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People from Manhattan


Desiree Gould

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Desiree Gould

Desiree Joan Gould (born March 27, 1945) is an American theater, film and television actress, singer and dancer. She is known for her role in the 1983 slasher classic Sleepaway Camp. Early life Desiree Gould was born in New York City[2] in 1945 to a Jewish mother and a Russian-Italian father. When she was young, she and her family relocated to Forest Hills in Queens, and later spent some years of her life in Manhattan. When she was five years old, she took singing and tap-dancing classes, later having vocal training with Harry Garland, Roger Leonard, Herb Greene, developing a mezzo-soprano vocal range for musical theater, while she later took lessons in Ballet at the New York Conservatory of Dance, with Pat Doukodovsky, and, the Ballet Academy East, with Don Paradise.[3] This led to her desire to choose acting as a career path, which did not immediately occur, and she spent over twenty years between several different jobs, before deciding to take acting classes,[2] training with the Gene Feist Theatre Found

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American real estate businesspeople

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People from New York (state)

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Leo Gottlieb (lawyer)

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Leo Gottlieb (lawyer)

Leo Gottlieb (c. 1896–1989) was an American lawyer. He worked for Root, Clark, Buckner & Howland from 1920 to 1946, and Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton from 1946 to 1974. "He was the president of the New York Lawyers Association in the early 1960's."[1] Gottlieb is the namesake of the Leo Gottlieb Professorship of Law at the Harvard Law School, formerly held by Senator Elizabeth Warren.[2] It is now held by Christine A. Desan.[3] References "Leo Gottlieb, Lawyer, 93". The New York Times. September 27, 1989. Retrieved February 28, 2018. Williamson, Kevin D. (April 18, 2012). "Elizabeth Warren's Wall Street Money Machine". National Review. Retrieved March 1, 2018. "Christine A. Desan". Harvard Law School. Retrieved February 28, 2018.

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1890s births

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Kingdon Gould Jr.

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Kingdon Gould Jr.

Kingdon Gould Jr. (January 3, 1924 – January 16, 2018) was an American diplomat, businessman, and philanthropist.[1] A Republican businessman, Gould was appointed by President Richard Nixon to serve as United States Ambassador to Luxembourg, a position he would hold from 1969 through 1972. In 1973, Gould was appointed as Ambassador to the Netherlands also by President Nixon, serving until 1976. He is part of the fourth generation of the Gould family of financiers, philanthropists and diplomats, which includes his father Kingdon Gould Sr., grandfather George Jay Gould and great-grandfather Jay Gould, with associated generations of mothers, siblings, uncles, aunts, cousins, nieces and nephews. Early life Gould was the third child and the only son of Kingdon Gould, Sr., and his wife, Annunziata Lucci.[2] He attended Millbrook School in 1938[3] and graduated in 1942. He attended Yale University for two months in the spring of 1942[2] before serving in the United States Army in World War II and was the recipien

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New York Republicans

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Recipients of the Purple Heart medal

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Adolphus W. Green

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Adolphus W. Green

Adolphus Williamson Green (January 14, 1844 – March 8, 1917) was an American attorney and businessman. He was the co-founder of the National Biscuit Company (now known as Nabisco, owned by Mondelēz International) in 1898. A year later, in 1898, he was the first person to sell packaged biscuits. He served as the President of the National Biscuit Company from 1905 to 1917. Early life Adolphus Williamson Green was born on January 14, 1844 in Boston, Massachusetts.[2][3][4] His ancestors had immigrated to the United States from Ireland.[5] Green was educated in Boston public schools, including the Boston Latin School, from which he graduated in 1859.[3][6] He entered Harvard University in 1859, graduating in 1863.[4][7] Career Green started as the Principal of the Groton School in 1864.[3][7] In 1865, he became second assistant librarian at the New York Mercantile Library.[3][6] From 1867 to 1869, he was promoted to full librarian.[3][6] From 1869 to 1873, he worked for Evarts, Southmayd & Choate, a law

People from Manhattan

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People from Boston

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Kingdon Gould Sr.

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Kingdon Gould Sr.

Kingdon Gould Sr. (August 15, 1887 – November 7, 1945) was an American financier and champion polo player.[1] He was born on August 15, 1887 in Manhattan, New York City to George Jay Gould I and Edith M. Kingdon. He attended Columbia University and graduated in 1909. He served as an officer in World War I. He married Annunziata Camilla Maria Lucci (1890–1961) on July 2, 1917 in Manhattan, New York City.[2] Together they had the following children: Silvia Annunziata Gould (1919–1980) Edith Kingdon Gould (1920–2004) who married Guy Martin (1911-2014) Kingdon Gould Jr. (1925–2018) was Ambassador to Luxembourg and the Netherlands under Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford. Time wrote on July 27, 1942 : To beat the gas & rubber shortage Manhattan’s Mrs. Kingdon Gould took the old family carriages out of moth balls, sent Daughter Edith to buy a pair of horses. Inexperienced Daughter Edith came back with a pair of brewery-truck-model Percherons.[3] Kingdon died on November 7, 1945.[1] He was buried

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1887 births

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Military personnel from New York City

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Bill Green (New York politician)

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Bill Green (New York politician)

Sedgwick William Green (October 16, 1929 – October 14, 2002) was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from New York. He represented a district covering most or all of Manhattan's East Side. To date, he is the last Republican to have represented Manhattan in the U.S. House. Life and career Bill Green was born on October 16, 1929 in New York City, the son of Louis A. Green and Evelyn (née Schoenberg) Green.[1] His father was a wealthy investor who was one of the main shareholders in Grand Union, and Bill Green grew up in Manhattan.[2] He graduated from The Horace Mann School in 1946, Harvard University in 1950, and Harvard Law School in 1953. From 1953 to 1955, he served in the United States Army. After leaving the army, he was legal secretary for U.S. Court of Appeals (D.C.) Judge George T. Washington before leaving to practice law. From 1961-64, Green was the chief counsel to the New York Joint Legislative Committee on Housing and Urban Development. He was a member of the New Yo

Jewish American military personnel

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People from Manhattan

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Harvard College alumni

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Phil Griffin

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Phil Griffin

Philip T. Griffin (born November 27, 1956)[1] is a television executive, who in 2008 became president of MSNBC, a United States cable news channel.[2][3] Early life The youngest of four children, Griffin grew up in Chappaqua, New York[2] and Toledo, Ohio.[3] His father was an executive at Macy's. Griffin's family were Democrats and politically-minded. As a child, his mother took him to rallies for the hungry. His brother was a conscientious objector.[3] In 1979, Griffin graduated with a degree in English from Vassar College.[2] He wrote his thesis on Milton's Paradise Lost.[2] Early career Following graduation, Griffin moved to Atlanta to take a minimum wage job at the fledgling CNN.[2] Griffin was working a camera at CNN when it aired for the first time, on June 1, 1980.[2] At CNN, he befriended future MSNBC host Keith Olbermann, who worked there as a sportscaster.[2] After several years with CNN, working primarily as a writer-producer-editor in their sports department, Griffin began work at NBC in 198

Maumee Valley Country Day School alumni

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People from Manhattan

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NBC News people

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Reice Hamel

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Reice Hamel

Reice Hamel (1960, San Francisco) Reice Hamel (June 18, 1920 – October 1, 1986) was an American Audio Recording engineer. He is considered, along with his colleague Wally Heider, to be the pioneer of complex live remote recording. He recorded under the company name, Reice Hamel Recording USA. Early Years in New York Reice Hamel was born in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City on June 18, 1920. His mother Freida Bernstein, and Father Leo Hamel, were Jewish immigrants from Austria who came to America in the early 1900s. During World War II he was a Navy Lieutenant, Chief Radio Officer. After the War he worked for International Telephone and Telegraph as a field engineer and was also a freelance television technician in Manhattan, NYC. In 1956 he became interested in audio engineering and Magnetic Tape Recording and decided to try it as a business. He used a modified Ampex 601 tape deck to record his first performance, a Girl Scout round-up in the middle of the Idaho forest. Alone in San Francisc

American audio engineers

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People from the Lower East Side

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People from Manhattan

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Helen Gross

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Helen Gross

Helen Gross (born Hellen R. Gross, May 1896 – unknown)[1] was an American classic female blues singer,[2] active as a recording artist in the mid-1920s. Songs she recorded include "I Wanna Jazz Some More", "Bloody Razor Blues", and "Strange Man". All of her recorded work was from sessions in her birthplace, New York City, between May 1924 and March 1925.[2][3] She recorded 27 songs, which were originally released by Ajax Records. Steve Leggett, writing for AllMusic, noted that her recordings include "a preponderance of often baffling noise effects, which at times gives her songs the feel of a carnival sideshow."[2] Little is known of her life outside music, and no details of her death are recorded.[1] Career Gross recorded for Ajax Records, as did Rosa Henderson, Edna Hicks, Viola McCoy, Monette Moore, and Fletcher Henderson.[4] Her work was notable for the quality of the jazz musicians that accompanied her, including the trumpet and cornet players James "Bubber" Miley and Louis Metcalf, the stride piano

People from Manhattan

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Ajax Records artists

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American blues singers

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Oliver Harriman Jr.

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Oliver Harriman Jr.

Oliver Harriman Jr. (November 29, 1862 – August 14, 1940) was an American heir and stockbroker. Early life Oliver Harriman Jr. was born on November 29, 1862 in New York City.[1] His father, Oliver Harriman, was a dry goods businessman.[1] His mother was Laura Low.[1] He had four brothers and three sisters. Harriman attended Princeton University, where he was a member of the Ivy Club, and graduated in 1883.[1] Career Harriman started his career at Winslow, Lanier & Co., an investment firm in New York City, where he worked from 1883 to 1888.[1] He became a partner in Harriman & Co. in 1888.[1] Harriman served on the Board of Directors of the Continental Trust Company of New York.[1] Harriman served in the National Guard of New York from 1888 onward.[1] He was a member of the University Club of New York, the Metropolitan Club, the Knickerbocker Club, the New York Yacht Club, and the Westchester Country Club.[1] His wife became a philanthropist, serving as president of the National Conference on

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Princeton University alumni

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People from Silver Spring, Maryland

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Pat Harrington Jr.

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Pat Harrington Jr.

Pat Harrington Jr. on One Day at a Time (1976) Daniel Patrick Harrington Jr. (August 13, 1929 – January 6, 2016) was an Emmy Award winning, American voice, stage, and television actor, best known for his role as building superintendent Dwayne Schneider on the sitcom One Day at a Time. His father Pat Harrington Sr. was also an actor. Early life Harrington was born in Manhattan on August 13, 1929.[1] His father was a song and dance man who worked in vaudeville and performed on the Broadway stage. Harrington attended a Catholic military school, La Salle Military Academy in Oakdale, New York.[2][3] then graduated from Fordham University in 1950 with a bachelor of arts and subsequently received a master's degree in political philosophy, also from Fordham. During the Korean War, Harrington served as an intelligence officer with the United States Air Force, where he achieved the rank of first lieutenant. Following in his father's footsteps, he pursued a career in entertainment after graduating from college and

People from Manhattan

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American male television actors

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United States Air Force airmen

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Renee Harris (producer)

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Renee Harris (producer)

Irene Wallach Harris, better known as Renee Harris (June 15, 1876 – September 2, 1969) was the first female theatrical manager and producer in the United States. Harris was interested in the theater, but had no experience with it other than as a patron. While attending a matinée, she met her husband, the noted theatrical manager and producer Henry B. Harris. The two had a whirlwind courtship, with Harris assisting her husband in his work even before the marriage. Through their work together, Harris learned about both theater management and theatrical production. Her husband said that she was competent enough to take over his business if anything happened to him. The couple owned New York theaters, large homes and traveled extensively for both business and pleasure. They had taken an extended journey through Europe and North Africa and were returning to the United States after finalizing some theatrical business in London. The Harrises would be sailing on the maiden voyage of the new White Star liner, RMS Tit

People from Manhattan

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Burials at Ferncliff Cemetery

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People from Washington, D.C.

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Joe L. Hayes Jr.

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Joe L. Hayes Jr.

Joe L. Hayes Jr. (born May 1, 1970) is an American businessman and politician. Elected to the Alaska House of Representatives from Fairbanks, Alaska in Nov. 2000. He was the only African American in the Alaska House during his term. A distinguished alumnus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (B.A. 1997) he was elected Student Body President and as a student appointed by the Alaska Governor to the Statewide University of Alaska Board of Regents. Hayes worked for a decade as Executive Director of the UAF Alumni Association. Early life Born Joe L. Hayes Jr. to Brenda Ann Lee, a nurse assistant in Manhattan, New York, he was raised in Baltimore, Maryland, with nine other siblings without a father in the home. Hayes graduated from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute in 1998.[1] Public service Joe Hayes enlisted in the United States Air Force after High School graduation. During his four years of service Hayes advanced to the E-4 (rank) of Sergeant,[2] earning the Commendation Medal, Good Conduct Medal and the Na

People from Manhattan

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African-American state legislators in Alaska

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Businesspeople from Fairbanks, Alaska

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Anne Hendricks Bass

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Anne Hendricks Bass

Anne Hendricks Bass (born October 19, 1941) is an American investor, documentary filmmaker, philanthropist and art collector. She is the former wife of billionaire oilman Sid Bass. She directed the 2010 documentary film Dancing Across Borders. She is a patron of the arts in New York City and Fort Worth, Texas. Early life Anne Hendricks was born on October 19, 1941 in Indianapolis, Indiana.[1][2] Her father Dr John Wesley Hendricks was a "successful Indianapolis surgeon" and urologist.[3] Her mother, a graduate of Vassar College, was a "golf-champion mother".[2][4] She has younger sisters and a brother.[2] She was educated in public schools in Indianapolis until 1957, when she transferred to the Tudor Hall School for Girls, a private girls' school in Indianapolis now known as the Park Tudor School, graduating in 1959.[2] She took ballet lessons as a child.[2] She graduated from Vassar College in 1963, where she majored in Italian literature.[1][3] Career After graduation, she was an executive trainee at B

Park Tudor School alumni

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People from the Upper East Side

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People from Manhattan

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Rosina Henley

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Rosina Henley

Rosina Henley was an American actress and screenwriter active during Hollywood's silent era. She was married to British film director Harley Knoles, with whom she frequently collaborated.[1] Biography Rosina was born in Manhattan to actor E.J. Henley and opera singer Helen Bertram.[2][3] Her father died when she was young, and she was raised by her mother.[4] She made her own stage debut in 1907 at the age of 15, and from there forged a career as a stage actress.[5] She and her mother moved to Los Angeles in 1910, where she continued performing and took on motion picture acting work.[6] She made her debut as a scenarist on 1920's Guilty of Love, directed by her future husband.[7] After their marriage, the pair relocated to London, where they continued their work in the industry.[8] Her last known credit was on 1922's The Bohemian Girl. She died on July 5, 1978, and was survived by her son, author William Henry Knoles (pen name Clyde Allison). Selected filmography As actress: Courage for Two (1919)

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American women screenwriters

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Screenwriters from New York (state)

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Pat Henning

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Pat Henning

Fred Patrick "Pat" Henning (July 5, 1908 - April 28, 1973) was an American character actor, best known for playing Kayo Dugan in On The Waterfront (1954). Filmography Year Title Role Notes 1938 Shine On, Harvest Moon Shag Jackson 1939 Ride 'em, Cowgirl Henchman Lingstrom 1953 Man on a Tightrope Konradin 1954 On the Waterfront Kayo Dugan 1958 Wind Across the Everglades Sawdust 1963 The Cardinal Hercule Menton 1969 Hello Down There Reilly References External links Pat Henning on IMDb

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Patrick Higgins (musician)

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Patrick Higgins (musician)

Patrick Higgins is an American avant-garde composer, guitarist, and producer from New York City, known for his work in experimental and contemporary classical music. He plays guitar and composes in the ensemble Zs, described by The New York Times as "one of the strongest avant-garde bands in New York."[1] His work as composer traverses the styles of the European avant-garde and the tradition of post-minimalist Downtown New York music. He has received attention for his unique style of guitar playing and his work as a composer, heralded as "one of the most gifted guitarists working today" (The Quietus)[2] and a "formidable concert music composer" (The Boston Globe).[3] After a performance at South By Southwest music festival in Austin, TX he was named the "best guitarist of the 2013 event" by Premier Guitar Magazine.[4] Biography Higgins was born in 1984 in Manhattan and attended high school at the Urban School of San Francisco. He returned to New York City in 2002 to attend Columbia University, earning a B.

People from Manhattan

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Classical musicians from New York (state)

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American male classical composers

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Florence Hinkle

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Florence Hinkle

Florence Hinkle (June 22, 1885 - April 19, 1933) was an operatic soprano. Biography She was born on June 22, 1885 in Columbia, Pennsylvania. She toured with the Metropolitan Opera Company, and in 1915, appeared in Richmond, Virginia.[1] In 1919, she appeared at Aeolian Hall (Manhattan).[2] She died on April 19, 1933 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Family On June 20, 1916 in Manhattan she married Herbert Witherspoon, he had been previously married.[3] Her widower died in 1935 after being named as the general manager of the Metropolitan Opera to replace Giulio Gatti-Casazza.[4] His will set aside money for the Library of Congress to buy musical manuscripts in her name.[5] References "Richmond Times-Dispatch 28 March 1915 — Virginia Chronicle". virginiachronicle.com. Retrieved 2015-10-14. Musical America. Music Publications, Limited. 1919-01-01. "H. Witherspoon Weds. Metropolitan Opera Basso Marries Miss Florence Hinkle, Soprano". New York Times. June 21, 1916. Retrieved 2015-08-28. "Witherspoon Dies In O

20th-century women opera singers

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20th-century American opera singers

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20th-century American women singers

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Gaby Hoffmann

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Gaby Hoffmann

Gabrielle Mary Antonia Hoffmann[2][3] (born January 8, 1982)[4] is an American film and television actress best known for her roles on Sleepless in Seattle, Now and Then, Transparent and Girls,[5] which garnered her nominations for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series and Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series in 2015, respectively.[6] Additionally, she is remembered as a child actress from the films Field of Dreams, Uncle Buck, Now and Then, and Volcano.[7] Early life Hoffmann was born in New York City, New York.[8] Her mother, Viva (born Janet Susan Mary Hoffmann),[9] is an actress, writer and former Warhol superstar,[10] and her father, Anthony Herrera,[11] was a soap opera actor best known for his role as James Stenbeck from As the World Turns.[12] Viva and Herrera were estranged shortly after Hoffmann's birth; she was raised by her mother at the Chelsea Hotel in New York. Her father did not have a significant presence in her life.

People from Manhattan

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People from Fort Greene, Brooklyn

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Bard College alumni

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Frederic Charles Hirons

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Frederic Charles Hirons

George Rogers Clark Memorial Frederic Charles Hirons (March 28, 1882 - January 23, 1942) was the American architect, based in New York, who designed the Classical George Rogers Clark National Memorial, in Vincennes, Indiana, among the last major Beaux-Arts style public works in the United States, completed in 1933.[1] Biography He was born in Manhattan on March 28, 1882. Hirons was of French extraction; he immigrated to Massachusetts as a child. Hirons worked as a draftsman in the Boston architectural office of Herbert Hale from 1898 until 1901, before entering the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; on graduating in 1904 he received a Rotch Travelling Scholarship[2] to study at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. MIT's Paris prize enabled him to continue his European studies until 1909. On his return he established an architectural practice in New York with Ethan Allen Dennison (1881–1954).[3] Hirons and Dennison produced many commercial structures in the Beaux-Arts and Art Deco styles:[4] Delaware Ti

People from New York City

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People from Manhattan

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NRHP architects

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Adam Horowitz

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Adam Horowitz

Adam Horowitz (born December 4, 1971) is an American screenwriter and producer. He is known for co-creating the ABC fairy tale drama series Once Upon a Time with his writing partner Edward Kitsis. Days after the show ended in 2018, Kitsis and Horowitz were announced as showrunners for Apple TV's Amazing Stories. Early life Horowitz was born in New York City to a Jewish family,[1] and graduated from Hunter College High School in 1990. He attended University of Wisconsin–Madison and graduated with a B.A. in 1994, majoring in communication arts and political science. There he met his future collaborator, Edward Kitsis. Horowitz was writer and reporter for the Daily Cardinal student newspaper, writing as many as five articles in the same issue. He often caught editors off-guard with humorous leads or picking odd quotes. He worked on articles about spearfishing and the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Career Television After graduating, Kitsis and Horowitz traveled together to Los Angeles, and worked together on Fantas

People from Manhattan

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Television producers from New York City

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Screenwriters from New York (state)

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Louisa Horton

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Louisa Horton

Louisa Fleetwood Horton (September 10, 1920 - January 25, 2008) was an American film, television, and stage actress, who used her given name, Louisa Horton, professionally.[1] She was the former wife of the late The Sting director, George Roy Hill, with whom she had four children.[2] Personal life Horton was born to Jeter Rice and Frances Breckinridge (née Steele) Horton in Beijing, China. The daughter of a United States Marine Corps officer,[3] she was raised in Haiti and the area around Washington, D.C.[1] She lived in Manhattan for nearly 50 years before her death in 2008.[1] Marriage Horton met her husband George Roy Hill when they were both actors in a Shakespeare repertory company.[1] They were married in 1951, and had four children, but divorced in the 1970s.[1] They reportedly remained close even after their separation.[1] George Roy Hill, who was best known for directing the 1973's The Sting, an Oscar-winning film, as well as 1969's Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, died in 2002.[1] Career

People from Manhattan

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People from Englewood, New Jersey

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Shemp Howard

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Shemp Howard

Samuel Horwitz (March 11, 1895 – November 22, 1955),[1] known professionally as Shemp Howard, was an American actor and comedian. He was called "Shemp" because "Sam" came out that way in his mother's thick Litvak accent. He is best known as the third stooge in the Three Stooges, a role he played when the act began in the early 1920s (1923–1932), while it was still associated with Ted Healy and known as "Ted Healy and his Stooges"; and again from 1946 until his death in 1955. Between his times with the Stooges, he had a successful solo career as a film comedian. Early life Howard was born Samuel Horwitz in Manhattan, New York on March 11, 1895, and raised in Brooklyn. He was the third-born of the five Horwitz brothers, sons of their Lithuanian Jewish parents Solomon Horwitz (1872–1943) and Jennie Horwitz (1870–1939). Irving and Jack were his older brothers; Moses and Jerome were his younger brothers. Howard's first name, Shmuel (after his grandfather), was anglicized to Samuel, and his parents and brothers

Burials at Home of Peace Cemetery

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Deaths from heart-related cause

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People from Manhattan

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John Arthur Hughes

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John Arthur Hughes

John Arthur Hughes (November 2, 1880 – May 25, 1942) was an officer in the United States Marine Corps and a Medal of Honor recipient for his role in the United States occupation of Veracruz. Hughes joined the Marine Corps in March 1900, and was commissioned as an officer in December 1901. As the result of a gas attack during the Battle of Saint-Mihiel, he was medically retired with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in July 1919.[1] Hughes died on May 25, 1942 and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia. His grave can be found in section 8, lot 5265. Medal of Honor citation Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 2 November 1880, New York, N.Y. Accredited to: New York. G.O. No.: 177, 4 December 1915. Other Navy award: Navy Cross. Citation: For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, 21 and 22 April 1914. Capt. Hughes was in both days' fighting at the head of his company, and was eminent and conspicuous in his conduct, leading his men with skill and c

American Marine Corps personnel of World War I

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People from Manhattan

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Battle of Veracruz (1914) recipients of the Med...

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Humpty Jackson

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Humpty Jackson

Thomas "Humpty" Jackson (1879-1951) was a New York criminal and last of the independent gang leaders in New York's underworld during the early twentieth century.[1] Reportedly well read, Jackson was said to be an admirer of such writers such as Voltaire, Charles Darwin, Leonard Huxley and Herbert Spencer as well as various Greek and Latin texts. He was, however, known to be a violent man who regularly carried three revolvers, including one in his derby hat and another secreted in a strange-looking small sweaty holster under his hunchback. He was born in the Manhattan Gas House District on Nov. 1879 to Irish immigrant parents. Although little is known of his early life, Jackson uncommonly possessed an educational background despite his reputation as a ruthless criminal whose gang numbering fifty men included street thugs such as Spanish Louie, Nigger Ruhl, the Lobster Kid, and a six-foot-tall killer known as "The Grabber". Based in an old graveyard located between First and Second Avenues bound by 12th and 1

People from East Harlem

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People from Manhattan

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Gang members of New York City

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Al Jaffee

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Al Jaffee

Allan Jaffee (born Abraham Jaffee,[3] March 13, 1921) is an American cartoonist. He is notable for his work in the satirical magazine Mad, including his trademark feature, the Mad Fold-in. As of 2019, Jaffee had been a regular contributor to the magazine for 64 years and is its longest-running contributor. However, he launched his website [1] at the end of that year, where he announced he had stopped working after Mad's December 2019 issue. Since their August 2019 issue, Mad has either been reprinting old Fold-ins, or had new ones by Johnny Sampson. In the half-century between April 1964 and April 2013, only one issue of Mad was published without containing new material by Jaffee.[4][5] In a 2010 interview, Jaffee said, "Serious people my age are dead."[6] In 2008, Jaffee was honored by the Reuben Awards as the Cartoonist of the Year. New Yorker cartoonist Arnold Roth said, "Al Jaffee is one of the great cartoonists of our time."[7] Describing Jaffee, Peanuts creator Charles Schulz wrote, "Al can cartoon any

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Sidney Janis

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Sidney Janis

Sidney Janis (July 8, 1896 – November 23, 1989) was a wealthy clothing manufacturer and art collector who opened an art gallery in New York in 1948. His gallery quickly gained prominence, for he not only exhibited the work of most of the emerging leaders of Abstract Expressionism, but also that of such important European artists as Pierre Bonnard, Paul Klee, Joan Miró, and Piet Mondrian. As the critic Clement Greenberg explained in a 1958 tribute to the dealer, Janis' exhibition practices had helped to establish the legitimacy of the Americans, for his policy "not only implied, it declared, that Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Phillip Guston, Mark Rothko, and Robert Motherwell were to be judged by the same standards as Matisse and Picasso, without condescension, without making allowances." Greenberg observed that in the late 1940s "the real issue was whether ambitious artists could live in this country by what they did ambitiously. Sidney Janis helped as much as anyone to see that it was deci

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Madhur Jaffrey

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Madhur Jaffrey

Madhur Jaffrey CBE (née Bahadur; born 13 August 1933) is an Indian-born actress, food and travel writer, and television personality.[1][2] She is recognized for bringing Indian cuisine to the western hemisphere with her debut cookbook, An Invitation to Indian Cooking (1973), which was inducted into the James Beard Foundation’s Cookbook Hall of Fame in 2006.[3][4][5] She has written over a dozen cookbooks and appeared on several related television programmes, the most notable of which was Madhur Jaffrey's Indian Cookery, which premiered in the UK in 1982.[6] She is the food consultant at Dawat, considered by many food critics to be among the best Indian restaurants in New York City.[7][8][9] She played an instrumental part in bringing together filmmakers James Ivory and Ismail Merchant[10][11] and acted in several of their films such as Shakespeare Wallah (1965), for which she won the Silver Bear for Best Actress award at the 15th Berlin International Film Festival.[12] She has appeared in dramas on radio, st

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Dick Kallman

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Dick Kallman

For producer and radio host Dick Kollmar (1910-1971), see Dorothy Kilgallen. Dick Kallman (July 7, 1933 – February 22, 1980) was an American actor. Early life Kallman was born in Brooklyn in New York City, into wealth. His father, Alvan Kallman, a former barnstorming pilot, was owner of the Savoy-Plaza Hotel in New York City, The Balsams Grand Resort Hotel in New Hampshire, and the St. Johns Hotel in Havana.[1][2] Kallman's mother, Zara Whitman Kallman, had been a Broadway actress.[3] Career After working on the New York stage where he won a Theater World Award for his performance in the 1951 Broadway musical Seventeen,[4] Kallman starred in the title role of the 1965–1966 television sitcom Hank. He returned to Broadway, taking over the leading role in the musical Half a Sixpence.[5] As a singer, he released several albums of pop standards, including Hits & the Misses and Speak Softly, and in conjunction with his TV series, Hank Sings and Dick Kallman Drops in as 'Hank'. He performed one of his songs

Burials at Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Hollywood...

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Patrick Henry Jones

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Patrick Henry Jones

Patrick Henry Jones (November 20, 1830 – July 23, 1900) was an American lawyer, public servant and Postmaster of New York City during the mid-to late 19th century. In 1878, he was involved in the Alexander T. Stewart bodysnatching case when he was contacted by the kidnappers to act as an intermediary between themselves and the Stewart estate. When negotiations stalled between the Stewart family's lawyer Henry Hilton, he assisted Stewart's widow in negotiating for the return of her husband's body.[1] Jones also had a successful military career serving with the Union Army during the American Civil War, being involved in thirty major battles and countless skirmishes, and reaching the rank of brigadier general before the war's end. He was one of ten Irish-Americans to become brigade commanders and one of four Irish born officers to become a divisional commander.[2] Biography Early life and legal career Born in County Westmeath, Ireland on November 20, 1830, Jones attended grammar school in Dublin for three yea

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Sybil Kent Kane

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Sybil Kent Kane

Sybil Kent Kane (1856 – February 15, 1946) was an American socialite who was prominent in New York Society during the Gilded Age.[1] Early life Kane was born at the family home on August 28, 1844 in Newport, Rhode Island. She was the second youngest of eight children born to Oliver DeLancey Kane (1816–1874) and Louisa Dorothea (née Langdon) Kane (1821–1894). Her brothers were Walter Langdon Kane,[2] John Innes Kane,[3] DeLancey Astor Kane,[1] S. Nicholson Kane, and Woodbury Kane.[4] Her sisters were the artist Louisa Langdon Kane,[5] and Emily Astor Kane (who married Augustus Jay and was the mother of Peter Augustus Jay).[6][7] She was the granddaughter of Walter Langdon and Dorothea (née Astor) Langdon and the great-granddaughter of John Jacob Astor. She was also a cousin of Lt. Col. John Jacob Astor IV.[1] Her paternal lineage descended from John O'Kane who emigrated to the country in 1752 from County Londonderry and Antrim, Ireland. During the American Revolutionary War, O'Kane (who dropped the "'O" onc

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Mordecai Kaplan

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Mordecai Kaplan

Mordecai Menahem Kaplan (June 11, 1881 – November 8, 1983), was a rabbi, essayist and Jewish educator and the co-founder of Reconstructionist Judaism along with his son-in-law Ira Eisenstein.[1] Life and work Kaplan was born in Švenčionys, Lithuania, to Rabbi Israel and Haya (Anna) Kaplan. In 1889, he immigrated to the United States with his mother and sisters to join his father in New York City who was working with the Chief Rabbi Jacob Joseph. He attended Etz Chaim Yeshiva in Manhattan for a short period. In 1895 Kaplan attended the City College of New York. From 1893 to 1902 he also studied at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. After graduating from CCNY in 1900 he went to Columbia University studying philosophy, sociology and education receiving a master's degree and a Doctorate. Majoring in philosophy, he wrote his Masters thesis on the ethical philosophy of Henry Sidgwick. His lecturers included the philosopher of ethical culture Felix Adler and the sociologist Franklin Giddings.[2] In July

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Leonard Jerome

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Leonard Jerome

Leonard Walter Jerome (November 3, 1817 – March 3, 1891)[1] was a financier in Brooklyn, New York, and the maternal grandfather of Winston Churchill. Early life Leonard Jerome was born in Pompey in Onondaga County, New York, on November 3, 1817. He was one of nine sons and one daughter born to Aurora (née Murray) Jerome (1785–1867) and Isaac Jerome (1786–1866). Isaac was a descendant of Timothy Jerome, a French Huguenot immigrant who arrived in the New York Colony in 1717. Jerome was born on a farm in the Central New York town of Pompey, near Syracuse. His paternal grandmother was Betsy Ball, a relative of George Washington.[1]. His maternal ancestry was Scottish.[1] He originally enrolled in Princeton University, then known as the College of New Jersey (where two of his brothers studied theology and became Presbyterian ministers), as a member of the Class of 1839, before leaving for Union College, where he studied law with his uncle, known as Judge Jerome, and set up a practice in Rochester, New York.[1]

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Tyrone Jefferson

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Tyrone Jefferson

Tyrone Jefferson (born July 5, 1953) is an American trombonist, composer, arranger and producer. Over the course of his career he has collaborated with acts such as James Brown, Public Enemy, LL Cool J and others.[1] Early life and education Tyrone Jefferson was born on July 5, 1953 in Manhattan. At a young age, his family relocated to Charlotte, North Carolina, where his interest in jazz began. After starting junior high school, he started to play the piano then the trombone.[2] Jefferson holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, an M.S. in Management Information Systems from Pace University and a Professional Certificate in Arranging and Composition from Berklee College of Music. Career In high school Jefferson led his own band, which included a trumpet player, tuba player, tenor saxophonist, and three percussionists. During this time he also experimented with songwriting and arranging for several instruments. In the early 1970s Jefferson j

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Michael T. Kaufman

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Michael T. Kaufman

Michael T. Kaufman (March 23, 1938 – January 15, 2010) was a writer for The New York Times. He won the 1978 George Polk Award for foreign reporting for coverage of Africa.[1][2] Personal Kaufman was born in Paris as the only child of Adam and Pauline Kaufman. Pauline was a teacher and Adam was an economist. In 1940, when the Nazis invaded France, the Kaufman family moved to Spain and in 1941 sailed from Lisbon to New York. He grew up in Manhattan and at age 13, sold ice cream. He graduated from the Bronx High School of Science in 1954 and obtained his degree to City College in 1959.[3] He was married to Rebecca in 1960 and the couple had two sons and a daughter. Career After graduating college, Kaufman taught school in Harlem but quit after a few months to become a copy boy at the Times in 1959. During his 40 years at The New York Times,[2] Kaufman worked as a foreign correspondent, reporter, and columnist. As a correspondent, he traveled the world and interviewed a number of prestigious individuals. He a

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Charles Kaufman (educator)

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Charles Kaufman (educator)

Charles Howard Kaufman (November 29, 1928 – March 17, 2016) was an American music educator who taught at the Mannes School of Music from 1975 to 2002. Early life Kaufman was born in Manhattan on November 29, 1928, to Irving and Sophie (née Smith) Kaufman. He grew up in Mount Vernon, New York, and later served in the United States Army. After he married Rhoda Elkind, Kaufman worked for her father's sportswear company.[1] Education and career Kaufman quit working to return to school. He attended Columbia University, and earned a master's degree and doctorate in musicology, under the tutelage of Gustave Reese at New York University. He started teaching music history and theory at Mannes in 1975. Four years later, the school's board announced a plan to merge Mannes with the Manhattan School of Music. Kaufman was named faculty spokesperson, and strongly opposed the merger. As a result of faculty protest, Mannes was not shut down. The New York State Board of Regents instead removed members of the school board f

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Mayuko Kawakita

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Mayuko Kawakita

Mayuko Kawakita (河北 麻友子, Kawakita Mayuko, born November 28, 1991) is a Japanese-American actress and model,[1][2] known for her role as Rena on Fashion Story: Model,[3] Nippon Television variety show Hirunandesu!,[4] and Sekai no Hatemade Itte Q!.[5] She is the 2003 winner of the Japan Bishōjo Contest which is a beauty pageant held by Oscar Promotion.[6] Appearances TV dramas Sekaigumi TV (Fuji TV, 2005-2006), Mayu[7][8] Gakkō ja Oshierarenai! Episode 2 (NTV, 2008) Orthros no Inu (TBS, 2009), Shiho Aoi[9] Bikōjō Keikaku: Suzuki Rinko, 20-sai (KTV, 2010), Rinko Suzuki[10] Best Friend (NHK 1seg2, 2010) Don Quixote (NTV, 2011), Eri[11] Thumbs up! (BS Fuji, 2011), Reiko[12] Mōsō Sousa: Kuwagata Kōichi Junkyōju no Stylish na Seikatsu (TV Asahi, 2012), Mizuho Yamamoto[13] Sprout (NTV, 2012), Kiyoka Taniyama[14] Tokusō Shirei! Aichi Police (Nagoya Broadcasting Network, 2012-2013), Aichi Prefectural Police special investigation unit commander[15] Mistake! Episode 2 (Fuji TV, 2013)[16]

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Leon Barsha

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Leon Barsha

Leon Barsha (December 26, 1905–November 13, 1964) was an American film producer, editor and director. As a producer and director he was best known for making films in the Western genre.[1] In his later years he concentrated especially on editing. Personal Barsha was born in Manhattan, New York and died in California. He was married to Helen Barsha. They had a son, Tony, who became a playwright. Granddaughter Lili Barsha is an actor and writer. The North Hollywood home of the Barshas was designed by the architect Richard Neutra in 1937.[2] The house has been restored twice and moved at least once, changing owners several times.[3] Filmography As producer The Taming of the West (1939) Prairie Schooners (1940) The Wildcat of Tucson (1940) Beyond the Sacramento (1940) Hands Across the Rockies (1941) Bullets for Bandits (1942)[4] As editor Broadway Scandals (1929) Sudden Fear (1952) A Bullet for Joey (1955)[5] Walk the Dark Street (1956) Lizzie (1957) Twilight Zone (TV Series, 11

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Jerome Kern

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Jerome Kern

Jerome Kern in 1934 Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of musical theatre and popular music. One of the most important American theatre composers of the early 20th century, he wrote more than 700 songs, used in over 100 stage works, including such classics as "Ol' Man River", "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man", "A Fine Romance", "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes", "The Song Is You", "All the Things You Are", "The Way You Look Tonight", "Long Ago (and Far Away)" and "Who?". He collaborated with many of the leading librettists and lyricists of his era, including George Grossmith Jr., Guy Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Otto Harbach, Oscar Hammerstein II, Dorothy Fields, Johnny Mercer, Ira Gershwin and Yip Harburg. A native New Yorker, Kern created dozens of Broadway musicals and Hollywood films in a career that lasted for more than four decades. His musical innovations, such as 4/4 dance rhythms and the employment of syncopation and jazz progressions, built on, rather than rejected, ea

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Patrick J. Kerrigan

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Patrick J. Kerrigan

Patrick J. Kerrigan (1894) Patrick J. Kerrigan (1864 – December 23, 1895) was an American politician from New York. Life He was born in 1864, in New York City. He attended the public schools. Then he became a house painter, and later worked in the city's street cleaning department. Kerrigan entered politics as a Democrat. He was a member of the New York State Assembly (New York Co., 19th D.) in 1894.[1] His election was contested by the Republican candidate Edward R. Duffy on the grounds that Kerrigan, at the time of his election, had held a civil office in the City of New York which would render him ineligible to the State legislature. The Assembly Committee on Elections rejected the contest, finding that a section foreman in the street cleaning department is a city employee but not a city officer.[2] In November 1894, he ran for re-election, but was defeated by Republican Welton C. Percy. In November 1895, after re-epportionment, he ran in the 17th District of New York County for the Assembly, and was

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Emma Kenney

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Emma Kenney

Emma Rose Kenney (born September 14, 1999) is an American actress, best known for her portrayal of Deborah "Debbie" Gallagher on Shameless, a role she has played since 2011. Kenney played Harris Conner Healy in the revival of the '80s/'90s family sitcom Roseanne, and its continuation, The Conners. Early life Kenney was born on September 14, 1999, in Manhattan, born to Gillian Kenney, a criminal defense lawyer, and Kevin Kenney, a sports writer who formerly wrote for the New York Post and now works for Fox Sports.[1][2][3][4] Career Kenney's most notable role to date is that of Debbie Gallagher, the on-air daughter of William H. Macy in the comedic drama Shameless. Kenney won the role at just 12 years old, while a seventh-grade student at Park Middle School in Scotch Plains, New Jersey.[5] Outside of Shameless, Kenney made several appearances in short and made-for-television films and, in 2009, at just 9 years old, she was the youngest filmmaker to be a finalist at the New Jersey International Film Festiva

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Theodore W. Kheel

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Theodore W. Kheel

Theodore Kheel Theodore Woodrow Kheel (May 9, 1914 – November 12, 2010) was an American attorney and labor mediator who played a key role in reaching resolutions of long-simmering labor disputes between managements and unions and resulting strikes in New York City and elsewhere in the United States, including the 114-day-long 1962-63 New York City newspaper strike that crippled the city's traditional media. Early life and career Kheel was born on May 9, 1914, in Brooklyn and was named for U.S. Presidents Roosevelt and Wilson. He attended DeWitt Clinton High School. Kheel received a B.A. degree from Cornell University in 1935 and was awarded his law degree from Cornell Law School in 1937. At Cornell, Kheel was elected to the Sphinx Head Society.[1] He took a position with the National Labor Relations Board in 1938 and worked for the National War Labor Board during World War II, mediating labor disputes as part of an effort to maintain productivity of material needed for the ongoing war. Kheel was hired by N

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Nicholas J. Hayes

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Nicholas J. Hayes

Nicholas J. Hayes (1856 – January 3, 1928), also known as Nick Hayes, was a politician from New York City and one of the powers of the Democratic Party's Tammany Hall political machine for 30 years. His political power base was the 28th Assembly District (formerly the 33rd Assembly District) in lower East Harlem. He served as Fire Commissioner of New York City two times. Early life Nick Hayes was born in 1858 in Troy, New York of Irish parents. The family later moved to New York, where Hayes was educated in St. Francis Xavier's School. As a boy he had several odd jobs. He worked for the pharmaceutical company of McKesson & Robbins in Fulton Street, then he became a grocer's clerk and later a clerk in a tea house.[1] According to an obituary in the New York Sun, Hayes "had a way of getting along pleasantly – a bland, ingratiating way which was to smooth the road for him in politics and soon became a protégé of Tammany Hall boss Richard Croker."[1] Croker made him a clerk of the Superior Court, which wa

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Lewis Black

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Lewis Black

Lewis Niles Black[1] (born August 30, 1948)[2] is an American stand-up comedian, author, playwright, social critic and actor. His comedy routines often escalate into angry rants about history, politics, religion, or any other cultural trends. He hosted the Comedy Central series Lewis Black's Root of All Evil and makes regular appearances on The Daily Show delivering his "Back in Black" commentary segment, which he has been doing since The Daily Show was hosted by Craig Kilborn.[3] When not on the road performing, Black resides in Manhattan, but also maintains a residence in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. He is also a spokesman for the Aruba Tourism Authority, appearing in television ads that first aired in late 2009 and 2010, as well as the voice of Anger in 2015's Pixar film, Inside Out. He was voted 51st of the 100 greatest stand-up comedians of all time by Comedy Central in 2004; he was voted 5th in Comedy Central's Stand Up Showdown in 2008 and 11th in 2010. Black has served as an "ambassador for voting ri

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Pearl Lee Boone

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Pearl Lee Boone

Pearl Lee Boone (c.1895 / 1896 –1954) was an invertebrate zoologist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. She was one of the more infamous carcinologists of her time, as her career was fraught with claims of incompetence and disagreements about the veracity of her work in identifications. Life and career Boone was born in Virginia in 1895 or 1896. Her father was born in Maryland and her mother was born in Virginia.[1] Boone began at the United States National Museum, now the National Museum of Natural History in 1913. She was originally an entomological preparator for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Division of Insects at the museum. In 1916 she was hired as an aid for the Division of Marine Invertebrates at the museum, where she was paid $900 per year. In 1918 she was given a raise to be paid $1020 per year. During her time at the museum she earned a BA in 1919, M.S. and B. ed. in 1920 from George Washington University. In 1921 she was asked to resign from her positio

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Mario Cuomo

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Mario Cuomo

Mario Matthew Cuomo ( KWOH-moh, Italian: ; June 15, 1932 – January 1, 2015) was an American politician of the Democratic Party. He served as the 52nd Governor of New York for three terms, from 1983 to 1994,[1] Lieutenant Governor of New York from 1979 to 1982, and Secretary of State of New York from 1975 to 1978. Cuomo was known for his liberal views and public speeches, particularly his keynote speech address at the 1984 Democratic National Convention in which he sharply criticized the policies of the Reagan administration, saying, "Mr. President, you ought to know that this nation is more a 'Tale of Two Cities' than it is just a 'Shining City on a Hill.'"[2] He was widely considered a potential front-runner for the Democratic nomination for President in both 1988 and 1992, though he declined to seek the nomination in both instances. His legacy as a reluctant standard-bearer for the Democrats in presidential elections led to his being dubbed "Hamlet on the Hudson."[3][4] Cuomo was defeated for a fourth ter

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Andrew Cuomo

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Charles Ardai

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Charles Ardai

Charles Ardai (born 1969) is an American writer. He is the founder and C.E.O. of Juno, an internet company, and founder and editor of Hard Case Crime, a line of pulp-style paperback crime novels.[1][2] Early life A New York native and the son of two Holocaust survivors, Ardai told NPR in a May 2008 interview that the stories his parents told him as a child "were the most grim and frightening that you can imagine" and gave him the impression "there was a darker circle around a very small bit of light," something that enabled him to relate to his own characters' sufferings.[3] Ardai graduated from Hunter College High School in 1987, then attended Columbia University, where he graduated summa cum laude in 1991.[4] Career Ardai's writing has appeared in mystery magazines such as Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, gaming magazines such as Computer Gaming World and Electronic Games, and anthologies such as Best Mysteries of the Year and The Year's Best Horror Stories. Arda

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Alan Gerson

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Alan Gerson

Alan Jay Gerson (born November 1, 1957) is a former Democratic Party member of the New York City Council, first elected in 2001, and reelected in 2004, to represent the 1st council district in Manhattan. Prior to that Gerson served as Chair of Community Board Two in Manhattan from 1998-1999, serving on its board from 1990 to 2001.[1] Gerson lost the Democratic Primary to Margaret Chin on September 15, 2009, following previous challenges by her in the 2001 and 2004 primaries. The district is located in Lower Manhattan and includes Tribeca, portions of the Lower East Side, Chinatown, Little Italy, Greenwich Village, and the Financial District.[2] Gerson is a lifelong New York City resident and graduate of P.S. 41, I.S. 70, and Stuyvesant High School (1975[3]). He graduated Phi Beta Kappa and magna cum laude from Columbia College of Columbia University (1979[4]), and was a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar from Columbia Law School. He was an aide to New York State Assembly Member William Passannante. Gerson practiced

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Richard Kaplan (film producer)

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Richard Kaplan (film producer)

Richard James Kaplan (January 3, 1925 – September 29, 2018) was an American documentary film and television writer, director, and producer. Early life He was born in Manhattan to Benjamin Kaplan and Natalie (nee Blaustein) Kaplan, and was raised in the Rockaways in Queens.[1] Kaplan enrolled at Antioch College at the age of 16. He was drafted into the United States Army during World War II, interrupting his studies for three years. He graduated from Antioch after his discharge and studied filmmaking at the University of Southern California.[1][2] Career The producer worked with nonfiction film-making for around 60 years. He began making films in the 1950s, commissioned by clients such as the United States Air Force and the Indian Handicrafts Commission.[3] Kaplan directed the 1965 biographical documentary The Eleanor Roosevelt Story, produced by Sidney Glazier, which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.[4] He produced the 1970 Oscar-nominated documentary King: A Filmed Record... Montgomery

Directors of Best Documentary Feature Academy A...

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Marisol Escobar

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Marisol Escobar

Father Damien, by Marisol Escobar Marisol Escobar (May 22, 1930 – April 30, 2016), otherwise known simply as Marisol, was a French sculptor of Venezuelan heritage who worked in New York City.[1] Early life and education Maria Sol Escobar was born on May 22, 1930, to Venezuelan parents in Paris, France.[2] She was preceded by an elder brother, Gustavo.[2] Her father, Gustavo Hernandez Escobar, and her mother, Josefina, were from wealthy families and lived off assets from oil and real estate investments.[2] This wealth led them to travel frequently from Europe, the United States, and Venezuela.[2] At some point in time, Maria Sol began going by Marisol, a common Spanish nickname.[2] Josefina Escobar committed suicide in 1941, when Marisol was eleven.[2] The tragedy, followed by her father shipping Marisol off to boarding school in Long Island, New York, for one year, affected her very deeply.[2] Marisol decided to not speak again after her mother's passing, although she made exceptions for answering questio

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