Boeing aircraft


Boeing CC-137

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Boeing CC-137

The Boeing CC-137 is the designation for five Boeing 707-347C transport aircraft which served with the Canadian Forces from 1970 to 1997. The aircraft provided long range passenger transport for the military, VIP transport for government and air-to-air refueling for fighters such as the CF-116 Freedom Fighter and CF-18 Hornet. It was replaced by the Airbus CC-150 Polaris in the transport role and much later in the tanker role. Design and development During the 1960s, the Royal Canadian Air Force set out a requirement to replace the aging fleet of Canadair CC-106 Yukons and Canadair CC-109 Cosmopolitan transports. Initially, the Boeing KC-135 was being considered because the versatile design could also fulfill a yet-unspecified aerial refuelling role.[1] Although a "purpose-built" aircraft would have suited the RCAF requirements better, an opportunity to acquire Boeing 707s as an alternative, soon presented itself.[2] Operational history Boeing CC-137 tanker in 1994 Canada purchased five Boeing 707s in ...more...

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Low-wing aircraft

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Boeing Condor

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Boeing Condor

The Boeing Condor is a high-tech test bed aerial reconnaissance unmanned aerial vehicle. It has a wingspan of over 200 feet.[1] Carbon-fibre composite materials make up the bulk of the Condor's fuselage and wings. Although the Condor has a relatively low radar cross-section and infrared signature, it is not unobservable making it too vulnerable for use in military operations.[2] The Condor is completely robotic, with an onboard computer to communicate with the computers on the ground via satellite to control all facets of the Condor's missions. The Condor's frame is made of mainly Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composite, as it gives off very low radar and heat signatures.[2] In 1989, the Condor set the world piston-powered aircraft altitude record of 67,028 ft (20,430 m) and was the first aircraft to fly a fully automated flight from takeoff to landing and also setting an unofficial endurance world record in 1988 by flying continuously for more than 50 hours; the flight was not ratified by the Fédération ...more...

Unmanned military aircraft of the United States

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Unmanned aerial vehicles of the United States

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Boeing aircraft

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Boeing CQM-121 Pave Tiger

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Boeing CQM-121 Pave Tiger

The Boeing CQM-121 Pave Tiger was an unmanned aerial vehicle developed by Boeing for use by the United States Air Force. Intended for the Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses (SEAD) role, the drone reached the flight-test stage before cancellation. Design and development The CQM-121 program began in 1983, with Boeing being awarded a contract for the development of a small drone aircraft that was intended for the suppression of enemy air defenses.[1] The resulting YCQM-121A, given the code name "Pave Tiger", was a tailless aircraft powered by a two-stroke engine.[2] The drones were to be fitted in 15-cell containers with wings folded; the sides of the container would open to allow for launch on a rail using a solid-fuel rocket booster. The aircraft would then follow a pre-programmed route, and could either use electronic countermeasures to suppress air defense systems, or use a small warhead to directly destroy them.[3] Operational history Flight testing of the 13 YCQM-121A aircraft began in 1983, however the ...more...

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Aircraft first flown in 1983

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Unmanned military aircraft of the United States

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Boeing E-3 Sentry

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Boeing E-3 Sentry

The Boeing E-3 Sentry, commonly known as AWACS, is an American airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) aircraft developed by Boeing. Derived from the Boeing 707, it provides all-weather surveillance, command, control, and communications, and is used by the United States Air Force, NATO, Royal Air Force, French Air Force, and Royal Saudi Air Force. The E-3 is distinguished by the distinctive rotating radar dome above the fuselage. Production ended in 1992 after 68 aircraft had been built. In the mid-1960s, the US Air Force (USAF) was seeking an aircraft to replace its piston-engined Lockheed EC-121 Warning Star, which had been in service for over a decade. After issuing preliminary development contracts to three companies, the USAF picked Boeing to construct two airframes to test Westinghouse Electric and Hughes's competing radars. Both radars used pulse-Doppler technology, with Westinghouse's design emerging as the contract winner. Testing on the first production E-3 began in October 1975. The first ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Aircraft first flown in 1976

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Boeing E-6 Mercury

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Boeing E-6 Mercury

The Boeing E-6 Mercury (formerly E-6 Hermes) is an airborne command post and communications relay based on the Boeing 707-320. The original E-6A manufactured by Boeing's defense division entered service with the United States Navy in July 1989, replacing the EC-130Q. This platform, now modified to the E-6B standard, conveys instructions from the National Command Authority to fleet ballistic missile submarines (see communication with submarines), a mission known as TACAMO (TAke Charge And Move Out). The E-6B model deployed in October 1998 also has the ability to remotely control Minuteman ICBMs using the Airborne Launch Control System. The E-6B replaced Air Force EC-135Cs in the "Looking Glass" role, providing command and control of U.S. nuclear forces should ground-based control become inoperable. With production lasting until 1991, the E-6 was the final new derivative of the Boeing 707 to be built.[2] Design and development Navy E-6B Mercury at the Mojave Air and Space Port Like the E-3 Sentry Airborne ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Aircraft first flown in 1987

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United States nuclear command and control

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Northrop Grumman E-8 Joint STARS

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Northrop Grumman E-8 Joint STARS

The Northrop Grumman E-8 Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (Joint STARS) is a United States Air Force airborne ground surveillance, battle management and command and control aircraft. It tracks ground vehicles and some aircraft, collects imagery, and relays tactical pictures to ground and air theater commanders. The aircraft is operated by both active duty Air Force and Air National Guard units and also carries specially trained U.S. Army personnel as additional flight crew. Development Joint STARS evolved from separate United States Army and Air Force programs to develop technology to detect, locate and attack enemy armor at ranges beyond the forward area of troops.[1] In 1982, the programs were merged and the U.S. Air Force became the lead agent. The concept and sensor technology for the E-8 was developed and tested on the Tacit Blue experimental aircraft. The prime contract was awarded to Grumman Aerospace Corporation in September 1985 for two E-8A development systems. Upgrades In late 2005 ...more...

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Northrop Grumman aircraft

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Aircraft first flown in 1991

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Boeing E-767

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Boeing E-767

The Boeing E-767 is an Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft.[1] It was designed in response to the Japan Air Self-Defense Force's requirements, and is essentially the Boeing E-3 Sentry's surveillance radar and air control system installed on a Boeing 767-200. Development Background On September 6, 1976, Soviet Air Forces pilot Viktor Belenko successfully defected to the West, flying his MiG-25 'Foxbat' to Hakodate, Japan. During this incident, Japan Self-Defense Force radar lost track of the aircraft when Belenko flew his MiG-25 at a low altitude, prompting the Japan Air Self-Defense Force (JASDF) to consider procurement of airborne early warning aircraft. In 1976, the U.S. Air Force was about to deploy the E-3 Sentry airborne warning and control system aircraft, which was considered to be the prime candidate for the airborne early warning mission by JASDF. However, the Japan Defense Agency (JDA, now Ministry of Defense) realized that the E-3 would not be readily available due to USAF needs ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Aircraft first flown in 1994

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Boeing 767

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Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet

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Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet

The Boeing F/A-18E and F/A-18F Super Hornet are twin-engine, carrier-capable, multirole fighter aircraft variants based on the McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet. The F/A-18E single-seat and F/A-18F tandem-seat variants are larger and more advanced derivatives of the F/A-18C and D Hornet. The Super Hornet has an internal 20 mm M61 rotary cannon and can carry air-to-air missiles and air-to-surface weapons. Additional fuel can be carried in up to five external fuel tanks and the aircraft can be configured as an airborne tanker by adding an external air refueling system. Designed and initially produced by McDonnell Douglas, the Super Hornet first flew in 1995. Low-rate production began in early 1997 with full-rate production starting in September 1997, after the merger of McDonnell Douglas and Boeing the previous month. The Super Hornet entered service with the United States Navy in 1999, replacing the Grumman F-14 Tomcat, which was retired in 2006; the Super Hornet serves alongside the original Hornet. The Royal ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Carrier-based aircraft

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Boeing aircraft

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McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle

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McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle

The McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle is an American twin-engined, all-weather tactical fighter aircraft designed by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) to gain and maintain air supremacy in all aspects of aerial combat. Following reviews of proposals, the United States Air Force selected McDonnell Douglas's design in 1967 to meet the service's need for a dedicated air-superiority fighter. The Eagle first flew in July 1972, and entered service in 1976. It is among the most successful modern fighters, with over 100 victories and no losses in aerial combat, with the majority of the kills by the Israeli Air Force.[3][4] The Eagle has been exported to Israel, Japan, and Saudi Arabia. The F-15 was originally envisioned as a pure air-superiority aircraft. Its design included a secondary ground-attack capability[5] that was largely unused. The aircraft design proved flexible enough that an all-weather strike derivative, the F-15E Strike Eagle, an improved and enhanced version which was later developed, entered service in 198 ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Twinjets

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Aircraft first flown in 1972

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Boeing F-15SE Silent Eagle

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Boeing F-15SE Silent Eagle

The Boeing F-15SE Silent Eagle was a proposed upgrade of the F-15E strike fighter by Boeing using stealth features, such as internal weapons carriage and radar-absorbent material. Design and development On 17 March 2009, Boeing first displayed an F-15SE demonstrator. The F-15SE was designed to use fifth-generation fighter technology, such as radar-absorbing materials, to significantly reduce its radar cross-section (RCS). It would have possessed a level of stealth that the U.S. government would have allowed for export, being optimized for air-to-air missions (against X-band radars) and much less effective against ground radars (which use other frequencies).[3] Different levels of RCS reduction were studied,[4] and Boeing stated that this stealth will only be in the range of fifth-generation aircraft such as the F-35 Lightning II from the frontal aspect.[5] Unique features to the F-15SE were the conformal weapons bays (CWB) that would have replaced the conformal fuel tanks (CFT) to hold weapons internally – ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Aircraft first flown in 2010

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Boeing aircraft

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McDonnell Douglas F-15E Strike Eagle

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McDonnell Douglas F-15E Strike Eagle

The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F-15E Strike Eagle is an American all-weather multirole strike fighter[4] derived from the McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle. The F-15E was designed in the 1980s for long-range, high-speed interdiction without relying on escort or electronic-warfare aircraft. United States Air Force (USAF) F-15E Strike Eagles can be distinguished from other U.S. Eagle variants by darker aircraft camouflage and conformal fuel tanks (CFTs) mounted along the engine intake ramps (although CFTs can also be mounted on earlier F-15 variants). The Strike Eagle has been deployed for military operations in Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, and Libya, among others. During these operations, the strike fighter has carried out deep strikes against high-value targets and combat air patrols, and provided close air support for coalition troops. It has also been exported to several countries. Development Origins The McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle had been introduced by the USAF as a replacement for its fleet of McDonnell ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Twinjets

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Delta-wing aircraft

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McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet

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McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet

The McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet is a twin-engine, supersonic, all-weather, carrier-capable, multirole combat jet, designed as both a fighter and attack aircraft (hence the F/A designation). Designed by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) and Northrop, the F/A-18 was derived from the latter's YF-17 in the 1970s for use by the United States Navy and Marine Corps. The Hornet is also used by the air forces of several other nations, and since 1986, by the U.S. Navy's Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels. The F/A-18 has a top speed of Mach 1.8 (1,034 knots, 1,190 mph or 1,915 km/h at 40,000 ft or 12,200 m). It can carry a wide variety of bombs and missiles, including air-to-air and air-to-ground, supplemented by the 20-mm M61 Vulcan cannon. It is powered by two General Electric F404 turbofan engines, which give the aircraft a high thrust-to-weight ratio. The F/A-18 has excellent aerodynamic characteristics, primarily attributed to its leading-edge extensions. The fighter's primary missions are fighter esc ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Carrier-based aircraft

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Mid-wing aircraft

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Boeing F2B

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Boeing F2B

The Boeing F2B was a biplane fighter aircraft of the United States Navy in the 1920s, familiar to aviation enthusiasts of the era as the craft of the Three Sea Hawks aerobatic flying team, famous for its tied-together formation flying.[1] Design and development Initially the Boeing Model 69, it was inspired by the results of tests on the FB-6, which was powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-1340B Wasp radial engine. Boeing set out to use this engine in a fighter designed specifically for carrier operations, using the same welded-tubing fuselage and wooden-frame wings as for the Model 15, and adding a large spinner to reduce air drag around the engine (this was dropped in production). Armament was either two .30 in (7.62 mm) machine guns, or one .30 in and one .50 in (12.7 mm); the lower wing had attachments for up to four 25 lb (11 kg) bombs, plus a fifth could be hung from the fuselage.[2] Operational history First flight of the F2B prototype was November 3, 1926. The Navy acquired the prototype as XF2B-1, ...more...

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Aircraft first flown in 1926

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Boeing aircraft

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Boeing F3B

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Boeing F3B

The Boeing F3B was a biplane fighter and fighter bomber that served with the United States Navy from 1928 into the early 1930s. Design and development Designed by the company as its Model 74, the plane was an incremental improvement over the F2B. The Navy-designated prototype XF3B-1 still had the tapered wings of the F2B for instance, but was built as a single-float seaplane using the FB-5 undercarriage. However, the growing use of aircraft carriers took away most of the need for floating fighters, and by the time other test results had been taken into account, the production F3B-1 (Model 77) had a larger upper wing that was slightly swept back and a redesigned tail with surfaces made from corrugated aluminum.[2] It also eliminated the spreader bar arrangement of the undercarriage and revised the vertical tail shape.[3] Operational history It first flew on 3 February 1928, turning in a respectable performance and garnering Boeing a contract for 73 more. F3Bs served as fighter-bombers for some four years w ...more...

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Aircraft first flown in 1928

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Biplanes

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Boeing XF6B

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Boeing XF6B

The Boeing XF6B-1 / XBFB-1 was Boeing's last biplane design for the United States Navy. Only the one prototype, Model 236, was ever built; although first flying in early 1933, it rammed into a crash barrier in 1936 and the design was not pursued further. Design and development Ordered by the U.S. Navy on 30 June 1931, the fighter aircraft was a derivative of the Boeing F4B; it was almost entirely of metal construction, with only the wings still fabric-covered. The aircraft was powered by a 625 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1535-44 Twin Wasp engine.[1] The intended role of this design turned out to be uncertain. While its rugged construction was capable of withstanding high g-forces, it weighed in at 3,704 pounds (700 pounds more than the F4B), and did not have the maneuverability needed in a fighter aircraft. It was, however, suitable as a fighter-bomber, and in March 1934 the prototype was redesignated XBFB-1 in recognition of its qualities. Even so, various ideas were tried to improve its fighter qualificati ...more...

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Aircraft first flown in 1933

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Boeing aircraft

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Boeing GA-1

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Boeing GA-1

The Boeing GA-1 (company designation Model 10) was an armored triplane. Designed in 1919, it was powered by a pair of modified Liberty engines driving pusher propellers. The first of the Engineering Division's heavily armored GAX series (ground attack, experimental) aircraft, the ponderous airplane was intended to strafe ground troops while remaining immune to attack from the ground as well as from other enemy aircraft. It was so well armored that its five-ton weight proved excessive. Development Soon after the end of World War I, the US Army sought to explore highly armored and armed specialist ground-attack aircraft. This was a pet project of General William Mitchell. The Army Air Service Engineering Division issued requests for proposals to U.S. aircraft producers on 15 October 1919. There were no designs offered, so the Engineering Division ordered one of its engineers, Isaac M. Laddon, to attempt what the aviation industry clearly considered impossible. His design, designated GAX, first flew at McCook ...more...

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Aircraft first flown in 1920

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Triplanes

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Boeing XF8B

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Boeing XF8B

The Boeing XF8B (Model 400) was a single-engine aircraft developed by Boeing during World War II to provide the United States Navy with a long-range shipboard fighter aircraft. The XF8B was intended for operation against the Japanese home islands from aircraft carriers outside the range of Japanese land-based aircraft. Designed for various roles including interceptor, long-range escort fighter, dive-bomber, and torpedo bomber, the final design embodied a number of innovative features in order to accomplish the various roles. Despite its formidable capabilities, the XF8B-1 never entered series production. Design and development The XF8B-1 was, at the time, the largest and heaviest single-seat, single-engine fighter developed in the United States. Boeing called the XF8B-1 optimistically, the "five-in-one fighter" (fighter, interceptor, dive bomber, torpedo bomber, or level bomber). It was powered by a single 3,000 hp (2,200 kW) Pratt & Whitney XR-4360-10 four-row 28-cylinder radial engine, driving two th ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Aircraft first flown in 1944

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Aircraft with contra-rotating propellers

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The Great Artiste

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The Great Artiste

The Great Artiste nose art The Great Artiste was a U.S. Army Air Forces Silverplate B-29 bomber (B-29-40-MO 44-27353, Victor number 89), assigned to the 393d Bomb Squadron, 509th Composite Group. The aircraft was named for its bombardier, Captain Kermit Beahan, in reference to his bombing talents. It flew 12 training and practice missions in which it bombed Japanese-held Pacific islands and dropped pumpkin bombs on targets in Japan. It was the only aircraft to participate in both the bombing of Hiroshima and the bombing of Nagasaki, albeit as an observation aircraft on each mission. After the war ended it returned with the 509th Composite Group to Roswell Army Air Field, New Mexico. It was scrapped in September 1949 after being heavily damaged in an accident at Goose Bay Air Base, Labrador, the year before. Aircraft history Built at the Glenn L. Martin Aircraft Plant at Omaha, Nebraska, The Great Artiste (B-29-40-MO 44-27353) was a Silverplate B-29 Superfortress bomber. It was accepted by the Army Air For ...more...

Boeing B-29 Superfortress

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Individual aircraft in the collection of the Sm...

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Boeing aircraft

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Boeing CH-47 Chinook

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Boeing CH-47 Chinook

The Boeing CH-47 Chinook is an American twin-engined, tandem rotor, heavy-lift helicopter developed by American rotorcraft company Vertol and manufactured by Boeing Vertol (later known as Boeing Rotorcraft Systems). The CH-47 is among the heaviest lifting Western helicopters. Its name, Chinook, is from the Native American Chinook people of modern-day Washington state. The Chinook was originally designed by Vertol, which had begun work in 1957 on a new tandem-rotor helicopter, designated as the Vertol Model 107 or V-107. Around the same time, the United States Department of the Army announced its intention to replace the piston engine-powered Sikorsky CH-37 Mojave with a new, gas turbine-powered helicopter. During June 1958, the U.S. Army ordered a small number of V-107s from Vertol under the YHC-1A designation; following testing, it came to be considered by some Army officials to be too heavy for the assault missions and too light for transport purposes. While the YHC-1A would be improved and adopted by the ...more...

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Boeing aircraft

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Kawasaki aerospace

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Boeing Vertol CH-46 Sea Knight

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Boeing Vertol CH-46 Sea Knight

The Boeing Vertol CH-46 Sea Knight is a medium-lift tandem-rotor transport helicopter powered by twin turboshaft engines. It was designed by Vertol and manufactured by Boeing Vertol following Vertol's acquisition by Boeing. Development of the Sea Knight, which was originally designated by the firm as the Vertol Model 107, commenced during 1956. It was envisioned as a successor to the first generation of rotorcraft, such as the H-21 "Flying Banana", that had been powered by piston engines; in its place, the V-107 made use of the emergent turboshaft engine. On 22 April 1958, the V-107 prototype performed its maiden flight. During June 1958, the US Army awarded a contract for the construction of ten production-standard aircraft, designated as the YHC-1A, based on the V-107; this initial order was later cut down to three YHC-1As though. During 1961, the US Marine Corps (USMC), who had been studying its requirements for a medium-lift, twin-turbine cargo/troop assault helicopter, selected Boeing Vertol's Model 107 ...more...

Military helicopters

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Aircraft first flown in 1958

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Twin-turbine helicopters

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Boeing Vertol YUH-61

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Boeing Vertol YUH-61

The Boeing Vertol YUH-61 (company designation Model 179), was a twin turbine-engined, medium-lift, military assault/utility helicopter. The YUH-61 was the runner-up in the United States Army Utility Tactical Transport Aircraft System (UTTAS) competition in the early 1970s to replace the Bell UH-1 Iroquois helicopter. At the end of the flyoff program, Sikorsky Aircraft was awarded a contract to develop and build its UH-60A entry. Development Under a contract awarded in August 1972, Boeing Vertol designed and delivered three prototypes to compete UTTAS program.[1] When Boeing Vertol failed to win the Army competition, it pinned its hope on winning civil orders and the US Navy's LAMPS III program. In the end, a variant of the Sikorsky design, the SH-60B, won the Navy contract, and the civil orders received were canceled.[1] Three aircraft were built and a further two were cancelled and not completed. An attack helicopter design, using the YUH-61's dynamic system (engines, rotor systems and gearboxes), was pro ...more...

Aircraft first flown in 1974

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United States military helicopters

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Boeing aircraft

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Boeing AH-64 Apache

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Boeing AH-64 Apache

The Boeing AH-64 Apache is an American twin-turboshaft attack helicopter with a tailwheel-type landing gear arrangement and a tandem cockpit for a crew of two. It features a nose-mounted sensor suite for target acquisition and night vision systems. It is armed with a 30 mm (1.18 in) M230 chain gun carried between the main landing gear, under the aircraft's forward fuselage, and four hardpoints mounted on stub-wing pylons for carrying armament and stores, typically a mixture of AGM-114 Hellfire missiles and Hydra 70 rocket pods. The AH-64 has a large amount of systems redundancy to improve combat survivability. The Apache originally started as the Model 77 developed by Hughes Helicopters for the United States Army's Advanced Attack Helicopter program to replace the AH-1 Cobra. The prototype YAH-64 was first flown on 30 September 1975. The U.S. Army selected the YAH-64 over the Bell YAH-63 in 1976, and later approved full production in 1982. After purchasing Hughes Helicopters in 1984, McDonnell Douglas contin ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Attack helicopters

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Hughes aircraft

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Boeing Vertol XCH-62

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Boeing Vertol XCH-62

The Boeing Vertol XCH-62 (Model 301) was a triple-turbine, heavy-lift helicopter project designed for the United States Army by Boeing Vertol. Approved in 1971, only one aircraft was built before it was canceled in 1974. An attempt by NASA to resurrect the program was aborted in 1983. Design and development While the CH-47 Chinook is a large helicopter by American standards, its payload of 28,000 lb is dwarfed by the huge Soviet-Russian heavy-lift helicopters such as the Mil Mi-26 (44,000 lb) and the experimental Mil Mi-12 (55,000–88,000 lb), and for a long time Boeing and the US military had an urge to match or top the Mil heavy lifters.[1] In the late 1960s, Boeing came up with designs for machines with broad similarities to the Sea Knight and Chinook, but about twice the size of the Chinook in terms of linear dimensions. Proposed machines included the "Model 227" transport and the "Model 237" flying crane.[1] Following award of an Army contract for a prototype of a "Heavy Lift Helicopter (HLH)" in 1973 ...more...

Aircraft first flown in 1974

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Cancelled military aircraft projects of the Uni...

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Tandem rotor helicopters

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Boeing HALE

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Boeing HALE

The Boeing HALE is a concept for High Altitude, Long Endurance unmanned aerial vehicles. Two demonstration HALE aircraft are currently under development:[1] The hydrogen powered Phantom Eye. The solar-electric SolarEagle. The HALE concept for surveillance missions includes flight altitudes above 65,000 ft, for endurance periods of days, months and even years – far beyond the 30-hour endurance of RQ-4 Global Hawk. Similar aircraft QinetiQ Zephyr Global Observer Vulture (UAV) Luminati Aerospace V0 Substrata Luminati Aerospace V1 Stratos References Haddox, Chris. "SolarEagle (Vulture II) Backgrounder" Archived June 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine Boeing Phantom Works, September 2010. Retrieved: 18 October 2010. ...more...

Unmanned aerial vehicles of the United States

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Boeing aircraft

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Boeing KB-29 Superfortress

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Boeing KB-29 Superfortress

Experimental Boeing YKB-29T Superfortress,(Boeing B-29-90-BW Superfortress) 45-21734, assigned to the 421st Air Refueling Squadron, Yokota Air Base, Japan, 1954 Returned to United States and retired to AMARC, Feb 1955. The Boeing KB-29 was a modified Boeing B-29 Superfortress for air refueling needs by the USAF. Two primary versions were developed and produced: KB-29M and KB-29P. The 509th and 43d Air Refueling Squadrons (Walker AFB, NM and Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ respectively) were created in 1948 to operate the KB-29M tankers.[1] The 303d Bombardment Wing at Davis-Monthan AFB flew B-29s and KB-29s from 1951 to 1953 that provided training for strategic bombardment and air refueling operations to meet SAC's global commitments.[3] Deployed at Sidi Slimane AB, French Morocco, 5 Oct – 6 November 1952.[3] Variants KB-29M Section source: Baugher[1] and National[4] The B-29 played an important role in developing the effective use of aerial refueling during the late 1940s. The first aircraft involved in this progr ...more...

Four-engined piston aircraft

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Boeing KC-97 Stratofreighter

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Boeing KC-97 Stratofreighter

The Boeing KC-97 Stratofreighter is a United States strategic tanker aircraft based on the Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter. It was succeeded by the Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker. Design and development The KC-97 Stratofreighter was an aerial refueling tanker variant of the C-97 Stratofreighter (which was itself based on the Boeing B-29 Superfortress), greatly modified with all the necessary tanks, plumbing, and a flying boom. The cavernous upper deck was capable of accommodating oversize cargo accessed through a very large right-side door. In addition, transferrable jet fuel was contained in tanks on the lower deck (G-L models). Both decks were heated and pressurized for high altitude operations. Note: Occasionally the KC-97 has been referred to as "Stratotanker". However, all reputable sources refer to the KC-97 as Stratofreighter, not -tanker. This includes both Boeing and the USAF themselves.[6][7] Operational history Two USAF A-7 Corsair IIs refueling from a KC-97. The USAF began operating the KC-97 in 1 ...more...

Four-engined piston aircraft

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Boeing military aircraft

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Air refueling

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Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker

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Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker

The Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker is a military aerial refueling aircraft. Both the KC-135 and the Boeing 707 airliner were developed from the Boeing 367-80 prototype. It is the predominant variant of the C-135 Stratolifter family of transport aircraft. The KC-135 was the US Air Force's first jet-powered refueling tanker and replaced the KC-97 Stratofreighter. The KC-135 was initially tasked with refueling strategic bombers, but was used extensively in the Vietnam War and later conflicts such as Operation Desert Storm to extend the range and endurance of US tactical fighters and bombers. The KC-135 entered service with the United States Air Force (USAF) in 1957; it is one of six military fixed-wing aircraft with over 50 years of continuous service[1] with its original operator. The KC-135 is supplemented by the larger KC-10. Studies have concluded that many of the aircraft could be flown until 2040, although maintenance costs have greatly increased. The KC-135 is to be partially replaced by the Boeing KC-46 Peg ...more...

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Aircraft first flown in 1956

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Boeing KC-767

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Boeing KC-767

The Boeing KC-767 is a military aerial refueling and strategic transport aircraft developed from the Boeing 767-200ER. The tanker received the designation KC-767A, after being selected by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) initially to replace older KC-135Es. In December 2003, the contract was frozen and later canceled due to corruption allegations. The tanker was developed for the Italian and Japanese air forces, who ordered four tankers each. Financing of the development of the aircraft has largely been borne by Boeing, in the hope of receiving major orders from the USAF. Boeing's revised KC-767 proposal to the USAF was selected in February 2011 for the KC-X program under the designation KC-46. Development Commercial Derivative Air Refueling Aircraft At the start of the 2000s a considerable and sudden increase in their maintenance costs was leading the U.S. Air Force to run a procurement program for the replacement of around 100 of its oldest KC-135E Stratotankers. Most USAF KC-135s are of the updated KC-135R var ...more...

Aircraft first flown in 2005

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Low-wing aircraft

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Boeing 767

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Boeing KC-46 Pegasus

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Boeing KC-46 Pegasus

The Boeing KC-46 Pegasus is a military aerial refueling and strategic military transport aircraft developed by Boeing from its 767 jet airliner. In February 2011, the tanker was selected by the United States Air Force (USAF) as the winner in the KC-X tanker competition to replace older Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers. The first aircraft was to be delivered to the Air Force in August 2017, but was delayed until 10 January 2019.[3] Development Background In 2001, the U.S. Air Force began a procurement program to replace around 100 of its oldest KC-135E Stratotankers, and selected Boeing's KC-767. The Boeing tanker received the KC-767A designation from the United States Department of Defense in 2002 and appeared in the 2004 edition of DoD model designation report.[4] The Air Force decided to lease 100 KC-767 tankers from Boeing.[5] Despite several nations leasing military aircraft, there was criticism. US Senator John McCain and others criticized the draft leasing agreement as being wasteful and problematic. In r ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Aircraft first flown in 2015

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Boeing L-15 Scout

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Boeing L-15 Scout

The Boeing L-15 Scout or YL-15 was a small, piston engine liaison aircraft built by Boeing in very small numbers after World War II. It was a short take-off and landing (STOL) aircraft powered by a 125 hp Lycoming engine. The L-15 was an attempt by Boeing to expand its product line as World War II drew to a close and Boeing's production of combat aircraft declined. Boeing decided against marketing the L-15 as a general aviation aircraft, and the twelve that were produced went to the United States Army for testing then were transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Alaska for various duties. Design The scout was a conventional geared aircraft that was also tested on ski and float gear. The unique fuselage tapered sharply behind the pilot similar to a helicopter fuselage, with a high-mounted boom supporting the tail surfaces. The original design included a single vertical stabilizer, but two small downward-mounted stabilizers were used on production models. Spoiler-ailerons were used for roll contr ...more...

Aircraft first flown in 1947

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High-wing aircraft

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Lucky Lady II

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Lucky Lady II

Lucky Lady II is a United States Air Force Boeing B-50 Superfortress that became the first airplane to circle the world nonstop. Its 1949 journey, assisted by in-flight refueling, lasted 94 hours and 1 minute. The plane later suffered an accident, and today only the fuselage is preserved. 1949: First circumnavigation of the world The Lucky Lady II was a B-50 of the 43rd Bombardment Group, equipped with 12 .50-caliber (12.7mm) machine guns. For its circumnavigation mission, a fuel tank was added in the bomb bay for extra range. The mission required a double crew with three pilots, under the command of Capt. James Gallagher. The crews rotated in shifts of four to six hours.[1][2] Lucky Lady II flight map Bearing a total crew of 14, the aircraft started its round-the-world trip at 12:21 p.m. on February 26, 1949. It took off from Carswell Air Force Base near Fort Worth, Texas, and headed east toward the Atlantic Ocean. After flying 23,452 mi (37,742 km), the aircraft passed the control tower back at Cars ...more...

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Individual aircraft

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Mackay Trophy winners

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McDonnell Douglas MD-11

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McDonnell Douglas MD-11

The McDonnell Douglas MD-11 is an American three-engine medium- to long-range wide-body jet airliner, manufactured by McDonnell Douglas and, later, by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. Based on the DC-10, it features a stretched fuselage, increased wingspan with winglets, refined airfoils on the wing and smaller tailplane, new engines and increased use of composite materials. Two of its engines are mounted on underwing pylons and a third engine at the base of the vertical stabilizer. It also features a glass cockpit that decreases the flight deck crew to two from the three required on the DC-10 by eliminating the need for a flight engineer. Development An MD-11 (left) and DC-10 comparison Origins Although the MD-11 program was launched in 1986, McDonnell Douglas started to search for a DC-10 derivative as early as 1976. Two versions were considered then, a DC-10-10 with a fuselage stretch of 40 feet (12 m) and a DC-10-30 stretched by 30 feet (9.1 m). That later version would have been capable of transporting ...more...

Wide-body aircraft

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Aircraft first flown in 1990

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Trijets

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NASA 515

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NASA 515

NASA 515 is a Boeing 737 heavily modified for NASA use as a continuing research facility.[1] The aircraft was the first 737 built and was used by Boeing to qualify the 737 design.[2] NASA 515 was maintained and flown by Langley Research Center as part of the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The aircraft is on public display at the Museum of Flight, near Seattle, Washington.[3] See also Wikimedia Commons has media related to N515NA (aircraft). List of NASA aircraft References "NASA's B-737 Flying Laboratory". NASA. May 1994. Retrieved 2013-05-02. "Boeing 737-130". The Museum of Flight. Retrieved 2013-05-02. Robert Bogash (28 Nov 2003). "FINAL FLIGHT The Trip Home for the Boeing 737 Prototype Airplane". Rbogash.com. Retrieved 2013-05-02. Wallace, Lane E. Airborne Trailblazers. NASA. Retrieved January 10, 2010. ...more...

NASA aircraft

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Boeing aircraft

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Boeing New Large Airplane

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Boeing New Large Airplane

The Boeing NLA, or New Large Airplane, was a 1990s concept for an all-new quadjet airliner in the 500+ seat market.[1] Somewhat larger than the 747, this aircraft was similar in concept to the McDonnell Douglas MD-12 and later Airbus A380. In 1993, Boeing chose not to pursue development of this concept, later focusing instead on the Boeing 747-500X and -600X, then 747X and 747X Stretch, and after that, the Boeing 747-8. The project names for this aircraft were NLA and Boeing 763-246C.[2] Specifications (NLA, as designed) Cockpit crew Two Seating capacity 606 ((E, B, F) 3-class) Length overall 244 ft 4 in (74.47 m) Wingspan 260 ft 0 in (79.25 m) Height 77 ft 8 in (23.67 m) Maximum take-off weight Range at design load 7,800 nmi (14,400 km; 8,980 mi) Engines (4×) Thrust (4×) Source: Seattle Post-Intelligencer[3] See also Boeing New Midsize Airplane Boeing Yellowstone Project Related development Boeing 747-8 Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era A ...more...

Abandoned civil aircraft projects of the United...

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Quadjets

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Boeing NB

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Boeing NB

The Boeing NB (or Model 21) was a primary training aircraft developed for the United States Navy in 1923. It was a two-bay, equal-span biplane of conventional configuration with interchangeable wheeled and float undercarriage. The pilot and instructor sat in tandem, open cockpits. The NBs were produced in two batches; the first (NB-1) were powered by radial engines and the second by war-surplus V-8s still in the Navy's inventory. The original prototype evaluated by the Navy had been assessed as being too easy to fly, and therefore of limited use as a trainer. In particular, it was noted that the aircraft was impossible to spin. The NB-1 design attempted to introduce some instability, but it was soon discovered that while it was now possible to get the aircraft into a spin, it was virtually impossible to recover from one. A series of modifications were made to attempt a compromise. Variants An NB-1 floatplane at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, in 1926. VNB-1 - prototype (one built) N ...more...

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Northrop Grumman E-10 MC2A

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Northrop Grumman E-10 MC2A

The Northrop Grumman E-10 MC2A was planned as a multi-role military aircraft to replace the Boeing 707-based E-3 Sentry and E-8 Joint STARS, the Boeing 747-based E-4B, and the RC-135 Rivet Joint aircraft in US service. The E-10 was based on the Boeing 767-400ER commercial airplane. Development In 2003, the Northrop Grumman, Boeing, and Raytheon MC2A team was awarded a $215 million contract for pre-SDD (System Development and Demonstration) development of the aircraft. MC2A is an acronym for Multi-Sensor Command and Control Aircraft. The MC2A was intended to be the ultimate theater-wide combat control center. While the Northrop Grumman E-8 Joint STARS aircraft was a recent development, it is the last such type based on the 707. Installing the high technology systems envisaged for the MC2A on an increasingly obsolete airframe would not provide the capability required. The availability of powerful and reliable turbofans allowed a twinjet to be considered. In August 2003, Air International reported that the g ...more...

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Cancelled military aircraft projects of the Uni...

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Boeing 767

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North American Rockwell OV-10 Bronco

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North American Rockwell OV-10 Bronco

The North American Rockwell OV-10 Bronco is an American twin-turboprop light attack and observation aircraft. It was developed in the 1960s as a special aircraft for counter-insurgency (COIN) combat, and one of its primary missions was as a forward air control (FAC) aircraft. It can carry up to three tons of external munitions, internal loads such as paratroopers or stretchers, and loiter for three or more hours. Development Background The aircraft was initially conceived in the early 1960s through an informal collaboration between WH Beckett and Colonel KP Rice, U.S. Marine Corps, who met at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, California, and who also happened to live near each other. The original concept was for a rugged, simple, close air support aircraft integrated with forward ground operations. At the time, the U.S. Army was still experimenting with armed helicopters, and the U.S. Air Force was not interested in close air support. The concept aircraft was to operate from expedient forward air bases ...more...

Twin-turboprop tractor aircraft

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Boeing military aircraft

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Turboprop aircraft

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Boeing XP-4

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Boeing XP-4

The Boeing XP-4 was a prototype United States biplane fighter of the 1920s that was grounded permanently after just 4.5 hours of flight testing.[1] Development and design In 1926, the United States Army was very interested in the turbo-supercharger as a way of improving engine performance, and requested that one be added to the last of the PW-9s, and the engine upgraded to a 510 hp Packard 1A-1500. This machine was designated XP-4.[1] In addition, the basic PW-9 armament of one .50 and one .30 cal. machine guns in the nose was supplemented by two added .30 cal. guns mounted under the lower wing, far enough out to be outside the propeller arc (thus not needing synchronization).[2] All these modifications added weight, so the lower wing span was extended by 9.5 feet. The airplane was delivered to Wright Field for testing on 27 July 1927, but it quickly became apparent that the Packard engine did not have sufficient power to compensate for the 800 lbs of extra weight, the craft performing more poorly than i ...more...

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Biplanes

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Boeing XP-7

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Boeing XP-7

The Boeing XP-7 was a prototype United States biplane fighter of the 1920s. Development and design The XP-7 started life as the last Boeing Model 15 (PW-9D), serial 28-41. It was then adapted to mount the 600 hp Curtiss V-1570 Conqueror engine. Labelled by Boeing as their Model 93, the XP-7's nose was shorter and deeper than that of the standard PW-9, and the craft was 75 pounds lighter overall. It first flew in September 1928 and did well, with a 17 mph speed increase over the PW-9. However, despite a proposal to build an additional four P-7s, the design was at the very limits of its capabilities and somewhat outdated even by the time of its first flight. At the end of testing, the Conqueror engine was removed and the aircraft converted back into a PW-9D.[1] Operators  United States United States Army Air Corps Specifications Data from [1] General characteristics Crew: 1 Length: 24 ft 0 in (7.31 m) Wingspan: 32 ft 0 in (9.75 m) Height: 9 ft 0 in (2.74 m) Wing area: 252 ft2 (23.4 m2) Em ...more...

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Biplanes

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Boeing XP-8

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Boeing XP-8

The Boeing XP-8 (Boeing Model 66) was a prototype American biplane fighter of the 1920s, notable for its unusual design incorporating the engine radiator into the lower wing.[1] Design and development Boeing developed the prototype in 1926 as a private venture, with the goal of winning the Army Air Corps competition announced in 1925. Designated by Boeing as its Model 66, the airframe was basically a PW-9 with an experimental 600 hp Packard 2A-1500 engine. In order to streamline around the engine, the radiator was moved back so that the opening coincided with the front edge of the lower wing, resulting in an unusually narrow profile around the engine. Testing Army testing of the aircraft began in January 1928, and it handled well, but performance was lacking, achieving only a maximum speed of 173.2 mph. Even so, the prototype continued in Air Corps service until June 1929, after which it was scrapped. The airframe design lived on in the Navy's Boeing F2B. Operators  United States United States Army Ai ...more...

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Aircraft first flown in 1928

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Boeing P-8 Poseidon

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Boeing P-8 Poseidon

The Boeing P-8 Poseidon (formerly the Multimission Maritime Aircraft or MMA) is a military aircraft developed for the United States Navy (USN). The aircraft has been developed by Boeing Defense, Space & Security, modified from the 737-800ERX. The P-8 conducts anti-submarine warfare (ASW), anti-surface warfare (ASUW), and shipping interdiction, along with an early warning self-protection (EWSP) ability, otherwise known as electronic support measures (ESM).[8] This involves carrying torpedoes, Harpoon anti-ship missiles, and other weapons. It is able to drop and monitor sonobuoys. It is designed to operate in conjunction with the Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton Broad Area Maritime Surveillance unmanned aerial vehicle. The P-8 is operated by the U.S. Navy, the Indian Navy (as the P-8I Neptune), and the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF). The aircraft has been ordered by the UK's Royal Air Force (RAF) where it will be known as the Poseidon MRA1, the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF), and the Royal New Zealand ...more...

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Twinjets

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Boeing 737

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Boeing XP-9

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Boeing XP-9

The Boeing XP-9 (company Model 96) was the first monoplane fighter aircraft produced by the United States aircraft manufacturing company Boeing. It incorporated sophisticated structural refinements that were influential in later Boeing designs. The sole prototype exhibited unsatisfactory characteristics with its lack of pilot visibility directly leading to its cancellation.[1] Design and development The XP-9 was designed in 1928 to meet the requirements of a US Army request for a monoplane fighter. Its primary contribution to aircraft design was its semi-monocoque construction, which would become a standard for future aircraft. Boeing employed the structural features of the XP-9 into their contemporary P-12 biplane fighter when the P-12E variant incorporated a semi-monocoque metal fuselage structure similar to that of the XP-9. The undercarriage arrangement of the P-12C had also been first tried out on the XP-9 and then transferred into the production model.[2] Operational history The prototype XP-9, mark ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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High-wing aircraft

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Boeing P-12

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Boeing P-12

The Boeing P-12/F4B was an American pursuit aircraft that was operated by the United States Army Air Corps and United States Navy. Design and development Developed as a private venture to replace the Boeing F2B and F3B with the United States Navy, the Boeing P-12 first flew on 25 June 1928. The new aircraft was smaller, lighter and more agile than the ones it replaced but still used the Wasp engine of the F3B. This resulted in a higher top speed and overall better performance. As result of Navy evaluation 27 were ordered as the F4B-1; later evaluation by the United States Army Air Corps resulted in orders with the designation P-12. Boeing supplied the USAAC with 366 P-12s between 1929 and 1932. Production of all variants totaled 586. F4B-1 The F4B-1 was built using traditional construction techniques of the day. The fuselage was a steel tube truss design with formers and longerons to define the aerodynamic shape. Wings were of traditional construction and covered by fabric. Ailerons were of a tapered desi ...more...

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Biplanes

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Single-engine aircraft

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Boeing P-26 Peashooter

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Boeing P-26 Peashooter

The Boeing P-26 "Peashooter" was the first American all-metal production fighter aircraft and the first pursuit monoplane to enter squadron service with the United States Army Air Corps.[N 1] Designed and built by Boeing, the prototype first flew in 1932, and the type was still in use with the U.S. Army Air Corps as late as 1941 in the Philippines. There are only two surviving Peashooters, but there are three reproductions on exhibit with two more under construction. Design and development The project, funded by Boeing, to produce the Boeing Model 248 began in September 1931, with the US Army Air Corps supplying the engines and the instruments. The design, which included an open cockpit, fixed landing gear and externally braced wings, was the last such design procured by the USAAC as a fighter aircraft. The Model 248 had a high landing speed, which caused a number of accidents. To remedy this, flaps were fitted to reduce the landing speed. The Army Air Corps ordered three prototypes, designated XP-936, with ...more...

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Conventional landing gear

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Aircraft first flown in 1932

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Boeing XPB

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Boeing XPB

The Boeing XPB (company Model 50) was an American twin-engined biplane long-range patrol flying boat of the 1920s. A single example was built for the United States Navy. Design and development In September 1924, the Naval Aircraft Factory was tasked with designing a long-range twin-engined flying boat, capable of flying the 2,400 mi (3,860 km) between San Francisco and Hawaii. The initial design was carried out by Isaac Laddon, an employee of Consolidated Aircraft, and then passed to Boeing for detailed design and construction. The new flying boat, the Boeing Model 50, was a two-bay biplane of very streamlined design for flying boats of the time. The wings were of metal construction, with wooden wingtips and leading edges. The fuselage had a metal lower part, with the upper half made of laminated wooden frames with a wood veneer covering. Two 800 hp (600 kW) Packard 2A-2500 V12 engines driving four-bladed propellers were mounted in tandem between the wings above the fuselage.[1] Operational history Boei ...more...

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Aircraft first flown in 1925

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Twin-engined push-pull aircraft

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Boeing P-29

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Boeing P-29

The Boeing P-29 and XF7B-1 were an attempt to produce a more advanced version of the highly successful P-26. Although slight gains were made in performance, the U.S. Army Air Corps and U.S. Navy did not order the aircraft. Design and development The Boeing YP-29 originated as the Model 264, developed as a private venture under a bailment contract negotiated with the U.S. Army. Development of three prototypes was initiated in the interval between the testing of the XP-936 (P-26 prototype, company Model 248) and the delivery of the first P-26A (Model 266) to the U.S. Army. The Model 264 was an updated and modernized P-26, differing in having fully cantilever wings of elliptical-design, wing flaps, enclosed "greenhouse" canopy, and retractable undercarriage. The landing gear was similar to the Boeing Monomail, the main wheels retracting backwards about halfway into the wings. The fuselage and the tail were basically the same as those of the P-26. The 264 retained the proven 550 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1340- ...more...

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Carrier-based aircraft

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Aircraft first flown in 1934

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Boeing XP3B

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Boeing XP3B

The Boeing XP3B-1 (company designation Model 466) was a proposed patrol aircraft, developed by Boeing for use by the United States Navy in the late 1940s.[1] It was planned to be powered by two Allison T40 turboprops driving contra-rotating propellers, and utilized tandem landing gear. The project was cancelled before any aircraft were built.[2] Specifications Data from Bowers[1] General characteristics Length: 108 ft 11 in (33.20 m) Wingspan: 125 ft (38 m) Height: 32 ft 10 in (10.01 m) Wing area: 1,400 sq ft (130 m2) Empty weight: 66,000 lb (29,937 kg) Gross weight: 127,000 lb (57,606 kg) Powerplant: 2 × Allison T40-A-2 turboprops, 5,200 shp (3,900 kW) each Propellers: 6-bladed, 17 ft (5.2 m) diameter Performance Maximum speed: 395 kn; 731 km/h (454 mph) Range: 4,497 nmi; 8,328 km (5,175 mi) References Wikimedia Commons has media related to Boeing aircraft. Citations Bowers 1989, p.568. Andrade 1979, p.206. Bibliography Andrade, John. U.S. Military Aircraft Desi ...more...

Twin-turboprop tractor aircraft

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Boeing military aircraft

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Twin-engined turboprop aircraft

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Boeing XPBB Sea Ranger

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Boeing XPBB Sea Ranger

The Boeing XPBB-1 Sea Ranger (Boeing 344) was a prototype twin-engined flying boat patrol bomber built for the United States Navy. The order for this aircraft was canceled, to free production capacity to build the Boeing B-29, and only a single prototype was completed. Development Well before the United States entered World War II, the Navy started a program to develop a long-range flying boat, able to cover the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean. The Model 344 design offered by Boeing was chosen, and a contract for 57 aircraft was awarded on 29 June 1940. The designation given to the type was PBB for Patrol Bomber, Boeing, the first aircraft of the PB category built by Boeing for the Navy. Nevertheless, Boeing did have important experience in the construction of large flying boats, having produced the successful Boeing 314 airliner. To build the large PBB, Boeing started construction of a new lakeside factory in Renton, Washington, that was owned by the US Navy. However, the prototype was constructed mostly ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

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Boeing aircraft

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Cancelled military aircraft projects of the Uni...

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Boeing Pelican

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Boeing Pelican

The Boeing Pelican ULTRA (Ultra Large TRansport Aircraft) was a proposed ground effect fixed-wing aircraft under study by Boeing Phantom Works. Development The Boeing Pelican ULTRA is intended as a large-capacity transport craft initially for military use, with possible subsequent availability as a commercial freighter[1] serving the world's largest cargo centers.[2] It is significantly larger and more capable than the biggest existing commercial airliners, commercial freighters, and military airlifters.[3] The Pelican is not targeted for civilian transportation,[4] but it can be converted to a commercial airliner transporting up to 3,000 passengers.[2] Internal deliberation The design process for what became the Pelican began in early 2000, when designers in the Phantom Works division of Boeing started working on solutions for the United States armed forces objective of moving thousands of troops, weapons, military equipment, and provisions to a war or battle scene faster,[5] such as successfully deployi ...more...

Eight-engined tractor aircraft

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Abandoned civil aircraft projects of the United...

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Abandoned military projects of the United States

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Boeing Persistent Munition Technology Demonstrator

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Boeing Persistent Munition Technology Demonstrator

The Persistent Munition Technology Demonstrator or PMTD is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed and produced by the Advanced Weapons and Missile Systems division of Boeing as a test bed in order to further develop and flight test various UAV technologies. It has also been referred to as the Dominator.[1] The PMTD weighs 60 pounds (27 kg), has a 12 feet (3.7 m) wingspan and is powered by a single piston engine driving a pusher propeller. It was first flown in April, 2006, at Vandalia Municipal Airport, Vandalia, Illinois. Designed for either air or ground launch and high loiter times, the PMTD has the ability to operate completely autonomously. During its maiden flight, the UAV autonomously flew to 14 programmed locations, changed altitude four times, and met all programmed speeds. The initial set of flight tests focused solely on validation of the autonomous flight mode, while future tests will include sensor integration, weapon guidance systems, munitions dispensing systems and in-flight refueling. E ...more...

Unmanned military aircraft of the United States

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Boeing military aircraft

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Unmanned aerial vehicles of the United States

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