Red Mountain Press Editor's Award and the 2017 Northeastern Book Award for Poetry. Her first novel, The Road Back to Sweetgrass received the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers 2015 Fiction Award, the earlier unpublished manuscript the Native Writers' Circle of the Americas First Book Award 2008. Indian Country Media Network described the novel as being "is most notable for [...] its closely-observed and beautifully expressed perspective on contemporary American Indian life".[4] Critic Martha Viehma

Anishinaabe people

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Native American women writers

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Writers from Minnesota

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Mary Jo Pehl

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Mary Jo Pehl

Mary Jo Pehl (born February 27, 1960 in Circle Pines, Minnesota) is an American writer, actress and comedian. She is best known for her various roles on the television series Mystery Science Theater 3000. Mystery Science Theater 3000 Pehl was one of the writers on MST3K. From 1992 to 1996, Pehl played the role of "Magic Voice", a disembodied woman's voice who would announce upcoming commercials at the beginning of the show. In 1996, she began playing the role of Pearl Forrester, the mother of Dr. Clayton Forrester (Trace Beaulieu), initially as a guest character and then as a recurring character on the departure of TV's Frank (played by Frank Conniff). When Beaulieu left the series at the end of the seventh season, she took over as the head "mad" on the series. She would retain that role to the show's end in the tenth season. Pehl also played a number of other small roles on the series, such as "Jan in the Pan", a woman's head that had been removed from a body (inspired by the movie The Brain That Wouldn't

Screenwriters from Minnesota

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Women television writers

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Craig Kilborn

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Craig Kilborn

Craig Kilborn (born August 24, 1962) is an American comedian, sports and political commentator, actor, and television host. He was the first host of The Daily Show, a former anchor on ESPN's SportsCenter, and Tom Snyder's successor on CBS' The Late Late Show. On June 28, 2010, he launched The Kilborn File after a six-year absence from television, which aired on some Fox stations for a six-week trial run. In comedy, he is known for his deadpan delivery.[1] Early life The son of Shirley, a school teacher, and Hiram Kilborn, an insurance executive, Craig Kilborn was born in Kansas City and moved to Hastings, Minnesota, where he was raised, at four years of age.[2] Kilborn was taller than his peers from an early age, standing out on the playground and then the basketball court as he got older, eventually growing to 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m).[3] In the 9th grade, Kilborn was recruited by the Northside Magicians, an all-star basketball team in Minneapolis. He excelled with the Magicians and with the team at Hastings Hig

Fox network shows

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2010 American television series debuts

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2010 American television series endings

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Jerome J. Workman Jr.

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Jerome J. Workman Jr.

Jerome J. Workman Jr. is an American scientist, born on August 6, 1952, in Northfield, Minnesota. Jerry Workman Jr. and J.J. Workman are also names he uses for publishing. Workman is an author and editor of spectroscopy works and is an analytical spectroscopist.[1][2][3][4][5] Career Workman has published multiple reference text volumes, including the three-volume Academic Press Handbook of Organic Compounds, and five-volume The Concise Handbook of Analytical Spectroscopy. He has published or edited numerous major reviews and several hundred technical papers on the subject of spectroscopy. For this work, he has received the Williams-Wright Award, the ASTM International Award of Merit,[6] and the Eastern Analytical Symposium Award.[7] He, along with co-author Howard L. Mark, have published over 140 successive columns on statistics and chemometrics for Spectroscopy Magazine since 1986.[8] He has lectured widely and internationally on spectroscopy, including at the Oxford Conference on Spectrometry, and throug

American chemists

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American writers

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Eileen Rose Busby

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Eileen Rose Busby

Eileen Rose Busby (August 15, 1922 – April 6, 2005) was an American author and antiques expert who was featured on HGTV's Appraise It! show. Early life Busby was born Eileen May Rose in Two Harbors, Minnesota. Her parents, Frank and Esther Rose, relocated to San Diego while she was still a baby. Busby taught herself to read when she was 3 years old, skipped a grade in school, and graduated from San Diego High School at age 16. Biography Busby, who first married James (Jim) Scott and then Richard Busby, often spoke before groups about antiques collecting. She also taught a how-to course for many years at Cuyamaca College and Grossmont College, community colleges in El Cajon, California.[1] She wrote two books about the history and collecting of Royal Winton Porcelain and Cottage Ware. Her third book, Chintz and Pastel Ware, co-authored with daughter Cordelia Mendoza, also an antiques expert and an appraiser,[2] is scheduled for posthumous publication by Schiffer Publishing in 2011. She was scheduled to lec

American collectors

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Writers from Minnesota

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Selby Beeler

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Selby Beeler

Selby Beeler is the author of the books Throw Your Tooth on the Roof: [1]Tooth Traditions Around the World and How Many Elephants? A Lift the Flap Counting Book. Biography She grew up in Rochester, Minnesota, moved to New York for college and work, on to Alabama with her husband and then back to Rochester, Minnesota, where they live with one hand-me-down cat. In addition to raising two above-average children, Selby has, at various times, taught swimming and canoeing, rescued baby birds, worked for a fashion magazine, drawn a weekly cartoon for an Army newspaper, written weekly newspaper articles, and co-owned two children's stores for which she wrote and illustrated all the advertising. Books Throw Your Tooth on the Roof: Tooth Traditions Around the World Illustrated by G. Brian Karas; Houghton Mifflin, 1998; Ages 4–8; ISBN 0-395-89108-6 -- "It happens to everyone, everywhere, all over the world. 'Look! Look! My tooth fell out! My tooth fell out!' But what happens next? What in the world do you do with

People from Rochester, Minnesota

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Matthew Logelin

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Matthew Logelin

Matthew Logelin addresses the crowd at an event for The Liz Logelin Foundation in 2009. Matthew Logelin is an American author, blogger, public speaker, and charity founder. In 2011, he published Two Kisses for Maddy: A Memoir of Loss and Love, which was a New York Times best seller.[1] His blog, Matt, Liz and Madeline: Life and Death, All in a 27-Hour Period, received over 40,000 hits per day at its height in 2008.[2] Both the blog and the memoir document his grief and sudden single parenthood following the unexpected death of his wife, Liz Logelin, 27 hours after the birth of the couple's first child. A screen adaptation of the memoir was optioned by Lifetime in 2012.[3] In 2009, Logelin established The Liz Logelin Foundation, a non-profit organization providing financial grants to families with children who have lost a parent.[4] Background Matt Logelin was born to Sara and Tom Logelin and raised in Minnetonka, Minnesota. He has three younger brothers.[5] He and Elizabeth 'Liz' Goodman met at an area ga

American male bloggers

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People from Minnetonka, Minnesota

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Dan Hooper

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Dan Hooper

Daniel Wayne Hooper (born December 16, 1976) is an American cosmologist and particle physicist specializing in the areas of dark matter, cosmic rays, and neutrino astrophysics. He is a Senior Scientist at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory[1] and an Associate Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago.[2] Hooper is the author of three books, Dark Cosmos: In Search of our Universe’s Missing Mass and Energy (2006),[3] Nature’s Blueprint: Supersymmetry and the Search for a Unified Theory of Matter and Force (2008),[4] and At the Edge of Time: Exploring the Mysteries of Our Universe's First Seconds (2019).[5] Career Hooper received his PhD in physics in 2003 from the University of Wisconsin,[2] under the supervision of Francis Halzen. He was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford between 2003 and 2005, and the David Schramm Fellow at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) from 2005 until 2007.[6] He is currently a Senior Scientist at Fermilab[1] and an Asso

20th-century American physicists

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James Patrick Shannon

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James Patrick Shannon

James Patrick Shannon (February 16, 1921 – August 28, 2003) was an American laicized Roman Catholic bishop and educator. Biography Early years James Patrick Shannon was born in South St. Paul, Minnesota on February 16, 1921 from Patrick Joseph Shannon and Mary Alice McAuliff Foxley Shannon. He was the youngest of 6 children in a large Irish Catholic family. Joseph Shannon was born in Ireland, and was the owner of Shannon Cattle Company in South St. Paul. Mary Alice was first married to Fred Foxley, and was widowed with four small children prior to marrying Joseph Shannon and having two children with him, James and his older sister Mary. Shannon graduated from St. Augustine's (Catholic) School, South St. Paul, in 1934, attended Cretin High School from 1934 to 1936, and then transferred to St. Thomas Military Academy, from which he graduated in 1938 Summa Cum Laude, as valedictorian of his class. He attended the College of St. Thomas (St. Paul) from 1938 to 1941, graduating Summa Cum Laude in 1941 and was aga

Catholics from Minnesota

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Laicized Roman Catholic bishops

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Tammy Faye Messner

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Tammy Faye Messner

Tamara Faye Messner (née LaValley, formerly Bakker; March 7, 1942 – July 20, 2007) was an American Christian singer, evangelist, author, talk show hostess, and television personality. She initially gained notice for her work with The PTL Club, a televangelist program she co-founded with her then-husband Jim Bakker in 1974.[1] Prior to founding The PTL Club, they had hosted their own puppet show series for local programming in Minnesota in the early 1970s, and Messner also had a career as a recording artist.[1] In 1978, she and Bakker built Heritage USA, a Christian theme park.[1] Messner would garner significant publicity when Jim Bakker was indicted, convicted, and imprisoned on numerous counts of fraud and conspiracy in 1989, resulting in the dissolution of The PTL Club.[1] After divorcing Bakker in 1992, she remarried to Roe Messner.[2] She was diagnosed with colon cancer in 1996, of which she suffered intermittently for over a decade before dying of the disease in 2007.[2] Over the course of her career,

American women activists

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People from Andover, Kansas

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Mary Welsh Hemingway

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Mary Welsh Hemingway

Mary Welsh Hemingway (April 5, 1908 – November 26, 1986) was an American journalist and author, who was the fourth wife and widow of Ernest Hemingway. Early life Born in Walker, Minnesota, Welsh was a daughter of a lumberman. In 1938, she married Lawrence Miller Cook, a drama student from Ohio. Their life together was short and they soon separated. After the separation, Mary moved to Chicago and began working at the Chicago Daily News, where she met Will Lang Jr. The two formed a fast friendship and worked together on several assignments. A career move presented itself during a vacation trip to London, when Mary started a new job at the London Daily Express. The position soon brought her assignments in Paris during the years preceding World War II.[1] As a journalist covering World War II After the fall of France in 1940, Welsh returned to London as a base to cover the events of the War.[2] She also attended and reported on the press conferences of Winston Churchill.[2] It was during the war years that s

People from Walker, Minnesota

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Hemingway family

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American expatriates in the United Kingdom

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Dennis Banks

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Dennis Banks

Dennis Banks (Ojibwe, April 12, 1937 – October 29, 2017) was a Native American activist, teacher, and author. He was a longtime leader of the American Indian Movement, which he co-founded in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1968 to represent urban Indians. Born on Leech Lake Indian Reservation in northern Minnesota, he was also known as Nowa Cumig (Naawakamig in the Double Vowel System), which in the Ojibwe language means "in the center of the universe." Work with AIM In 1968, Banks co-founded the American Indian Movement (AIM) in Minneapolis.[2] They were seeking to ensure and protect the civil rights of Native Americans living in urban areas.[3] Banks participated in the 1969–1971 occupation of Alcatraz Island, initiated by Indian students from San Francisco of the Red Power movement. It was intended to highlight Native American issues and promote Indian sovereignty on their own lands. In 1972, he assisted in the organization of AIM's "Trail of Broken Treaties", a caravan of numerous activist groups across the

Members of the American Indian Movement

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Peace and Freedom Party vice presidential nominees

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2016 United States vice-presidential candidates

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John C. Hamer

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John C. Hamer

John C. Hamer is an American-Canadian historian and mapmaker. His research has focused primarily on the history of the Latter Day Saint movement, authoring several books on the topic. Hamer is a leading expert on various schisms within especially non- far-Western (U.S.) portions of the Latter Day Saint "Restoration" movement. Raised in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), Hamer left the religion before joining Community of Christ in 2010 and now serves as Pastor of its Toronto Congregation.[7] Hamer was a contributor to By Common Consent, the Restoration Studies Coordinator at Sunstone Education Foundation, and the Executive Director of the John Whitmer Historical Association.[8] Biography Hamer's mother's ancestry goes back seven generations to the early Latter Day Saint church in 1833.[9] His family history is connected to many variations of the (Latter Day Saint) Restoration (including Brighamites, Josephites, Rigdonites, Whitmerites, and Strangites).[8] Hamer was born in the s

Canadian religion academics

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21st-century American essayists

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Canadian male non-fiction writers

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Tim Babcock

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Tim Babcock

Timothy Milford Babcock (October 27, 1919 – April 7, 2015) was an American politician, the 16th Governor of the state of Montana, from 1962 to 1969.[1] Early life Babcock was born in Littlefork, Minnesota, the son of Olive (Rinehart) and Erwin Babcock.[2] He graduated from Dawson County High School in 1939.[3] He married Betty Lee on September 21, 1941, and they had two children.[4] After graduating from Dawson County High School in 1939, he worked at a Douglas Aircraft factory in California. In 1944, he enlisted in the US Army as an infantryman, and served with the 394th Infantry Regiment, 99th Infantry Division in the European Theater during World War II.[4] He fought at Elsenborn Ridge, part of the Battle of the Bulge. He later took part in the capture of the Remagen Bridge, where he was awarded a Bronze Star Medal for valor.[5] Career Babcock served three terms in the Montana Legislature prior to being elected lieutenant governor in 1960. He became governor in 1962 upon the death of Governor Donald Nu

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Owen Harding Wangensteen

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Owen Harding Wangensteen

Owen Harding Wangensteen (September 21, 1898 – January 13, 1981) was an American surgeon who developed the Wangensteen tube, which used suction to treat small bowel obstruction, an innovation estimated to have saved a million lives by the time of his death. He founded the Surgical Forum at the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and was renowned for his surgical teaching. Amongst his most notable students were Walton Lillehei, Christiaan Barnard and Norman Shumway. He made contributions to other surgical practices in other areas, including appendicitis, peptic ulcers and particularly gastric cancer. In his later life, he showed a keen interest in the history of medicine and co-wrote a number of books on the subject with his wife. Early life Wangensteen on his graduation from the University of Minnesota, 1919. Owen Harding Wangensteen was born in 1898 to Ove Wangensteen and his wife Hannah and brought up on the family farm in Lake Park, Minnesota.[1] His parents were Norwegian-immigrant farmers and he spen

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Arnold Fredrickson

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Arnold Fredrickson

Arnold Gerhard Fredrickson (1932-2017) was an American chemical engineer and Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science (CEMS) at the University of Minnesota. He was known for his work in transport phenomena, bioengineering and population dynamics. Fredrickson was the author of over 100 scientific publications and advisor to over 50 graduate students. He was recognized for his contributions to chemical engineering with election as fellow to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1997) and fellow and founding member of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers (1993). Early life and education Arnold was born and grew up in Faribault, Minnesota, located about 50 miles south of Minneapolis. In 1954, he completed his B.S with distinction in chemical engineering from the University of Minnesota, followed by a master's degree in chemical engineering from Minnesota in 1956. He then completed in 1959 a Ph.D. in chemical engineering at the University

Minnesota CEMS

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Jesse Ventura

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Jesse Ventura

Jesse Ventura (born James George Janos; July 15, 1951) is an American media personality, actor, author, retired professional wrestler, and former politician who served as the Mayor of Brooklyn Park from 1991 to 1995 and as the 38th Governor of Minnesota from 1999 to 2003. He was the first and only candidate of the Reform Party to win a major government position. Ventura was a member of the U.S. Navy Underwater Demolition Team during the Vietnam War.[5] After leaving the military, he embarked on a professional wrestling career from 1975 to 1986, taking the ring name Jesse "The Body" Ventura. He had a long tenure in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) as a performer and color commentator, and was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame class of 2004.[1] In addition to wrestling, Ventura pursued an acting career, appearing in films such as Predator and The Running Man (both 1987). Ventura first entered politics in 1991 when he was elected mayor of Brooklyn Park, Minnesota, a position he held until 1995. Three year

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Marty Seifert

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Marty Seifert

Martin John "Marty" Seifert (born April 23, 1972) is a former Republican Minority Leader and former member of the Minnesota House of Representatives. He represented District 21A, a predominantly rural district in southwestern Minnesota that includes portions of Lyon, Redwood and Yellow Medicine counties, and the cities of Marshall and Redwood Falls.[1] In 2010 and 2014, he unsuccessfully sought the Republican nomination for Governor of Minnesota. Minnesota House of Representatives First elected in 1996, Seifert served as House Majority Whip from 1999-2006. When the Republicans lost control of the House after the 2006 election, he took over leadership of the party in the House from former Speaker Steve Sviggum.[1] Seifert served on the House Rules and Legislative Administration Committee and was an ex officio member of the House Finance Committee and the House Ways and Means Committee.[2] On June 3, 2009, Seifert announced that he was stepping down from his position as minority leader to run for governor o

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Robert F. Gellerman

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Robert F. Gellerman

Robert F. Gellerman (1928 - 2011) was an American historian and writer who specialized in music history, particularly reed organs. Life He was born in 1928.[1][2] He was born and raised in Cloquet, Minnesota. He died in 2011.[1][2] Career During his lifetime, he was a communications engineer, historian and reed organ enthusiast.[3] Bibliography Most of his books have been printed by Vestal Press. His notable books include:[4][5] The American Reed Organ and the Harmonium[6] ISBN 9781461694243 Gellerman's International Reed Organ Atlas[7] ISBN 9781879511347 The American Reed Organ: Its History, How It Works, How to Rebuild It ISBN 9780911572537 References "Robert Gellerman - Historical records and family trees - MyHeritage". www.myheritage.com. Retrieved 1 June 2018. "Robert F. Gellermann's Homepage". www.reedorganfest.com. Retrieved 1 June 2018. "Gerllerman Website". www.reedsoc.org. Retrieved 1 June 2018. "Results for 'au:Gellerman, Robert F.,' [WorldCat.org]". www.worldcat

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Art Donahue

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Art Donahue

Arthur Gerald Donahue, DFC (29 January 1913 – 11 September 1942) was an American fighter pilot who volunteered to fly for the British Royal Air Force in World War II. He was one of 11 American[1] pilots who flew with RAF Fighter Command between 10 July and 31 October 1940, thereby qualifying for the Battle of Britain clasp to the 1939–45 campaign star. He was killed in action in September 1942. Early life Donahue was born to Frank and Ada Donahue in 1913 and was raised on a dairy farm near St. Charles, Minnesota.[2] He learned to fly as a teenager at the Conrad Flying Service, operated by Max Conrad, an aviator known as the "Flying Grandfather" who had set numerous world records for distance and endurance. Becoming Minnesota's youngest commercially certificated pilot at the age of 19, Donahue helped Conrad run the flight school until he left to enlist in the Royal Air Force.[3] He traveled to Canada, claimed to be Canadian, and was accepted.[4] Royal Air Force service After training with No. 7 Operational

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Arvonne Fraser

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Arvonne Fraser

Arvonne Skelton Fraser (September 1, 1925 – August 7, 2018) was an American women's rights advocate and political campaigner.[1][2] She held the position of Senior Fellow at the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, and from 1993–1994 was the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.[1][2] She also managed the political campaigns of her husband Donald M. Fraser during his career, from 1954 to 1979.[1] Early life Fraser was born on September 1, 1925 in Lamberton, Minnesota, to parents Orland Delbert and Phyllis Dufrene Skelton.[2] She grew up on their family farm and attended Lamberton High School, graduating in 1943.[2][3] In 1948, she received a bachelor of arts degree in liberal arts from the University of Minnesota.[2] While studying there, she had her first experience of working on a political campaign when she worked in the office of Hubert Humphrey’s U.S. Senate campaign.[3] Career Following graduation, Fraser began her career in Minnesota Demo

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Richard Sipe

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Richard Sipe

Aquinas Walter Richard Sipe (December 11, 1932 – August 8, 2018) was an American Benedictine monk-priest for 18 years (1952–70 at Saint John's Abbey, Collegeville, Minnesota[1]), a psychotherapist and author of six books about Catholicism, the clerical sexual abuse in the Catholic Church, and clerical celibacy. Life Born in Robbinsdale, Minnesota, he was an American Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor trained specifically[2] to deal with the mental health problems of Roman Catholic priests. He practiced psychotherapy, "taught on the faculties of Major Catholic Seminaries and colleges, lectured in medical schools, and served as a consultant and expert witness in both civil and criminal cases involving the sexual abuse of minors by Catholic priests". During his training and therapies, he conducted a 25-year ethnographic study published in 1990 about the sexual behavior of supposed celibates, in which he found more than half were involved in sexual relationships. In 1970, after receiving a dispensation

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Charles Eastman

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Charles Eastman

Charles Alexander Eastman[1] (born Hakadah and later named Ohíye S'a; February 19, 1858 – January 8, 1939) was a Santee Dakota physician educated at Boston University, writer, national lecturer, and reformer. In the early 20th century, he was "one of the most prolific authors and speakers on Sioux ethnohistory [2] and American Indian affairs."[3] Eastman was of Santee Dakota, English and French ancestry. After working as a physician on reservations in South Dakota, he became increasingly active in politics and issues on Native American rights, he worked to improve the lives of youths, and founded thirty-two Native American chapters[4] of YMCA. He also helped found the Boy Scouts of America. He is considered the first Native American author to write American history from the Native American point of view. Early life and education Eastman was named Hakadah at his birth in Minnesota; his name meant "pitiful last" in Dakota. Eastman was so named because his mother died following his birth. He was the last of f

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Paul Robert Hanna

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Paul Robert Hanna

Paul Robert Hanna (1902–1988) was a Professor of Education, author of books and journals, in the educational field, and leader in elementary education. He also held titles such as an honorary Doctor of Pedagogy, husband, father, grandfather throughout his lifespan. Biography Paul Robert Hanna was born in Sioux City, Iowa on June 21, 1902, to George Archibald and Regula Figi Hanna. Hanna spent most of his youth in Minnesota. He graduated from high school in 1920 and married Jean Shuman in 1926. Paul and Jean Hanna had two sons and a daughter, Emily (born 1930), John (born 1932), and Robert (born 1934) and lived in the Hanna-Honeycomb House. The Hannas had eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Throughout his school and college years, Hanna belonged to many organizations such as the Kappa Delta Rho, Student Council, and the Extemporaneous Team. He attended college from 1924 to 1929 to earn his Ph.D. degree which led him to become a teacher in Washington State University and in 1935 became an associ

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Chara M. Curtis

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Chara M. Curtis

Chara M. Curtis is a writer and children's book author from Minnesota. Biography Chara Mahar Curtis was born in Minnesota, worked in advertising and music publishing in Chicago and Nashville before becoming a full-time writer. Chara has lived in a variety of places, including northern Wisconsin, Nashville, Chicago, and Istanbul. She now makes her home near the San Juan Islands of Washington. She is a daughter of Radio/TV News & Sports personality Harold Richard "Dick" Eugene Mahar and Gloria Estelle LaValleur Mahar Shemorry and has six siblings (in order of age): Richard, Pamela, Jennifer, twins Debra & Douglas, and Bonnie. Bibliography How Far to Heaven(1993) All I See Is Part of Me (1994) No One Walks on My Father's Moon[1]/ (1996) Voyage Publishing ISBN 978-0-9649454-1-8 Fun Is a Feeling(1998) Awards 1996 Body Mind Spirit Magazine Award of Excellence for All I See is Part of Me 1997 Washington State Governor's Writers Award for No One Walks on My Father's Moon References

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Lester Mondale

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Lester Mondale

The Reverend Robert Lester Mondale (May 28, 1904 – August 19, 2003) was an American Unitarian minister and Humanist. He was the only person to sign each of the three Humanist Manifestos of 1933, 1973, and 2003. Biography Mondale was born in Walnut Grove, Minnesota, the son of Methodist minister and World War I hero Theodore Sigvaard Mondale and Jessie Alice Larson.[1][2] Although his family was Methodist, he converted to Unitarianism while earning his B.A. from Hamline University. In 1926 Mondale entered the Unitarian ministry and in 1929 he earned an S.T.B. from Harvard Divinity School.[3] He was ordained by the New North Unitarian Church, Hingham, Massachusetts, and went on to serve congregations in Evanston, Illinois, Kansas City, Missouri; Birmingham, Michigan; White Plains, New York; Tempe, Arizona; and Quincy, Illinois. His younger half-brother was Walter Mondale, Vice-President of the United States under Jimmy Carter. In 1933, Mondale was the youngest to sign A Humanist Manifesto and was also signat

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Agnes Larson

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Agnes Larson

Agnes Larson (15 March 1892 – 24 January 1957) was an American local historian. Life and work Agnes Matilda Larson was born in Preston, Minnesota on 15 March 1892, sister of Henrietta Larson. She attended St. Olaf College, graduating with a B.A. in history and English. Larson taught high school in Walcott, North Dakota and Northfield, Minnesota and studied social work at the University of Chicago in the summer. She was awarded her M.A. by Columbia University in 1922 and she began teaching at Mankato State Teachers College. Larson started teaching at St. Olaf's in 1926 and she received another M.A. from Radcliffe College in 1929. Two years later she was awarded a fellowship by the American Association of University Women and she studied the white pine industry in Minnesota with Frederick Merk at Harvard University. The following year, she returned to Northfield to work on her thesis and catalog for the Norwegian-American Historical Association. Larson received her doctorate in 1938 and served as chair of the

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Henrietta Larson

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Henrietta Larson

Henrietta Larson (24 September 1894 – 25 August 1983) was an American business historian. Life and work Henrietta Melia Larson was born in Ostrander, Minnesota on 24 September 1894, sister of Agnes Larson. She received her B.A. from St. Olaf College in 1918 and taught one year of high school before she became an instructor at Augustana College in 1921–22. She studied at the University of Minnesota in 1922–24, then taught at Bethany College from 1925 to 1926. Larson received her Ph.D. from Columbia University and The Wheat Market and the Farmer in Minnesota, 1858–1900 in 1926. She then taught at Southern Illinois University in 1926–28 before she became a research associate at the Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration in 1928. Together with N. S. B. Gras, she wrote Jay Cooke, Private Banker in 1936 and she was the editor of the Bulletin of the Business Historical Society in 1938. They compiled the Casebook in American Business History in 1939 and Larson was promoted to assistant profes

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John Birrenbach

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John Birrenbach

John "Sparky" Birrenbach (born May 17, 1961) is an American businessman, marketing consultant, writer, filmmaker, and marijuana rights activist.[1][2] Birrenbach, who founded the Institute for Hemp,[3][4] was named High Times magazine's 1993 Freedom Fighter of the Year. He was the Independent Grassroots Party's nominee for US President in 1996.[2] Life and activism Birrenbach, former owner of the Saint Paul business Executive Tea and Coffee, told a reporter that he was arrested for marijuana possession in the 1980s.[5] Birrenbach, a former US Navy Corpsman having served in the US Navy from 1979-1985 (honorably discharged in Sept 1983), In 1987 Birrenbach founded the Institute for Hemp, a nonprofit industrial hemp research organization.[6] In 1989 Birrenbach met with members of the Russian Agricultural delegation sent to Minnesota where he and they discussed Cannabis cultivation in the Ukraine and other former Soviet Republics. In 1990, Birrenbach applied for a permit to harvest wild hemp in Minnesota, a

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Mary H. O'Connor

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Mary H. O'Connor

Mary H. O'Connor (sometimes credited as Mary Hamilton O'Connor) was an American screenwriter and film editor active during Hollywood's silent era. Biography She was born in Saint Paul, Minnesota, in 1872, the daughter of Thomas O'Connor and Bridget Nash. She came from a big family (which included a sister, Loyola O'Connor, who became an actress), and grew up in Minnesota, Oregon, and New York.[1] She began her career as a magazine and newspaper journalist in New York before Hollywood came calling.[2][3] By 1913, she was living in Santa Monica and churning out scripts as a rapid pace under contract at Vitagraph. At the time, she said she hoped to become a director.[4] Eventually, she was named chief of Triangle-Fine Arts' scenario department. She'd also work at Mutual and Famous Players-Lasky.[5][6] In 1921, she left Hollywood to work at Paramount's then-new London studio, where she worked on scripts for films like Dangerous Lies and The Mystery Road.[7] She retired from screenwriting to work on creative f

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Florence Page Jaques

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Florence Page Jaques

Florence Page Jaques (March 7, 1890 – January 1, 1972) was an American author who wrote nature and travel books for adults,[1] and short stories and poetry for children.[2] Born in Decatur, Illinois, she attended Millikin University in Decatur, completing an A.B. degree there in 1911 before doing graduate work at Columbia University in New York City.[1] She married Francis Lee Jaques, a wildlife painter for the American Museum of Natural History in New York, on May 12, 1927. Together they produced seven illustrated outdoor travel books, including Snowshoe Country, winner of the John Burroughs Medal in 1946 for distinguished work in natural history. The couple left New York for North Oaks, Minnesota, a suburb of Saint Paul, in 1953, and lived there for the rest of their lives. Francis died in 1969[3] and Florence in 1972.[1] Bibliography Canoe Country (1938) The Geese Fly High (1939) Birds Across the Sky (1942) Snowshoe Country (1944) Canadian Spring (1947) As Far as the Yukon (1951) There Was

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Helen Hoang

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Helen Hoang

Helen Hoang is an American romance novelist, best known for her debut novel The Kiss Quotient and the USA Today best-selling sequel The Bride Test. Career Prior to being published, Hoang wrote paranormal and fantasy romances with a martial arts bent.[1] She states that she wrote on and off for around ten years before The Kiss Quotient was published.[2] Hoang says that the writers who influence her own work the most are Jayne Ann Krentz, Christine Feehan, Nalini Singh, Elizabeth Lowell, Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Kresley Cole, Eloisa James, Julia Quinn, and Lisa Kleypas.[3] The Kiss Quotient Hoang wrote the first draft of what would become The Kiss Quotient within ten weeks.[1][2] The manuscript went through several drafts before she entered the online pitch contest Pitch Wars, where she revised it again with the help of her mentor Brighton Walsh, working for eight months.[1] Published in June 2018, The Kiss Quotient follows Stella, an autistic woman who hires an escort in order to explore intimacy with ot

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Gilbert Esau

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Gilbert Esau

Gilbert Donald Esau (October 31, 1919 – July 16, 2012) was a Minnesota politician and a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives from southwestern Minnesota. First elected in 1962, Esau was re-elected in 1964, 1966 and 1968. After sitting out for four years, he opted to run again in 1972, was elected and was re-elected in 1974, 1976, 1978 and 1980. Background From the town of Mountain Lake, Esau, was an automobile garage and body repair shop owner. He served in the United States Army during World War II, being deployed in both the European and Asiatic theatres between 1941 and 1945. Prior to being elected to the Minnesota Legislature, he was a member of the Mountain Lake Village Council from 1954-1963. Service in the Minnesota House Esau represented the old District 18A and, later, 28A, which included all or portions of Brown, Cottonwood, Jackson, Murray and Redwood counties, changing somewhat after the 1972 legislative redistricting. He was, along with senators Dennis Frederickson, Earl Renneke a

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Sally Helgesen

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Sally Helgesen

Sally Helgesen (born July 1, 1948) is an American author, speaker and leadership coach.[1][2][3] Early life and education Helgesen was born in Minnesota and grew up in Kalamazoo, Michigan.[4] She attended Michigan State University, received her BA degree in English and Classics Hunter College (1973–75) and attended The Graduate Center of the City University of New York.[5] Career In 1990, Helgesen published The Female Advantage: Women’s Ways of Leadership, the first book to focus on what women had to contribute as leaders rather than how they needed to change and adapt.[6] The book became a best-seller and has remained continuously in print.[7] In 1995, Helgesen published The Web of Inclusion: A New Architecture for Building Great Organizations, which has been heralded as having introduced the language of inclusion into the work environment.[8] The book was regarded as one of the best books on leadership by The Wall Street Journal.[9] In 2018, she published How Women Rise with co-author Marshall Goldsmit

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Marie Inez Hilger

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Marie Inez Hilger

Sister Marie Inez Hilger (October 16, 1891 - May 18, 1977) was an American Benedictine nun and anthropologist who was the first woman admitted to the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. [1] Biography Sister Marie Inez Hilger was born in Roscoe, Minnesota, October 16, 1891. According to her obituary from the College of Saint Benedict & Saint John's University, Sister Inez was the second oldest child of at least eight siblings: six sisters and two brothers born to Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Hilger.[2] The Hilgers were the first settlers in Roscoe in 1889 after emigrating from Germany.[3] Sister Inez entered Saint Benedict's convent at the age of 17 in 1908 and pronounced her perpetual vows five years later in 1914.[2] She taught for 25 years in elementary, secondary and college levels prior to starting a new career as an anthropologist.[2] When Saint Benedict and Saint John's school planned to expand into a college, Sister Inez decided to pursue higher education.[3] Hilger received her Bache

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Herbert W. Chilstrom

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Herbert W. Chilstrom

Herbert W. Chilstrom (October 18, 1930 – January 19, 2020) was an American religious leader, who served as the first Presiding Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). He was re-elected to a four-year term at the 1991 ELCA Churchwide Assembly in Orlando, Florida. He served as bishop of the Minnesota Synod of the Lutheran Church in America, one of the three church bodies which merged to form the ELCA on Jan. 1, 1988.[1][2] Education and career Chilstrom graduated in 1954 from Augsburg College, Minneapolis, with a bachelor of arts degree in sociology. He went on to receive a bachelor of divinity from Augustana Theological Seminary (later merged with other seminaries to form the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago) in 1958. In 1966, he graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary with a master of theology. He earned a Doctor of Education from New York University and received honorary doctorates from Northwestern Lutheran Theological Seminary, St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1979 and Gustavus Ad

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Kenneth O. Chilstrom

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Kenneth O. Chilstrom

Kenneth O. "K.O." Chilstrom (born April 20, 1921) is a retired United States Air Force officer, combat veteran, test pilot, and author. He was the first USAF pilot to fly the XP-86 Sabre, chief of fighter test at Wright Field, commandant of the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School, and program manager for the XF-108 Rapier. Chilstrom was a pilot in the first jet air race and delivered the first air mail by jet. He flew over eighty combat missions in the Italian Campaign of World War II and tested over twenty foreign models of German and Japanese fighters and bombers to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses. Early life Chilstrom was born on April 20, 1921 in Zumbrota—a small town in the south-east part of Minnesota.[1] He developed an interest in aviation at an early age and began building model airplanes while still in grade school in Chicago, Illinois. After graduating from high school in 1939, Chilstrom went to a military recruiting office to sign up for pilot training.[2] Since he did not have the two year

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Amy Klobuchar

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Amy Klobuchar

Amy Jean Klobuchar ( Klōba-shar; born May 25, 1960) is an American lawyer and politician serving as the senior United States senator from Minnesota. A member of the Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL), Minnesota's affiliate of the Democratic Party, she previously served as the Hennepin County attorney. In February 2019, she announced her candidacy for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in the 2020 election. Born in Plymouth, Minnesota, Klobuchar is a graduate of Yale University and the University of Chicago Law School. She was a partner at two Minneapolis law firms before being elected county attorney for Hennepin County in 1998, making her responsible for all criminal prosecution in Minnesota's most populous county. Klobuchar was first elected to the Senate in 2006, becoming Minnesota's first elected female United States senator, and reelected in 2012 and 2018.[1] In 2009 and 2010, she was described as a "rising star" in the Democratic Party.[2][3] Early life and educati

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Paul Beyerl

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Paul Beyerl

Rev. Paul Beyerl, (pronounced "bye'-rul") born 1945 in Owen, Wisconsin, is known as an author and educator, and particularly as a Wiccan priest, in Wiccan and neopagan circles. Biography With his partner, Beyerl maintains a 45,000-square-foot (4,200 m2) botanical garden on Rose Hill in Kirkland, Washington, which serves as a classroom and a place where students and visitors are able to see medicinal herbs and ornamental plants as they grow. Beyerl is known as an herbal educator, with a number of publications in the field. He has taught at Bellevue Community College and teaches courses in herbal medicine at Seattle Central Community College and Cascadia College.[1] The Hermit's Grove, which he founded, offers a Master Herbalist certification program.[2] His teachings about herbs focus on their spiritual and scientific/medical properties. In addition to the Hermit's Grove, Beyerl is the founder of the Rowan Tree Church,[3] a Wiccan church that emerged in the mid-1970s in Minneapolis, Minnesota. and was inc

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