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People from Manhattan


David Lebe

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David Lebe

David Lebe (born 1948) is an American photographer. He is best known for his experimental images using techniques such as pinhole cameras, hand-painted photographs, photograms, and light drawings. Many of his photographs explore issues of gay identity, homoeroticism, and living with AIDS, linking his work to that of contemporaries such as Robert Mapplethorpe, Peter Hujar, and David Wojnarowicz. Though his style and approach set him apart from these contemporaries, "Lebe is now incontrovertibly part of the history of twentieth-century queer artists."[1] Early life and education Lebe was born in Manhattan and grew up downtown in Stuyvesant Town–Peter Cooper Village. He attended the progressive City and Country School and the High School of Music & Art, from which he graduated in 1966. By age fifteen he had developed a deep interest in photography and regularly visited New York’s museums and galleries , where he admired the work of photographers such as Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, and Robert Frank, amon

Photographers from New York City

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LGBT artists from the United States

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University of the Arts (Philadelphia) alumni

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Edmund Horman

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Edmund Horman

Edmund C. Horman (April 15, 1906 - April 16, 1993)[1] was an American businessman who flew to Chile in 1973 in search of his son, Charles Horman, knowing that soldiers had seized him, but was unaware that he had been shot to death by the Chilean military forces under General Augusto Pinochet, during their coup against President Salvador Allende.[2][3][4] Biography Horman was born in Manhattan,[2] and had studied at Columbia University.[5] Horman worked in engineering and industrial design and owned Jersey Industrial Trucks.[2][5][6] He was married to Elizabeth Lazar from 1940 until his death.[2][5] Horman was also the father-in-law of Joyce Horman.[2][5] Horman died of pneumonia at New York City's Mount Sinai Hospital[2][5] on 16 April, 1993.[1] He was 87.[7] Search for Charles Horman Horman's search for his son, Charles, was depicted in Thomas Hauser's 1979 book The Execution of Charles Horman: An American Sacrifice, which was then adapted into the 1982 Academy Award-winning Costa Gavras film, Missing, i

People from Manhattan

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Chris Jackson (publisher)

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Chris Jackson (publisher)

Chris Jackson is publisher and editor-in-chief of the One World imprint of Random House. Early life Jackson grew up outside of Harlem, New York, and attended Hunter College High School and Columbia University.[1] Career From 2006 to 2016 Jackson was executive editor of Spiegel and Grau[2] before becoming head of One World. The New York Times describes Jackson as a "rare public star in the world of book publishing."[3] Calling Jackson "someone you need to know," Ebony cites his work with Ta-Nehisi Coates, Jay-Z and Beyoncé as well as Jackson's "background and understanding of how to take Black stories and turn them into something that the entire market should--and could--appreciate."[4] Critic Vinson Cunningham, writing for The New York Times Magazine, says, "To the extent that 21st-century literary audiences have been introduced to the realities and absurdities born of the phenomenon of race in America, Jackson has done a disproportionate amount of that introducing."[5] References Lewis, Andy (Septem

People from Manhattan

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American publishers (people)

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Hunter College High School alumni

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Alexander Cartwright (baseball player)

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Alexander Cartwright (baseball player)

Alexander "Alick" Joy Cartwright Jr. (April 17, 1820 – July 12, 1892) was a founding member of the New York Knickerbockers Base Ball Club in the 1840s. Although he was an inductee of the Baseball Hall of Fame and he was sometimes referred to as a "father of baseball," the importance of his role in the development of the game has been disputed. The rules of the modern game were long considered to have been based on the Knickerbocker Rules developed in 1845 by Cartwright and a committee from the Knickerbockers. However, later research called this scenario into question.[1] After the myth of Abner Doubleday having invented baseball in Cooperstown in 1839 was debunked, Cartwright was inducted into the Hall of Fame as a pioneering contributor, 46 years after his death.[2][3] Although it has been stated that Cartwright was officially declared the inventor of the modern game of baseball by the 83rd United States Congress on June 3, 1953,[2][4][5][6] the Congressional Record, the House Journal, and the Senate Journ

American emigrants to the Kingdom of Hawaii

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National Baseball Hall of Fame inductees

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People from Honolulu

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Ronald B. Colby

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Ronald B. Colby

Ronald Colby, born Ronald Blakeslee Colby on June 30, 1934, is an American filmmaker,[1] screenwriter, and author. Early and personal life Ronald Colby was born in Manhattan, New York to John Colby and Millicent Blakeslee. Both of Colby's parents were Vaudeville dancers. John also known as Jack Colby toured the country on the B.F. Keith Circuit, played the Palace in New York City and performed in W. C. Fields Ballyhoo on Broadway.[2] Colby joined the Air Force after finishing High school. He has two sons Trevor and Dylan Colby from his first marriage to Patricia Lee. Colby is recently widowed from his second wife production designer, film producer Patricia Van Ryker.[3][4] Ronald Colby earned a Bachelor's degree in theater from Hofstra University and a Master's Degree in theater from New York University Career and Documentaries Early in Colby's career, Francis Ford Coppola recruited him into his company American Zoetrope[5][6] as production executive and producer. The films included, You're a Big Boy Now

American filmmakers

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American writers

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Hofstra University alumni

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Larry Evans (chess player)

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Larry Evans (chess player)

Larry Melvyn Evans (March 22, 1932 – November 15, 2010) was an American chess grandmaster, author, and journalist. He won or shared the U.S. Chess Championship five times and the U.S. Open Chess Championship four times. He wrote a long-running syndicated chess column and wrote or co-wrote more than twenty books on chess. He is not to be confused with Larry David Evans (b. 1952), another American chessmaster who was active in the 1970s and 1980s and achieved the International Master title. Chess career Early years Evans was born in Manhattan on March 22, 1932, and learned much about the game by playing for ten cents an hour on 42nd Street in New York City, quickly becoming a rising star. At age 14, he tied for 4th–5th place in the Marshall Chess Club championship. The next year he won it outright, becoming the youngest Marshall champion at that time. He also finished equal second in the U.S. Junior Championship, which led to an article in the September 1947 issue of Chess Review. At 16, he played in the 194

Chess theoreticians

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Bobby Fischer

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American chess writers

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Francis Delafield

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Francis Delafield

Francis Delafield (August 3, 1841 – July 17, 1915)[1] was an American physician, born in New York City. His father, Dr. Edward Delafield, was the son of the prominent John Delafield who had emigrated to America from London, England in 1783 carrying the provisional peace treaty between England and The United States. While his father Edward graduated Yale in 1812, Francis graduated at Yale (1860) and at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University (1863), and after further study abroad practiced medicine in New York. Francis was appointed to the staff of Bellevue Hospital (1874), and to the chair of pathology and practice of medicine in the College of Physicians and Surgeons (1875–82). Francis Delafield resided for many years at 5 West 50th Street in Manhattan, New York.[2] In 1886, he became the first president of the Association of American Physicians. Early life Francis Delafield was born in New York City, the son of Edward Delafield by his second marriage to Julia Floyd. Julia Floyd was th

Cornell family

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Yale College alumni

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People from Manhattan

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Murray Gell-Mann

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Murray Gell-Mann

Murray Gell-Mann (September 15, 1929 – May 24, 2019)[5][6] was an American physicist who received the 1969 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the theory of elementary particles. He was the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Theoretical Physics Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology, a distinguished fellow and one of the co-founders of the Santa Fe Institute, a professor of physics at the University of New Mexico, and the Presidential Professor of Physics and Medicine at the University of Southern California.[7] Gell-Mann spent several periods at CERN, a nuclear research facility in Switzerland, among others as a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellow in 1972.[8][9] Early life and education Gell-Mann was born in lower Manhattan into a family of Jewish immigrants from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, specifically from Chernivtsi (historical name: Czernowitz) in present-day Ukraine.[10][11] His parents were Pauline (née Reichstein) and Arthur Isidore Gell-Mann, who taught English as a

Jewish skeptics

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Jewish American physicists

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Jewish Nobel laureates

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Roger O. Hirson

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Roger O. Hirson

Roger Overholt Hirson (May 5, 1926 – May 27, 2019)[1] was an American dramatist and screenwriter best known for his books of the Broadway musicals, Pippin, for which he was nominated for a Tony Award,[2] and Walking Happy. He contributed extensively for original television anthology series episodes since the 1950s and also wrote the screenplays or stories for several prominent films such as The Bridge at Remagen (1969). Early life Hirson graduated from Friends Seminary in 1943.[3] Filmography Alcoa Hour: "The Big Build-Up" Alcoa Hour: "Man on a Tiger" Goodyear Television Playhouse: "End of the Mission" Goodyear Television Playhouse: "Doing Her Bit" Goodyear Television Playhouse: "Mr. Dorothy Allen" Hallmark Hall of Fame: "A Bell for Adano" Kraft Television Theatre: "The Glass Wall" Playhouse 90: "The Long March" Playhouse 90: "Journey to the Day" Studio One: "Trial by Slander" Studio One: "The Weston Strain" Studio One: "Kurishiki Incident" Sunday Showcase: "One Loud Clear Voice"

People from Manhattan

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Friends Seminary alumni

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Tony Award winners

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David Coleman (educator)

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David Coleman (educator)

David Coleman (born in 1969) is an American businessman, currently serving as the ninth president of the College Board, a non-profit organization that designed the SAT exam, SAT Subject Tests, and Advanced Placement (AP) exams.[1] He is often described in the media as "the architect" of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.[2][3] Early life and education Coleman was born in Manhattan to a Jewish family. His father is a psychiatrist; his mother, Elizabeth Coleman, was the president of Bennington College from 1987 to 2013. At the time Coleman was growing up, his mother was Dean of The New School in downtown Manhattan.[4] When Coleman was in college, the family had moved to Vermont. Coleman attended Stuyvesant High School, and earned a B.A. in philosophy from Yale University in 1991.[5] As an undergraduate at Yale, he participated in the Ulysses S. Grant tutoring program in reading for inner-city New Haven high school students. He started Branch, a community service program for inner-city students. Col

Standards-based education

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Education reform

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American Rhodes Scholars

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Edith Campbell

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Edith Campbell

Edith Campbell, RRC, MM (12 December 1871 – 1951) was a Canadian nurse. She was one of the first Canadian nurses to arrive in England to assist in the establishment of the Duchess of Connaught Canadian Red Cross Hospital, a field hospital in Taplow, Buckinghamshire, and serve during the First World War in both England and France, earning a number of medals including the Royal Red Cross, first class, and the Military Medal. She was also twice mentioned in dispatches. After the war, she was superintendent of the Toronto Branch of the Victorian Order of Nurses. Her medals and a number of her personal items are held by the Canadian War Museum. Early life Edith Campbell was born in 1871 in Montreal, Quebec. She was from a 'medical family'; her grandfather - Francis Wayland Campbell - was dean of the Medical Faculty of Bishop's College and her father and uncle were both physicians. She was known as "Daisy" at home. In 1907 she graduated from the school of nursing at New York's Presbyterian Hospital and subsequen

William Osler

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Canadian women in World War I

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Canadian military nurses

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William R. Johnson (minister)

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William R. Johnson (minister)

William R. Johnson (sometimes referred to as Bill Johnson[2]) was the first openly gay minister to be ordained in a historic protestant denomination. He received his ordination through the United Church of Christ (UCC) on June 25, 1972 in San Carlos, California.[3][4] Education and ordination William Johnson first received his undergraduate degree in May 1968 from Elmhurst College with a BA in English. He then held two summer student pastoral positions in Iowa before beginning his seminary in the following fall at Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, California. He attended seminary from 1968–1971 and during that time he also held church positions as a youth minister, student pastor, chaplain, and Interim Associate Pastor. In 1970, The Graduate Theological Union organized a support group in Berkeley for gay seminarians. William, having recently embraced his identity as a gay man that year, became an active member of the group. That year the group hosted a public forum at Graduate Theological Union on the

LGBT Protestant clergy

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LGBT Christian clergy

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United Church of Christ ministers

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Allison Raskin

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Allison Raskin

Allison Beth Raskin (born June 20, 1989) is an American writer, director, comedian, YouTuber, podcaster, and mental health advocate.[1] Raskin previously worked as a writer at BuzzFeed Video, but left in 2015 with fellow writer and friend Gaby Dunn to pursue work on their comedy YouTube channel, Just Between Us (JBU).[2] Raskin has written for Elle, NBC News Think, and Splinter News.[3][4][5] On September 5, 2017, Raskin and Dunn released a joint novel, I Hate Everyone but You, which reached the top ten on The New York Times best sellers list.[6] Early life and education Raskin was born on June 20, 1989 in Manhattan, New York. She attended the University of Southern California and received a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts degree.[1] Raskin is outspoken about her struggles with mental health. When she was 4 years old she was diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and continued to experience anxiety and depression.[3][7] She took medication until she was 21 and took a 7 year break, which still include

American women comedians

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University of Southern California alumni

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American comedians

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Stanley Chais

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Stanley Chais

Stanley Chais (March 27, 1926 – September 26, 2010) was an American investment advisor, money manager, and philanthropist. He operated "feeder funds" which collected money for funds related to the Madoff investment scandal. The widow, family, and estate of Chais settled with Madoff trustee Irving Picard in 2016 for $277 million. Early and personal life Chais was born to a Jewish family[1] in the Bronx, New York.[2] He attended Syracuse University, graduating in 1947.[3][4] He was married to Pamela Chais, a playwright and screenwriter.[2] They resided with their three children first in Sands Point, New York, and then in Beverly Hills and West Hollywood, California.[2][3] After the scandal, they moved to Manhattan, New York.[2] Involvement in Madoff's Ponzi scheme Chais was an investment advisor, money manager, and philanthropist. He operated "feeder funds" which collected money for funds related to the Madoff investment scandal.[5][6] He operated three funds that offered returns of up to 25%. He told clie

People from Sands Point, New York

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People from West Hollywood, California

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People from the Bronx

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Marian Sulzberger Heiskell

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Marian Sulzberger Heiskell

Marian Sulzberger Heiskell (1918–2019) was an American newspaper executive, philanthropist and former owner of the New York Times. Early life She was born Marian Effie Sulzberger December 31, 1918 in Manhattan, New York to parents Arthur Hays and Iphigene (Ochs) Sulzberger.[1] Her first marriage was to Orvil E. Dryfoos in 1941.[1][2] She later married Andrew Heiskell, who was at the time the chairman of Time Inc., in 1965.[1] Career Heiskell was known for her work in publishing, conservation and philanthropy. As a member of the Sulzberger family that controls the New York Times, she became a director of the Times in 1963, holding the position for 34 years.[1] Outside of the New York Times, she was also credited for having originated the concept for People Magazine.[3] In the area of conservation, she founded the Council on the Environment of New York City, now known as Grow NYC, in 1970.[4] Heiskell was a chairwoman of the National Parks of New York Harbor Conservancy.[5] From 1990 to 2012, she was the

21st-century philanthropists

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American centenarians

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Philanthropists from New York (state)

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M. E. Holland

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M. E. Holland

M. E. Holland M. E. Holland (born in 1967)[1] is an American writer, director, producer, and actor. His production company, DelFlix Pictures, has produced one feature film and a music video. He wrote and directed his first film The Other Brother (2001)[2]. [3] In 2007, he wrote the screenplay for Love and Other Four Letter Words.[4] Holland's work covers controversial issues such as sexual abuse, toxic masculinity, American misogyny, and morality in the African American community. Early life and education Holland was born January 17, 1967 in Manhattan, New York. His mother, Margaret, was a homemaker, and his father, Nick, owned two stores in Harlem. Around the age of 12, his parents moved the family to Mount Vernon, New York for two years and then to Greenburgh, New York in Westchester County where he graduated from Greenburgh High School. Career In 1986, Holland joined the U. S. Army where he received seven service medals and commendations.[5] After being honorably discharged in October 1988, he returne

People from Greenburgh, New York

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People from Manhattan

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Fordham University alumni

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Alessandro Fabbri

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Alessandro Fabbri

Alessandro Fabbri (1877–1922) was both the builder and the commanding officer of the Otter Cliffs Radio Station, a United States Navy facility that was important during World War I. He was awarded the Navy Cross for exceptionally meritorious service.[1] Before the US entered the war, the New York Times reported that Alessandro and his brother Ernesto Giuseppi Fabbri Jr. were under investigation by the US government, suspected of using radio equipment to assist German spies.[2] Upon publication of a vigorous response from Ernesto, the Times clarified that the government had been investigating radio operators in general, not targeting the Fabbris specifically.[3] Alessandro's brother Ernesto and uncle Egisto Paolo Fabbri were associate and partner respectively of J.P. Morgan & Co.[4] Ernesto Jr. and family owned the Bar Harbor "cottage" Buonriposo.[5] Alessandro Fabbri was remembered as a scientist who also "achieved distinction as a naturalist, hunter, yachtsman, explorer and inventor."[6] Fabbri Memo

People from Mount Desert Island

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American naval personnel of World War I

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Scientists from New York City

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Susan Kamil

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Susan Kamil

Susan Laurie Kamil (September 16, 1949 – September 8, 2019) was the publisher (as of 2018) as well as editor-in-chief of the Random House Publishing Group. Career Susan Kamil was born in Manhattan, where she attended the High School of Music & Art.[1] After graduating from George Washington University, she began her publishing career at Simon & Schuster in 1979.[2] Kamil was a subsidiary rights director and then became a senior editor at Simon & Schuster working under Joni Evans.[2] Evans was married to Dick Snyder, then CEO of Simon & Schuster. When Evans divorced Snyder in 1987 in a very public divorce, Evans moved over to Random House as Publisher, taking Kamil with her. Kamil said that Dick Snyder, CEO of Simon & Schuster "taught me everything--not just business lessons, life lessons--and I'll always be grateful to him." [2] At Random House, Kamil was executive editor at "Little Random" under Joni Evans.[3] Both women later formed the imprint Turtle Bay books at "Big" Random Ho

Random House

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Vassar College alumni

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George Washington University alumni

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Barbara Gray

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Barbara Gray

Barbara Gray is the General Manager of Transportation Services at the City of Toronto and an Advisory Board Member of the University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute. She is an expert in urban transportation and urban transit.[1][2][3][4][5] Gray has been working as a municipal civil servant since 1999, first in Seattle, and, since 2016, in Toronto. Gray was born in Manhattan, and earned a graduate degree in Urban Planning at the University of Washington.[1] Ben Spurr, writing in the Toronto Star, described Gray as an advocate of "Progressive transportation policies".[1] He reported she was a defender of the rights of pedestrians and cyclists. Spurr wrote that Gray played a central role in getting the Seattle electorate to vote to support the Move Seattle levy, an additional tax Seattle taxpayers would pay to build improvements to Seattle public transportation infrastructure.[6] Sue-Ann Levy, writing in the Toronto Sun, asserted that Gray was engaged in a "war on the car", in both Seattle and T

University of Washington College of Built Envir...

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American urban planners

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People from Toronto

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Cornelia, Countess of Craven

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Cornelia, Countess of Craven

Cornelia, Countess of Craven born Cornelia Martin (22 September 1877 – 24 May 1961) was an American born heiress who married into the British aristocracy and was known as one of the "Dollar Princesses." She was also a prominent art collector. Early life Cornelia Martin was born in New York City on 22 September 1877. She was the only daughter of the socially ambitious Bradley Martin[1] and Cornelia Sherman Martin.[2] She had two brothers, Sherman Martin and Bradley Martin Jr., who became president of the Nineteenth Ward Bank.[1] Her mother threw the infamous society costume party, the Bradley-Martin Ball, at the Waldorf Hotel in 1897.[3] Despite her intentions of creating an economic stimulus during the recession, the event was criticised for its excessive consumption and is today best remembered as among the most extravagant of the Gilded Age excesses.[4] Her paternal grandparents were Henry Hull Martin and Anna (née Townsend) Martin. Her paternal uncle was Frederick Townsend Martin. Cornelia's mother was

Craven family

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British countesses

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People from Manhattan

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Joe Devlin (actor)

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Joe Devlin (actor)

Joe Devlin (February 7, 1894 - October 1, 1973) was an American actor. He appeared in numerous films and TV series from the 1930s to the 1960s. Early life Devlin was born in Manhattan, New York in 1894. Before becoming an actor, Devlin was a vaudeville performer. Career Devlin started his acting career during the late 1930s, appearing in films such as Held for Ransom, King of the Underworld, Chasing Trouble, Tight Shoes, Murder in the Big House, Sweethearts of the U.S.A. and Shoot to Kill.[1] He also appeared in TV series like Front Page Detective, My Hero, The Whistler, Damon Runyon Theater and Hey, Jeannie! among others.[2] Devlin was famous for his resemblance to Italian fascist dictator Benito Mussolini, whom he played in three films during World War II.[1] Personal life Devlin was married to Iva Beaudreau, with whom he had two sons, Robert and William. Both Joe and Iva were vaudeville performers and Iva was a tea leaf reader. He subsequently divorced from Iva Beaudreau.[3] Death Devlin died on

Male actors from New York City

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People from Manhattan

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Michael Henry Heim

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Michael Henry Heim

Michael Henry Heim (January 21, 1943 – September 29, 2012) was a Professor of Slavic Languages at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). He was an active and prolific translator, and was fluent in Czech, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Hungarian, Romanian, French, Italian, German, and Dutch.[1] He died on September 29, 2012, of complications from melanoma.[2] Biography Heim was born in Manhattan, New York City on January 21, 1943. His father, Imre Hajdu, was Hungarian, born in Budapest; before moving to the US in 1939, he had been a music composer and master baker. In New York, Imre was introduced as a piano teacher to Blanche, Heim's mother, whom he married shortly thereafter. Shortly after Pearl Harbor, Imre joined the US Army. At the time of Heim's birth, Imre was stationed in Alabama.[3] Heim's father died when he was four, and he was raised by his mother and step-father in Staten Island. In 1966, he was drafted into the US Army during the Vietnam War. When it was discovered that he was the sole

21st-century translators

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American people of Hungarian descent

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Translators from Czech

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David W. Belin

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David W. Belin

David William Belin (June 20, 1928 – January 17, 1999) was an attorney for the Warren Commission and the Rockefeller Commission.[1] Belin was a partner in a Des Moines, Iowa law firm and, with former NBC News president Michael Gartner, was co-owner of The Tribune in Ames, Iowa.[1] Early life Belin was born in Washington, D.C. and raised in Sioux City, Iowa.[1] Notable actions Belin served the Jewish community in many leadership positions. A successful businessman, Belin owned a number of Midwestern publications. Government service Belin served in the United States Army in Korea and in Japan.[1] He was a concert violinist for a period of his service.[2] Belin was assistant counsel to the Warren Commission, which investigated President John F. Kennedy's assassination. Belin concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald had worked entirely on his own as Kennedy's assassin, which the commission affirmed in its final report. Belin stood by the findings of the Warren report until his death, and was known to become incens

Ross School of Business alumni

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University of Michigan College of Literature, S...

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People from Manhattan

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Nat Hentoff

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Nat Hentoff

Nathan Irving Hentoff (June 10, 1925 – January 7, 2017) was an American historian, novelist, jazz and country music critic, and syndicated columnist for United Media. Hentoff was a columnist for The Village Voice from 1958 to 2009.[1] Following his departure from The Village Voice, Hentoff became a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, continued writing his music column for The Wall Street Journal, which published his works until his death. He often wrote on First Amendment issues, vigorously defending the freedom of the press. Hentoff was formerly a columnist for: Down Beat, JazzTimes, Legal Times, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher and Free Inquiry. He was a staff writer for The New Yorker, and his writings were also published in: The New York Times, Jewish World Review, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Commonweal, and Enciclopedia dello Spettacolo. Early life Hentoff was born on June 10, 1925, in Boston, Massachusetts,[2][3] the firstborn child of Simon, a

People from Manhattan

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American anti-communists

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American anti-abortion activists

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Henry Highland Garnet

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Henry Highland Garnet

Henry Highland Garnet (December 23, 1815 – February 13, 1882) was an African-American abolitionist, minister, educator and orator. Having escaped with his family as a child from slavery in Maryland, he grew up in New York City. He was educated at the African Free School and other institutions, and became an advocate of militant abolitionism. He became a minister and based his drive for abolitionism in religion. Garnet was a prominent member of the movement that led beyond moral suasion toward more political action. Renowned for his skills as a public speaker, he urged black Americans to take action and claim their own destinies. For a period, he supported emigration of American free blacks to Mexico, Liberia, or the West Indies, but the American Civil War ended that effort. In 1841 he married abolitionist Julia Williams and they had a family. They moved to Jamaica in 1852 to serve as missionaries and educators. After the war, the couple worked in Washington, DC. On Sunday, February 12, 1865, he delivered a

People from Maryland

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People from Manhattan

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People from Troy, New York

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Adaora Adimora

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Adaora Adimora

Adaora Alise Adimora is an American doctor and academic. She is the Sarah Graham Kenan Distinguished Professor of Medicine and professor of epidemiology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Her research centers on the transmission of HIV, as well as other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), among minority populations. Her work has highlighted the importance of social determinants of HIV transmission and the need for structural interventions to reduce risk. In 2019, she became an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine in recognition of her contributions. Education and early career Adimora was raised in Manhattan. Her mother was a nurse administrator and her father was a physician.[1] She attended Cornell University, where she received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1977. She then attended Yale University School of Medicine, where she received her Doctor of Medicine in 1981.[1] She began her internship in Internal Medicine at Boston City Hospital. When she began medical scho

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Epidemiologists

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Paul Bryar

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Paul Bryar

Paul Bryar (born Gabriel Paul Barrere; February 21, 1910 – August 30, 1985) was an American actor. In a career spanning nearly half a century, he appeared in numerous films and television series. Career Bryar appeared in nearly 220 films between 1938 and 1983, although most of his roles were small in size. He made his film debut in the Harold Lloyd comedy Professor Beware. Some B-movies during the 1940s and 1950s like Jungle Siren, Lady from Chungking, Parole, Inc. and The Bob Mathias Story gave him the chance to play substantial supporting roles. Bryar appeared in three movies directed by Alfred Hitchcock[1], including Vertigo (1958), where he had an uncredited role as the friendly Police Captain who accompanies James Stewart to the coroner's inquest. The other Hitchcock films were Notorious (1946) and The Wrong Man (1956). He also appeared in a 1955 episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents.[1] Byrar was typecast as a policeman in numerous other films[2], including Rebel Without a Cause (1955) and some Bowery

Male actors from New York City

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People from Manhattan

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Myrtle Anderson

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Myrtle Anderson

Myrtle Anderson was a Jamaican actress, singer, and radio performer active in Hollywood in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. Biography Myrtle was born in Kingston, Jamaica, to Charles Anderson and Cecilia Tyrell. She later moved to Manhattan with her sisters and her mother — who seems to have remarried — when she was just 5 years old. A talented student and a gifted singer, she eventually graduated from Columbia University. She was married for a time to a police officer named Henry Simms; as it turned out, Simms was already married to someone else at the time they said "I do" in 1930; he was charged with bigamy in 1935. During their marriage, Myrtle briefly considered becoming a policewoman.[1] After performing with the Johnson Singers, appearing on Broadway, and getting her own radio show in NYC,[2] Myrtle began winning small roles in films around 1936, when she played Eve in The Green Pastures, a retelling of biblical stories with an all-black cast.[3] Later on in her career, she split her time between takin

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William J. Fallon (attorney)

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William J. Fallon (attorney)

William J. Fallon (January 23, 1886 – April 29, 1927) christened The Great Mouthpiece by the press was a prominent defense attorney during the 1920s who defended the gangster Arnold Rothstein and his accomplice Nicky Arnstein during the trial for the fixing of the 1919 World Series.[1] Early life and education Fallon was born in Manhattan in 1886 and graduated Valedictorian of the Fordham class of 1906, and then went on to attend Fordham Law School in 1909. After his graduation he worked for three years as a prosecutor in Westchester County, New York. Career At the urging of Governor Whitman he unsuccessfully prosecuted the Warden of Sing Sing prison Thomas Osborne on trumped up charges, including "Gross Immorality" with prisoners because the Governor wished to be rid of a prison reformer whom he considered too soft. In 1918 he set up a law firm with his friend Eugene McGee; it was around this time that he met Arnold Rothstein who was taken by the polished charm of the lawyer who was known for his oratory

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Irving Florman

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Irving Florman

Irving Florman (1892[1], Poland - May 9, 1981, Manhattan[2]) was appointed U.S. Ambassador to Bolivia by President Harry Truman. His appointment was based on what was considered “unorthodox” qualifications because he “had been a Manhattan inventor (cigarette lighters, mine detectors), and a sometime Broadway lyric-writer (Chauve-Souris, 1943).”[3] He served as Ambassador from November 1949 until September 1951, when he resigned for health reasons.[2] Prior to being his ambassadorship, he worked as a research and mechanical engineer, an inventor and a Broadway producer and songwriter. It’s been reported he was “an associate of ... Morris Gest ... and had a long friendship with the producer David Belasco.[2] A resident of Manhattan at the time of his death, he died at Roosevelt-St. Luke's Hospital.[2] References "Florman, Irving, b. 1892". Harry S. Truman Library & Museum. Retrieved 8 November 2019. "Irving Florman, Envoy To Bolivia for Truman". The New York Times. May 11, 1981. Retrieved 8 Novem

Polish people

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American theatre managers and producers

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Austen Croom-Johnson

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Austen Croom-Johnson

Austen Herbert Croom-Johnson (20 October 1909 Hereford, England – 18 May 1964 Manhattan, New York City) was an English-born pianist, composer, and radio producer: first, until about 1935, for the BBC, then, from about 1936, for NBC. He went on to become a prolific jingle writer, first beginning around 1938 in radio with his chief collaborator, Alan Kent, then, beginning around 1947, in television. Croom-Johnson and Kent are widely credited for being the fathers of the modern short jingle.[1][2] Career Austen Herbert Croom-Johnson – nicknamed "Bunny" and "Ginger" Croom-Johnson – was born in Hereford. His double surname, "Croom-Johnson," are the surnames of his paternal great-grandparents, Henry Johnson (c. 1795–18??) and Catherine Croom (c. 1795–1876). Austen moved to New York City in 1935. Before moving to New York City, he had worked for the British Broadcasting Company for many years as a producer and performer. One of the programs he created for the BBC, Soft Lights and Music, became very popular. While

BBC radio producers

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Jingle composers

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Anne Fulenwider

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Anne Fulenwider

Anne Fulenwider (born March 30 1972 in Manhattan, New York) is the editor-in-chief of Marie Claire magazine. She has been the editor-in-chief since 2012.[1] Prior to that she was the editor-in-chief for Brides. At Marie Claire, Fulenwider has been responsible for introducing the Image Makers Awards (awards to honor Hollywood artists), Fresh Faces (a spotlight feature), and The Power Trip (a women's conference bringing together powerful women from both the west and east coasts of the US). Fulenwider appears frequently as a judge on the Emmy-winning TV show Project Runway and as a mentor on Project Runway All Stars. She is an advisor to numerous councils such as the New York State Council on Women. Early life and career Fulenwider became interested in editing when she served as the editor of her high school newspaper. She studied English and American Literature at Harvard University. She wrote a few articles for The Harvard Crimson,[2] but ended up at the literary magazine there. [3] After graduating magna c

Fashion executives

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American magazine editors

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David Clarkson (NYSE)

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David Clarkson (NYSE)

David Clarkson (March 27, 1795 – June 3, 1867) an American banker who was president of the New York Stock Exchange from 1837 to 1851. Early life He was the eldest son of eight children born to Gen. Matthew Clarkson and, his second wife, Sally (née Cornell) Clarkson (1762–1803).[1] From his father's first marriage to Mary Rutherfurd (a daughter of Walter Rutherfurd and sister of U.S. Senator John Rutherfurd), he had one half-sister, Mary Rutherfurd Clarkson, who married her cousin Peter Augustus Jay (the eldest son of Chief Justice John Jay). His father was a Revolutionary War hero who served in the New York State Assembly and Senate and was the 6th President of the Bank of New York.[2] His paternal grandparents were David Clarkson (a direct descendant of the English born Puritan clergyman, the Rev. David Clarkson)[3] and Elisabeth (née French) Clarkson (a direct descendant of Phillip French, the 27th Mayor of New York City) and his uncle, Thomas Streatfeild Clarkson, was the grandfather of Thomas S. Clarks

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Watson B. Dickerman

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Watson B. Dickerman

Watson Bradley Dickerman (January 4, 1846 – April 5, 1923) was an American banker who founded Dominick & Dickerman and served as president of the New York Stock Exchange. Early life Dickerman was born on January 4, 1846 in Mount Carmel, Connecticut.[1] He was the ninth and youngest child of son of Ezra Dickerman (1800–1860) and Sarah (née Jones) Dickerman (1806–1890).[2] Among his siblings were brothers George Sherwood, Henry Street and Ezra Day Dickerman.[3] He was educated at Williston Seminary, a prep school established in 1841 in Easthampton, Massachusetts.[4] Career Watson Dickerson Dickerman began his finance and banking career as a young employee and trainee of Jacob Bunn in the J. Bunn Bank of Springfield, Illinois before coming to New York City in 1868 and joining the Open Board of Brokers, which was consolidated with the New York Stock Exchange in 1869.[4] On June 15, 1870, he formed the stock brokerage firm of Dominick & Dickerman with Chicago-born William Gayer Dominick. Dominic

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William A. M. Burden I

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William A. M. Burden I

William Armistead Moale Burden (July 11, 1877 – February 2, 1909) was an American football guard for the Harvard Crimson football team and stock broker. Early life Burden was born on July 11, 1877 in Troy, New York to millionaire iron manufacturer I. Townsend Burden and Evelyn Byrd (Moale) Burden. He attended Groton School where he was a member of the school's football team. In 1895, he succeeded Percy Haughton as team captain.[1] Harvard Burden played on the Harvard freshman football team in 1896. The following season he became the backup center on the varsity team. In 1898 he became a starting guard and in 1899 was the team captain.[1] Following his senior season, Burden was named a second-team All-American by the New York Tribune and Outing and a third-team All-American by Walter Camp.[2][3][4] Outside of football, Burden was first marshall and president of his class as well as president of the Hasty Pudding and Groton clubs. Burden graduated from Harvard in 1900.[1] Career Immediately after leaving

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Vivian Cherry

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Vivian Cherry

Vivian Cherry (July 27, 1920 – March 4, 2019) was an American photographer, best known for her street photography[1][2] as a member of the New York Photo League.[3] Cherry was born in New York.[4] She joined the Photo League in 1946.[3] Publications Helluva Town: New York in the 1940s and 50s. New York: powerHouse, 2008. ISBN 978-1-57687-404-2. With a text by Barbara Head Millstein. Vivian Cherry's New York. New York: powerHouse, 2010. ISBN 978-1-57687-519-3. With an essay by Julia Van Haaften. Collections Cherry's work is held in the following permanent collections: Museum of Modern Art, New York: 4 prints (as of December 2019)[5] Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY: 25 prints (as of December 2019)[6] International Center of Photography, New York: 3 prints (as of December 2019)[7] Exhibitions Solo exhibitions Vivian Cherry: a Working Street Photographer, 1940s–1990s, Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, 2000[8] Group exhibitions Life of the City, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2002[9]

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Stephen Guernsey Cook Ensko

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Stephen Guernsey Cook Ensko

Stephen Guernsey Cook Ensko (May 9, 1896 – December 18, 1969) was an expert on American antique silver. His book is the standard reference work for antique silver.[1] Biography Stephen was born in 1896 in Manhattan, New York City to Robert Ensko (1855–1934) and Mary Elizabeth Blakeley (1857–?). His siblings include: Robert Ensko II (1880–1971) who worked as a lace dealer; Charlotte Ensko (1882-?) who married Milton Ernest Horn (1876–1929); Lamont Northrope Ensko (1890–1987) who worked in the family silver business; Elathene Amanda Ensko (1898–1981) who married George Robert Christie (1895–1996); and William Edward Ensko (c1900–1918) who was a sergeant in the US Army who was killed in a car accident in France during World War I.[2] Stephen married Dorothea J. Winterloff (1892–1977) of Germany on June 4, 1918 in Manhattan and they had three children: Dorothea Charlotte Ensko (1920– ) who married Vernon Charles Wyle (1913–1986);[3] Stephen William Ensko (1922–1945) who was a 2nd Lieutenant in the US Army who

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Susan Hirschman

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Susan Hirschman

Susan Hirschman was the founder of children's publisher Greenwillow Books.[1] Career Hirschman was born in Manhattan, and lived there for her entire career.[2] She was inspired to enter publishing during high school when she heard a talk by Jennie Lindquist.[2] Her first job was in 1954, working as a secretary at publisher Alfred A. Knopf.[1] She later moved to Sandpiper Press, and from there to Harper & Row, where she worked under Ursula Nordstrom.[2] After taking time off from Harper & Row, she was quickly hired by Macmillan to head their children's book publishing division.[2] She remained there until October 1974, when she resigned in protest of a mass firing.[3] She founded Greenwillow as an imprint of William Morris (now HarperCollins), where she remained until her retirement in 2001.[1] Works published During Hirschman's career, she was responsible for the US publication of Watership Down, as well as works by children's authors Kevin Henkes and Jack Prelutsky.[4][5] References Britto

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William L. Bull

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William L. Bull

William Lanman Bull Sr. (August 23, 1844 – January 2, 1914) was an American banker who served as president of the New York Stock Exchange. Early life Bull was born on August 23, 1844, in New York City.[1] He was the seventh child and youngest son of Frederic Bull (1800–1871) and Mary Huntington (née Lanman) Bull (1804–1880).[2] Among his siblings were Elizabeth Atwater Bull (wife of merchant Augustus Oscar van Lennep),[3][4] Frederic Bull, and Anna Chester Bull.[5] His paternal grandparent were Elizabeth (née Atwater) Bull and Jireh Bull (a descendant of Rhode Island Governor Henry Bull) and his maternal grandparents were Peter Lanman and Abigail (née Trumbull) Lanman (a daughter of U.S. Representative and Connecticut governor Joseph Trumbull). Through his mother, he was a first cousin of scholar Charles Rockwell Lanman.[5] After receiving a preparatory education, he studied at the College of the City of New York, where he graduated in 1864.[2] Career After graduation, Bull began his business career by

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George Feldstein

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George Feldstein

George Feldstein (Born 1941 in Manhattan, NY) was an engineer known for his contributions to audio-visual technologies. Feldstein is responsible for the creation of several audio and video control devices, such as a remote for 35mm projects, the first HD digital touch panel, and the RF wireless control system. Feldstein holds 14 patents.[1] Feldstein was the founder and CEO of Crestron Electronics, an audiovisual technologies company.[2] Feldstein holds awards from InfoComm International and the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame for his contributions to the AV industry.[3][4] Education Feldstein received his B.S. in electronic engineering from New York University.[5] References "George Feldstein Inventions, Patents and Patent Applications - Justia Patents Search". patents.justia.com. Retrieved 2020-01-15. Ewalt, David M. "Crestron Electronics: A Made-In-America Success Story". Forbes. Retrieved 2020-01-15. "Crestron Founder George Feldstein Honored with Distinguished Infocomm Pioneers of AV Award"

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Nina Griscom

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Nina Griscom

Nina Louise Griscom (née Renshaw; May 8, 1954 – January 25, 2020) was an American model, television host, designer, columnist and businesswoman.[1] Early years Griscom's father was journalist Charles C. Renshaw Jr., and her mother was Elizabeth Fly Vagliano, later the wife of Felix Rohatyn, who was known for her support of educational and cultural institutions. After graduating from Miss Porter’s School in Farmington, Connecticut, Griscom briefly attended Barnard College. As a college student, Griscom began working as a model for Eileen Ford.[1] Career Griscom's work on TV included being co-host of an entertainment news program on HBO (1990-1993) and a restaurant-review series on the Food Network. (1993-1998).[1] As a businesswoman, Griscom partnered with Alan Richman to operate home-decorating stores in Manhattan and in Southampton, New York.[1] She also worked as a spokeswoman[2] and consultant for Revlon and designed purses for the GiGi New York Collection.[1] Personal life Griscom was married to, a

American women columnists

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Deaths from motor neuron disease

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Donald M. Blinken

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Donald M. Blinken

Donald M. Blinken is a leader in the fields of investment banking, education, and arts patronage.[1][2] He was director and one of the founders of E. M. Warburg Pincus & Company, an investment bank in New York, was the board chairman of the State University of New York from 1978 to 1990 and American Ambassador to Hungary from 1994–1998.[3][1][4] Blinken, brother Alan Blinken and a third brother were born to a father originally from Kiev (at the time, it was part of Russia) and a mother of German Jewish heritage. They grew up both in New York City and Yonkers, New York. The three brothers attended the Horace Mann School.[5] His son, Tony Blinken,[3] is a retired American government official who served as United States Deputy Secretary of State from 2015 to 2017 and Deputy National Security Advisor from 2013 to 2015 under President Barack Obama. Blinken graduated with a degree in Economics from Harvard in 1947[4][6] after serving in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II.[1] Blinken was president

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Stella Adler

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Stella Adler

Stella Adler (February 10, 1901 – December 21, 1992)[1] was an American actress and acting teacher.[2] She founded the Stella Adler Studio of Acting in New York City in 1949.[3] Later in life she taught part time in Los Angeles, with the assistance of protégée, actress Joanne Linville,[4] who continues to teach Adler's technique.[5][6] Her grandson Tom Oppenheim now runs the school in New York City,[2] which has produced alumni such as Marlon Brando, Robert De Niro, Harvey Keitel, Elaine Stritch, Kate Mulgrew, Kipp Hamilton, and Jenny Lumet.[7] Irene Gilbert, a longtime protégée and friend, ran the Stella Adler Studio of Acting in Los Angeles, until her death.[4][8] The Los Angeles school continues to function as an acting studio and houses several theaters. Alumni of the Stella Adler-Los Angeles school include Mark Ruffalo, Benicio del Toro, Brion James, Salma Hayek, Clifton Collins Jr., and Sean Astin. Early life Stella Adler was born in the Lower East Side of New York City.[9] She was the youngest daugh

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Jonathan Herzog

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Jonathan Herzog

Jonathan Herzog (born 1995) is an American politician, political organizer and universal basic income advocate. Herzog served as the Iowa Campaign Coordinator for Andrew Yang's 2020 Presidential Campaign and is currently running for Congress in New York's 10th congressional district.[1] Early Life and Education Herzog was born in the Upper West Side of Manhattan.[2] He is the son of Israeli immigrants and has two sisters.[3] He attended Ramaz School, which is a coeducational Jewish Modern Orthodox Day School and Hunter College High School.[4] He attended Harvard University where he graduated first in his class. [5] Later, he attended New York University and completed his MBA. Herzog took an indefinite leave from Harvard Law School to move to Iowa to serve as Andrew Yang's Iowa Campaign Coordinator. Political career Andrew Yang's 2020 Presidential Campaign Herzog took an indefinite leave from Harvard Law School to serve as the Iowa Campaign Coordinator for Andrew Yang. Herzog found Yang's message to be a

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Henry Frank Holthusen

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Henry Frank Holthusen

Henry Frank Holthusen (August 3, 1894 - September 19, 1971 Manhattan) was a corpolration, (sic) admiralty and international lawyer and diplomat.[1] Personal life Holthusen graduated from Columbia University both for undergraduate (1915) and law degrees (1917). He died of cancer at his home at 128 Central Park South.[1] Career After serving in the US Army during World War I, Holthusen was a special assistant United States Attorney General and later counsel in the United States for the newly established Latvian and Estonian Governments. [1] President Hoover named him Minister to Czechoslovakia in 1933, but it was an end of the term appointment and he did not serve.[2] He negotiated with the Mexican Government for the Economic Survey of Mexico by a joint United States‐Mexican Economic Commission in 1944 and headed the Telecommunications Mission to Japan, Turkey and other countries in 1951‐52. He was a partner in the law firm of Holthusen & Pinkham until 1952.[1] References "Henry Holthusen, Lawyer,

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Henry Hill

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Henry Hill

Henry Hill Jr. (June 11, 1943 – June 12, 2012) was an American mobster who was associated with the Lucchese crime family of New York City between 1955 and 1980. In 1980, Hill was arrested on narcotics charges and became an FBI informant. He testified against his former mafia associates, resulting in 50 convictions, including those of caporegime (captain) Paul Vario and James Burke on multiple charges. He had entered the Witness Protection Program in 1980, but was removed from the program in the early 1990s. Hill's life story was documented in the true crime book Wiseguy: Life in a Mafia Family by Nicholas Pileggi,[2] which was subsequently adapted by Martin Scorsese into the critically acclaimed film Goodfellas in 1990. Hill was portrayed by Ray Liotta in the film. Early life Henry Hill Jr. was born on June 11, 1943, in Manhattan, New York[3] to Henry Hill Sr., an immigrant Irish electrician, and Carmela Costa Hill, a Sicilian-American. The working-class family, consisting of Henry and his eight siblings,

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Henry Alsberg

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Henry Alsberg

Henry Garfield Alsberg (Sep. 21, 1881 – Nov. 1, 1970) was an American journalist and writer who served as the founding director of the Federal Writers' Project. A lawyer by training, he was a foreign correspondent during the Russian Revolution, secretary to the U.S. Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, and an influential volunteer for refugee aid efforts. Alsberg was a producer at the Provincetown Playhouse. He spent years traveling through war-torn Europe on behalf of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee. After publishing several magazines for the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, he was appointed to head the Federal Writers' Project. Fired from the project shortly after testifying before the House Un-American Activities Committee, he worked for a short time for the Office of War Information, then joined Hastings House Publishers as an editor. Early life and education Alsberg was born Sep. 21, 1881, in Manhattan to Meinhard and Bertha Alsberg. Meinhard was born in Arolsen, Germany and immi

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Lucius Duncan Bulkley

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Lucius Duncan Bulkley

Lucius Duncan Bulkley (January 12, 1845 - July 20, 1928) was an American dermatologist and alternative cancer treatment advocate. Biography Bulkley was born in Manhattan. His father was Henry Daggett Bulkley.[1] In 1869, he obtained his M.D. from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.[2][3] He was house physician at New York Hospital and travelled to Europe to study dermatology in London, Paris and Vienna.[3] Bulkley was awarded the Stevens Triennial Prize from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, for his essay Thermometry in Disease and the Alvarenga prize by the College of Physicians of Philadelphia for his monograph Syphilis in the Innocent, in 1891.[3][4] He was Chairman of Dermatology and Syphilology of the American Medical Association.[5] He was President of the New York Dermatological Society and the New York Academy of Medicine.[5] Bulkley edited the Archives of Dermatology (1874-1882), the only journal in English during this period devoted to dermatology.[1] He founded the New York

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Jamey Gambrell

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Jamey Gambrell

Jamey Gambrell (April 10, 1954 – February 15, 2020) was an American translator of Russian literature, and an expert in modern art. She was an editor with the Art in America magazine, and was a winner of the Thornton Wilder Prize for Translation of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Life Gambrell was born in Manhattan on April 10, 1954. Her mother, Helen Roddy, was a teacher, and her father, James Gambrell III, was a professor of law. She had two siblings, a sister and a brother.[1] Gambrell attended the Elisabeth Irwin High School. She received an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas at Austin, where her thesis was on Anna Akhmatova.[2] She studied at the Sorbonne and obtained a master's degree from Columbia University in Russian studies.[1] In the 1980s and 1990s, she lived in Moscow, where she took part in the newly rising underground art scene. There she also adopted her daughter, Calla.[1] Gambrell died in Manhattan on February 15, 2020 after suffering from cancer.[1] Career Lite

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University of Texas at Austin College of Libera...

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Cristina (singer)

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Cristina (singer)

Cristina Monet Zilkha[2] (née Monet-Palaci,[3] January 17, 1956 – March 31, 2020),[1][4] known during her recording career mononymously as Cristina, was an American singer and writer, best known for her new wave recordings made for ZE Records in the late 1970s and early 1980s in New York City. She "was a pioneer in blending the artsiness and attitude of punk with the joyful energy of disco and pop.... [which] helped pave the way for the massive successes of her contemporaries, like Madonna and Cyndi Lauper, and anticipated the rise of confrontational but danceable alt-pop acts..."[2] Biography A Harvard dropout,[5] and the daughter of a French psychoanalyst and an American illustrator-novelist-playwright, Cristina was working as a writer for The Village Voice when she met Michael Zilkha, who later became her husband.[6][3] A wealthy heir to England's Mothercare retail empire, Michael started ZE Records with Michel Esteban. Zilkha persuaded her to record a song titled "Disco Clone", an eccentric pastiche dan

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