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Women autobiographers


Janet Shaw

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Janet Shaw

Janet Lucy Shaw[1] (7 October 1966 – 3 December 2012) was a visually-impaired Australian tandem cyclist and author. She became visually impaired due to congenital retinoblastoma (eye cancer) and lost her sight completely at the age of 33. She first represented Australia in cycling at the 2002 IPC World Cycling Championships. She broke several world records with her pilot, Kelly McCombie.; they won two bronze medals at the 2004 Athens Paralympics. In 2008, Shaw was re-diagnosed with cancer; she died of the disease in 2012. She wrote two memoirs and several books for children and young adults. Personal Shaw was born on 7 October 1966 in Perth.[2] She was born with retinoblastoma, a malignant eye cancer, and had one eye removed as a baby and had radiotherapy in the other.[3] She was adopted as a baby along with three other children.[3] Later on in life she discovered that her biological father was media personality Terry Willesee.[3] At the age of eight, she was transferred to a school for the blind.[3] Shaw b

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Australian female cyclists

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Deaths from cancer in Western Australia

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Jean Shrimpton

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Jean Shrimpton

Jean Rosemary Shrimpton (born 7 November 1942)[5] is an English model and actress. She was an icon of Swinging London and is considered to be one of the world's first supermodels.[1][6][7][8] She appeared on numerous magazine covers including Vogue,[9][10] Harper's Bazaar, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Elle, Ladies' Home Journal, Newsweek, and Time.[11] In 2009, Harper's Bazaar named Shrimpton one of the 26 best models of all time,[12] and in 2012, TIME named her one of the 100 most influential fashion icons of all time.[11] She starred alongside Paul Jones in the film Privilege (1967). Early life Born in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, and brought up on a farm, Shrimpton was educated at St Bernard's Convent School, Slough. She enrolled at Langham Secretarial College in London when she was 17. A chance meeting with director Cy Endfield led to an unsuccessful meeting with the producer of his film Mysterious Island (1961); Endfield then suggested she attend the Lucie Clayton Charm Academy's model course.[13] In 1960,

21st-century women models

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20th-century women models

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Margaret Skinnider

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Margaret Skinnider

Margaret Skinnider (28 May 1892 – 10 October 1971) was a revolutionary and feminist born in Coatbridge, Scotland. She fought during the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin as a sniper, among other roles, and was the only female wounded in the action. As a scout, she was praised for her bravery.[1] Sadhbh Walsche in The New York Times refers to her as "the schoolteacher turned sniper".[2] Early life Skinnider was born in 1893 to Irish parents in the Lanarkshire town of Coatbridge. She trained as a mathematics teacher and joined Cumann na mBan in Glasgow. She was also involved in the women's suffrage movement, including a protest at Perth Prison.[3][4] Ironically, she had learned to shoot in a rifle club [5] which had originally been set up so that women could help in defence of the British Empire.[6] During her trips to Ireland, Skinnider came under the influence of Constance Markievicz and became active in smuggling detonators and bomb-making equipment into Dublin (in her hat) in preparation for the 1916 Easter Ri

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Scottish autobiographers

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Explosives engineers

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Ada "Bricktop" Smith

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Ada "Bricktop" Smith

Ada Beatrice Queen Victoria Louise Virginia Smith, better known as Bricktop, (August 14, 1894 – February 1, 1984) was an American dancer, jazz singer, vaudevillian, and self-described saloon-keeper who owned the nightclub Chez Bricktop in Paris from 1924 to 1961, as well as clubs in Mexico City and Rome. She has been called "...one of the most legendary and enduring figures of twentieth-century American cultural history." Early life Smith was born in Alderson, West Virginia, the youngest of four children by an Irish father and a black mother. When her father died, her family relocated to Chicago. It was there that saloon life caught her fancy, and where she acquired her nickname, "Bricktop," for the flaming red hair and freckles inherited from her father. She began performing when she was very young, and by 16, she was touring with TOBA (Theatre Owners' Booking Association) and on the Pantages vaudeville circuit. Aged 20, her performance tours brought her to New York City. While at Barron's Exclusive Club,

LGBT people from West Virginia

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20th-century American dancers

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Gülriz Sururi

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Gülriz Sururi

Gülruz Sururi (24 July 1929 – 31 December 2018)[1] was a Turkish drama actress and author. She presented a TV cooking show and co-owned a theatre. Biography She was born in İstanbul, Turkey on 24 July 1929. Her father Lütfullah was the founder of the first Turkish Musical theatre and her mother Suzan was a prima donna.[2] She studied acting and singing at the Municipal Conservatoire of Istanbul. In 1942, she began her drama career at the Children's Section of the City Theatre of Istanbul accepting the advise of the theatre director Muhsin Ertuğrul (1892–1979). In 1955, she took the stage at Muammer Karaca Theatre. Sururi transferred to Haldun Dormen Theatre in 1960. In 1962, she founded with Engin Cezzar their own theatre bearing their names.[2] She was named "The Woman of the Year" by the Turkish Women's Association in 1966.[2] On 18 September 1968, she married to Engin Cezzar.[3] In the 1990s, she presented five years long a cooking show A La Luna in the television channel TRT.[2] In 1998, she was given

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Theatre owners

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Danielle Staub

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Danielle Staub

Danielle Staub (born Beverly Ann Merrill,[2] 1962),[3][4] is an American television personality. In May 2009, she came to prominence after being cast in the reality television series The Real Housewives of New Jersey, as a main cast members for two seasons. Early life Born to a 15-year-old mother of Sicilian heritage, Staub was adopted and reared in Pennsylvania. She said in her autobiography, The Naked Truth, that multiple relatives sexually abused her, writing, "The memory goes back as far as 8 years old. By 11, I started fighting back."[5] Career In 2001, Staub briefly acted in an episode of All My Children.[6] In 2009, Staub joined the cast of The Real Housewives of New Jersey, where she appeared in the first two seasons. After weeks of speculation, Bravo announced that Staub would not be returning to the show for season three, giving no reason.[7] In September 2010, she appeared on the Style Network comedy program The Dish. She acted in several sketches including a surprise cold open where she tried

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The Real Housewives of New Jersey cast members

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American autobiographers

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Pam St Clement

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Pam St Clement

Pamela Ann Clements (born 11 May 1942), known professionally as Pam St Clement, is an English actress. She is known for portraying the role of Pat Butcher in the BBC soap opera EastEnders from June 1986 until January 2012, with a guest appearance in May 2016, thereby becoming one of the programme's longest-serving cast members.[1] Early life Born Pamela Ann Clements, her parents, Ann Tribe and Reginald Clements, married in 1940.[2] Shortly after St Clement's birth in 1942, her mother died of tuberculosis, and she was put into foster care when her father remarried.[3] St Clement subsequently grew up in various different foster homes until she was taken in by a family who owned a farm in Devon.[4] She has commented: "I was very fortunate in the end. I was always being farmed off to holiday homes, then when I was just pre-teens I went down to Devon to some people who were very good at taking on youngsters, and what originated as a business arrangement became my home."[4] St Clement's father rose to become the

English film actresses

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LGBT people from England

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Actresses from London

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Nadezhda Sokhanskaia

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Nadezhda Sokhanskaia

Nadezhda Stepanovna Sokhanskaia (Russian: Надежда Степановна Соханская, 1 March 1823 – 15 December 1884) was a Russian short story writer and autobiographer who wrote about the Ukraine, using the pen name Kokhanovskaya (Кохановская).[1][2] Life Sokhanskaia was born in Kursk Governorate in 1823. Her father was an Army captain and he died when she was a small child. She attended a boarding school from the age of eleven to seventeen where she was a prize winning student. When she returned home she found that her family were destitute. She failed to find work befitting her ambitions and it was only religion that gave her hope.[3] Sokhanskaia was still reading and she wrote short stories that she submitted. She sent copies to the literary critic Pyotr Pletnyov who had edited the journal The Contemporary. He advised her to write about her own life. This improved her style and during the 1850s she published many stories about local life.[3] These stories were set in the area where she lived in Ukraine that includ

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19th-century Russian women writers

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19th-century women writers

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Annalyn Swan

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Annalyn Swan

Annalyn Swan (born ca. 1951 in Biloxi, Mississippi) is an American writer and biographer who has written extensively about the arts. With her husband, art critic Mark Stevens she is the author of de Kooning: An American Master (2004), a biography of Dutch-American artist Willem de Kooning, which was awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography.[1] De Kooning also won the National Book Critics Circle prize for biography[2] and the Los Angeles Times biography award, and was named one of the 10 best books of 2005 by the New York Times.[3] In her review in the New York Times, Janet Maslin wrote: "The elusiveness of its subject makes the achievements of de Kooning: An American Master that much more dazzling."[4] A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Princeton University (Class of 1973), Swan was the first woman editor-in-chief of The Daily Princetonian.[5] She was named a Marshall Scholar[6] and earned her master's degree at King's College, Cambridge University. She began her writing career at Time, then

Women autobiographers

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21st-century American biographers

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Newsweek people

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Barbara Tate

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Barbara Tate

Barbara Tate in 2009 Barbara Tate (2 June 1927 – 12 November 2009) was a British artist and writer, perhaps best known for her bestselling book West End Girls, which was published shortly after her death.[1] Career in Art Born in Uxbridge as Barbara June Peddle, her father Charles Jonathan Peddle (1895-1973) was a carpenter and lorry-driver; a violent man, he once tied a noose around her neck when she was aged 3 and balanced her on her toes until rescued hours later when her mother came home. Abandoned soon after by her mother Elsie Irene (née Williams) (1904-1973), she was brought up by her maternal grandparents. In 1944 aged 17 she won a scholarship to Ealing School of Art.[2] In 1972 Tate became a member of the Society of Women Artists (SWA). She was the organisation's President from 1985 to 2000 and later became an Honorary President. The SWA bestows the Barbara Tate Award annually in her memory.[3] Her paintings were awarded gold and silver medals from the Paris Salon and the Grand Prix de la Cote d'

Women autobiographers

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20th-century British women artists

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Academics of the University of West London

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Puma Swede

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Puma Swede

Johanna Jussinniemi[1] (born 13 September 1976), better known by her stage name Puma Swede, is a Swedish pornographic actress and feature dancer.[4] The first part of her stage name comes from the sports car, the Ford Puma.[5] Since 2005, she has appeared in over 200 movies.[3] She is of Finnish descent, as both her parents were originally from Finland,[6] and she has resided in California since 2004.[7][8] Swede worked as a computer sales representative in Sweden and later on as a glamour model before moving into adult films.[7] She initially only performed in girl–girl scenes,[9] but made her hardcore boy–girl debut in the 2005 video School of Hardcore by the studio AntiInnocence Video, with whom she was previously a contract performer.[10] She has received a 2009 AVN Award nomination for Web Starlet of the Year,[11] and a 2009 XBiz Award nomination for Web Babe/Starlet of the Year.[12] In 2010, she made her first mainstream film appearance, a cameo in the comedy The 41-Year-Old Virgin Who Knocked Up Sar

Women autobiographers

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Swedish film actresses

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Adrienne Thomas (novelist)

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Adrienne Thomas (novelist)

Adrienne Thomas was the pseudonym of Hertha A. Deutsch, nee Strauch (1897–1980), a German autobiographical novelist.[1] Life Hertha Strauch was born in St Avold in Alsace-Lorraine, then part of Germany, on June 24, 1897. She grew up bilingual in German and French, going to school in Metz,[2] where her family owned a small department store. During World War I she became a nurse for the Red Cross, at first in Metz and later in Berlin, where her family moved. During the 1920s she trained as a singer and actor at the Clara Lion Conservatory in Frankfurt.[2] Writing as Adrienne Thomas, she drew on her Red Cross experiences for her semi-autobiographical anti-war novel Die Katrin wird Soldat (Katrin Becomes a Soldier), the diary of a young Jewish girl serving behind the German lines as a relief worker. Published in 1930, the book was translated into sixteen languages. When Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933 Thomas was forced to go into exile and her writings banned. After living in Austria, France and the United

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20th-century German women writers

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20th-century German novelists

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Jean Barker, Baroness Trumpington

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Jean Barker, Baroness Trumpington

Jean Alys Barker, Baroness Trumpington, DCVO, PC (née Campbell-Harris; 23 October 1922 – 26 November 2018) was an English Conservative politician and member of the House of Lords.[3] From an upper-class background, she was a socialite for years before entering politics. Early life Trumpington was born to Major Arthur Campbell-Harris and his American wife, Doris (née Robson), an heiress to a Chicago paint manufacturer. Trumpington's father was an officer in the 7th Hariana Lancers, part of the Bengal Lancers, who became aide-de-camp to the Viceroy of India and knew David Lloyd George. Trumpington took dancing lessons at Madame Vacani's school in Knightsbridge. After two years she moved to the Ballet Rambert to learn under Pearl Argyle. Her mother had lost most of her inheritance in the Wall Street Crash of 1929, including selling their home at 55, Great Cumberland Place. On the family's return from India, they lived in their house Rowling, Goodnestone, near Sandwich, Kent, where Doris specialised in interio

Members of Cambridgeshire County Council

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Women autobiographers

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Bletchley Park women

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Nootsara Tomkom

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Nootsara Tomkom

Nootsara Tomkom (Thai: นุศรา ต้อมคำ; RTGS: Nutsara Tomkham) is a Thai volleyball player. She has been selected to play for the Thailand women's national volleyball team for 39 times.[1] Career She participated at the 2006 FIVB World Grand Prix.[2] Tomkom played along Wilavan Apinyapong with the Spanish club IBSA Club Voleibol for the 2007/2008 season of the Spanish Superliga.[3][4] Tomkom won the Bronze medal with the Azeri club Rabita Baku in the 2013–14 CEV Champions League after falling 0-3 to the Russian Dinamo Kazan,[5] but defeating 3-0 to the Turkish Eczacıbaşı VitrA Istanbul in the third place placement match.[6] She was awarded tournament's Best Setter.[7] Rabita Baku, claimed their sixth title championship by winning the 2013–14 Azerbaijani Super League 3-0 to Azeryol Baku[8] and she won the Best Setter award.[9] She also ranked fourth in the 2013-14 Thailand League with Idea Khonkaen. Tomkom helped Azerrail Baku to win the 2015–16 Azerbaijan Super League championship[10] and she was awarded B

Competitors at the 2019 Southeast Asian Games

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Companions of the Order of the Direkgunabhorn

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Commanders of the Order of the White Elephant

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Laura de Turczynowicz

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Laura de Turczynowicz

Laura de Turczynowicz née Laura Christine Blackwell (28 August 1878 – 25 October 1953) was an operatic singer, theatre producer and director, notable for her charitable works during and after World War I, and an autobiography of her wartime experience in Poland. Biography Laura Christine Blackwell was born on 28 August 1878 in St. Catharines, Ontario.[1] She travelled to New York, Germany and Poland to pursue her career in the theater. It was in Krakow where she married Stanislaw de Turczynowicz, Count Gozdawa, becoming Laura de Turczynowicz, Countess Gozdawa; the couple had a daughter (Wanda Jolanda) and twin sons (Stanislaw Piotr and Wladislaw Pawel).[2] It was not long after her children were born that World War I broke out. Madame de Turczynowicz was a prisoner in her home to the Germans for eight months, during which time, one of her sons suffered from typhus.[3] During this time, General Paul Von Hindenburg of the German army commandeered her home, which left them prisoners in their own home. Laura d

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Women theatre directors

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Lucy Wheelock

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Lucy Wheelock

Lucy Wheelock (February 1, 1857 – October 1, 1946) was an American early childhood education pioneer within the American kindergarten movement.[1] She began her career by teaching the kindergarten program at Chauncy-Hall School (1879–89). Wheelock was the founder and head of Wheelock Kindergarten Training School, which later became Wheelock College in Boston, Massachusetts. She wrote, lectured, and translated on subjects related to education. Early years and education Lucy Wheelock was born in Cambridge, Vermont, February 1, 1857. She was of New England descent. Her parents included Edwin and Laura (Pierce) Wheelock,[2] and five siblings. Her father, a descendant of John Adams, had been a pastor for many years in Cambridge.[3][4] Wheelock's education began under the care of her mother. She was a student at the Underhill Academy in Vermont, and the public high school in Reading, Massachusetts, from which she graduated in 1874.[3] In preparation for entry to Wellesley College, she studied at Chauncy-Hall Sch

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People from Cambridge, Vermont

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Educators from Vermont

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Mina Urgan

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Mina Urgan

Mina Urgan Irgat (14 May 1916 – 15 June 2000) was a Turkish academic, translator, author and socialist politician. Early life Mina Urgan was born to poet Tahsin Nahit and his wife Şefika in İstanbul on 14 May 1916.[1] To another source, she was born on 1 May 1915.[2] Her father died as she was three years old, and her mother made a second marriage with Falih Rıfkı Atay, a renowned journalist and writer. As the Surname Law was enacted in Turkey in 1934, her stepfather's close friend, the renowned author Necip Fazıl Kısakürek, suggested her the family name "Urgan" (literally "rope"), ironically stating that "it would match her because the socialist-minded young girl would be hanged one day anyway".[3] She was schooled in Lycée Notre Dame de Sion Istanbul, and finished the high school in the Arnavutköy Girls' College (Robert College). She was inspired by her stepfather Atay and enjoyed to be in his circle of people of letters and artists. She was one of the first female skiers and swimmers in Turkey. She grad

Turkish former Muslims

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Turkish atheists

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Anne Valery

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Anne Valery

Anne Valery (née Firth) (24 February 1926 – 29 April 2013) was an English screenwriter, author and actress noted for co-writing episodes for the BAFTA-nominated drama Tenko in the early 1980s. The daughter of actress Doriel Paget, she joined the Auxiliary Territorial Service in World War II and later became part of Fitzrovia's literary scene, establishing friendships with several writers. After modelling on the Paris and London catwalks and working as a producer's secretary, Valery began a career in acting in 1949 but was unable to establish a career in this field and turned to presenting on television for the BBC and Associated-Rediffusion. She operated a secondhand shop by the late 1960s and wrote two volumes of autobiography at the encouragement of her partner Robin Jacques. Valery also wrote television scripts for soap operas and her career saw progression when the BBC asked her to write for the drama show Angels. There she met fellow writer Jill Hyem and the two were commissioned by the BBC to write epi

Women autobiographers

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English feminists

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English autobiographers

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Fatima Whitbread

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Fatima Whitbread

Fatima Whitbread MBE (born Fatima Vedad; 3 March 1961) is a female British former javelin thrower. She won the 1986 European Championships in Stuttgart, having broken the world record with a throw of 77.44 metres in the qualifying round the previous day. She went on to win the 1987 World Championships in Rome. She is also a two-time Olympic medallist, winning bronze at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and silver at the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Her former world record throw makes her one of only two women in history to have thrown the javelin (old model) over 75 metres. Early life Whitbread was born in Stoke Newington, London,[1] to a Turkish Cypriot mother and Greek Cypriot father.[2] She grew up in a series of children's homes, occasionally being left in the care of her abusive biological mother. In a 2003 interview with The Observer, Whitbread said, "It was a nightmare of a childhood and it was only because I loved sport so much that I got through it and met my true mother."[2] At the age of 14, she was adopted

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Turkish Cypriot sportspeople

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Turkish Cypriot people

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Carrie White (hairdresser)

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Carrie White (hairdresser)

Carrie White is an American hairdresser, author, and spokesperson. She is known as the "First Lady of Hairdressing," who has styled Jennifer Jones, Betsy Bloomingdale, Elizabeth Taylor, Goldie Hawn, Camille Cosby, Ann-Margret, Elvis Presley, Sharon Tate, Brad Pitt, and Sandra Bullock, among others.[1][2] She collaborated with Richard Avedon on shoots for Vogue, and her work has appeared in Harper's Bazaar, InStyle, Allure, Vanity Fair, Ladies' Home Journal, Mademoiselle, and Glamour.[3] She is credited as technical advisor on Shampoo and, in 2011, she published her internationally bestselling autobiography, Upper Cut: Highlights of My Hollywood Life.[4] Early life Carrie White was born as Carole Enwright, on Burton Way in Beverly Hills, and was uprooted to Pacoima, CA when she was seven, before moving back to Hollywood, CA at the age of fifteen. At Hollywood High, she studied art with June Hardwood and drama with John Engle and Martin Landau. After graduating high school, she supported herself while pursuin

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Ann Widdecombe

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Ann Widdecombe

Widdecombe at a book club hosted by Edwina Currie in Clapham, 2010 Ann Noreen Widdecombe (born 4 October 1947) is a British politician, author and television personality. She served as a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for South West England for the Brexit Party[4] from 2019 to 2020. She previously served as the Conservative Member of Parliament (MP) for Maidstone from 1987 to 1997 and for Maidstone and The Weald from 1997 to 2010. Born in Bath, Somerset, Widdecombe read Latin at the University of Birmingham and later studied Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford.[5] She is a convert from Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism and was a member of the Conservative Christian Fellowship. Widdecombe was a Privy Councillor. She served as Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department from 1995 to 1997 and Shadow Home Secretary from 1999 to 2001. Ideologically, Widdecombe identifies herself as a social conservative. As a member of the House of Commons, she was known for oppos

20th-century English politicians

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21st-century English women politicians

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Brexit Party parliamentary candidates

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Jacqueline Wilson

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Jacqueline Wilson

Dame Jacqueline Wilson DBE, FRSL (née Aitken; born 17 December 1945) is an English novelist who writes for children's literature. As her children's novels frequently feature themes of adoption, divorce and mental illness, they tend to attract controversy.[1] Four of her books appear in the BBC's The Big Read poll of the 100 most popular books in the UK, and for her lifetime contribution as a children's writer, Wilson was a UK nominee for the international Hans Christian Andersen Award in 2014.[2] Wilson is the author of many book series. Her Tracy Beaker series, inaugurated in 1991 with The Story of Tracy Beaker, includes three sequels and has been adapted into four CBBC television series: The Story of Tracy Beaker, Tracy Beaker Returns, The Dumping Ground, and The Tracy Beaker Survival Files. As of 2019, Wilson has written 111 novels.[3] Life and career Early life Jacqueline Aitken was born in Bath, Somerset, England in 1945. Her father was a civil servant; her mother was an antiques dealer.[4] Jacqueline

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English women non-fiction writers

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1999 novels

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Ola Elizabeth Winslow

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Ola Elizabeth Winslow

Ola Elizabeth Winslow (January 5, 1885 in Grant City, Missouri – September 27, 1977 in Damariscotta, Maine)[1] was an American historian, biographer, and educator.[2] She won a Pulitzer Prize in 1941 for her biography of Jonathan Edwards, an 18th-century American theologian whose basic writings she edited for Signet Classics. Born in Missouri, Winslow was an instructor at College of the Pacific from 1909 to 1914, when she earned a master's degree from Stanford University. She was professor of English at Goucher College in Baltimore (1914–1944) and at Wellesley College (1944–1977, emeritus after 1950).[2] Winslow earned a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1922 with a thesis that was later published as a book with the title Low Comedy as a Structural Element in English Drama from the Beginnings to 1642.[3] Winslow died in Maine at age 92. Books Low Comedy as a Structural Element in English Drama from the Beginnings to 1642 (Menasha, WI, 1926) – "originally presented as the author's thesis, Universi

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20th-century American biographers

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Goucher College faculty and staff

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Annie Turner Wittenmyer

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Annie Turner Wittenmyer

Sarah "Annie" Turner Wittenmyer (August 26, 1827 – February 2, 1900) was an American social reformer, relief worker, and writer. She served as the first President of the Women's Christian Temperance Union from 1874 to 1879.[1] The Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home was renamed the Annie Wittenmyer Home in 1949 in her honor. Early years Born in Sandy Springs, Adams County, Ohio in 1827,[2] she attended a seminary for girls. She married merchant William Wittenmyer at age 20.[3] In 1850, they moved to Keokuk, Iowa, and she started a Sunday School and a tuition-free school for underprivileged children in 1853. She also developed a Methodist congregation from these children and wrote several hymns. Three of her four children died before reaching adulthood, and her husband died in 1860. The Civil War When the American Civil War began in April 1861 and reports of suffering soldiers reached the home front, she responded by traveling to military hospitals and describing the horrible conditions she witnessed prompting lo

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American social reformers

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American autobiographers

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Jo Wood

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Jo Wood

Josephine Wood (née Karslake; born 15 March 1955) is an English model, television personality, and entrepreneur. She is the former wife of The Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood.[1] She accompanied him regularly on tour, looking after his wardrobe and diet.[2] Wood has travelled the world, and has lived in Los Angeles, New York and is now settled in London. When living in New York, Wood designed clothes for the fashion label No Scruples. Wood published her autobiography, Hey Jo, in February 2013.[3] Early life Born Josephine Karslake, Wood was born on 15 March 1955 in Essex to Rachel (née Lundell), who is South African by birth, and Michael Karslake. Her father was an architectural model maker and her mother was an Avon lady and a doll maker. She is the oldest of four children. She has a sister, Lize, and two brothers, Vinnie and Paul.[4] Wood worked as a model until she was 22, and was The Sun's "Face of 1972".[2] Family In 1973, Wood eloped with Peter Greene in Las Vegas. They had a son, Jameson (Ja

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Turia Pitt

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Turia Pitt

Turia Pitt (born 24 July 1987) is an Australian mining engineer, humanitarian, athlete, motivational speaker, author and mother. Accident and later life In September 2011, Pitt was competing in an ultramarathon through Western Australia's Kimberley region, when she was caught in a grass fire. During a subsequent inquiry, she stated there was "nowhere else to go" when the competitors tried to outrun an out-of-control blaze that swept up Selena Gorge, just outside Kununurra. Pitt suffered burns to 65 percent of her body. It was several hours before medical help arrived and she was air-lifted out. Doctors did not expect her to survive her injuries.[3] The parliamentary inquiry into the Kimberley Ultramarathon was damning of the race organisers, RacingThePlanet.[4] Among other things, it was revealed that organisers were unable to communicate properly between checkpoints. Pitt launched Supreme Court action against RacingThePlanet, and in May 2014, it was reported that an out-of-court settlement had been reach

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Shania Twain

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Shania Twain

Shania Twain, OC (born Eilleen Regina Edwards; August 28, 1965) is a Canadian singer, songwriter, actress and television personality. She has sold over 100 million records, making her the best-selling female artist in country music history and among the best-selling music artists of all time.[1][2][3] Her success garnered her several honorific titles including the "Queen of Country Pop".[4][5] Raised in Timmins, Ontario, Twain pursued singing and songwriting from a young age before signing with Mercury Nashville Records in the early 1990s. Her self-titled debut studio album saw little commercial success upon release in 1993. After collaborating with producer and later husband Robert John "Mutt" Lange, Twain rose to fame with her second studio album, The Woman in Me (1995), which brought her widespread success. It sold 20 million copies worldwide, spawned widely successful singles such as "Any Man of Mine", and earned her a Grammy Award. Her third studio album, Come On Over (1997), became the best-selling stu

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Twiggy

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Twiggy

Dame Lesley Lawson DBE (née Hornby; born 19 September 1949) is an English model, actress, and singer widely known by the nickname Twiggy. She was a British cultural icon and a prominent teenage model in swinging sixties London. Twiggy was initially known for her thin build (thus her nickname) and the androgynous appearance considered to result from her big eyes, long eyelashes, and short hair.[1][2] She was named "The Face of 1966" by the Daily Express[3] and voted British Woman of the Year.[4] By 1967, she had modelled in France, Japan, and the US, and had landed on the covers of Vogue and The Tatler. Her fame had spread worldwide.[4] After modelling, Twiggy enjoyed a successful career as a screen, stage, and television actress. Her role in The Boy Friend (1971) brought her two Golden Globe Awards. In 1983 she made her Broadway debut in the musical My One and Only, for which she earned a Tony nomination for Best Actress in a Musical. She later hosted her own series, Twiggy's People, in which she interviewe

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Faith Evans

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Faith Evans

Faith Renée Jordan (née Evans; born June 10, 1973) is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, and actress. Born in Lakeland, Florida, and raised in New Jersey, Evans relocated to Los Angeles in 1991 for a career in the music business. After working as a backing vocalist for Al B. Sure! and Christopher Williams, she became the first female artist to contract with Sean "Puff Daddy" Combs' Bad Boy Entertainment recording company in 1994. On the label, she featured on records with several label mates such as 112 and Carl Thomas, and released three platinum-certified studio albums between 1995 and 2001: Faith (1995), Keep the Faith (1998) and Faithfully (2001).[1] In 2003, she ended her relationship with the company to sign with Capitol Records.[2] Her first album released on the label, The First Lady (2005) became her highest-charting album at the time, reaching the top of the US Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums charts, while the holiday album A Faithful Christmas, released the same year, would become her la

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Silvia Rodgers

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Silvia Rodgers

Silvia Rodgers, Lady Rodgers (3 March 1928-8 October 2006), born Silvia Szulman, was a German-Jewish-British writer and political activist. She was married to Bill Rodgers, Baron Rodgers of Quarry Bank. Early life Rodgers was born in Wedding (Berlin) to working-class Jewish parents.[1] Her parents were members of the Communist Party of Germany.[2][3] Her mother insisted that Silvia not participate in the Nazi salute at school.[3] In an afterword to Rodgers's memoir, Rodgers wrote "When I was ten and still in Berlin, I had that feeling that there was nothing I could not do".[4] The family came to Britain in 1939.[5] Marriage and political involvement Silvia Rodgers and Bill Rodgers married in 1955.[5] The couple had three daughters: Rachel, Lucy and Juliet.[1] Rodgers influenced her husband's political career, particularly his decision to leave the Labour Party and set up the Social Democratic Party.[1] Bill Rodgers said that most of the child-rearing fell to Silvia and that he was neglectful; she also w

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Kesha

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Kesha

Kesha Rose Sebert (born March 1, 1987), known mononymously as Kesha (formerly stylized Ke$ha), is an American singer, songwriter and rapper. In 2005, at age 18, Kesha was signed to Kemosabe Records. Her first major success came in early 2009 after she was featured on American rapper Flo Rida's number-one single "Right Round". Kesha's music and image propelled her to immediate success. She has earned two number-one albums on the US Billboard 200 with Animal (2010) and Rainbow (2017), and the number-six record Warrior (2012). She has attained ten top-ten singles on the US Billboard Hot 100, including "Blah Blah Blah", "Your Love Is My Drug", "Take It Off", "Blow", "Die Young", "My First Kiss" with 3OH!3, and the chart-topping "Tik Tok", "We R Who We R", "Right Round" with Flo Rida, and "Timber" with Pitbull. "Tik Tok", at one point, was the best-selling digital single in history, selling over 16.5 million units internationally. As of November 2019, the song has sold over 25 million copies. In 2020, Kesha relea

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Amy Klobuchar

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Amy Klobuchar

Amy Jean Klobuchar ( Klōba-shar; born May 25, 1960) is an American lawyer and politician serving as the senior United States senator from Minnesota. A member of the Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL), Minnesota's affiliate of the Democratic Party, she previously served as the Hennepin County attorney. In February 2019, she announced her candidacy for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in the 2020 election. Born in Plymouth, Minnesota, Klobuchar is a graduate of Yale University and the University of Chicago Law School. She was a partner at two Minneapolis law firms before being elected county attorney for Hennepin County in 1998, making her responsible for all criminal prosecution in Minnesota's most populous county. Klobuchar was first elected to the Senate in 2006, becoming Minnesota's first elected female United States senator, and reelected in 2012 and 2018.[1] In 2009 and 2010, she was described as a "rising star" in the Democratic Party.[2][3] Early life and educati

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Margaret Child Villiers, Countess of Jersey

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Margaret Child Villiers, Countess of Jersey

The Dowager Countess of Jersey, c.1919 Graves of the 7th (left) and 8th (right) Earls of Jersey in All Saints' parish churchyard, Middleton Stoney, Oxfordshire - Margaret is buried with her husband. Margaret Elizabeth Child Villiers, Countess of Jersey, DBE, JP (née Leigh; 29 October 1849 – 22 May 1945) was an English noblewoman, activist, writer and hymn-writer. She was the daughter and eldest child of William Henry Leigh, 2nd Baron Leigh. On 19 September 1872 she married Victor Child Villiers, 7th Earl of Jersey. They had six children: George Henry Robert Child Villiers, 8th Earl of Jersey (1873–1923) Lady Margaret Child Villiers (1874–1874), died in infancy. Lady Margaret Child Villiers (1875–1959), married Walter Rice, 7th Baron Dynevor, and had issue. Lady Mary Julia Child Villiers (1877–1933), married Thomas Pakenham, 5th Earl of Longford, and had issue. Lady Beatrice Child Villiers (1880–1970), married Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany, and had issue. Hon. Arthur George Child Villie

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Julia A. A. Wood

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Julia A. A. Wood

Julia A. A. Wood, "A woman of the century" Julia A. A. Wood (pen name, Minnie Mary Lee; April 13, 1826/1830 – 1903) was an American author. She was an indefatigable worker, and produced an astonishing amount of poems, stories, sketches and novels. She began writing very early in life, but did not publish in book form until she was in her forties. Myrrha Lake; or, Into the Light of Catholicity (New York, about 1871; 2nd edition, 1873); Hubert's Wife: a Story for You (Baltimore, 1875); The Brown House at Duffield: a Story of Life without and within the Fold (Baltimore, 1877); and The Story of Annette and her Five Dolls: Told to dear little Catholic Children (Baltimore, 1880) were her published works.[1] Early life and education Julia Amanda Sargent was born in New London, New Hampshire, April 13, 1826,[2] or in 1830,[1] or about 1830.[3] She was a daughter of Ezekiel Sargent and his wife, Emily Everett Adams.[2] She was educated in the New London Literary and Scientific Institution, Colby Academy, and later

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Dorothy Sterling

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Dorothy Sterling

Dorothy Sterling (née Dannenberg; November 23, 1913 – December 1, 2008) was an American writer and historian. After college, she worked as a journalist and writer in New York for several years, including work for the Federal Writers’ Project.[1] In 1937 she married Philip Sterling (died 1989), also a writer.[1] Her daughter, Anne Fausto-Sterling, is a noted biologist, the Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Biology and Gender Studies at Brown University, and is married to playwright Paula Vogel.[2] Her son, Peter Sterling, is a well-known neuroscientist and coiner of the term allostasis. Career Sterling worked for Time from 1936 to 1949 and was then assistant bureau chief in Life’s news bureau from 1944 to 1949.[3] Starting in the 1950s, she authored more than 30 books, mainly non-fiction historical works for children on the origins of the women's and anti-slavery movements, civil rights, segregation, and nature, as well as mysteries. Politics Sterling belonged to the Communist Party USA in the 1940s. Even af

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Adetoun Ogunsheye

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Adetoun Ogunsheye

Felicia Adetoun Omolara Ogunsheye (née Banjo; born 5 December 1926) is the first female professor in Nigeria. She was a professor of library and information science at the University of Ibadan.[1] Early life and education Ogunsheye was born on December 5, 1926 in Benin City, Nigeria, to parents from Ogun State.[2] She is the elder sister of Lieutenant Colonel Victor Banjo and Ademola Banjo. She had her secondary education at Queens College, before becoming the only female student at Yaba College of Technology in 1946. In 1948, she received her diploma, becoming the first woman to graduate from the school.[3] She attended University College Ibadan, then went on to Newnham College, Cambridge University, UK, to study Geography on scholarship, earning BA and MA degrees in 1952 and 1956, respectively; she became the first Nigerian woman there.[1] She earned another master's degree in Library Science from Simmons College, Massachusetts, USA in 1962.[4] She established the Abadina Media Resource Centre Library o

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Gabby Rivera

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Gabby Rivera

Gabby Rivera is an American writer and storyteller. She is the author of the 2016 young adult novel Juliet Takes a Breath, and wrote the 2017–2018 Marvel comic book America, about superhero America Chavez.[1][2] Her work often addresses issues of identity and representation for people of color and the queer community, within American popular culture.[3] Early life and education Gabby Rivera was born to Martha and Charles Rivera.[4] Rivera grew up in the Bronx neighborhood of New York City, she is of Puerto Rican decent.[5][6] An early love of reading and writing came from her mother, a kindergarten teacher.[7] Gabby Rivera attended Goucher College in Towson, Maryland, graduating in 2004.[8] Career Rivera is an editor at Autostraddle, an online magazine for, about, and written by LGBTQIA+ women, occasional trans men, and non-binary people.[9] Rivera has also written poems and short stories. She is an activist and youth mentor through her work as the youth programs manager at GLSEN. Juliet Takes a Breath

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Nikki Grahame

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Nikki Grahame

Nicola Rachel-Beth Grahame (born 28 April 1982) is an English television personality, model and author. She rose to prominence after appearing on the seventh series of Big Brother and went on to star in her own reality series, Princess Nikki. In 2006, Grahame won a National Television Award for Most Popular TV Contender. In 2010, she finished as the runner-up in Ultimate Big Brother. Grahame appeared in the sixteenth series of Big Brother in 2016 as a time warp housemate, and the following year she appeared in the fourth season of Big Brother Canada in which she finished in sixth place. Grahame has released two books, Dying To Be Thin, and Fragile. The autobiographical books are based on her experiences with anorexia nervosa throughout her life. Early life Grahame has described her early childhood as the "happiest ever", however a series of upsets followed, when at the age of eight, her parents divorced and her grandfather, to whom she was extremely close, died from cancer. Grahame was raised by her mother

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Barbara Beskind

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Barbara Beskind

Barbara M. Knickerbocker Beskind (born 1924) is an American inventor and designer.[1][2] Early education and career Barbara Beskind is a designer and internationally recognized pioneer in the field of occupational therapy.[3] Beskind graduated in 1945 from the College of Home Economics at Syracuse University with a BS in Applied Arts and Design. At the end of World War II, she trained as an occupational therapist through the U.S. Army’s War Emergency Course and served for 20 years, retiring as a major in 1966. She went on to found the Princeton Center for Learning Disorders, the first independent private practice in occupational therapy in the U.S. She authored a clinical text published in 1980 on the treatment of children with learning disorders and holds a patent for inflatable equipment that helps learning-disordered children improve their balance. The American Occupational Therapy Association honored Beskind as a Charter Fellow in recognition of her innovative therapeutic techniques. In 1989 she retired

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Ella Simon

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Ella Simon

Cinderella (Ella) Jane Simon (1902 – 13 February 1981) was an Australian Aboriginal activist [1]. Ella was born in a tent on the edge of Taree to Lucy Ann Russell, a Biripi woman. The main 'Aboriginal camp' at Taree at the time was at Brown's Hill[2]. Brown's Hill Fringe Camp (now the site of Ruprecht Park) was located on the northern side of the Manning River, within Biripi Country and was established by displaced Aboriginal people from the Biripi and Worimi nations in the 1850s[3] [4]. In May 1900, the location of the Station at Purfleet, New South Wales was decided at the meeting of the Aborigines Protection Board in Sydney. This was the establishment of a government reserve (No. 89) of eighteen acres [5]. Ella's maternal grandfather: was George Russell. was from the coast. had an Aboriginal mother and Scottish father [6] worked a lot for local farmers told the McClellans of the terrible conditions of Brown's Hill Camp. They were so sympathetic they offered him a little corner of their land. co

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Madeleine Blair

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Madeleine Blair

Madeleine Blair (pseudonym) was a prostitute who lived and worked in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century in the Midwestern and Western United States as well as Canada. Her autobiography, which tells the story of her life and work as a prostitute, was published by Harper & Brothers Publishers in 1919.[1] Early life Childhood As Madeleine published her autobiography using a pseudonym, her real identity has never been uncovered. Therefore, both her date of birth and the exact origins of her family cannot be ascertained. She was a third generation American, whose parents moved from the Atlantic seaboard to settle in "a thriving town of the Middle West." While never naming the specific location of her childhood, Madeleine describes it in her autobiography as a "new and crude" town, with few opportunities. She was the second eldest child of a large family, and her father was a well-respected member of the community. Madeleine's upbringing was in line with that of an upper-class child; her family

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Sigrid Grabner

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Sigrid Grabner

Sigrid Grabner (née Hauf; born 29 October 1942) is a German writer. Biography Sigrid Grabner was born in the town of Tetschen-Bodenbach. After the expulsion of the Sudeten Germans, her family moved to Merseburg in 1947 where Grabner attended school until 1957. In 1961 she graduated from high school in Halle and worked in agriculture for one year. From 1962 to 1967 she studied cultural studies and Indonesian studies at the Humboldt University in East Berlin.[1] In 1972, she received her doctorate there with a thesis on the Indonesian cultural policy during the Sukarno dictatorship. Since 1974 Grabner has worked as a freelance writer. The Stasi spied on Grabner, as she became suspicious of being a CIA agent. In the 1990s, she co-founded and led the Brandenburgische Literaturbüro.[2] She was married to writer and concentration camp survivor Hasso Grabner[3] and has two children.[1] Today Grabner lives in Potsdam. Writing Grabner has published a large number of non-fiction books, Essays, biographies and hist

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Ire'ne lara silva

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Ire'ne lara silva

ire'ne lara silva is a Chicana feminist poet and writer from Austin, Texas. Early years silva, who has adopted the convention of spelling her name all lowercase, grew up in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas. Her parents were migrant farmworkers and she spent many years with her family moving "from South Texas to Mathis to Oklahoma to New Mexico to the Panhandle and back to South Texas."[1] Writing career silva is the author of three chapbooks of poetry, two full-length books of poetry, and one short story collection. Her work has appeared in various journals including Acentos Review, Pilgrimage, and Yellow Medicine Review and various anthologies including Improbable Worlds: An Anthology of Texas and Louisiana Poets and The Weight of Addition: An Anthology of Texas Poetry. Her most recent collection of poetry, blood sugar canto, was published by Saddle Road Press in January 2016. silva is the co-editor, with Dan Vera, of the forthcoming IMANIMAN: Poets Reflect on Transformative & Transgressive Bor

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Sanmao (author)

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Sanmao (author)

Sanmao (Chinese: 三毛; 26 March 1943 – 4 January 1991) was a Taiwanese writer and translator. Her works range from autobiographical writing, travel writing and reflective novels, to translations of Spanish-language comic strips. She studied philosophy and taught German before becoming a career writer. Born as Chen Mao-ping (陳懋平), her pen name was adopted from the main character of Zhang Leping's most famous work, Sanmao.[1] In English, she was also known as Echo or Echo Chan, the first name she used in Latin script, after the eponymous Greek nymph. Early life Sanmao was born in Chongqing to Chen Siqing, a lawyer, and Miao Jinlan.[2][3] She had an older sister, Chen Tianxin.[4] Her parents were devout Christians.[2][3] Her family was from Zhejiang. After the Second Sino-Japanese War, the family moved to Nanjing.[3] When she was six, her family moved to Taiwan because of the Communist takeover of mainland China. She disliked the lack of freedom in Taiwan's educational system, in which strict restrictions were

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Florence Howe Hall

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Florence Howe Hall

Florence Marion Howe Hall (August 25, 1845 – April 10, 1922)[1] was an American writer, critic, and lecturer about women's suffrage in the United States.[2] Along with her two sisters, Laura Elizabeth Richards and Maude Howe Elliott, Hall received the first Pulitzer Prize for a biography, Julia Ward Howe.[2][3] Early life Florence Marion Howe was born on August 25, 1845 in South Boston, Massachusetts.[4] She was named Florence after Florence Nightingale, her godmother and friend of her parents, and Marion after her great--great-granduncle, General Francis Marion of the Revolutionary War fame.[4] Florence was the second of six children born of the marriage of Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe, a prominent physician, abolitionist and founder of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, and Julia Ward Howe, a poet and author, best known for writing "The Battle Hymn of the Republic".[5][6] Her elder sister was Julia Romana Howe;[7] and her younger siblings included Henry Marion Howe, a metallurgist;

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Katherine Jackson

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Katherine Jackson

Katherine Esther Jackson (née Scruse, born Kattie B. Screws; May 4, 1930) is the matriarch of the Jackson family. Early life Katherine Jackson was born as Kattie B. Screws[1][2] on May 4, 1930 in Clayton, Alabama to Prince Albert (October 16, 1907 – January 21, 1995) and Martha Screws (née Upshaw; December 14, 1902 – April 25, 1990). The elder of two daughters, Jackson contracted polio at age two, which left her with a noticeable permanent limp. In 1934, her father changed his surname to "Scruse", and renamed his daughter "Katherine Esther".[3] That year, the Scruse family moved to East Chicago, Indiana, an industrial city in northwest Indiana near Chicago. As a child, Jackson aspired to become an actress or country singer, but was dismayed to find no notable black country stars. Jackson's parents divorced when she was still a child. While attending Washington High School, Jackson joined the local high school band. In 1947, Katherine met Joseph Jackson, who was also living in East Chicago. Joseph obtained

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Henya Pekelman

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Henya Pekelman

Henya M. Pekelman (Hebrew: הֶניָה מ' פֶּקֶלמן, 1903 – August 20, 1940) was a Zionist pioneer and manual laborer of the Yishuv. She immigrated to Mandatory Palestine in 1922, and her self-published book "The Life of a Woman Worker in the Homeland" (Hebrew: חיי פועלת בארץ)[1] is recognized as one of the most authentic sources about the life of women laborers in Palestine in the 1920s. She committed suicide in 1940. Biography Pekelman was born in Born in Mărculești in Bessarabia Governorate, Russian Empire (in present-day Moldova),[2] to a religious Jewish family of merchants that gave great importance to education and diligence. After finishing her primary education, she joined the effort of providing for the family. In 1922, after her father's death, she immigrated to Mandatory Palestine with her mother. In Palestine, Pekelman worked in various manual labor jobs, including concrete casting and flooring.[3] It was Ada Maimon, ten years Pekelman's senior, from the same hometown, who helped her upon arrival an

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Elsie Altmann-Loos

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Elsie Altmann-Loos

Elsie Altmann-Loos (1899 - 1984) was an Austrian dancer, actress and autobiographer. Life Altmann's debut concert was in 1919. Later that year she became the second wife of modernist architect Adolf Loos, who was thirty years older than her.[1] Elsie Altmann starred as Lisa in the original production of Emmerich Kálmán’s operetta Gräfin Mariza at Theater an der Wien in 1924. A photograph of her by Madame D'Ora was used to advertise the operetta.[2] Altmann's dance "projected [an] image of cheerfulness, reinforced by an elegant taste for Biedermeyer-style costumes".[1] Elsie Altmann later recalled some of the strain of her relationship with Loos, who would be imprisoned for child abuse in 1928: I have always been a woman-child and this is what Loos loved in me. But all of a sudden, he finds that I don’t have sex appeal, and moreover, that my legs are too short. If I had longer legs, he said, it would change my life. So Loos decided to take me to a surgeon who would break my two legs and elongate them[3]

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Jhet van Ruyven

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Jhet van Ruyven

Jhet van Ruyven (born Juliet Torcelino; January 9, 1959) is a Filipino-Canadian author who wrote the auto-biographical book The Tale of Juliet in 2005. The Tale of Juliet is van Ruyven's self-published book which tells her life story from being a poor child vendor in the Philippines to succeeding as an immigrant in Canada. Following the launch of her book, van Ruyven was recognized by People Asia Magazine as one of the awardees of the 2005 People of the Year in the Philippines [1] and won an Honorable Mention for Best Non-Fiction Book at the Independent Publisher Award in Western Canada.[2] Early life Van Ruyven was born in a rural village in Pader, Batangas, Philippines to a family of 12 siblings. Her father was a family driver and her mother a vendor. To earn extra money to help her parents, van Ruyven had to spend her childhood selling food and merchandise after going to school. She sold mangoes, rice cakes, fish, vegetables and candies in her neighborhood and in the popular tourist spot Matabungkay Bea

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Yema Lucilda Hunter

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Yema Lucilda Hunter

Lucilda Hunter, née Caulker (born 1943) is a Sierra Leonean librarian, novelist and biographer who writes under the name Yema Lucilda Hunter.[1] Life Yema Lucilda Hunter was born in 1943 in Freetown.[1] She was educated at the Annie Walsh Memorial School,[2] before undertaking university study in England. She gained a BA from the University of Reading in 1964, a post-graduate diploma in librarianship from North-Western Polytechnic in 1966, and a master's degree in philosophy from Loughborough University.[1] Hunter has worked as a librarian at the Sierra Leone Library Board, in the Medical Library at Connaught Hospital in Freetown, and with the World Health Organization in Brazzaville.[1] She took early retirement in 1999, and that year was made a fellow of the British Library Association. She lives with her husband in Accra, Ghana.[2] Works Road to freedom, 1982 Mother and daughter: memoirs and poems, 1983 Bittersweet, 1989 An African treasure: in search of Gladys Casely-Hayford, 1904-1950, 2008

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Women librarians

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