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American autobiographers


Ada "Bricktop" Smith

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Ada "Bricktop" Smith

Ada Beatrice Queen Victoria Louise Virginia Smith, better known as Bricktop, (August 14, 1894 – February 1, 1984) was an American dancer, jazz singer, vaudevillian, and self-described saloon-keeper who owned the nightclub Chez Bricktop in Paris from 1924 to 1961, as well as clubs in Mexico City and Rome. She has been called "...one of the most legendary and enduring figures of twentieth-century American cultural history." Early life Smith was born in Alderson, West Virginia, the youngest of four children by an Irish father and a black mother. When her father died, her family relocated to Chicago. It was there that saloon life caught her fancy, and where she acquired her nickname, "Bricktop," for the flaming red hair and freckles inherited from her father. She began performing when she was very young, and by 16, she was touring with TOBA (Theatre Owners' Booking Association) and on the Pantages vaudeville circuit. Aged 20, her performance tours brought her to New York City. While at Barron's Exclusive Club,

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20th-century American dancers

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Margaret Anderson

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Margaret Anderson

Margaret Anderson may refer to: People Margaret J. Anderson (1859–1930), American hotel owner, businesswomen, and socialite Margaret C. Anderson (1886–1973), American editor and publisher Margaret Thorn (née Anderson, 1897–1969), New Zealand bookkeeper, political activist and welfare worker Margaret Anderson (indexer) (1900–1997), British biochemist and indexer Margaret Betty Harvie Anderson, Baroness Skrimshire of Quarter (1913–1979), British politician Margaret Jean Anderson (1915–2003), Canadian businesswoman Peggy Anderson (author) (Margaret Joan Anderson, 1938–2016), American reporter and author Margaret L. Anderson (born 1941), American professor Margaret Dawn Anderson (born 1967), Canadian civil servant and politician Margaret Anderson Kelliher (born 1968), American politician Margaret A. Anderson, executive director of FasterCures Other USS Margaret Anderson (SP-1203), a U.S. Navy patrol boat during World War I Margaret Anderson, a character in Father Knows Best See als

American magazine editors

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Fourth Way

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Drew Fortier

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Drew Fortier

Andrew Lawrence Fortier (born July 14, 1987) is an American musician, guitarist, filmmaker, actor, and author. He is best known for his work with Bang Tango, Stephen Shareaux, and Zen From Mars; which he cofounded, and includes members of Kik Tracee, Enuff Z'Nuff, Flipp, and Fear Factory.[1][2][3] He was guitarist for the now late Chuck Mosley (Faith No More). He has directed and edited the documentary Attack of Life: The Bang Tango Movie as well as the upcoming David Ellefson produced horror film Dwellers which Fortier also wrote and stars in.[4] He is the author of Dark, Depressing, and Hilarious which is an autobiography on his career thus far. Film career Attack of Life: The Bang Tango Movie Fortier took 4 years filming and editing what would become a documentary on 80's hard rock band Bang Tango. Originally intended as a studio documentary, the film became expanded upon once original members of the band became involved and more information was revealed regarding the band's history.The film was never gi

Actors from Illinois

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American documentary film directors

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Dan Davis (writer)

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Dan Davis (writer)

Dan “Tito” Davis is an American writer. Davis was a fugitive from US authorities between 1994 and 2007, when he was renditioned back to the US from Venezuela. He is the author of the book Gringo: My Life on the Edge as an International Fugitive. Education and early life Dan Davis was born in South Dakota. He was on the wrestling team in high school and became a professional horse jockey afterwards.[1] Davis began selling legal ephedrine pills (white crosses) in 1972, starting with Black Hills State College, before transferring to University of Nevada, Las Vegas [2] where he supplied legal ephedrine pills to the Bandidos Motorcycle Club.[1] He spent five years in prison during the 1980s for tax fraud.[3] Fugitive years In 1998 Davis was indicted on state and federal charges, including conspiracy to distribute methamphetamines and marijuana, with additional narcotics charges from 1994—which Davis claims were the result of a friend of his framing him with two pounds of meth.[1] After living in hiding in the

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Baratunde Thurston

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Baratunde Thurston

Baratunde Rafiq Thurston (born September 11, 1977) is an American writer, comedian, and commentator. Thurston co-founded the black political blog Jack and Jill Politics,[1] whose coverage of the 2008 Democratic National Convention was archived in the Library Of Congress,[2] and was director of digital for The Onion.[1] In 2012, his book How to be Black became a New York Times bestseller.[3] Early life and education Thurston was born in Washington, D.C. He grew up on the intersection of 14th and Newton Streets in the Columbia Heights neighborhood of Washington. His father was killed when he was young and his mother worked in the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. He has an older sister.[4] In junior high, his mother and he moved to a suburban black neighborhood in Maryland. Thurston was educated at the Sidwell Friends School and Harvard University where he graduated with a degree in Philosophy.[5][6] Career Thurston is the author of three self-published books: Better than Crying: Poking Fun at P

American web producers

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Evander Holyfield

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Evander Holyfield

Evander Holyfield (born October 19, 1962) is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1984 to 2011. He reigned as the undisputed champion at cruiserweight in the late 1980s and at heavyweight in the early 1990s, and remains the only boxer in history to win the undisputed championship in two weight classes. Nicknamed "The Real Deal", Holyfield is the only four-time world heavyweight champion, having held the unified WBA, WBC, and IBF titles from 1990 to 1992; the WBA and IBF titles again from 1993 to 1994 and between 1996 and 1999; and the WBA title for a fourth time from 2000 to 2001. As an amateur, Holyfield represented the United States at the 1984 Summer Olympics, winning a bronze medal in the light heavyweight division. He turned professional at the age of 21, moving up to cruiserweight in 1985 and winning his first world championship the following year, defeating Dwight Muhammad Qawi for the WBA title. Holyfield then went on to defeat Ricky Parkey and Carlos de León to win the WBC and IBF

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BBC Sports Personality World Sport Star of the ...

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American autobiographers

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Mike Tyson

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Mike Tyson

Michael Gerard Tyson (born June 30, 1966) is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1985 to 2005. He reigned as the undisputed world heavyweight champion and holds the record as the youngest boxer to win a heavyweight title, at 20 years, four months, and 22 days old.[3] Tyson won his first 19 professional fights by knockout, 12 of them in the first round. He won the WBC title in 1986 after stopping Trevor Berbick in the second round, and added the WBA and IBF titles after defeating James Smith and Tony Tucker in 1987. This made Tyson the first heavyweight boxer to simultaneously hold the WBA, WBC and IBF titles, and the only heavyweight to successively unify them. Tyson became the lineal champion in 1988 when he knocked out Michael Spinks in 91 seconds of the first round.[4] He successfully defended his titles nine times, which included victories over Larry Holmes and Frank Bruno. In 1990, Tyson lost the titles to underdog Buster Douglas, who knocked him out in the tenth round. Attempting to

Criminals from New York (state)

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American male criminals

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American sportspeople convicted of crimes

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Mountain Wolf Woman

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Mountain Wolf Woman

Mountain Wolf Woman, or Xéhachiwinga (April 1884 – November 9, 1960), was a Native American woman of the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) tribe.[1] She was born in April 1884 into the Thunder Clan near Black River Falls, Wisconsin.[2] Her parents were Charles Blowsnake and Lucy Goodvillage. She was brought up in the traditional tribal religion; later, she converted to the Peyote religion (Native American Church) after her second marriage. Traditionally, brothers arranged their sisters’ marriages, but she did not like the man her brothers chose and, after the birth of her second child, she left him and later married a man of her own choosing. Her autobiography was transcribed by Nancy Oestreich Lurie and translated in consultation with Frances Thundercloud Wentz.[3][4] At the time of the interviews for the book, she had eight children, 39 grandchildren, and 11 great-grandchildren. Mountain Wolf Woman was then an early full-length autobiography of an American Indian woman. She died at age 76, on November 9, 1960.[5] Refe

People from Black River Falls, Wisconsin

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20th-century American non-fiction writers

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Women autobiographers

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Megyn Kelly

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Megyn Kelly

Megyn Marie Kelly (born November 18, 1970)[4] is an American journalist and attorney who was a news anchor at Fox News from 2004 to 2017, and a talk show host and correspondent with NBC News from 2017 to 2018. She currently self-reports on her Instagram page and YouTube channel.[5] During her time at Fox News, Kelly hosted America Live, and prior to that, co-hosted America's Newsroom with Bill Hemmer. From 2007 to 2012, the two reporters hosted Fox News Channel's New Year's Eve specials Kelly also hosted The Kelly File from October 2013 to January 2017. In 2014, she was included in the TIME list of the 100 most influential people.[6] Kelly left Fox News in January 2017 and joined NBC News. She started hosting the third hour of the morning show Today with her program titled Megyn Kelly Today in September 2017. The show was cancelled on October 26, 2018, and she departed the network in January 2019. Early life Kelly was born in Champaign, Illinois,[7][8] to Edward Kelly, who taught at the State University of

Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affair...

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Catholics from Illinois

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Journalists from Illinois

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Calvin Coolidge

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Calvin Coolidge

Calvin Coolidge[1] (born John Calvin Coolidge Jr.; ; July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 30th president of the United States from 1923 to 1929. A Republican lawyer from New England, born in Vermont, Coolidge worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts state politics, eventually becoming governor of Massachusetts. His response to the Boston Police Strike of 1919 thrust him into the national spotlight and gave him a reputation as a man of decisive action. The next year, he was elected vice president of the United States, and he succeeded to the presidency upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding in 1923. Elected in his own right in 1924, he gained a reputation as a small government conservative and also as a man who said very little and had a rather dry sense of humor.[2][3] Coolidge restored public confidence in the White House after the scandals of his predecessor's administration, and left office with considerable popularity.[4] As a Coolidge biographe

Non-interventionism

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Candidates in the 1924 United States presidenti...

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Candidates in the 1920 United States presidenti...

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Tina Fey

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Tina Fey

Elizabeth Stamatina "Tina" Fey (born May 18, 1970) is an American actress, comedian, writer, producer, and playwright. She appeared on the NBC sketch comedy series Saturday Night Live from 1997 to 2006, and created the acclaimed comedy series 30 Rock (2006–2013) and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (2015–2019). Fey has also starred in Baby Mama (2008), Date Night (2010), Megamind (2010), Muppets Most Wanted (2014), Sisters (2015), Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (2016), and Wine Country (2019). Fey broke into comedy as a featured player in the Chicago-based improvisational comedy group The Second City. She then joined SNL as a writer, later becoming head writer and a performer, appearing as co-anchor in the Weekend Update segment and, later, developing a satirical portrayal of 2008 Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin in subsequent guest appearances. In 2004, she co-starred in and wrote the screenplay for Mean Girls, which was adapted from the 2002 self-help book Queen Bees and Wannabes. After leaving SNL in 20

People from the Upper West Side

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American autobiographers

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Women autobiographers

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Sammy Hagar

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Sammy Hagar

Samuel Roy Hagar (born October 13, 1947),[1] also known as The Red Rocker,[2] is an American rock vocalist, songwriter, musician, and entrepreneur. Hagar came to prominence in the 1970s with the hard rock band Montrose. He then launched a successful solo career, scoring an enduring hit in 1984 with "I Can't Drive 55". He enjoyed commercial success when he replaced David Lee Roth as the lead singer of Van Halen in 1985, but left in 1996. He returned to the band for a two-year reunion from 2003 to 2005. On March 12, 2007, Hagar was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Van Halen. His musical style primarily consists of hard rock and heavy metal.[3][4][5][6] Also a businessman, Hagar founded the Cabo Wabo Tequila brand and restaurant chain, as well as Sammy's Beach Bar Rum.[7] His current musical projects include being the lead singer of Chickenfoot and The Circle. Hagar also is the host of Rock & Roll Road Trip with Sammy Hagar on Mark Cuban's cable network AXS TV.[8] Early life Na

American autobiographers

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Jewish heavy metal musicians

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Planet Us members

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Paris Hilton

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Paris Hilton

Paris Whitney Hilton (born February 17, 1981)[1] is an American media personality, businesswoman, socialite, model, singer, actress, fashion designer and DJ. Hilton is a great-granddaughter of Conrad Hilton, the founder of Hilton Hotels. Born in New York City and raised there and in Beverly Hills, California, she began her modeling career as a teenager when she signed with New York-based modeling development agency Trump Model Management. Her late-night persona made her a fixture of tabloid journalism, and Hilton was proclaimed "New York's leading It Girl" in 2001.[2] In 2003, a leaked 2001 sex tape with her then-boyfriend Rick Salomon, later released as 1 Night in Paris, catapulted her into global fame, and the reality television series The Simple Life, in which she starred with her socialite counterpart Nicole Richie, started its five-year run with 13 million viewers, on FOX. In 2004, Hilton released her book Confessions of an Heiress, which became a New York Times Best Seller, in 2005, she appeared in th

American female DJs

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American DJs

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American hip hop singers

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Victoria Jackson

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Victoria Jackson

Victoria Jackson (born August 2, 1959)[1] is an American actress, comedian, and singer who was a cast member of the NBC television sketch comedy series Saturday Night Live (SNL) from 1986 to 1992. From 2008 to 2017, Jackson was politically active as part of the Tea Party movement. Jackson's autobiography, Is My Bow Too Big? How I went from Saturday Night Live to the Tea Party was published in 2012. Early life Jackson was born in Miami, Florida, the daughter of Marlene Esther (née Blackstad) and James McCaslin Jackson, a gym coach.[1] From the age of 5 until she was 18, Jackson's father trained her in gymnastics.[2] After graduating from high school, Jackson attended Florida Bible College in Hollywood, Florida, later transferring to Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina on a gymnastics scholarship. At Furman, she was cast in her first play. She transferred to Auburn University in 1979 for her senior year, changing her major to theater. Midway through her senior year, she left Auburn to pursue an a

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Breast cancer survivors

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American conservative people

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Wilma Mankiller

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Wilma Mankiller

Wilma Pearl Mankiller (Cherokee: ᎠᏥᎳᏍᎩ ᎠᏍᎦᏯᏗᎯ (A-ji-luhsgi Asgaya-dihi), November 18, 1945 – April 6, 2010) was a Cherokee activist, social worker, community developer and the first woman elected to serve as Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. Born in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, she lived on her family's allotment in Adair County, Oklahoma, until the age of 11, when her family relocated to San Francisco as part of a federal government program to urbanize Native Americans. After high school, she married a well-to-do Ecuadorian and raised two daughters. Inspired by the social and political movements of the 1960s, Mankiller became involved in the Occupation of Alcatraz and later participated in the land and compensation struggles with the Pit River Tribe. For five years in the early 1970s, she was employed as a social worker, focusing mainly on children's issues. Returning to Oklahoma in the fall of 1976, Mankiller was hired by the Cherokee Nation as an economic stimulus coordinator. She progressed into grant writ

Native American women writers

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American women activists

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Veryl Goodnight

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Veryl Goodnight

Veryl Goodnight: The Day the Wall Came Down, 1998 copy in Clayallee, Berlin-Zehlendorf near Allied Museum Veryl Goodnight (born January 26, 1947) is a sculptor and since 2006 has been living in Mancos, Colorado.[1] She is known for her equine sculpture - in particular a realistic depiction of horses, often in an American West context.[2] She was inducted into the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame in Fort Worth, Texas, in 2016.[3] Goodnight is best known for her 1996 and 1998 statues The Day the Wall Came Down. Early life Veryl was born in Ashland, Ohio, on January 26, 1947, but her family moved to Lakewood, Colorado when she was only a few weeks old. As a young child living in the West, she fell in love with horses. Her parents could not afford to buy her one of her own, but Veryl continued to think and dream about horses. When she was very little she would sculpt horses out of snow.[4] She received from her parents her first set of professional paints when she was in third grade, and soon her hom

Women autobiographers

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American autobiographers

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21st-century American women artists

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Gary Dell'Abate

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Gary Dell'Abate

Gary Dell'Abate (born March 14, 1961), also known by the nickname Baba Booey,[1] is an American radio producer who has been the executive producer of The Howard Stern Show since 1984. His autobiography, They Call Me Baba Booey, was released on November 2, 2010.[2] Early life and career Dell'Abate was born in the New York City borough of Brooklyn and raised in Uniondale, New York, on Long Island. He comes from a large Italian-American family. His father, Salvatore Dell'Abate, was a salesman for Häagen-Dazs ice cream, while his mother, Ellen (née Cotroneo) was a food demonstrator at Macy's in New York City and Fortunoff on Long Island. Dell'Abate attended Adelphi University, receiving the Richard F. Clemo Award his senior year, and he interned at several radio stations including WLIR.[3] While working with Roz Frank, a traffic reporter on WNBC, he came into contact with Howard Stern. The Howard Stern Show Dell'Abate has worked on The Howard Stern Show since September 4, 1984: originally on 66 WNBC, then syn

American autobiographers

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Prank calling

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People from Greenwich, Connecticut

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Ivana Trump

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Ivana Trump

Ivana Marie Trump (née Zelníčková; Czech: , born February 20, 1949) is a Czechoslovak–American businesswoman and former model who was the first of the three wives of Donald Trump, the 45th president of the United States. They married in 1977 and divorced in 1991. They have three children together, Donald Trump Jr., Ivanka Trump, and Eric Trump. Early life Ivana Zelníčková was born on February 20, 1949 in the Moravian town of Zlín (formerly known as Gottwaldov), Czechoslovakia, the daughters of Miloš Zelníček (1927–1990) and Marie Zelníčková (née Francová).[1][2][3][4] From the age of 13, her father nurtured and encouraged her skiing talent. Before the Prague Spring of 1968, she was seventeen when she began attending Charles University in Prague studying German and English and continued her education in the early 1970s when she attained a masters degree in physical education.[5][6] While at Charles University, she was on the ski team and witnessed Warsaw Pact tanks entering Prague on August 21, 1968, but, th

Czech women in business

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American autobiographers

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Emma Goldman

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Emma Goldman

Emma Goldman (June 27 [O.S. June 15], 1869 – May 14, 1940) was an anarchist political activist and writer. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the 20th century. Born in Kovno, Russian Empire (now Kaunas, Lithuania) to a Jewish family, Goldman emigrated to the United States in 1885.[2] Attracted to anarchism after the Chicago Haymarket affair, Goldman became a writer and a renowned lecturer on anarchist philosophy, women's rights, and social issues, attracting crowds of thousands.[2] She and anarchist writer Alexander Berkman, her lover and lifelong friend, planned to assassinate industrialist and financier Henry Clay Frick as an act of propaganda of the deed. Frick survived the attempt on his life in 1892, and Berkman was sentenced to 22 years in prison. Goldman was imprisoned several times in the years that followed, for "inciting to riot" and illegally distributing information about birth control. In 1906, Goldman f

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Antitheists

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American atheist writers

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Liliʻuokalani

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Liliʻuokalani

Liliʻuokalani (Hawaiian pronunciation: ; born Lydia Liliʻu Loloku Walania Kamakaʻeha; September 2, 1838 – November 11, 1917) was the only queen regnant and the last sovereign monarch of the Hawaiian Kingdom, ruling from January 29, 1891, until the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom on January 17, 1893. The composer of "Aloha ʻOe" and numerous other works, she wrote her autobiography Hawaiʻi's Story by Hawaiʻi's Queen during her imprisonment following the overthrow. Liliʻuokalani was born on September 2, 1838, in Honolulu, on the island of Oʻahu. While her natural parents were Analea Keohokālole and Caesar Kapaʻakea, she was hānai (informally adopted) at birth by Abner Pākī and Laura Kōnia and raised with their daughter Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Baptized as a Christian and educated at the Royal School, she and her siblings and cousins were proclaimed eligible for the throne by King Kamehameha III. She was married to American-born John Owen Dominis, who later became the Governor of Oʻahu. The couple had no biologi

Recipients of the Royal Order of the Star of Oc...

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American composers

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American autobiographers

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Sono Osato

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Sono Osato

Sono Osato (大里 ソノ, Osato Sono, August 29, 1919 – December 26, 2018) was an American dancer and actress.[1] She performed with ballet companies Ballets Russe de Monte-Carlo and the American Ballet Theatre. As an actress, she starred alongside Frank Sinatra in the film The Kissing Bandit. Early life Osato was born in Omaha, Nebraska.[1] She was the oldest of three children of a Japanese father (Shoji Osato, 1885–1955) and an Irish-French Canadian mother (Frances Fitzpatrick, 1897–1954).[2] Her family moved to Chicago in 1925 in order to be closer to Frances' family, and Shoji opened a photography studio there.[1][3] In 1927, when she was eight, Osato's mother took her and her sister to Europe for two years; while in Monte Carlo, they attended a performance of Cléopâtre by Sergei Diaghilev's famous Ballets Russes company, which inspired Osato to start ballet classes when she returned to Chicago in late 1929.[1][4][3] She studied with prominent dancers Berenice Holmes and Adolph Bolm.[3] Career Osato began he

Dancers from Nebraska

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Women autobiographers

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American autobiographers

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Priscilla Presley

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Priscilla Presley

Priscilla Ann Presley (née Wagner, changed by adoption to Beaulieu; born May 24, 1945) is an American actress and business magnate. Married to Elvis Presley from 1967 to 1973, she served as chairwoman of Elvis Presley Enterprises (EPE), the company that turned Graceland, Elvis' mansion, into one of the top tourist attractions in the United States. In her acting career, Presley had a starring role as Jane Spencer in the three successful Naked Gun films, in which she co-starred with Leslie Nielsen, and played the role of Jenna Wade on the long-running television series Dallas. Early life and ancestry Presley was born Priscilla Ann Wagner in Brooklyn on May 24, 1945.[1] Her maternal grandfather, Albert Henry Iversen, was born (May 19, 1899 - February 17, 1971) in Egersund, Norway.[2] He emigrated to the United States, where he married Lorraine, who was of Scots-Irish and English descent. Their only daughter, Anna Lillian Iversen, was born in March 13, 1926. Later she was called (or her name was changed to) Ann

Women autobiographers

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American autobiographers

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Television producers from New York City

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Lucretia Longshore Blankenburg

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Lucretia Longshore Blankenburg

Lucretia Longshore Blankenburg Lucretia Longshore Blankenburg (May 8, 1845 – March 28, 1937) was an American second-generation suffragist, social activist, civic reformer, and writer.[1][2][3][4] During the period of 1892 until 1908, she served as president of the Pennsylvania Woman Suffrage Association.[5] Her husband, Rudolph Blankenburg served as mayor of Philadelphia. Together, the Blankenburgs worked for the things that uplifted humanity, that made for cleaner politics, and for better citizenship.[6] During his term, she aided the city in scores of ways, doing some of the routine speech-making for him. She took almost full charge handling his correspondence.[7] Blankenburg was one of the leading club women of the city. She served as vice-president of the National Education Association; president of the Pennsylvania State Suffrage Association, 1892; and first vice-president of the General Federation of Women's Clubs, 1912–1914.[7] She was a member of the New Century Club, the Working Women's Guild, and

Women autobiographers

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People from Lisbon, Ohio

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19th-century American non-fiction writers

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Sarah Tarleton Colvin

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Sarah Tarleton Colvin

Sarah Tarleton Colvin (September 12, 1865 – April 22, 1949) was an American nurse and women's rights advocate who served as the national president of the National Woman's Party in 1933. Jailed for her activism while picketing the White House in 1918 and 1919, Colvin later wrote her autobiography about the suffrage movement and her nursing career. Early life Sarah Lightfoot Tarleton was born on September 12, 1865 in Greene County, Alabama, as the oldest child of Sallie Bernard (née Lightfoot) and Robert Tarleton.[1][2][3] Her father was a physician, having graduated from Yale University and served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War.[1][2] Her mother was descended of Lieutenant Philip Lightfoot, who served in Harrison's Continental Artillery Regiment of Virginia, during the American Revolution.[4] When the war concluded, the family resided with Tarlton's paternal grandparents in Caddo Parish, Louisiana, where her brother, Robert Jr. was born. The family then moved to Mobile, Alabama, where her fathe

Silent Sentinels

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American autobiographers

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Faith Evans

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Faith Evans

Faith Renée Jordan (née Evans; born June 10, 1973) is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, and actress. Born in Lakeland, Florida, and raised in New Jersey, Evans relocated to Los Angeles in 1991 for a career in the music business. After working as a backing vocalist for Al B. Sure! and Christopher Williams, she became the first female artist to contract with Sean "Puff Daddy" Combs' Bad Boy Entertainment recording company in 1994. On the label, she featured on records with several label mates such as 112 and Carl Thomas, and released three platinum-certified studio albums between 1995 and 2001: Faith (1995), Keep the Faith (1998) and Faithfully (2001).[1] In 2003, she ended her relationship with the company to sign with Capitol Records.[2] Her first album released on the label, The First Lady (2005) became her highest-charting album at the time, reaching the top of the US Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums charts, while the holiday album A Faithful Christmas, released the same year, would become her la

20th-century American women singers

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American women record producers

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Record producers from Florida

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Mo Udall

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Mo Udall

Morris King "Mo" Udall (June 15, 1922 – December 12, 1998) was an American attorney and Democratic politician who served as a U.S. Representative from Arizona from May 2, 1961 to May 4, 1991. He was a leading contender for the 1976 Democratic presidential nomination. He was noted by many for his independent and liberal views.[1][2][3][4] In 1961, Udall won a special election to succeed his brother, Stewart Udall, as the congressman for Arizona's 2nd congressional district. In Congress, the younger Udall became a prominent and popular figure for his independent ways, his leading role in the conservation and environmental protection movements, his key role in reforming Congress and political campaigns, and his pioneering role in opposing the Vietnam War.[1][2][5][3] Udall sought the Democratic nomination in the 1976 presidential election, but was defeated by Jimmy Carter. He supported Ted Kennedy's strong challenge to Carter in the 1980 Democratic primaries, and Udall delivered the keynote address at the 1980

Candidates in the 1976 United States presidenti...

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Kesha

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Kesha

Kesha Rose Sebert (born March 1, 1987), known mononymously as Kesha (formerly stylized Ke$ha), is an American singer, songwriter and rapper. In 2005, at age 18, Kesha was signed to Kemosabe Records. Her first major success came in early 2009 after she was featured on American rapper Flo Rida's number-one single "Right Round". Kesha's music and image propelled her to immediate success. She has earned two number-one albums on the US Billboard 200 with Animal (2010) and Rainbow (2017), and the number-six record Warrior (2012). She has attained ten top-ten singles on the US Billboard Hot 100, including "Blah Blah Blah", "Your Love Is My Drug", "Take It Off", "Blow", "Die Young", "My First Kiss" with 3OH!3, and the chart-topping "Tik Tok", "We R Who We R", "Right Round" with Flo Rida, and "Timber" with Pitbull. "Tik Tok", at one point, was the best-selling digital single in history, selling over 16.5 million units internationally. As of November 2019, the song has sold over 25 million copies. In 2020, Kesha relea

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Amy Klobuchar

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Amy Klobuchar

Amy Jean Klobuchar ( Klōba-shar; born May 25, 1960) is an American lawyer and politician serving as the senior United States senator from Minnesota. A member of the Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL), Minnesota's affiliate of the Democratic Party, she previously served as the Hennepin County attorney. In February 2019, she announced her candidacy for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in the 2020 election. Born in Plymouth, Minnesota, Klobuchar is a graduate of Yale University and the University of Chicago Law School. She was a partner at two Minneapolis law firms before being elected county attorney for Hennepin County in 1998, making her responsible for all criminal prosecution in Minnesota's most populous county. Klobuchar was first elected to the Senate in 2006, becoming Minnesota's first elected female United States senator, and reelected in 2012 and 2018.[1] In 2009 and 2010, she was described as a "rising star" in the Democratic Party.[2][3] Early life and educati

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Candidates in the 2020 United States presidenti...

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Kay Johnson-Gentile

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Kay Johnson-Gentile

Kay Johnson-Gentile is an American musician and educator. Education Kay Johnson-Gentile received her associate degree in Music from the State University of New York at Buffalo (University at Buffalo) in 1966. She then received a BA in History in 1980, an EdM in 1987, and PhD in Elementary Education in 1990.[1][2] Musical career While dealing with a cancer diagnosis and fight starting in 1975,[2] during which she received nine months of chemotherapy, Johnson-Gentile became a songwriter after finding music aided in her therapy—specifically the music of John Denver, whom she later met.[3] As she survived and in the years afterwards, she then began to advocate for and teach the use of music as a rehabilitation and treatment tool—first at the Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center in Buffalo, NY, and later while travelling to other regions. During this period she provided music therapy workshops for cancer patients, their families, and physicians. She also developed a pilot program for music therapy with the

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Julia A. A. Wood

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Julia A. A. Wood

Julia A. A. Wood, "A woman of the century" Julia A. A. Wood (pen name, Minnie Mary Lee; April 13, 1826/1830 – 1903) was an American author. She was an indefatigable worker, and produced an astonishing amount of poems, stories, sketches and novels. She began writing very early in life, but did not publish in book form until she was in her forties. Myrrha Lake; or, Into the Light of Catholicity (New York, about 1871; 2nd edition, 1873); Hubert's Wife: a Story for You (Baltimore, 1875); The Brown House at Duffield: a Story of Life without and within the Fold (Baltimore, 1877); and The Story of Annette and her Five Dolls: Told to dear little Catholic Children (Baltimore, 1880) were her published works.[1] Early life and education Julia Amanda Sargent was born in New London, New Hampshire, April 13, 1826,[2] or in 1830,[1] or about 1830.[3] She was a daughter of Ezekiel Sargent and his wife, Emily Everett Adams.[2] She was educated in the New London Literary and Scientific Institution, Colby Academy, and later

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Dorothy Sterling

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Dorothy Sterling

Dorothy Sterling (née Dannenberg; November 23, 1913 – December 1, 2008) was an American writer and historian. After college, she worked as a journalist and writer in New York for several years, including work for the Federal Writers’ Project.[1] In 1937 she married Philip Sterling (died 1989), also a writer.[1] Her daughter, Anne Fausto-Sterling, is a noted biologist, the Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Biology and Gender Studies at Brown University, and is married to playwright Paula Vogel.[2] Her son, Peter Sterling, is a well-known neuroscientist and coiner of the term allostasis. Career Sterling worked for Time from 1936 to 1949 and was then assistant bureau chief in Life’s news bureau from 1944 to 1949.[3] Starting in the 1950s, she authored more than 30 books, mainly non-fiction historical works for children on the origins of the women's and anti-slavery movements, civil rights, segregation, and nature, as well as mysteries. Politics Sterling belonged to the Communist Party USA in the 1940s. Even af

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Walter McElreath

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Walter McElreath

Walter McElreath (July 17, 1867 – December 6, 1951) was an American lawyer, legislator, bank executive, and author in Atlanta, Georgia. McElreath was a member of the Georgia House of Representatives from 1909 until 1912.[1] He was one of the founders and the first leader of the Atlanta History Center and its McElreath Hall is named after him. McElreath was born in Lost Mountain, Georgia. He studied at Powder Springs High School and then Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia.[1] McElreath wrote about the Cotton States and International Exposition in his memoirs. He wrote an autobiography.[2] He also wrote about Georgia's state constitution.[3] The Atlanta History Center has a collection of his papers.[1] References "Walter McElreath Papers". ahc.galileo.usg.edu. My Folks. 1941. OCLC 1837163. "A Treatise on the Constitution of Georgia, Giving the Origin,.. by Walter McElreath on The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd". The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

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Robert R. Max

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Robert R. Max

Robert Roger Max Robert R. Max is a World War II veteran and author of The Long March Home: An American Soldier's Life as a Nazi Slave Laborer (ISBN 9781555718916). The autobiographical book, which was published in 2017 when Max was 94, recounts his military experiences. Born on July 10, 1923 in Newark, New Jersey to Jewish parents, Max attended college at Ohio University before enlisting in the United States Army at age 20. In 1944 at age 21, Max was part of the Allied landing at Omaha Beach in France.[1] He was captured by the German forces during the Battle of the Bulge on January 4, 1945. Rather than being sent to a prisoner of war camp, Max was made to work as a German slave laborer. After 68 days, he escaped and was eventually rescued by the advancing Allied troops. Max is the recipient of a purple heart with oak leaf cluster and three bronze campaign battle stars. An account of Max's experience is preserved in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.[2] Max was married to Shi

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Ralph Abernathy

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Ralph Abernathy

Ralph David Abernathy Sr. (March 11, 1926 – April 17, 1990) was an American civil rights activist and Baptist minister. He was ordained in the Baptist tradition in 1948. As a leader of the Civil Rights Movement, he was a close friend and mentor of Martin Luther King Jr. He collaborated with King to create the Montgomery Improvement Association which led to the Montgomery bus boycott. He also co-founded and was an executive board member of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). He became president of the SCLC following the assassination of King in 1968, where he led the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. among other marches and demonstrations for disenfranchised Americans. He also served as an advisory committee member of the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE). In 1971, Abernathy addressed the United Nations about world peace. He also assisted in brokering a deal between the FBI and Indian protestors during the Wounded Knee incident of 1973. He retired from his position as president of t

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Ms. Pat

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Ms. Pat

Ms. Pat (born Patricia Williams; April 2, 1972) is an American stand-up comedian and host of the podcast The Patdown with Ms. Pat.[2] Early life and education Ms. Pat has four biological children and numerous adopted children. She had her first child at 14 and her second at 15.[3] The father of her two children is 10 years older than her and they began their relationship when she was 12 years old. Her elder two children were conceived later in life with her husband.[4] She is open about having two abortions in her teenage years.[5] She is a survivor of child sexual abuse at the hand of her mother's boyfriend and the father of her two children.[3] When she was 16, she sold crack cocaine in Atlanta while supporting herself and her two children using the street name "Rabbit." [3] Career Comedy Ms. Pat started doing comedy after being encouraged by her caseworker. She did her first stand-up in 2002 in Atlanta. In 2006, her career as a comic elevated to the next stage after moving to Indianapolis with her hu

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Sidney Lens

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Sidney Lens

Sidney Lens (1912–1986), also known by his birth name Sid Okun, was an American labor leader, political activist, and author, best known for his book, The Day Before Doomsday, which warns of the prospect of nuclear annihilation, published in 1977 by Doubleday. He also wrote a history of U.S. intervention abroad, The Forging of the American Empire, originally published in 1974 and republished in 2003 by Haymarket Books with a new introduction by Howard Zinn; and an autobiography, Unrepentant Radical. Formerly a member of Hugo Oehler's Revolutionary Workers League, Lens was active in retail worker unions in Chicago[1] and in the anti-war movement during the Vietnam War. In 1967, he was among more than 500 writers and editors who signed the "Writers and Editors War Tax Protest" pledge, vowing to refuse to pay the 10% Vietnam War Tax surcharge proposed by president Johnson.[2] Lens was an editor of The Progressive. In 1980, Lens was the Citizens Party (United States) candidate for United States Senate in Illin

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Barbara Beskind

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Barbara Beskind

Barbara M. Knickerbocker Beskind (born 1924) is an American inventor and designer.[1][2] Early education and career Barbara Beskind is a designer and internationally recognized pioneer in the field of occupational therapy.[3] Beskind graduated in 1945 from the College of Home Economics at Syracuse University with a BS in Applied Arts and Design. At the end of World War II, she trained as an occupational therapist through the U.S. Army’s War Emergency Course and served for 20 years, retiring as a major in 1966. She went on to found the Princeton Center for Learning Disorders, the first independent private practice in occupational therapy in the U.S. She authored a clinical text published in 1980 on the treatment of children with learning disorders and holds a patent for inflatable equipment that helps learning-disordered children improve their balance. The American Occupational Therapy Association honored Beskind as a Charter Fellow in recognition of her innovative therapeutic techniques. In 1989 she retired

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Madeleine Blair

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Madeleine Blair

Madeleine Blair (pseudonym) was a prostitute who lived and worked in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century in the Midwestern and Western United States as well as Canada. Her autobiography, which tells the story of her life and work as a prostitute, was published by Harper & Brothers Publishers in 1919.[1] Early life Childhood As Madeleine published her autobiography using a pseudonym, her real identity has never been uncovered. Therefore, both her date of birth and the exact origins of her family cannot be ascertained. She was a third generation American, whose parents moved from the Atlantic seaboard to settle in "a thriving town of the Middle West." While never naming the specific location of her childhood, Madeleine describes it in her autobiography as a "new and crude" town, with few opportunities. She was the second eldest child of a large family, and her father was a well-respected member of the community. Madeleine's upbringing was in line with that of an upper-class child; her family

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Joan Haverty Kerouac

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Joan Haverty Kerouac

Joan Haverty Kerouac (1931– May 15, 1990),[2] born Joan Virginia Haverty,[3] was the second wife of writer Jack Kerouac and the author of an autobiography, Nobody's Wife: The Smart Aleck and the King of the Beats. Joan Kerouac's autobiography, which existed only in manuscript form when she died, appeared in book form in 2000 after the Kerouacs' only child, Jan Kerouac, her half-brother, David, and David's brother-in-law John Bowers helped prepare it for publication.[2] Joan Kerouac was born near Albany, New York, and grew up there. At age 19, she moved to Manhattan after befriending Bill Cannastra, a lawyer she met in Provincetown, Massachusetts, while visiting an artists' colony. She remained close to Cannastra until his death in a subway accident in 1950. Later in 1950, Joan met Jack Kerouac in Manhattan. He invited her to his mother's home to meet his mother, Gabrielle Kerouac, and two weeks later Joan and Jack were married. Joan became the model for the character Laura in Jack Kerouac's novel On the Road

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Mr. T

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Mr. T

Mr. T (born Lawrence Tureaud; May 21, 1952)[2][3][4][5] is an American actor, bodyguard, television personality, and retired professional wrestler, known for his roles as B. A. Baracus in the 1980s television series The A-Team and as boxer Clubber Lang in the 1982 film Rocky III. Mr. T is known for his distinctive hairstyle inspired by Mandinka warriors in West Africa,[6] his gold jewelry, and his tough-guy image. In 2006, he starred in I Pity the Fool, a reality show shown on TV Land; the title of the show comes from the famous catchphrase used by his character, Clubber Lang. Early life Mr. T was born Lawrence Tureaud in Chicago, Illinois, the youngest son in a family with twelve children. Tureaud, with his four sisters and seven brothers, grew up in a three-room apartment in the Robert Taylor Homes.[7] His father, Nathaniel Tureaud, was a minister.[3] After his father left when he was five, he shortened his name to Lawrence Tero.[4] In 1970, he legally changed his last name to T.[4] His new name, Mr. T.,

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Louis Theroux

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Louis Theroux

Louis Sebastian Theroux ([1] born 20 May 1970) is a British-American[2] documentary filmmaker, journalist, broadcaster, and author.[3] He has received two British Academy Television Awards and a Royal Television Society Television Award. Born in Singapore to an English mother and American father (writer Paul Theroux), Theroux moved with his family to London when he was a child. After graduating from Oxford, he moved to the U.S. and worked as a journalist for Metro Silicon Valley and Spy. He moved into television as the presenter of offbeat segments on Michael Moore's TV Nation series. This led to a series of BBC documentaries, including Louis Theroux's Weird Weekends, When Louis Met..., and several BBC Two specials. Early life Louis Sebastian Theroux was born in Singapore on 20 May 1970, the son of American travel writer and novelist Paul Theroux and his English then-wife Anne (née Castle).[4][5] His paternal grandmother, Anne (née Dittami), was an Italian-American grammar school teacher, and his paternal

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Molly O'Neill

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Molly O'Neill

Molly O'Neill (9 Oct 1952, Columbus, Ohio - 16 Jun 2019) was an American food writer, cookbook author, and journalist, perhaps best known as for her food column in the New York Times Sunday Magazine and Style section throughout the 1990s.[1] Molly O'Neill was born and grew up in Columbus, Ohio, the only girl in a family with five brothers born to Charles and Virginia O'Neill. In her 2006 memoir, she describes the family's strong interest in baseball.[2] Her father had been a minor league pitcher before working for North American Aviation and later running an excavation business. Her younger brother Paul O'Neill, became an outfielder for the Cincinnati Reds and the New York Yankees. Molly's early exposure to cooking came from making dinner for her brothers, at times surreptitiously to circumvent "healthier" dinners left for the children by their mother. O'Neill earned a bachelor's degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and then moved to Northampton, Massachusetts where she and eight other women o

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Alvin M. Josephy Jr.

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Alvin M. Josephy Jr.

Alvin M. Josephy Jr. (May 18, 1915 – October 16, 2005) was an American historian who specialized in Native American issues. New York Times reviewer Herbert Mitgang called him in 1982 the "leading non-Indian writer about Native Americans".[1] Early life Josephy was born in Woodmere, New York. His mother was a daughter of publisher Samuel Knopf and a sister of Alfred A. Knopf.[1] He graduated in 1932 from the Horace Mann School in New York City and attended Harvard College, but family misfortune forced him to withdraw after two years. Career Early career Early in his career, Josephy worked as a Hollywood screenwriter, New York City newspaper correspondent, radio station news director, the Washington Office of War Information, and in the Pacific theater as United States Marine Corps combat correspondent, where he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for "heroic achievement in action... [making] a recording of historical significance" during the U.S. invasion of Guam.[2] After the war, Josephy returned to Holly

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Nathan Rich

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Nathan Rich

Nathan Rich (born 13 February 1982) is an American author, Scientology critic and content creator known for the memoir Scythe Tleppo, which outlines growing up in Scientology and his battle with homelessness and addiction.[2] He appeared on Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath alongside classmate Tara Reile about their experiences at the Scientology boarding school, the Mace-Kingsley Ranch School.[3][4] Early life and education Rich is the only child of Julie Miriam Rich, a pet communicator who died from cancer in 2010.[1][5][3] He completed only two school grades, seventh and eighth grades, at Dunedin Academy. He spent four years at the Mace Kingsley Ranch when he was 8 and 14 years old. At 17, he left home and was later disowned by his family.[6][7] He spent seven years homeless while using and dealing drugs[3] before attending community college.[1] Scientology Mace-Kingsley Ranch At 8 years old, Rich was sent to the Scientology boarding school, the Mace-Kingsley Ranch in Palmdale, California, and

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Gene Cernan

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Gene Cernan

Eugene Andrew Cernan (March 14, 1934 – January 16, 2017) was an American astronaut, naval aviator, electrical engineer, aeronautical engineer, and fighter pilot. During the Apollo 17 mission, Cernan became the eleventh person to walk on the Moon. Since he re-entered the Apollo Lunar Module after Harrison Schmitt on their third and final lunar excursion, he was the last person to walk on the Moon. Cernan traveled into space three times and to the Moon twice; as pilot of Gemini 9A in June 1966, as lunar module pilot of Apollo 10 in May 1969, and as commander of Apollo 17 in December 1972, the final Apollo lunar landing. Cernan was also a backup crew member of the Gemini 12, Apollo 7 and Apollo 14 space missions. Biography Early years Cernan was born on March 14, 1934, in Chicago, Illinois;[1] he was the son of Rose (née Cihlar) and Andrew Cernan. His father was of Slovak descent and his mother was of Czech ancestry.[2][3] Cernan grew up in the Illinois towns of Bellwood and Maywood. He was a Boy Scout and ea

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Ingrid Bergman

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Ingrid Bergman

Ingrid Bergman[a] (29 August 1915 – 29 August 1982) was a Swedish-American actress who starred in a variety of European and American films, television movies, and plays.[1] She won many accolades, including three Academy Awards, two Primetime Emmy Awards, a Tony Award, four Golden Globe Awards, and a BAFTA Award. Bergman was born in Stockholm to a Swedish father and a German mother, and started her acting career in Swedish and German films. Her introduction to Americans came in the English-language remake of Intermezzo (1939). In addition to the classic and Best-Picture-Academy-Award winning Casablanca (1942) opposite Humphrey Bogart, her notable performances from the 1940s include the dramas For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943), Gaslight (1944), The Bells of St. Mary's (1945), and Joan of Arc (1948), all of which earned her nominations for the Academy Award for Best Actress; she won the award for Gaslight. She made three films with Alfred Hitchcock including Spellbound (1945), with Gregory Peck, and Notorious (19

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Maya Angelou

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Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou ( (listen);[1][2] born Marguerite Annie Johnson; April 4, 1928 – May 28, 2014) was an American poet, singer, memoirist, and civil rights activist. She published seven autobiographies, three books of essays, several books of poetry, and is credited with a list of plays, movies, and television shows spanning over 50 years. She received dozens of awards and more than 50 honorary degrees.[3] Angelou is best known for her series of seven autobiographies, which focus on her childhood and early adult experiences. The first, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969), tells of her life up to the age of 17 and brought her international recognition and acclaim. She became a poet and writer after a series of occupations as a young adult, including fry cook, sex worker, nightclub dancer and performer, cast member of the opera Porgy and Bess, coordinator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and journalist in Egypt and Ghana during the decolonization of Africa. She was an actress, writer, director, a

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Roger Wilkins

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Roger Wilkins

Roger Wilkins (January 29, 1932 – March 26, 2017) was an African-American civil rights leader, professor of history, and journalist. Biography Wilkins was born in Kansas City, Missouri, on January 29, 1932,[1] and grew up in Michigan. He was educated at Crispus Attucks Elementary School[2] in Kansas City, Missouri, then Creston High School in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Wilkins received his A.B. degree in 1953 and J.D. degree in 1956, both from the University of Michigan, where he interned with the NAACP and was a member of the senior leadership society, Michigamua.[3] Career Wilkins worked as a welfare lawyer in Ohio before becoming an Assistant Attorney General in President Lyndon B. Johnson's administration at age 33, one of the highest-ranking blacks ever to serve in the executive branch up to that time. Roger Wilkins was sworn in as Director of the federal Community Relations Service on Friday, February 4, 1966, in a ceremony at The White House.[4] Leaving government in 1969 at the end of the Johnson a

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