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Accidental deaths in California


Joe Flynn (American actor)

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Joe Flynn (American actor)

Joseph Anthony Flynn III (November 8, 1924 – July 19, 1974) was an American character actor.[1] He was best known for his role as Captain Wallace Binghamton in the 1960s ABC television situation comedy McHale's Navy.[2] He was also a frequent guest star on 1960s TV shows, such as Batman, and appeared in several Walt Disney film comedies.[2] Early years He was born to a physician in Youngstown, Ohio. Flynn graduated from Rayen High School there and attended for one year the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. He then spent three years in the Army Medical Corps during World War II attaining the rank of staff sergeant before moving west, in 1946, to pursue acting and to complete his education. He majored in political science at the University of Southern California.[3] Early career Lon Chaney, Jr., Joe Flynn and Robert Shayne in Indestructible Man (1956) Flynn's interest in theater was evident well before his departure from northeastern Ohio. He established himself early on as a ventriloquis

Murdered male actors

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California Republicans

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Ohio Republicans

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Missy (actress)

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Missy (actress)

Missy (September 24, 1967 – August 13, 2008)[2] was an American pornographic actress.[1] Early life Missy graduated from Simi Valley High School and attended Moorpark College.[3] Prior to her porn career, she worked in an outpatient records unit in a Thousand Oaks hospital.[3] Career Missy began her career in the adult business in 1994,[1] when appearing in amateur videos with her then-husband Mickey G..[2] She became a non-exclusive contract girl with Wicked Pictures by 1997.[2][3] Missy was the first adult actress to ever win the AVN Awards for Best New Starlet and Female Performer of the Year in the same year.[4] She left the porn industry in 2001, sending an open letter to AVN magazine detailing that she had found religion after suffering a "mental breakdown."[2][5] Death In September 2008, AVN reported that Missy had died from an accidental prescription drug overdose from Amitriptyline intoxication, over a month earlier in Santa Clarita, California.[2] She is buried under her real name at Desert

LGBT entertainers from the United States

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American pornographic film actresses

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Women pornographic film directors

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Greg Plitt

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Greg Plitt

George Gregory Plitt, Jr. (November 3, 1977 – January 17, 2015) was an American fitness model, actor, and former Army Ranger. He starred in the Bravo television series Work Out.[2] He died at age 37 when he was struck by a train locomotive while filming a video. Early life, family and education Greg Plitt was originally from Lutherville, Maryland. His mother was an interior designer, and his father was a real estate agent.[2] Plitt had an older sister who attended the United States Naval Academy.[1] Plitt said that he had been a fitness buff since his father bought a home gym when Plitt was in sixth grade; he was further inspired after seeing how his older sister changed after her first year in the Naval Academy.[3] Plitt was a graduate of Gilman School, Class of 1996, in Baltimore, Maryland, where he was on the football, wrestling, and golf teams. He was also a graduate of the United States Military Academy, Class of 2000,[2] and was both Airborne and Ranger qualified. Career Plitt served in the US Arm

Male actors from Baltimore

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Railway accident deaths in the United States

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Accidental deaths in California

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Chalky Wright

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Chalky Wright

Albert "Chalky" Wright (February 1, 1912 – August 12, 1957) was an American featherweight boxer who fought from 1928 to 1948 and held the world featherweight championship in 1941-2. His career record was 161 wins (with 83 knockouts), 44 losses and 19 draws. In 2003, Wright ranked #95 on The Ring magazine's list of the 100 Greatest Punchers of All-Time. Early years and family Wright was born in Willcox, Arizona, though a few sources erroneously give Wright's place of birth as Durango, Colorado or Durango, Mexico),[2] the youngest of seven children born to James ("Jim") and Clara Wright (née Martin).[3] Wright's maternal grandfather, Caleb Baines Martin, was a runaway slave from Natchez, Mississippi who fled to the Arizona Territory shortly before the Civil War. After serving in the Union Army as a Buffalo Soldier, he homesteaded 160 acres in Graham County, Arizona. He bought cattle from Colonel Henry Hooker and established a dairy ranch on the property (which eventually grew to 640 acres), making him the fir

World featherweight boxing champions

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People from Willcox, Arizona

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American male boxers

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Death of Elisa Lam

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Death of Elisa Lam

The body of Elisa Lam, also known by her Cantonese name, Lam Ho Yi (藍可兒; April 30, 1991[1] – February 2013), a Canadian student at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, was recovered from a water tank atop the Cecil Hotel in Downtown Los Angeles on February 19, 2013.[2] She had been reported missing at the beginning of the month. Maintenance workers at the hotel discovered the body when investigating guest complaints of problems with the water supply. Her disappearance had been widely reported; interest had increased five days prior to her body's discovery when the Los Angeles Police Department released video of the last time she was known to have been seen, on the day of her disappearance, by an elevator security camera. In the footage, Lam is seen exiting and re-entering the elevator, talking and gesturing in the hallway outside, and sometimes seeming to hide within the elevator, which itself appears to be malfunctioning. The video went viral on the Internet, with many viewers reporting that the

2010s missing person cases

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Missing person cases in California

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February 2013 events in the United States

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Kevin Gilbert (musician)

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Kevin Gilbert (musician)

Kevin Matthew Gilbert (November 20, 1966 – May 18, 1996) was an American songwriter, musician, composer, producer and collaborator. Early life Kevin Matthew Gilbert was born in Sacramento, California on November 20, 1966, later living in Scotch Plains, New Jersey and San Mateo, California, where he attended Abbott Middle School and Junipero Serra High School.[1] Career 1980s: Early years Kevin Gilbert was an accomplished composer, singer and instrumentalist who played keyboards, guitar, bass guitar, cello, and drums. His talents also extended to production. He toured with Eddie Money before winning the 1988 Yamaha SOUNDCHECK International Rock Music Competition with his progressive rock group Giraffe.[2] Producer Patrick Leonard was impressed with Gilbert's performance at the competition and invited him to join him in forming a new band which became Toy Matinee. During this time, Gilbert worked on the projects of several established pop musicians, including Madonna, Michael Jackson, and Keith Emerson, act

Songwriters from California

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American male songwriters

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Singers from California

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Daniel J. Maloney

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Daniel J. Maloney

Portrait of Daniel J. Maloney, early US glider pilot, circa 1905 Daniel John Maloney (circa 1879 – July 18, 1905) was an American pioneering aviator and test pilot who made the first high-altitude flights by man using a Montgomery glider in 1905. Early life A native of the Mission district in San Francisco, California, Daniel Maloney started his career in aviation by making parachute jumps and trapeze stunts from tethered hot-air balloons in the 1890s at Glen Park, San Francisco and Idora Park in Oakland. For these events he would often adopt the name “Professor Lascelles” or “Jerome Lesalles” although he was never formally trained as a professor. Many of the parachute jumps occurred at heights of 500–800 feet above the ground. By 1904 he became a full-time aerial exhibitionist.[1] Aeronaut Maloney was hired by John J. Montgomery in early 1905 to serve as an aeronaut for a tandem-wing glider design called the Montgomery Aeroplane. In February 1905, Maloney was trained by Montgomery on the workings of the

People from Aptos, California

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Aviation pioneers

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Accidental deaths in California

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Dean Potter

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Dean Potter

Dean Spaulding Potter (April 14, 1972 – May 16, 2015) was an American free climber, alpinist, BASE jumper, and highliner.[2] He was noted for hard first ascents, free solo ascents, speed ascents, and enchainments in Yosemite National Park and Patagonia. Potter died in a wingsuit flying accident in Yosemite National Park.[3] Early life Dean Potter was born in 1972[4][1] to an Army officer in a military hospital at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas[5] and grew up in New Hampshire. He taught himself to climb when he was in 10th grade in southern New Hampshire. He attended the University of New Hampshire, where he rowed varsity crew and the coach urged the team not just to beat the competition, but to "own" them. Potter decided that he did not want to "own" anyone and he quit college and pursued his passion for climbing.[6] Free climbing Potter climbed many new routes and completed many solo ascents in Yosemite and Patagonia. He free-solo climbed a small part of El Capitan in Yosemite, where he pioneered a route he ca

Laureus World Sports Awards winners

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People from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

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People associated with the Eiger

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Todd Skinner

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Todd Skinner

Todd Richard Skinner (October 27, 1958 – October 23, 2006)[1] was an American free climber. His climbing achievements included the first free ascents of many routes around the world and the world's first free ascent of a grade 7 climb. Skinner was born in Pinedale, Wyoming, and planned to "take a little while off to climb" after gaining a degree in finance from the University of Wyoming in 1982. Instead, he became a full-time free climber and motivational speaker. In 1990, he settled in Lander, Wyoming, in part because he considered the dolomite cliffs there to be the ultimate training ground for free climbing. He opened the Wild Iris Mountain Sports store in Lander, and encouraged visits by climbers from around the world. He was married with three children. Todd Skinner was attempting to free climb the "Jesus Built My Hotrod" route up the face of Leaning Tower in Yosemite National Park on October 23, 2006. While rappelling down, he fell 500 feet and died. The cause of death was the failure of the belay loo

People from Lander, Wyoming

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People from Pinedale, Wyoming

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Accidental deaths in California

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Derek Hersey

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Derek Hersey

Derek Hersey (right) and friends making PBJ sandwiches, Yosemite Valley, California Hersey's business card Hersey bouldering in Zion Derek Geoffrey Hersey (26 October 1956 – 28 May 1993)[1][2][3][4] was a British rock climber and for many years an active participant in the Boulder, Colorado climbing scene. Climbing specialization Hersey specialized in unroped "free solo" climbing, often in the 5.10–5.11 range; he died during such a free solo climb.[3][5] Few climbers have tried to repeat his achievements, which include many of Colorado's hardest traditional routes. Background Originally from Stretford, Greater Manchester, England, Hersey referred to Eldorado Canyon as his 'office', where he could be seen on any day of the week,[2][6] if not on a road trip to Yosemite National Park or elsewhere. He also referred to Boulder, Colorado's Liquor Mart as 'The Shrine', and described his climbing-chalk bag as 'my bag of courage'. Hersey was featured in Climbing Magazine[7][8] and posthumously in the film F

Deaths in Yosemite National Park

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Accidental deaths in California

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Sports deaths in California

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Margaret Dunning

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Margaret Dunning

Margaret Isabel Dunning (June 26, 1910 – May 17, 2015) was an American businesswoman and philanthropist and benefactor of the Plymouth (Michigan) Historical Museum. She was born in Redford, Michigan. Personal life Dunning was the daughter of Charles Dunning and Elizabeth (Bessie) Rattenbury. Margaret spent her first 13 years on a dairy and potato farm owned by her father, located at the corner of Plymouth and Telegraph roads in Redford Township, Michigan. The 156-acre (63 ha) farm had been purchased by her grandparents, who were original settlers in the area. When Charles died in 1923, Margaret and her mother, Bessie, moved into Redford and later to the village of Plymouth. Bessie purchased property in the village and built the home where Margaret resided. Margaret attended the country school where her father was a student, and was then sent to Dana Hall, a private school in Wellesley, Massachusetts. She returned to Plymouth in 1927 and graduated from Plymouth High School in 1929.[1] She attended the Univer

Women centenarians

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Accidental deaths from falls

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Accidental deaths in California

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Bob Welch (baseball)

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Bob Welch (baseball)

Robert Lynn Welch (November 3, 1956 – June 9, 2014) was an American professional baseball starting pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1978–87) and Oakland Athletics (1988–94). Prior to his professional career, he attended Eastern Michigan University, where he played college baseball for the Eastern Michigan Hurons baseball team.[1] He helped lead the Hurons, coached by Ron Oestrike, to the 1976 College World Series, losing to Arizona in the Championship Game. Welch was a two-time MLB All-Star, and he won the American League Cy Young Award as the league's best pitcher in 1990. He was a three-time World Series champion - twice as a player and once as a coach. He is the last pitcher to win at least 25 games in a single season (27 in 1990).[1] Playing career In a 17-year career, Welch compiled a 211–146 record with 1,969 strikeouts and a 3.47 ERA in 3,092 innings. His 137 wins during the 1980s was third among major league pitchers during that decade, following Jack M

Accidental deaths from falls

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Accidental deaths in California

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San Antonio Dodgers players

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Lucía Zárate

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Lucía Zárate

Lucia Zarate (January 2, 1864 – January 15, 1890) was a Mexican entertainer with dwarfism who performed in sideshows. Zarate is the first person to have been identified with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II.[1] She was entered into the Guinness World Records as the "lightest recorded adult", weighing 4.7 pounds (2.1 kg) at the age of 17.[2] Early life She was born in San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas (which became the town of Ursulo Galvan), Veracruz, Mexico, and settled on the Agostadero, (later Cempoala), Veracruz. According to an 1894 article in Strand Magazine, Zarate achieved her full growth by the age of one year.[3] Her family home, Casa Grande (Big House) is open to the public as a museum.[4] Career At age twelve, Zarate moved from Mexico to the United States, where she was exhibited for her small stature. She first worked as part of an act billed as the "Fairy Sisters", later partnering with Francis Joseph Flynn (billed under the stage name "General Mite") to exhibit internationally.[5

1864 births

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Guinness World Records winners

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Actresses from Veracruz

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James Horner

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James Horner

James Roy Horner (August 14, 1953 – June 22, 2015) was an American composer, conductor and orchestrator of film scores, writing over 100. He was known for the integration of choral and electronic elements, and for his frequent use of motifs associated with Celtic music.[1][2] Horner's first major score was in 1979 for The Lady in Red, but he did not establish himself as an eminent film composer until his work on the 1982 film Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.[3] His score for James Cameron's Titanic is the best-selling orchestral film soundtrack of all time.[4][5] He also wrote the score for the second highest-grossing film of all time, Cameron's Avatar.[6] Horner collaborated on multiple projects with directors including Don Bluth, James Cameron, Joe Johnston, Walter Hill and Ron Howard; producers including George Lucas, David Kirschner, Jon Landau, Brian Grazer and Steven Spielberg; and songwriters including Will Jennings, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil. He won two Academy Awards, six Grammy Awards, two Golde

Decca Records artists

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Jewish American classical musicians

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Sony Classical Records artists

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Los Angeles County Jane Doe (1921 - 1951)

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Los Angeles County Jane Doe (1921 - 1951)

Unidentified decedents are a group of people who have died but officials were unable to discover who they were when they were alive. Several victims are not identified for several years or even decades after their deaths, one case being that of Barbara Precht, who died in 2006 and was identified in 2014.[1] Around 40,000 decedents still remain unidentified in the United States.[2][3] Los Angeles County Does (1921–1951) Retouched morgue photograph of the female victim killed in a dynamite explosion between 1921 and 1951. Two children were witnessed playing with sticks of dynamite in Los Angeles County, California between the years of 1921 and 1951. Poor record keeping resulted in the exact date of the incident being unknown; the time range was established from the thirty-year career of the particular crime scene photographer. The dynamite subsequently exploded and killed both the victims, one male and one female. Very little is known about these two victims, especially the male child, as it was impossible

Unidentified decedents in California

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Unsolved deaths

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California-related lists

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Charles H. Larrabee

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Charles H. Larrabee

Charles Hathaway Larrabee (November 9, 1820 – January 20, 1883) was a Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Wisconsin for the 36th Congress (1859-1860). He was a lawyer and Union army officer in the American Civil War. Early life Larrabee was born in Rome, New York on November 9, 1820, the son of Charles Larrabee of Connecticut. His family moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where young Charles attended Springfield Academy and then Granville College from 1834 to 1836. At Granville he specialized in English studies, mathematics and ancient languages.[1]:4[2] Later, he read law with Samson Mason and W.A. Rogers in Springfield, Ohio.[1]:4 He studied law with Congressman Samson Mason in Ohio, but before becoming a lawyer, Larrabee worked as an engineer and helped survey the Little Miami Railroad.[2] He was admitted to the bar in September 1841, in Pontotoc, Mississippi, and in the same year ran unsuccessfully for the Mississippi Legislature. He moved to Chicago in 1844, where he edited the Democratic Advocat

People from Horicon, Wisconsin

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Politicians from Rome, New York

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U.S. state supreme court judges admitted to the...

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Hal Ledyard

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Hal Ledyard

Harold "Hal" Ledyard (July 7, 1931 – April 21, 1973) was a professional gridiron football player in the National Football League and Canadian Football League. After backing up future Pro Football Hall of Famer Y. A. Tittle in 1953, Ledyard joined the United States Army, where he played quarterback for the Fort Jackson base football team in 1955.[1] Ledyard joined the Ottawa Rough Riders in 1956 and spent three seasons as the team's starting quarterback before being replaced by Frank Tripucka before the 1959 season. Ledyard signed with the Toronto Argonauts in 1959, but was waived before the season began.[2] After not being signed during the 1960 football season, Ledyard returned to the CFL in 1961 with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers, splitting playing time with Dick Thornton and future Canadian Football Hall of Famer Ken Ploen. During his time in Winnipeg, Ledyard was known as "The best relief pitcher in football"[3][4] due to his success relieving Ploen. He was a part of the Blue Bomber teams that won the 49th

Deaths by drowning

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Accidental deaths in California

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Players of American football from Alabama

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Hans Otto Storm

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Hans Otto Storm

Hans Otto Storm (1895–1941) was a German-American novelist and radio engineer.[1] His literary reputation quickly faded into obscurity after his early death, but in the 1940s received some positive praise from literary critic Edmund Wilson.[2] He is one of many people who has been speculatively suggested to be the pseudonymous writer B. Traven.[3] Life Storm was born in Bloomington, California to German parents who may have been refugees fleeing anti-socialist fervor following the failed Revolutions of 1848.[3] He studied engineering at Stanford University and entered the emerging field of radio. He traveled in South and Central America, including long spells in Nicaragua and Peru.[3] He served two years with a United States Army hospital during World War I.[3] Storm died of accidental electrocution on December 11, 1941, a few days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, while rushing to complete a large radio transformer for the Army Signal Corps in a laboratory in San Francisco.[1][3] His literary papers are

1939 novels

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Accidental deaths in California

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Accidental deaths by electrocution

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Jacque MacKinnon

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Jacque MacKinnon

Jacque Harold MacKinnon (November 10, 1938 – March 6, 1975) was an American football tight end in the American Football League for the San Diego Chargers. He also was a member of the Oakland Raiders in the National Football League and the Southern California Sun in the World Football League. He played college football at Colgate University. Early years Born and raised in Dover, New Jersey, MacKinnon attended Dover High School.[1] He was a running back in football, a sprinter in track and a center in basketball. He accepted a football scholarship from Colgate University, where he was a standout at halfback. Professional career MacKinnon was selected by the San Diego Chargers in the 33rd round (264th overall) of the 1962 AFL Draft and the Philadelphia Eagles in the 20th round (280th overall) of the 1961 NFL Draft. As the last player selected in the 1961 NFL Draft, he was designated Mr. Irrelevant, however, he is the only such player ever to be eventually selected as an All-Star. He opted to sign with the

Southern California Sun players

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Sportspeople from Morris County, New Jersey

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American Football League players

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Bill Bridgeman

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Bill Bridgeman

William Barton "Bill" Bridgeman (June 25, 1916 – September 29, 1968) was an American test pilot who broke aviation records while working for the Douglas Aircraft Company, testing experimental aircraft. In July 1951, the United States Navy announced the D-558-II Skyrocket piloted by Bridgeman had "attained the highest speed and altitude ever recorded by a piloted plane."[1][2] On August 15 of the same year, he set a world record with a speed of Mach 1.88 and an unofficial record height of 79,494 feet (24,230 m).[3][4] Bridgeman was born in Ottumwa, Iowa. His father was a barnstormer and separated from his mother shortly after he was born. He was raised in Malibu, California by his paternal grandmother and majored in geology in college. He enlisted in the United States Navy to attend flight school at Pensacola. He graduated and was commissioned in 1941, and was sent to Pearl Harbor, where he experienced the Japanese attack on December 7. He flew PBY flying boats in the New Guinea/Australia sector, then four-e

People from Ottumwa, Iowa

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American aviation record holders

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Accidental deaths in California

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Bill Graham (promoter)

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Bill Graham (promoter)

Bill Graham (born Wulf Wolodia Grajonca; January 8, 1931 – October 25, 1991) was a German-American impresario and rock concert promoter from the 1960s until his death in 1991 in a helicopter crash. On July 4, 1939 he was sent from Germany to France to escape the Nazis. At age 10 he settled in a foster home in the Bronx, New York. Graham graduated from DeWitt Clinton High School and from City College with a business degree. In the early 1960s, he moved to San Francisco, and, in 1965, began to manage the San Francisco Mime Troupe.[1] He had teamed up with local Haight Ashbury promoter Chet Helms and Family Dog, and their network of contacts, to organize a benefit concert, then promoted several free concerts. This eventually turned into a profitable full-time career and he assembled a talented staff. Graham had a profound influence around the world, sponsoring the musical renaissance of the '60s from the epicenter, San Francisco. Chet Helms and then Bill Graham made famous the Fillmore and Winterland Arena; the

Jewish American military personnel

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Jewish emigrants from Nazi Germany to the Unite...

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Pages with missing ISBNs

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Fletcher Jones (American entrepreneur)

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Fletcher Jones (American entrepreneur)

Fletcher Roseberry Jones (January 22, 1931 – November 7, 1972) was an American businessman, computer pioneer and thoroughbred racehorse owner. Early life and education Born in Bryan, Texas, Jones was the third of three children of an impoverished Depression era family. He graduated from Allen Military Academy in 1949, then studied at university for two years, but did not graduate. His interest in mathematics led to jobs in the fledgling computer departments at aviation companies. Married in 1951, he was transferred to California by his employer, North American Aviation Corp. After time at the company's offices in Columbus, Ohio, Jones and his wife and two small children settled in Los Angeles where he managed a North American Aviation computer center. Career In 1959, Fletcher Jones went into business with Roy Nutt, a widely respected computer programmer who had been working for United Aircraft Corp. The two founded a software services company named Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), when Jones, who ran

People from Bryan, Texas

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Businesspeople from Texas

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American computer businesspeople

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Victor Sen Yung

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Victor Sen Yung

Victor Sen Yung and Willie Best in Dangerous Money (1946) Victor Sen Yung (traditional Chinese: 揚森; simplified Chinese: 扬森; pinyin: Yáng Sēn; Jyutping: Joeng4 Sam1; October 18, 1915 – c. October 31, 1980),[1] born Sen Yew Cheung,[2] was an American character actor, best known for playing Jimmy Chan in the Charlie Chan films and Hop Sing in the western series Bonanza. He was born in San Francisco, California to Gum Yung Sen and his first wife, both immigrants from China.[3] When his mother died during the flu epidemic of 1919, his father placed Victor and his younger sister, Rosemary, in a children's shelter, and returned to his homeland to seek another wife. He returned in 1922 with his new wife, Lovi Shee, once again forming a household with his two children.[4] During his acting career, Victor was given billing under a variety of names, including Sen Yung, Sen Young, Victor Sen Young, and Victor Young. Career Sen Yung made his first significant acting debut in the 1938 film Charlie Chan in Honolulu, as

American male actors of Chinese descent

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NPOV disputes from March 2017

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Hong Kong people of Taishan descent

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Death of Mitrice Richardson

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Death of Mitrice Richardson

Mitrice Lavon Richardson (born April 30, 1985 – remains found August 9, 2010) was a 24-year-old American woman who went missing on September 17, 2009, after being released from a jail in Calabasas, California, where she had been taken after behaving erratically at a restaurant. She was missing for 11 months before being found deceased in August 2010 by park rangers who were in the area to inspect a marijuana grow site.[1] Richardson's parents have maintained that their daughter should never have been released on her own by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, given her obviously disturbed condition. In 2011, they won civil lawsuits against the county of $900,000 in damages. In January 2017, the California Attorney General's office concluded an investigation into the circumstances surrounding Richardson's release from jail and decided not to bring charges against anyone involved in her release.[2] Early life and education Mitrice Richardson was the daughter of Latice Sutton and Michael Richardson. S

Deaths by person in the United States

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LGBT people from California

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2000s missing person cases

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Iven Carl Kincheloe Jr.

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Iven Carl Kincheloe Jr.

Iven Carl "Kinch" Kincheloe Jr.[1] (July 2, 1928 – July 26, 1958)[2][3] was an American fighter pilot, test pilot, aeronautical engineer, and a flying ace in the Korean War.[3][4] Early life and education Born in Detroit, Michigan, Kincheloe grew up in Cassopolis in the southwest part of the state, the only child of Iven C. Kincheloe Sr. (1894–1966) and Frances Wilder Kincheloe.[5] Interested in aviation from a very young age, he graduated from Dowagiac High School in 1945 and attended Purdue University in Indiana. Kincheloe joined the Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC), was a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity (Indiana Alpha), and graduated in 1949 with a bachelor's degree in aeronautical engineering. In the summer of 1948, the ROTC cadet met test pilot Chuck Yeager and sat in the cockpit of the Bell X-1. Korean War Upon graduation from college, Kincheloe received his commission in the U.S. Air Force and entered flight training. After earning his pilot wings in August 1950, he spent a year as a

Burials at Arlington National Cemetery

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Recipients of the Silver Star

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Recipients of the Distinguished Flying Cross (U...

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Robert Henry Lawrence Jr.

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Robert Henry Lawrence Jr.

Robert Henry Lawrence Jr. (October 2, 1935 – December 8, 1967) was a United States Air Force officer and the first African-American astronaut.[1] Early years Lawrence was born October 2, 1935, in Chicago, Illinois. He attended Haines Elementary School and, at the age of 16, he graduated in the top 10 percent from Englewood High School in Chicago, in 1952. At the age of 20, he graduated from Bradley University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry. At Bradley, Lawrence became a member of Omega Psi Phi fraternity[2] and distinguished himself as Cadet Commander in the Air Force ROTC and received the commission of second lieutenant in the Air Force Reserve Program. Air Force Robert Henry Lawrence during his Air Force career At the age of 21, he was designated as a U.S. Air Force pilot after completing flight training at Malden Air Force Base, Missouri. At 22, he married Barbara Cress, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Henry Cress of Chicago. By the time he was 25, he had completed an Air Force assignment

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Mike Bell (wrestler)

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Mike Bell (wrestler)

Michael Bell (March 18, 1971 – December 14, 2008) was an American professional wrestler who worked for the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) and Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW) as Mike "Mad Dog" Bell.[2] He was the brother of Mark Bell and Chris Bell (director of the 2008 documentary, Bigger, Stronger, Faster), and the 2015 follow up documentary, Prescription Thugs, in which Mike Bell's life and death by prescription drugs are explored. Professional wrestling career Bell worked as a jobber for WWE (then-named, the World Wrestling Federation, or, WWF) during the early-1990s, even performing on its flagship TV show, Monday Night Raw. Like many jobbers of that era, Bell worked on a match-by-match basis for the WWF, never being under continuous contract with the promotion.[3] Bell later worked with the original ECW, including performing at the Mid-Hudson Civic Center. Bell was well known in the wrestling community for a 2001 incident with Perry Saturn during a taped WWF match for Jakked/Metal. Bell and Sat

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Anton Yelchin

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Anton Yelchin

Anton Viktorovich Yelchin (Russian: Анто́н Ви́кторович Е́льчин, IPA: ; March 11, 1989 – June 19, 2016) was an American actor. He played Pavel Chekov in three Star Trek films: Star Trek (2009), Star Trek Into Darkness (2013), and the posthumously released Star Trek Beyond (2016). Born to a Russian Jewish family in Leningrad, Yelchin and his family moved to the United States when he was a baby. In the late 1990s, Yelchin began appearing in television and film roles. His role in Steven Spielberg's miniseries Taken helped further his career.[1] Yelchin also starred in Huff, the films Fright Night, Hearts in Atlantis, Alpha Dog, Like Crazy, Green Room, and the posthumously released Trollhunters. Early life Yelchin was born on March 11, 1989, in Leningrad, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union (now Saint Petersburg, Russia).[2][3] His parents, Irina Korina and Viktor Yelchin, were pair figure skaters who were stars of the Leningrad Ice Ballet for 15 years.[4][5] His family is Jewish and were subjected to religious and polit

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Eric Show

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Eric Show

Eric Vaughn Show (May 19, 1956 – March 16, 1994) was a Major League Baseball player who played for most of his career with the San Diego Padres. The pitcher holds the Padres record for most career wins, and he was a member of the first Padres team to play in the World Series. On September 11, 1985, he surrendered Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd career hit. Show's later life was affected by drug abuse. He was found dead in his room at a drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility in 1994. Early life Eric Show was born in Riverside, California. He attended the University of California, Riverside, where he majored in physics and played college baseball for the Highlanders from 1976–1978. In 1977, Show won a Division II College World Series with the team.[1][2][3] Playing career 1981–1984 Show made his debut in late September 1981, and the following year went 10–6 while splitting time between the starting rotation and bullpen. In 1983 he won 15 games. In 1984, he followed with a 15–9 record. However, he stru

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James Dean

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James Dean

James Byron Dean (February 8, 1931 – September 30, 1955) was an American actor. He is remembered as a cultural icon of teenage disillusionment and social estrangement, as expressed in the title of his most celebrated film, Rebel Without a Cause (1955), in which he starred as troubled teenager Jim Stark. The other two roles that defined his stardom were loner Cal Trask in East of Eden (1955) and surly ranch hand Jett Rink in Giant (1956). After his death in a car crash,[1] Dean became the first actor to receive a posthumous Academy Award nomination for Best Actor, and remains the only actor to have had two posthumous acting nominations.[2] In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked him the 18th best male movie star of Golden Age Hollywood in AFI's 100 Years...100 Stars list.[3] Early life James Byron Dean was born on February 8, 1931 at the Seven Gables apartment on the corner of 4th Street and McClure Street in Marion, Indiana,[4] the only child of Mildred Marie (Wilson) and Winton Dean. He was primarily

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Ray Conniff

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Ray Conniff

Joseph Raymond Conniff (November 6, 1916 – October 12, 2002) was an American bandleader and arranger best known for his Ray Conniff Singers during the 1960s. Biography Conniff was born in Attleboro, Massachusetts, United States,[1] and learned to play the trombone from his father. He studied music arranging from a course book.[2] Early career After serving in the U.S. Army in World War II (where he worked under Walter Schumann), he joined the Artie Shaw big band and wrote many arrangements for him.[1] After his stint with Shaw, he was then hired by Mitch Miller in 1954, then head of A&R at Columbia Records, as their home arranger, working with several artists including Rosemary Clooney, Marty Robbins, Frankie Laine, Johnny Mathis, Guy Mitchell and Johnnie Ray.[1] He wrote a top 10 arrangement for Don Cherry's "Band of Gold" in 1955, a single that sold more than a million copies.[1] Among the hit singles he backed with his orchestra (and eventually with a male chorus) were "Yes Tonight Josephine" and

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Leonard Cohen

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Leonard Cohen

Leonard Norman Cohen CC GOQ (September 21, 1934 – November 7, 2016) was a Canadian singer, songwriter, poet, and novelist. His work explored religion, politics, isolation, depression, sexuality, loss, death and romantic relationships.[2] Cohen was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He was invested as a Companion of the Order of Canada, the nation's highest civilian honour. In 2011, Cohen received one of the Prince of Asturias Awards for literature and the ninth Glenn Gould Prize. Cohen pursued a career as a poet and novelist during the 1950s and early 1960s; he did not launch a music career until 1967, at the age of 33. His first album, Songs of Leonard Cohen (1967), was followed by three more albums of folk music: Songs from a Room (1969), Songs of Love and Hate (1971) and New Skin for the Old Ceremony (1974). His 1977 record Death of a Ladies' Man, co-written and produced by Phil Spector, was a move away from Cohen's pre

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Lisa Robin Kelly

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Lisa Robin Kelly

Lisa Robin Kelly (March 5, 1970 – August 15, 2013)[1] was an American actress. She was best known for her role as Laurie Forman on the TV series That '70s Show. Early life Kelly was born in Southington, Connecticut and raised there and in Mooresville, North Carolina.[2][3] Her parents were Thomas Carl Kelly and Linda Diane (née Grimm) Kelly.[1] Career Kelly made her debut in the 1992 Married... with Children episode "Kelly Doesn't Live Here Anymore". She appeared again in 1994 in episodes of Silk Stalkings and on Charmed in 1999, as well as in direct-to-video and television films such as Amityville Dollhouse, Late Last Night and Jawbreaker. Kelly played Laurie Forman, the older sister of Eric Forman, on That '70s Show. She abruptly left the show midway through the third season, and her character was written out of the show to "attend beauty school". She returned to the show in the fifth season for four episodes but was replaced with Christina Moore in the sixth season. In an interview with ABC News, she

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Greg Moore (racing driver)

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Greg Moore (racing driver)

Gregory William Moore (April 22, 1975 – October 31, 1999) was a Canadian race car driver who competed in the Indy Lights and Championship Auto Racing Teams (CART) from 1993 to 1999. He began competitive karting at the age of ten and achieved early success, before progressing to open-wheel car racing in the Canadian Formula Ford Championship in 1991. Moore won the 1992 USAC FF2000 Western Division Championship and the 1995 Indy Lights Championship. He began competing in CART with Forsythe Racing in 1996, finishing ninth in the drivers' championship and was second to Alex Zanardi in the Rookie of the Year standings. The following year, Moore claimed the first two victories of his career to finish seventh in the points' standings. He improved on his performance to place fifth overall with a further two wins in 1998. In 1999, he took another win as his form lowered and fell to tenth. At the season-ending Marlboro 500 at California Speedway, Moore was killed in a violent airborne collision with a concrete barrier

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Elizabeth Peña

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Elizabeth Peña

Elizabeth Maria Peña (September 23, 1959 – October 14, 2014) was an American actress, writer, panelist and musician. Her work in films included Nothing like the Holidays, Batteries Not Included, La Bamba, Down and Out in Beverly Hills, Jacob's Ladder, Rush Hour, The Incredibles, and Lone Star, for which she won the 1996 Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting Female and a Bravo Award for Outstanding Actress in a Feature Film. She was also a founding member of the Hispanic Organization of Latin Actors. Peña also voiced Rosa Santos in Maya and Miguel. Early life Peña was born on September 23, 1959[1] in Elizabeth, New Jersey, where she was raised, the daughter of Mario Peña, an actor, director, and writer who co-founded the Latin American Theatre Ensemble, and Estella Margarita (Toirac) Peña, an arts administrator and producer.[1][2] She is of Cuban descent, and spent her early years in Cuba.[3] At age 8, Peña and her family moved to New York City. In 1975, she was a founding member of the Hispanic Organ

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Charles McGraw

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Charles McGraw

Charles Butters (May 10, 1914 – July 30, 1980), best known by his stage name Charles McGraw, was an American actor. Early life The son of Francis Butters and Beatrice Crisp Butters, McGraw was born in Des Moines, Iowa.[1] (A newspaper article published in 1951 says of McGraw, "He was born in New York City, but his parents moved to Akron, Ohio, when he was five years old.")[2] In January 1932, he graduated from high school, later attending college for one semester.[3] His early jobs included working on a freighter and dancing in night clubs.[2] Career Stage Before getting into film, McGraw was active in theatrical road companies.[2] He also appeared in "dozens of off-Broadway productions."[4] Film McGraw made his first film in 1942 with a small, uncredited role in The Undying Monster at Fox. He was in Tonight We Raid Calais (1942) and They Came to Blow Up America (1943) at the same studio, and also Two Tickets to London (1943), Destroyer (1943), Corvette K-225 (1943), The Mad Ghoul (1943), The Impostor

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Trice Harvey

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Trice Harvey

Trice Jeraine Harvey (July 14, 1936 – January 31, 2017) was an American politician in the state of California. Born in Paragould, Arkansas, Trice served on the Kern County, California Board of Supervisors from 1977 to 1987 and on the Rosedale School Board from 1972 to 1976. Trice also served as an inspector for the Kern County Board of Health. He served in the California State Assembly from 1986 to 1996.[1][2][3] Harvey died as a result of a fall.[4] References Bakersfield, The (May 24, 2016). "Kern County hasn't seen last of Harvey". Bakersfield Californian. Retrieved May 28, 2016. "California Green Book". Books.google.ca. Retrieved May 28, 2016. JoinCalifornia.com.-Trice Harvey Price, Robert (January 31, 2017). "Trice Harvey dies at 80". Bakersfield Californian. Retrieved February 1, 2017.

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Frank Clarke (pilot)

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Frank Clarke (pilot)

From a 1921 magazine noting a stunt for Stranger Than Fiction (1921) Frank Clarke (29 December 1898 - 12 June 1948) was a Hollywood stunt pilot, actor,[1] and military officer. His most prominent role was as Leutnant von Bruen (and double for von Richthofen in combat scenes) in the 1930 production Hell's Angels, but he flew for the camera and performed stunts in more than a dozen films in the 1930s and 1940s. Clarke was killed in an aircraft crash near Isabella, California, in 1948.[2] Early life Clarke was born near Paso Robles, California, on December 29, 1898. He came into prominence when he moved to Venice, California and learned to fly, purchasing a war surplus Curtiss JN-4. His first exploits were as a "stunt" pilot, with a risky mid-air transfer from one aircraft to another reported in local media on October 4, 1919. Clarke was positioned on the top wing of a Curtiss "Jenny" and after two misses, was able to catch the landing gear of the aircraft flown by fellow aviator Al Wilson. Newspapers herald

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Daryl (magician)

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Daryl (magician)

Daryl Easton (August 13, 1955 – February 24, 2017), known professionally as Daryl and born Daryl Martinez, was an American magician based in Las Vegas. In his marketing he used the self-proclaimed title of "The Magician's Magician".[2] Daryl usually went by his forename only. He specialized in card tricks, close-up and parlor magic. Career Two of his most famous contributions to magic were the "Hot Shot Cut", a knuckle-busting sleight where the spectator's chosen card spins like a boomerang out of the deck, and the "Ultimate Ambition" trick which allows a card to be inserted fairly into the middle of a deck and yet appear back on top.[3] Daryl won the gold medal at FISM - the World Congress of Magic (the "Olympics" of Magic), in Lausanne, Switzerland in 1982, with a routine that included his now famous Ambitious Card Routine using the Ultimate Ambition. He won six Academy Awards from The Magic Castle in Hollywood, California. Twice, his peers voted him Close-Up Magician of the Year (1980 and 1981), twice

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Jack Nance

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Jack Nance

Marvin John Nance (December 21, 1943 – December 30, 1996) was an American actor of stage and screen.[2] He was known for his work with director David Lynch,[2] particularly for his starring roles in Eraserhead (1977)[2] and Twin Peaks (1990–1991).[2] Early life Nance was born in Boston, Massachusetts and was raised in Dallas, Texas.[2] He graduated from South Oak Cliff High School. His father retired from Neiman Marcus. He worked for some time with the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco. In the 1970s, Nance met David Lynch, who cast him as the lead in Eraserhead.[3] Later career After Eraserhead, he remained on good terms with Lynch, who cast him in nearly all of his projects: Dune (1984): a small role as the Harkonnen Captain Iakin Nefud. Blue Velvet (1986): a supporting role as Paul, a friend of Dennis Hopper's villain character. The Cowboy and the Frenchman (1988): plays Pete, one of the cowboys. Wild at Heart (1990): a small role as "00 Spool". Twin Peaks (1990–91): as Pete Mar

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Van Dyke family

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Beverly Wills

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Beverly Wills

Beverly Wills (June 7, 1933 – October 24, 1963) was an American television and film actress. Biography She was born in 1933 as Beverly Josephine Williams in Los Angeles to actress and comedian Joan Davis and actor and writer Si Wills. Wills made her film debut in George White's Scandals (1945) when she was 11 years old.[1] Mickey (1948) followed three years later. In 1952, at the age of 18, Wills appeared with her mother and Jim Backus in the TV comedy, I Married Joan (1952–55). She played the younger sister of her real-life mother.[2] After the series ended its run, Wills appeared in only four more films including Some Like It Hot (1959) and Son of Flubber (1963). Wills' first marriage was to Lee Bamber, a Pasadena fireman, in 1952. Bamber and Wills eloped to Carson City, Nevada. The couple divorced in 1953. She was later married to Alan Grossman on July 12, 1954; the couple had two sons. Wills and Grossman divorced and she was remarried to Martin Colbert.[3][4][5] On October 24, 1963, Wills died in a h

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Harold Pruett

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Harold Pruett

Harold P. Pruett (April 13, 1969 – February 21, 2002) was an American film and television actor. He appeared in over thirty films and TV series throughout the 1970s to the 1990s. Career Born in Anchorage, Alaska, Pruett made his acting debut at age five in the 1976 film Sybil, starring Sally Field. He went on to appear in Summer Camp Nightmare (1987), Embrace of the Vampire (1995) and Precious Find (1996).[1] During the 1970s and 1980s, Pruett guest starred on numerous television series including Wonder Woman, The New Leave It to Beaver, It's Your Move, Eye to Eye, The Best Times, Hotel and Night Court. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, he danced in several music videos including two for pop singer Martika: "More Than You Know" (1989) and "Coloured Kisses" (1992). In 1990, Pruett landed his first co-starring television role on the NBC musical teen drama Hull High.[1] Due to low ratings, the series was canceled in October 1990 after nine episodes.[2] Later that year, he was cast as "Steve Randle" in the te

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Ike Turner

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Ike Turner

Izear Luster "Ike" Turner Jr. (November 5, 1931 – December 12, 2007) was an American musician, bandleader, songwriter, arranger, talent scout, and record producer. An early pioneer of fifties rock and roll, he is best known for his work in the 1960s and 1970s with his then-wife Tina Turner in the Ike & Tina Turner Revue. Turner began playing piano and guitar as a child, then formed a group, the Kings of Rhythm, as a teenager.[1] He employed the group as his backing band for the rest of his life. His first recording, "Rocket 88" (1951) (credited to "Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats"), is considered a contender for the distinction of "first rock and roll song". During the 1950s, Turner also worked as a talent scout and producer for Sun Records and Modern Records.[2] He was instrumental in the early careers of various blues musicians, such as B.B. King, Howlin' Wolf, and Bobby "Blue" Bland.[3] When Turner relocated to East St. Louis in 1954, his Kings of Rhythm became one of the most renowned acts on the

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Scott Darling (screenwriter)

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Scott Darling (screenwriter)

William Scott Darling (May 28, 1898 – October 29, 1951) was a Canadian-born writer and a pioneer screenwriter and film director in the Hollywood motion picture industry. He is often known in Hollywood histories as Scott Darling, though he was almost invariably credited in films as W. Scott Darling. Biography Born in Toronto, Ontario, Darling embarked on a career as a writer, primarily doing humor stories for magazines. He married Eleanor Fried, who later worked as a film editor, and they had a daughter, Gretchen (1915–1994), who became a stage actress and playwright. In 1914, Darling was hired by the Kalem Company of New York City to work at their California studios writing the scripts for the adventure film serial The Hazards of Helen. So successful were the short films that the job would last more than two years with Darling writing 119 episodes of what became the longest serial ever made at 23.8 hours. When finished writing the exhausting serial he took a year off then in 1918 accepted an offer from fel

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Robbie McIntosh (drummer)

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Robbie McIntosh (drummer)

Robert Broderick James McIntosh (6 May 1950 – 23 September 1974) was a Scottish drummer from Dundee, who was a founder-member of the Average White Band (AWB). His father was American-born actor Bonar Colleano, who had a successful career in films, especially in the UK. He was not married to Robbie's mother. Before going on to help found the AWB in 1971-72, McIntosh had been a member of the late 1960s bands the Senate with Alex Ligertwood, and Mal and the Primitives, followed by Brian Auger's Oblivion Express, appearing on the band's early albums Oblivion Express (1971), Better Land (1971) and Second Wind (1972). While working with the AWB, he also recorded two tracks that appear on the Herbie Mann album London Underground (1973). McIntosh died of an accidental heroin overdose,[1] at a party following a concert at the Troubadour in Los Angeles. According to a contemporary report in Time,[2] McIntosh and fellow band member Alan Gorrie took what they thought was cocaine, but was in fact heroin; Gorrie was save

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Gus Sandberg

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Gus Sandberg

Gustave E. Sandberg (February 23, 1895 – February 3, 1930), whose last name was sometimes spelled Sanberg, was a catcher in Major League Baseball. He played for the Cincinnati Reds in the 1923 and 1924 seasons. While playing in the minor leagues, Sandberg died of injuries sustained in an accidental fire. Early life Sandberg, from New York City, played semipro baseball as a young man. With the Empire City A.A. team from Ridgewood, Queens, Sandberg was teammates with future major league players including Jimmy Ring and Hugh McQuillan.[1] Career In July 1915, Sandberg signed a contract to play with the New York Giants organization, and in early 1916 the team sent him to play with the Albany Senators of the New York State League.[2] In 1919, Sandberg joined the Toronto Maple Leafs of the International League.[3] The next year, newspapers reported that several major league managers - most recently George Stallings of the Boston Braves - were interested in signing him.[4] In 1923, Sandberg was with the Cincinn

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James Banning

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James Banning

James Herman Banning James Herman Banning (November 5, 1900 – February 5, 1933) was an American aviation pioneer. In 1932, James Banning, accompanied by Thomas C. Allen, became America's first black aviator to fly coast-to-coast. Background Dreaming from boyhood of being a pilot, Banning eventually learned to fly from an army aviator after being repeatedly turned away from flight schools due to racial discrimination. He later became a demonstration pilot on the west coast, flying a biplane named "Miss Ames" (he had attended Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa). The flight James Banning and his mechanic Thomas Allen made the historic flight using a plane supplemented with surplus parts. The "Flying Hoboes," as they were affectionately known,[1] made the 3,300 mile trip from Los Angeles to Long Island, NY in 41 hours and 27 minutes aloft. However, the trip actually required 21 days to complete because the pilots had to raise money for the next leg of the trip each time they stopped. Death Only four month

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Chris Antley

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Chris Antley

Christopher Wiley Antley (January 6, 1966 – December 2, 2000) was a champion American jockey. Biography He was born in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and grew up in Elloree, South Carolina. He left school at sixteen to ride horses professionally at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, Maryland. His first win was on a horse named Vaya Con Dinero. Soon, he left Maryland to race in New York and New Jersey and at the age of 18 was the United States Champion Jockey by wins with 469. In the late 1980s, Antley spent time in a substance abuse clinic. In 1987, he became the first rider to win 9 races on 9 different horses in a single day[1] and in 1989, he won at least one race a day for 64 straight days. In 1990, Antley moved to California. In 1991, he rode Strike the Gold to victory in the Kentucky Derby. In 1997, he temporarily retired to deal with weight and drug problems. Then in 1999, Antley returned to ride the D. Wayne Lukas-trained Charismatic, and they won that year's Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes. In the

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Erik Roner

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Erik Roner

Nitro Circus is an "action sport collective" led by Travis Pastrana, featuring his friends and him traveling around the world riding dirtbikes, BASE jumping, and performing stunts. Co-founded in 2003 by Pastrana, Nitro Circus has become a media company that produces television programming, documentaries and the Nitro Circus Live tour. In 2016, the company introduced the Nitro World Games, an action sports competition designed around pushing progression in core action sports disciplines like FMX, BMX, skate and scooter. History DVDs The collective began by releasing 8 DVDs during the early 2000s. Good sales led to the creation of the television show. Title Travis & the Nitro Circus Travis & the Nitro Circus 2 Nitro Circus 3 Nitro Circus 4: Lock N Load Nitro Circus 5: Thrillbillies Nitro Circus 6: Thrillbillies Doublewide Nitro Circus 7: Country Fried Nitro Circus: Greatest Hits Television show Originally run as a 2006 miniseries on Fuel TV, it began running as an episodic realit

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