Boeing aircraft


Boeing Phantom Eye

topic

Boeing Phantom Eye

The Boeing Phantom Eye was a high altitude, long endurance (HALE) liquid hydrogen-powered[1] unmanned aerial vehicle developed by Boeing Phantom Works.[2] The aircraft was Boeing's proposal to meet the demand from the US military for unmanned drones designed to provide advanced intelligence and reconnaissance work, driven by the combat conditions in Afghanistan in particular.[3] In August 2016, the Phantom Eye demonstrator was disassembled for display at the Air Force Flight Test Museum.[4] Development The Phantom Eye was an evolution from Boeing's earlier success with the piston-powered Boeing Condor that set several records for altitude and endurance in the late 1980s. Boeing also studied a larger HALE UAV that can fly for over 10 days and carry payloads of 2,000 pounds (900 kg) or more; the company also worked on the Phantom Ray UAV as a flying testbed for advanced technologies.[5] Phantom Eye's propulsion system successfully completed an 80-hour test in an altitude chamber on March 1, 2010; this cleare ...more...

Aircraft first flown in 2012

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

High-wing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Hydrogen-powered aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing Phantom Ray

topic

Boeing Phantom Ray

The Boeing Phantom Ray is an American demonstration stealth unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) developed by Boeing using company funds. The autonomous Phantom Ray is a flying wing around the size of a conventional fighter jet, and first flew in April 2011. It will conduct a program of test flights involving surveillance, ground attack and autonomous aerial refueling missions.[2][3] The developers say it can carry 4,500 pounds (2,040 kg) of payload.[4] Design and development The Phantom Ray being carried on the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft in Missouri in December 2010. The Phantom Ray project, called "Project Reblue" internally at Boeing, was first conceived in mid-2007, and started in earnest in June 2008. The project was secret within the company, except for a small number of executives and engineers, until May 2009.[5] Developed by the Boeing Phantom Works, the Phantom Ray is based on the X-45C prototype aircraft,[6] which Boeing originally developed for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARP ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft first flown in 2011

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Flying wings

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Bell Boeing Quad TiltRotor

topic

Bell Boeing Quad TiltRotor

The Bell Boeing Quad TiltRotor (QTR) is a proposed four-rotor derivative of the Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey developed jointly by Bell Helicopter and Boeing. The concept is a contender in the U.S. Army's Joint Heavy Lift program. It would have a cargo capacity roughly equivalent to the C-130 Hercules, cruise at 250 knots, and land at unimproved sites vertically like a helicopter.[1] Development Background Bell developed its model D-322 as a quad tiltrotor concept in 1979. The Bell Boeing team disclosed a Quad TiltRotor design in 1999 which the companies had been investigating during the previous two years. The design was for a C-130-size V/STOL transport for the US Army's Future Transport Rotorcraft program and would have 50% commonality with the V-22. This design was to have a maximum takeoff weight of 100,000 lb (45,000 kg) with a payload of up to 25,000 lb (11,000 kg) in a hover.[2][3] The design was downsized to be more V-22-based and to have a payload of 18,000 to 20,000 lb (8,200 to 9,100 kg). This versio ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Proposed military aircraft of the United States

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Quadrotors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing RC-1

topic

Boeing RC-1

The Boeing RC-1, short for "Resource Carrier 1", was a design for an enormous cargo aircraft intended to haul oil and minerals out of the northern reaches of Alaska and Canada where ice-free ports were not available. It was optimized for short-haul missions only, carrying cargo to locations for loading onto ships, trains or pipelines. Depending on the role, the design was nicknamed "Brute Lifter" or "Flying Pipeline". The basic design had a rectangular wing spanning almost 500 feet (150 m), was powered by 12 Pratt & Whitney JT9D engines, and had 56 wheels in the main landing gear. A total of 2,300,000 pounds (1,000,000 kg) of cargo was carried in two under-wing pods and fuselage. The RC-1 would have been roughly twice the size and mass of the Antonov An-225 Mriya, the largest aircraft built, but would have carried about five times the payload.[a] The RC-1 was designed in the early 1970s. The rapid increase in jet fuel prices after 1973 doomed the project to be uneconomical. History Early concepts The ...more...

Aircraft specs templates using more general par...

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

T-tail aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

High-wing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing Insitu ScanEagle

topic

Boeing Insitu ScanEagle

The Boeing Insitu ScanEagle is a small, long-endurance, low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) built by Insitu, a subsidiary of Boeing, and is used for reconnaissance.[2][3] The ScanEagle was designed by Insitu based on the Insitu SeaScan, a commercial UAV that was intended for fish-spotting. The ScanEagle continues to receive improvements through upgrades and changes. Design and development ScanEagle is a descendant of another Insitu UAV, the Insitu SeaScan, which was conceived of as a remote sensor for collecting weather data as well as helping commercial fishermen locate and track schools of tuna. ScanEagle emerged as the result of a strategic alliance between Boeing and Insitu. The resulting technology has been successful as a portable Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) for autonomous surveillance in the battlefield, and has been deployed since August 2004 in the Iraq War. ScanEagle carries a stabilized electro-optical and/or infrared camera on a lightweight inertial stabilized turret system, and an inte ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft first flown in 2002

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing Insitu RQ-21 Blackjack

topic

Boeing Insitu RQ-21 Blackjack

The Boeing Insitu RQ-21 Blackjack, formerly called the Integrator, is an American unmanned air vehicle designed and built by Boeing Insitu to meet a United States Navy requirement for a small tactical unmanned air system (STUAS).[5] It is a twin-boom, single-engine, monoplane, designed as a supplement to the Boeing Scan Eagle.[5] The Integrator weighs 61 kg (135 lb) and uses the same launcher and recovery system as the Scan Eagle.[5] Development The RQ-21 was selected in June 2010 over the Raytheon Killer Bee, AAI Aerosonde, and General Dynamics/Elbit Systems Storm.[6] The RQ-21A Integrator first flew on 28 July 2012.[5] On 10 September 2012, the Integrator entered developmental testing with a 66-minute flight. The Navy launched one using a pneumatic launcher and a recovery system known as Skyhook. This eliminates the need for runways and enables a safe recovery and expeditionary capability for tactical missions on land or sea. At the current testing rate, Initial Operational Capability (IOC) was expected ...more...

Unmanned military aircraft of the United States

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

High-wing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing Skyfox

topic

Boeing Skyfox

The Boeing Skyfox is an American twin-engined jet trainer aircraft, a highly upgraded development of the Lockheed T-33. It was designed as a primary trainer to compete with and replace the Cessna T-37 Tweet.[1] Besides its primary role as a trainer, the aircraft was envisioned to have other roles as well, including ground attack. The program was started by the Skyfox Corporation in 1983, and was acquired by Boeing in 1986.[2] The program included the replacement of the Allison J33-A-35 turbojet by two Garrett TFE731-3A turbofans. It also included an extensive redesign of the airframe. Only one prototype aircraft was built, and the program was later canceled due to lack of customers.[3] Design and development Over 6,500 Lockheed T-33 trainers were built, making it one of the most successful jet trainer programs in history.[4][5] However, technology passed the "T-Bird" by, and by the 1980s, it was clear that the world's air forces needed a more modern training aircraft. The "Skyfox" was conceived and develop ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft first flown in 1983

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Low-wing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


SkyHook JHL-40

topic

SkyHook JHL-40

The SkyHook JHL-40 is a hybrid airship/helicopter currently in development. On July 9, 2008, Boeing announced that it had teamed up with SkyHook International, a Canadian company, to develop this aircraft.[1][2][3] No further press releases appear after 2009 and Skyhook International has abandoned its domain name registration since 2010 as shown by the Internet Archive. According to company spokespeople, the aircraft will combine the best features of a blimp and a helicopter, and will be capable of carrying a 40 ton load up to 200 miles (320 km) without refueling. At 302 feet (92 m) long, it will classify as the largest helicopter in the world, and will be capable of flying up to 800 miles (1,300 km) without a load.[4] The craft will use helium to provide enough lift to carry its own weight, and will use four helicopter rotors to lift the load and to propel the aircraft.[3] By using both helium and helicopter rotors, the aircraft can avoid having to jettison helium after unloading.[1] In comparison, the CH- ...more...

Quadrotors

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

International proposed aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing Sonic Cruiser

topic

Boeing Sonic Cruiser

The Boeing Sonic Cruiser was a concept jet airliner with a delta wing-canard configuration. It was distinguished from conventional airliners by its delta wing and high-subsonic cruising speed of up to Mach 0.98. Boeing first proposed it in 2001, but airlines generally preferred lower operating costs over higher speed. Boeing ended the Sonic Cruiser project in December 2002 and shifted to the slower (Mach 0.85), but more fuel-efficient 7E7 (later named 787 Dreamliner) airliner. Design and development As well as wanting more direct flights, passengers have demonstrated a preference for flights that take less time and aeroplane configurations that enhance comfort. It’s just common sense: people want to go where they want to go, when they want to go, how they want to go. Boeing’s answer to the demand for faster flights, more direct flights and increased comfort is the Sonic Cruiser.  — Peter Rumsey, Director of New Airplane Product Development, Ingenia, February 2002[2] The Sonic Cruiser was born from one o ...more...

Abandoned civil aircraft projects of the United...

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Canard aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing SolarEagle

topic

Boeing SolarEagle

The Boeing SolarEagle (Vulture II) was a proposed High-Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) unmanned aerial vehicle solar-electric spy plane developed by Boeing Phantom Works.[1] It was intended to remain airborne for five years at a time without needing to land. It had a wingspan of 393.7 feet (120 meters), and was slated to make its first flight in 2014.[2] It has 20 motors of the same type as the Qinetiq Zephyr designed by Newcastle University. DARPA is funding $90 million for the project with Boeing paying the rest.[3] However, the SolarEagle project was cancelled in 2012.[4] References Haddox, Chris. "SolarEagle (Vulture II) Backgrounder" Archived June 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine Boeing Phantom Works, September 2010. Retrieved: 18 October 2010. https://www.newscientist.com/gallery/drones/3 "The pilotless plane that can stay in the air for years". 27 July 2011. Archived from the original on 27 September 2012. Retrieved 4 December 2012. http://aviationweek.com/technology/facebook-s-uav-flies- ...more...

DARPA

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Solar-powered aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

DARPA projects

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


The Starship

topic

The Starship

The Starship was a former United Airlines Boeing 720 passenger jet, bought by Bobby Sherman and his manager, Ward Sylvester, and leased to touring musical artists in the mid-1970s. History The Starship, N7201U (S/N: 17907), was the first Boeing 720 built. It was delivered to United Airlines on October 1960 and then purchased in 1973 by Contemporary Entertainment.[1] English rock band Led Zeppelin used the aircraft for their 1973 and 1975 North American concert tours. During the 1972 tour and in the early part of the 1973 tour the band had hired a small private Falcon Jet to transport its members from city to city, but these aircraft are comparatively light and susceptible to turbulence.[2] After performing a show at Kezar Stadium in San Francisco in 1973, Led Zeppelin encountered bad turbulence on a flight back to Los Angeles. As a result, the band's manager Peter Grant resolved to hire The Starship for the remainder of the tour, at a cost of $30,000.[2] The aircraft was the same type as used by commercia ...more...

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Led Zeppelin

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Individual aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing T-43

topic

Boeing T-43

A T-43 in flight The Boeing T-43 was a modified Boeing 737-200 used by the United States Air Force for training navigators, now known as USAF combat systems officers. Informally referred to as the Gator[3] (an abbreviation of "navigator") and "Flying Classroom",[3] nineteen of these aircraft were delivered to the Air Training Command at Mather AFB, California during 1973 and 1974. Two additional aircraft were delivered to the Colorado Air National Guard at Buckley ANGB (later Buckley AFB) and Peterson AFB, Colorado, in direct support of cadet air navigation training at the nearby U.S. Air Force Academy. Two T-43s were later converted to CT-43As in the early 1990s and transferred to Air Mobility Command and United States Air Forces in Europe, respectively, as executive transports. A third aircraft was also transferred to Air Force Material Command for use as a radar test bed aircraft and was redesignated as an NT-43A. The T-43 was retired by the Air Education and Training Command in 2010 after 37 years of ser ...more...

Aircraft first flown in 1973

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing 737

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Low-wing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing-Stearman Model 75

topic

Boeing-Stearman Model 75

The Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 is a biplane formerly used as a military trainer aircraft, of which at least 10,626 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s.[1] Stearman Aircraft became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. Widely known as the Stearman, Boeing Stearman or Kaydet, it served as a primary trainer for the United States Army Air Forces, the United States Navy (as the NS and N2S), and with the Royal Canadian Air Force as the Kaydet throughout World War II. After the conflict was over, thousands of surplus aircraft were sold on the civilian market. In the immediate postwar years they became popular as crop dusters, sports planes, and for aerobatic and wing walking use in air shows. Design and development A WAVE in a Boeing Stearman N2S United States Navy training aircraft. United States Navy N2S-2 at NAS Corpus Christi, 1943. United States Navy NS-1s of the NAS Pensacola Flight School, 1936. Boeing Stearman E75 (PT-13D) of 1944. Vintage Boeing-Stearman Model 75, Breitling ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft first flown in 1934

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

World War II trainer aircraft of the United States

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


McDonnell Douglas T-45 Goshawk

topic

McDonnell Douglas T-45 Goshawk

The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) T-45 Goshawk is a highly modified version of the British BAE Systems Hawk land-based training jet aircraft. Manufactured by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) and British Aerospace (now BAE Systems), the T-45 is used by the United States Navy as an aircraft carrier-capable trainer. Development Background The T-45 Goshawk has its origins within the mid-1970s, during which time the U.S. Navy formally commenced its search for a new jet trainer aircraft to serve as a single replacement for both its T-2 Buckeye and A-4 Skyhawk trainers.[3] During 1978, the VTXTS advanced trainer program to meet this need was formally launched by the U.S. Navy. An Anglo-American team, comprising British aviation manufacturer British Aerospace (BAe) and American aircraft company McDonnell Douglas (MDC), decided to submit their proposal for a navalised version of the land-based BAE Systems Hawk trainer. Other manufacturers also submitted bids, such as a rival team of French aircraft company Dassault A ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Carrier-based aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Single-engined jet aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing TB

topic

Boeing TB

The Boeing TB (or Model 63) was an American torpedo bomber biplane designed by the US Navy and built by Boeing in 1927. Development and design The TB was an improved version of the Martin T3M. It was constructed of all dural, with a fabric covering. The equal-span wings were large and unstaggered, and could be folded aft, reducing the span to 21 feet 8 inches (6.60 m) for storage. The wheeled undercarriage was a conventional configuration that could be interchanged with floats. As a landplane, the main gear units carried twin wheels. The underside of the fuselage incorporated a glazed station for the bombardier.[1] Even before the three XTB-1s were delivered, the Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics had changed its opinion about what was needed in a torpedo bomber, and based on experience with the NAF XTN-1 had decided that a twin-engine aircraft would better suit the role. Having thus been made redundant, no TBs past the three prototypes were built.[1] Specifications Boeing TB-1 3-view drawing from L'Aéronaut ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Biplanes

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey

topic

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey

The Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey is an American multi-mission, tiltrotor military aircraft with both vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL), and short takeoff and landing (STOL) capabilities. It is designed to combine the functionality of a conventional helicopter with the long-range, high-speed cruise performance of a turboprop aircraft. The failure of Operation Eagle Claw during the Iran hostage crisis in 1980 underscored the requirement for a new long-range, high-speed, vertical-takeoff aircraft for the United States Department of Defense. In response, the Joint-service Vertical take-off/landing Experimental (JVX) aircraft program started in 1981. A partnership between Bell Helicopter and Boeing Helicopters was awarded a development contract in 1983 for the V-22 tiltrotor aircraft. The Bell Boeing team jointly produce the aircraft.[5] The V-22 first flew in 1989, and began flight testing and design alterations; the complexity and difficulties of being the first tiltrotor for military service led to many years of ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft first flown in 1989

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Tiltrotor aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Vertol VZ-2

topic

Vertol VZ-2

The Vertol VZ-2 (or Model 76) was a research aircraft built in the United States in 1957 to investigate the tiltwing approach to vertical take-off and landing. The aircraft had a fuselage of tubular framework (originally uncovered) and accommodation for its pilot in a helicopter-like bubble canopy. The T-tail incorporated small ducted fans to act as thrusters for greater control at low speeds. Ground tests began in April 1957 and on 13 August, the VZ-2 took off for the first time in hover mode only. On 23 July 1958, the aircraft made its first full transition from vertical flight to horizontal flight. By the time the test program ended in 1965, the VZ-2 had made some 450 flights, including 34 full transitions. The aircraft has been preserved by the National Air and Space Museum in storage at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility. Specifications The VZ-2 in flight in 1958. General characteristics Crew: one pilot Capacity: 1 passenger/observer Length: 26 ft 5 in (8.05 m ...more...

Aircraft first flown in 1957

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Tiltwing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Single-engined twin-prop tractor aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing X-32

topic

Boeing X-32

The Boeing X-32 is a concept demonstrator aircraft that was designed for the Joint Strike Fighter contest. It lost to the Lockheed Martin X-35 demonstrator, which was further developed into the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II. Development Background In 1993, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) launched the Common Affordable Lightweight Fighter project (CALF). The project's purpose was to develop a stealth-enabled design to replace all of United States Department of Defense lighter weight fighter and attack aircraft, including the F-16 Fighting Falcon, McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet, and vertical/short takeoff / vertical landing (V/STOL) AV-8B Harrier II.[1] Around the same time the Joint Advanced Strike Technology (JAST) project was started.[2] In 1994, the U.S. Congress ordered the two to be merged into the Joint Strike Fighter Program. Many companies took part in the first phase of this project, which involved drafting concept aircraft designs for submission to the Department of Defe ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Stealth aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Single-engined jet aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing X-37

topic

Boeing X-37

The Boeing X-37, also known as the Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV), is a reusable uncrewed spacecraft. It is boosted into space by a launch vehicle, then re-enters Earth's atmosphere and lands as a spaceplane. The X-37 is operated by the United States Air Force for orbital spaceflight missions intended to demonstrate reusable space technologies.[4] It is a 120%-scaled derivative of the earlier Boeing X-40. The X-37 began as a NASA project in 1999, before being transferred to the U.S. Department of Defense in 2004. Its first flight was during a drop test in 2006. There have been five X-37 orbital missions. The spaceplane's first mission, USA-212, was launched in April 2010 and returned to Earth in December 2010. A second X-37 was launched on mission USA-226 in March 2011 and returned in June 2012. The third mission was USA-240, which launched in December 2012 and landed in October 2014. The fourth mission, USA-261, launched in May 2015 and landed in May 2017. The fifth and latest X-37 mission, USA-277, launched on ...more...

Unmanned military aircraft of the United States

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

SpaceX military payloads

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing X-40

topic

Boeing X-40

The Boeing X-40A Space Maneuver Vehicle was a test platform for the X-37 Future-X Reusable Launch Vehicle. History The unpiloted X-40 was built to 85% scale to test aerodynamics and navigation of the X-37 Future-X Reusable Launch Vehicle project. After the first drop test in August 1998 the vehicle was transferred to NASA, which modified it. Between April 4 and May 19, 2001 the vehicle successfully conducted seven free flights.[3] In 2001 it successfully demonstrated the glide capabilities of the X-37's fat-bodied, short-winged design and validated the proposed guidance system. Testing The first X-40 drop test occurred at Holloman AFB, New Mexico on August 11, 1998 at 06:59. This was a joint Air Force/Boeing project known as Space Maneuver Vehicle. It was released from an altitude of approximately 9,200 feet (2,800 m) and 2.5 miles (4.0 km) away from the end of Runway 04 by a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter[1][2][3] (later tests used the CH-47 Chinook helicopter).[2][3] The vehicle dove to the runway in an a ...more...

Air Force Research Laboratory projects

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Military space program of the United States

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing X-45

topic

Boeing X-45

The Boeing X-45 unmanned combat air vehicle is a concept demonstrator for a next generation of completely autonomous military aircraft, developed by Boeing's Phantom Works. Manufactured by Boeing Integrated Defense Systems, the X-45 was a part of DARPA's J-UCAS project. Development Boeing developed the X-45 from research gathered during the development of the Bird of Prey. The X-45 features an extremely low-profile dorsal intake placed near the leading edge of the aircraft. The center fuselage is blended into a swept lambda wing, with a small exhaust outlet. It has no vertical control surfaces — split ailerons near each wingtip function as asymmetric air brakes, providing rudder control, much as in Northrop's flying wings. X-45A test flight Removing the pilot and its associated facilities from the aircraft dramatically reduces the aircraft's cost. Ground-based pilots execute the higher level decisions, but the mechanical flying of the aircraft is autonomous. Variants X-45A Boeing built two of the mo ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Unmanned experimental aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Tailless aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing X-46

topic

Boeing X-46

Artist's Impression of an X-46 landing on a carrier The Boeing X-46 was a proposed unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) that was to be developed in conjunction with the U.S. Navy and DARPA as a naval carrier-based variant of the Boeing X-45 UCAV being developed for the U.S. Air Force. Two contracts for technology demonstrators were awarded in June 2000, to Boeing for the X-46A and to Northrop Grumman for the X-47A. However, in April 2003, the Air Force and the Navy efforts were formally combined under the joint DARPA/United StatesF/Navy J-UCAV program, later renamed J-UCAS (Joint Unmanned Combat Air Systems), and the X-46 program was terminated as redundant.[1] A Navy-only N-UCAS demonstrator program started in the summer of 2006.[2] Boeing will use material developed for the X-46 and X-45 to propose the X-45N as a naval UCAV demonstrator.[3] References "Uncertainty Engulfs Pentagon's Unmanned Aircraft Plans". Aviation Week and Space Technology, 13 September 2002. "Navy UCAS Program Set To Be Launche ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Cancelled military aircraft projects of the Uni...

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Unmanned aerial vehicles of the United States

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing X-53 Active Aeroelastic Wing

topic

Boeing X-53 Active Aeroelastic Wing

The X-53 Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) development program is a completed American research project that was undertaken jointly by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Boeing Phantom Works and NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, where the technology was flight tested on a modified McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet. Active Aeroelastic Wing Technology is a technology that integrates wing aerodynamics, controls, and structure to harness and control wing aeroelastic twist at high speeds and dynamic pressures. By using multiple leading and trailing edge controls like "aerodynamic tabs", subtle amounts of aeroelastic twist can be controlled to provide large amounts of wing control power, while minimizing maneuver air loads at high wing strain conditions or aerodynamic drag at low wing strain conditions. The flight program which first proved the use of AAW technology in full scale was the X-53 Active Aeroelastic Wing program. Gerry Miller and Jan Tulinius led the development of the initial concept during wind ...more...

Aircraft first flown in 2006

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Air Force Research Laboratory projects

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Variable-geometry-wing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing YQM-94

topic

Boeing YQM-94

The Boeing YQM-94 B-Gull (also called Compass Cope B) was a developmental aerial reconnaissance drone developed by Boeing. It could take off and land from a runway like a manned aircraft, and operate at high altitudes for up to 24 hours to perform aerial surveillance, communications relay, or atmospheric sampling. Design and development Compass Cope was a program initiated by the United States Air Force (USAF) in 1971 to develop an upgraded reconnaissance drone that could take off and land from a runway like a manned aircraft, and operate at high altitudes for up to 24 hours to perform surveillance, communications relay, or atmospheric sampling. Two aircraft, the Boeing YQM-94 Compass Cope B, and the Ryan Aeronautical YQM-98A Compass Cope R participated in the program. Boeing was originally selected as a sole source for the Compass Cope program, with the USAF awarding the company a contract for two YQM-94A (later YGQM-94A) demonstrator vehicles in 1971. However, Ryan then pitched an alternative, and the ne ...more...

Unmanned military aircraft of the United States

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

High-wing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing–Sikorsky RAH-66 Comanche

topic

Boeing–Sikorsky RAH-66 Comanche

The Boeing–Sikorsky RAH-66 Comanche was a stealth armed reconnaissance and attack helicopter designed for the United States Army. Following decades of development, during 2004, the RAH-66 program was canceled prior to mass production commencing, by which point nearly US$7 billion had been already spent on the program. During the early 1980s, the U.S. Army started to formulate requirements for the replacement of its helicopters then in service, which resulted in the launch of the Light Helicopter Experimental (LHX) program. Nearly a decade later, following the refinement of requirements, evaluation of submissions, and the rebranding of the programme as the Light Helicopter (LX) program, during April 1991, the Army announced the selection of the Boeing–Sikorsky team's design as the contest winner, shortly after which a contract for construction of prototypes was awarded. The Comanche was to incorporate several advanced elements, such as stealth technologies, and a number of previously untried design features. ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Stealth aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft first flown in 1996

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing 7x7 series

topic

Boeing 7x7 series

Boeing Commercial Airplanes (BCA) is a division of the Boeing Company. It designs, assembles, markets, and sells jet airliners and business jets (Boeing Business Jets); it also provides product-related maintenance and training to customers worldwide.[4] It operates from division headquarters in Renton, Washington, with more than a dozen engineering, manufacturing, and assembly facilities located throughout the U.S. and internationally.[3] BCA includes the assets of the Douglas Aircraft division of the former McDonnell Douglas Corporation, which merged with Boeing in 1997.[5] Organization Boeing Commercial Airplanes (BCA) is organized as: Airplane Programs Renton – 737, BBJ Everett – 747, 767, 777, 787 Charleston – 787 Fabrication Division Global Partners Propulsion Systems Commercial Aviation Services BCA subsidiaries: Aeroinfo Systems[6] Aviall[7] Aviation Partners Boeing,[8] a 50/50 joint venture with Aviation Partners Inc. Boeing Canada Boeing Training & Flight Services ...more...

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

American companies started in 1997

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Companies started in 1997

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing CH-47 Chinook in Australian service

topic

Boeing CH-47 Chinook in Australian service

The Australian Defence Force has operated Boeing CH-47 Chinook heavy-lift helicopters for most of the period since 1974. Thirty of the type have entered Australian service, comprising twelve CH-47C variants, eight CH-47Ds and ten CH-47Fs. The helicopters have been operated by both the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and Australian Army. An initial order of eight Chinooks for the RAAF was placed in 1962, but soon cancelled in favour of more urgent priorities. The Australian military still required helicopters of this type, and twelve CH-47C Chinooks were ordered in 1970. The CH-47s entered service with the RAAF in December 1974. The eleven surviving Chinooks were retired in 1989 as a cost-saving measure, but it was found that the Australian Defence Force's other helicopters could not replace their capabilities. As a result, four of the CH-47Cs were upgraded to CH-47D standard, and returned to service in 1995 with the Australian Army. The Army acquired two more CH-47Ds in 2000 and another pair in 2012. The C ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft in Royal Australian Air Force service

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Australian Army aviation

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing 737-900

topic

Boeing 737-900

The Boeing 737 Next Generation, commonly abbreviated as 737NG,[4] or 737 Next Gen, is the −600/-700/-800/-900 series of the Boeing 737 airliner. It is the third generation derivative of the 737, and follows the 737 Classic (−300/-400/-500) series, which began production in the 1980s. They are short- to medium-range, narrow-body jet airliners powered by two engines. Produced since 1996 by Boeing Commercial Airplanes, the 737NG series includes four variants and can seat between 110 and 210 passengers. Formally launched in 1993, the 737NG is an upgrade of the preceding 737 Classic models featuring a redesigned wing that is larger in area, with a wider wingspan, and greater fuel capacity. It is equipped with CFM56-7 series engines, a glass cockpit, and features upgraded and redesigned interior configurations. Performance and capability upgrades over its predecessor include longer range, greater capacity (in its largest variants), and available higher maximum takeoff weight (MTOW) specifications. As of 31 Januar ...more...

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing 737

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Twinjets

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing X-51 Waverider

topic

Boeing X-51 Waverider

The Boeing X-51 Waverider is an unmanned research scramjet experimental aircraft for hypersonic flight at Mach 5 (3,300 mph; 5,300 km/h) and an altitude of 70,000 feet (21,000 m). The aircraft was designated X-51 in 2005. It completed its first powered hypersonic flight on 26 May 2010. After two unsuccessful test flights, the X-51 completed a flight of over six minutes and reached speeds of over Mach 5 for 210 seconds on 1 May 2013 for the longest duration powered hypersonic flight. Waverider refers in general to aircraft that take advantage of compression lift produced by their own shock waves. The X-51 program was a cooperative effort by the United States Air Force, DARPA, NASA, Boeing, and Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne. The program was managed by the Aerospace Systems Directorate within the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL).[2][3] X-51 technology is proposed for use in the High Speed Strike Weapon (HSSW), a Mach 5+ missile which could enter service in the mid-2020s. Design and development In t ...more...

Aircraft first flown in 2010

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Scramjet-powered aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Air Force Research Laboratory projects

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Middle of the market

topic

Middle of the market

The short Boeing 767-200/ER represents one fifth of the 767 sales The middle of the market, often abbreviated MoM, is the airliner market between the narrowbody and the widebody aircraft, a market segmentation used by Boeing Commercial Airplanes since at least 2003.[1] Both Airbus and Boeing produce aircraft that serve this segment. In the Boeing lineup, it is between the largest Boeing 737 MAX 9 of 194,700 lb (88.3 t) of maximum takeoff weight (MTOW) for 178 passengers in two classes over a 3,515 nmi (6,510 km) range,[2] and the smallest Boeing 787-8 of 502,500 lb (227.9 t) for 242 passengers in a 2-class configuration over a 7,355 nmi (13,621 km) range.[3] It was previously covered by Boeing with the largest modern narrowbody, the Boeing 757, typically the -200ER for 200 passengers over 3,915 nmi (7,251 km) with a 255,000 lb (116 t) MTOW,[4] and the smallest widebody, the seven-abreast Boeing 767, typically the -300ER for 269 passengers over 5,725 nmi (10,603 km) with a 412,000 lb (187 t) MTOW.[5] In the ...more...

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Proposed aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Airliners

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing Bird of Prey

topic

Boeing Bird of Prey

The Boeing Bird of Prey was a black project aircraft, intended to demonstrate stealth technology. It was developed by McDonnell Douglas and Boeing in the 1990s.[1] The company provided $67 million of funding for the project;[1] it was a low-cost program compared to many other programs of similar scale. It developed technology and materials which would later be used on Boeing's X-45 unmanned combat air vehicle. As an internal project, this aircraft was not given an X-plane designation. There are no public plans to make this a production aircraft. It is characterized as a technology demonstrator. Design and development Development of the Bird of Prey began in 1992 by McDonnell Douglas's Phantom Works division for special projects, at Area 51. The aircraft's name is a reference to the Klingon Bird of Prey warship from the Star Trek television series.[2] Phantom Works later became part of Boeing Integrated Defense Systems after the Boeing–McDonnell Douglas merger in 1997. The first flight was in 1996, and 39 m ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft first flown in 1996

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


TFX Program

topic

TFX Program

The Boeing 818 was the Boeing's candidate for the U.S. military's TFX fighter competition. The United States Air Force and Navy were both seeking new aircraft when Robert McNamara was appointed U.S. Secretary of Defense in January 1961.[1] The aircraft sought by the two armed services shared the need to carry heavy armament and fuel loads, feature high supersonic speed, twin engines and two seats, and probably use variable geometry wings.[2] On 14 February 1961, McNamara formally directed the services to study the development of a single aircraft that would satisfy both requirements. Early studies indicated that the best option was to base the design on the Air Force requirement, and use a modified version for the Navy.[3] In June 1961, Secretary McNamara ordered the go ahead of Tactical Fighter Experimental (TFX) despite Air Force and Navy efforts to keep their programs separate.[4] Proposals were received from Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell, North American and Republic. The evaluation group ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Variable-sweep-wing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing B-1

topic

Boeing B-1

The Boeing B-1 (company designation Model 6) was a small biplane flying boat designed by William Boeing shortly after World War I. Design and development The Model 6 was the first commercial design for Boeing (as opposed to military or experimental designs), hence the B-1 designation. Its layout was conventional for its day, with a Hall-Scott engine driving a pusher propeller mounted amongst the cabane struts. The pilot sat in an open cockpit at the bow, and up to two passengers could be carried in a second open cockpit behind the first. The design was reminiscent of the Curtiss HS-2L that Boeing had been building under license during the war. Operational history Only a single aircraft was built, as Boeing had trouble selling it in a market flooded with war-surplus aircraft. In 1920, it was purchased by Edward Hubbard, who used it to carry air mail between Seattle, Washington and Victoria, British Columbia. Air mail service began on 27 December 1919, and continued for eight years.[2] The plane flew until ...more...

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft first flown in 1919

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Flying boats

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


List of surviving Boeing B-47 Stratojets

topic

List of surviving Boeing B-47 Stratojets

The Boeing B-47 Stratojet is an American jet-engine Strategic Bomber used by the United States Air Force from 1951 until 1977. Of the 2,032 aircraft built, 23 survive today, none of which are airworthy, and all of which are located in the United States. Surviving aircraft Serial Geographic location Institutional location History Photo 46-66 Southern California Air Force Flight Test Museum Built at Boeing Seattle as XB-47. The second XB-47 built, after 46-65. First flight 21 July 1948. Test flown at Edwards AFB. In 1954 46-65 was scrapped, making 46-66 the oldest B-47 in existence, and the only surviving XB-47. Previously displayed at the since-closed Octave Chanute Aerospace Museum at the former Chanute AFB, Illinois. Returned to Edwards AFB in 2016. Awaiting funds for restoration.[1] 50-0062 Pooler, Georgia Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum Built at Boeing Wichita as B-47B. In 1954 redesignated as TB-47B (test aircraft). Used in 1957 as JTB-47B, and immediately after re-converted to TB ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


List of McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle operators

topic

List of McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle operators

Current operators of the F-15 in cyan, F-15E in red, both in dark blue The McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle has been in service with the United States Air Force since 1976. Israel, Japan, Saudi Arabia and other nations also operate the aircraft. The units it has been assigned to, and the bases it has been stationed are listed below. Operators  Israel Israeli Air Force has operated F-15s since 1977, received under Peace Fox I, II and III. These aircraft are currently organized into two F-15A/B/C/D squadrons and one F-15I squadron. The first 25 F-15A/Bs were early USAF production airframes. The second batch was temporarily embargoed as a result of the 1982 Lebanon War.[1] The IAF has 43 F-15A/B/C/D (20 F-15A, 6 F-15B, 11 F-15C, and 6 F-15D) aircraft in service as of January 2011.[2] It also operates 25 F-15I "Ra'am" aircraft as of January 2011.[2] 106 Squadron ("The Head of the Spear Squadron") Tel Nof Airbase (F-15A/B/C/D) 133 Squadron ("The Twin-Tail Knights Squadron") Tel Nof Airbase (F-15A/B/C/D) 69 Sq ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

McDonnell Douglas aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing New Midsize Airplane

topic

Boeing New Midsize Airplane

The New Midsize Airplane would replace the 757 and 767 in the middle of the market. The New Midsize Airplane (NMA), or New Midsize Aircraft,[1] is a concept airliner designed by Boeing to fill the middle of the market segment. In 2015, Boeing determined the market was large enough to launch a new design. In 2017, multiple airlines expressed interest in a composite, seven-abreast twin-aisle with an elliptical cross-section. The new aircraft, likely to be known as the Boeing 797, would be available in two versions: a 225-seater with 5,000 nmi (9,300 km) range and a 275-seater with a range of 4,500 nmi (8,300 km). Third-party forecasts for this market vary from 2,000 to 4,000 aircraft, though Boeing expects the market demand to lie at the upper end of this range. At a projected price of $65–75 million, the NMA should generate 30% more revenue than narrowbodies and have 40% lower trip costs than the widebodies it would replace, but would cost $12–15 billion to develop. It would be powered by a new 50,000 lbf (2 ...more...

Proposed aircraft of the United States

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Airliners

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Proposed aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing YB-9

topic

Boeing YB-9

The Boeing YB-9 was the first all-metal monoplane bomber aircraft designed for the United States Army Air Corps. The YB-9 was an enlarged alteration of Boeing's Model 200 Monomail commercial transport. Design and development In May 1930, Boeing had flown its Model 200 Monomail single-engined mailplane. The Monomail was of radical design for the time, being a semi-monocoque, stressed skin cantilever monoplane with a retractable undercarriage. Air Corps bomber squadrons of the day were largely equipped with slow wood-and-canvas biplanes such as the Keystone B-6, and Boeing decided to design and build a twin-engined bomber using the same techniques used in the Monomail to re-equip the Air Corps.[1][2] Using its own money, Boeing decided to build two prototypes of its new bomber design as a private venture. The two aircraft differed only in the engines used, with the Model 214 to be powered by two liquid-cooled Curtiss V-1570-29 Conqueror engines while the Model 215 had two Pratt & Whitney R-1860 Hornet B ...more...

Twin piston-engined tractor aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Twin-engined piston aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing EC-135

topic

Boeing EC-135

The Boeing EC-135 was a command and control version of the Boeing C-135 Stratolifter. During the Cold War, the EC-135 was best known for being modified to perform the Looking Glass mission where one EC-135 was always airborne 24 hours a day to serve as flying command post for the Strategic Air Command in the event of nuclear war. Various other EC-135 aircraft sat on airborne and ground alert throughout the Cold War, with the last EC-135C being retired in 1998. The EC-135N variant served as a tracking aircraft for the Apollo program. Missions Looking Glass EC-135C Looking Glass with Pacer Link modification Gen. Richard A. Ellis, CINCSAC, in battle staff compartment Officially known as "Operation Looking Glass", at least 11 EC-135C command post aircraft were provided to the Commander in Chief, Strategic Air Command (CINCSAC), and were based at various locations throughout the United States and worldwide. Operations began in 1961 with the 34th Air Refueling Squadron at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, in ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft first flown in 1965

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Strategic Air Command

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing Model 1

topic

Boeing Model 1

The Boeing Model 1, also known as the B & W Seaplane, was a United States single-engine biplane seaplane aircraft. It was the first Boeing product and carried the initials of its designers, William Boeing and Lt. Conrad Westervelt USN. Design The first B & W was completed in June 1916 at Boeing's boathouse hangar on Lake Union in Seattle, Washington. It was made of wood, with wire bracing, and was linen-covered. It was similar to the Martin trainer aircraft that Boeing owned, but the B & W had better pontoons and a more powerful engine. The first B & W was named Bluebill, and the second was named Mallard. They first flew on 15 June 1916, and in November. Operational history The two B & Ws were offered to the United States Navy. When the Navy did not buy them, they were sold to the New Zealand Flying School and became the company's first international sale. On June 25, 1919, the B&W set a New Zealand altitude record of 6,500 feet. The B & Ws were later used for express an ...more...

Floatplanes

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Biplanes

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing 367-80

topic

Boeing 367-80

The Boeing 367-80, known simply as the Dash 80, is an American quadjet prototype aircraft built by Boeing to demonstrate the advantages of jet propulsion for commercial aviation. It served as base for the design of the KC-135 tanker and the 707 airliner. The Dash 80 first flew in 1954, less than two years from project launch. Its US$16 million cost (equivalent to $149 million today) was an enormous risk for Boeing, which at the time had no committed customers. Only one example was built, which has been preserved and is currently on public display at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia. Design and development By the late 1940s two developments encouraged Boeing to begin considering building a passenger jet. The first was the maiden flight in 1947 of the B-47 Stratojet. The second was the maiden flight in 1949 of the world’s first jet airliner, the de Havilland Comet. Boeing President Bill Allen led a company delegation to the UK in summer 1950, where they saw the Comet fly at the Farnborough Airshow, and also ...more...

Artifacts in the collection of the Smithsonian ...

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Individual aircraft in the collection of the Sm...

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing Monomail

topic

Boeing Monomail

The Boeing Model 200 Monomail was an American mail plane of the early 1930s. Design and development The aircraft marked a departure from the traditional biplane configuration for a transport aircraft, instead featuring a single, low set, all metal cantilever wing. Retractable landing gear and a streamlined fuselage added to the aerodynamic efficiency of the aircraft. A single example was constructed for evaluation by both Boeing and the US Army (under the designation Y1C-18) but no mass production ensued, and the aircraft eventually joined Boeing's fleet on the San Francisco-Chicago air mail route from July 1931. A second version was developed as the Model 221, with a fuselage stretched by 8 inches (20 cm) that sacrificed some of its cargo capacity to carry six passengers in an enclosed cabin; however the single pilot sat in an open cockpit. This version first flew on 18 August 1930. Both the Model 200 and the Model 221 were eventually modified for transcontinental service as the Model 221A, with slight fu ...more...

Aircraft first flown in 1930

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing XP-15

topic

Boeing XP-15

The Boeing XP-15 was a prototype monoplane fighter of the United States, the second to be designated a pursuit type, after the Boeing XP-9. Design and development This aircraft was essentially a monoplane version of the Boeing P-12, differing in having the lower wing omitted and in having all-metal construction as well as altered ailerons. The XP-15 had a split-axle undercarriage and a tail wheel.[1] Boeing numbered the craft as its Model 202; while the United States Army accepted it for testing and designated it as XP-15, they never actually purchased it, and it retained its civil registration of X-270V.[1] Operational history The XP-15 first flew in January 1930, when it was discovered that the vertical stabilizer (a P-12C type) needed to be larger in order to compensate for the single wing. Initial testing showed a top speed to 178 mph, but with enlarged tail surfaces and a Townend cowling, it recorded 190 mph at 8,000 ft. The aircraft performed poorly, with a poor rate of climb and a high landing spe ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Parasol-wing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing X-50 Dragonfly

topic

Boeing X-50 Dragonfly

The Boeing X-50A Dragonfly, formerly known as the Canard Rotor/Wing Demonstrator, was a VTOL rotor wing experimental unmanned aerial vehicle that was developed by Boeing and DARPA to demonstrate the principle that a helicopter's rotor could be stopped in flight and act as a fixed wing, enabling it to transition between fixed-wing and rotary-wing flight. The X-50A built upon the work of the Sikorsky S-72 X-Wing program of the 1980s by designing the vehicle as a multi-mode aircraft from the ground up. The X-50A was one of two projects funded by DARPA in its "Heliplane" program.[1][2] Neither of the two prototype aircraft ever successfully transitioned to full forward flight. DARPA withdrew funding for the X-50 program in late 2006 due to inherent design flaws.[1] Development Boeing initially proposed using the CRW configuration to fill a requirement for a VTOL aircraft suitable for escorting the V-22 tiltrotor. The X-50A was a joint program between Boeing and DARPA, with each paying for half the developmen ...more...

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Aircraft first flown in 2003

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

DARPA

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing X-48

topic

Boeing X-48

The Boeing X-48 is an American experimental unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) built to investigate the characteristics of blended wing body (BWB) aircraft, a type of flying wing. Boeing designed the X-48 and two examples were built by Cranfield Aerospace in the UK. Boeing began flight testing the X-48B version for NASA in 2007. The X-48B was later modified into the X-48C version, which was flight tested from August 2012 to April 2013. Boeing and NASA plan to develop a larger BWB demonstrator. Design and development Background Boeing had in the past studied a blended wing body design, but found that passengers did not like the theater-like configuration of the mock-up; the design was dropped for passenger airliners, but retained for military aircraft such as aerial refueling tankers.[N 1][1] McDonnell Douglas developed the blended wing concept in the late 1990s,[2] and Boeing presented it during an annual Joint AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEA Propulsion Conference in 2004.[3] The McDonnell Douglas engineers believed their d ...more...

Blended wing body

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Flying wings

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

NASA aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing X-20 Dyna-Soar

topic

Boeing X-20 Dyna-Soar

The Boeing X-20 Dyna-Soar ("Dynamic Soarer") was a United States Air Force (USAF) program to develop a spaceplane that could be used for a variety of military missions, including aerial reconnaissance, bombing, space rescue, satellite maintenance, and as a space interceptor to sabotage enemy satellites.[1] The program ran from October 24, 1957 to December 10, 1963, cost US$660 million ($5.4 billion today[2]), and was cancelled just after spacecraft construction had begun. Other spacecraft under development at the time, such as Mercury or Vostok, were based on space capsules that returned on ballistic re-entry profiles. Dyna-Soar was more like the much later Space Shuttle. It could not only travel to distant targets at the speed of an intercontinental ballistic missile, it was designed to glide to Earth like an aircraft under control of a pilot. It could land at an airfield, rather than simply falling to Earth and landing with a parachute. Dyna-Soar could also reach Earth orbit, like Mercury or Gemini.[3] Th ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Crewed spacecraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Manned spacecraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


CGM-121 Seek Spinner

topic

CGM-121 Seek Spinner

YCGM-121B Seek Spinner at the National Museum of the United States Air Force CGM-121B Seek Spinner was a U.S. harassment drone or a kamikaze-drone as it was referred to at the time it was designed, developed by Boeing out of its CQM-121 Pave Tiger UAV. The main difference from the basic model was its seeker head, and its explosive payload, while aerodynamic characteristics had only minor changes. Although it was several times cheaper than its main rival, Tacit Rainbow drone, Seek Spinner never became operational. Mission According to Gen. Lawrence A. Skantze, Seek Spinner was designed for the suppression of enemy air defenses by employing swarming tactics in order to suppress enemy capability to track and engage the overwhelming number of Seek Spinners launched simultaneously, by that even 1:20 hit ratio out of thousand Seekers launched in a single salvo was to be considered a highly successful result, enough to wipe out Soviet radars. Specifications (YCGM-121B) General characteristics Crew: None L ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Unmanned military aircraft of the United States

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Single-engined pusher aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Sikorsky-Boeing SB-1 Defiant

topic

Sikorsky-Boeing SB-1 Defiant

The Sikorsky-Boeing SB-1 Defiant (stylized as "SB>1") is the Sikorsky Aircraft and Boeing entry for the United States Army's Future Vertical Lift program, succeeding the Joint Multi-Role initiative. It is a compound helicopter with rigid coaxial rotors, powered by two Honeywell T55s, and should make its first flight in 2018. Development Sikorsky Aircraft and Boeing are jointly producing a medium-lift-sized demonstrator they call SB>1 Defiant[1][2] (also widely known as "SB-1")[3][4] for phase one of the program. Originally planned to fly in late 2017, its first flight was delayed in April 2017 to early 2018.[5] Once flight testing begins, the aircraft will be evaluated by the Army for further development.[6][7] Sikorsky is leading the development of phase one with an aircraft based on their previous Sikorsky X2 design.[8] Boeing plans to lead phase two, which is the mission systems demonstrator phase.[9] The Boeing-Sikorsky team is seen to have an advantage, given their big industrial base that should resu ...more...

Compound helicopters

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Sikorsky aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing Model 908-909

topic

Boeing Model 908-909

The Boeing Model 908-909 was a prototype single-engine supersonic multirole fighter aircraft originally developed for the United States Air Force (USAF) Lightweight Fighter program, a program that later developed into the Air Combat Fighter (ACF) program. It was initially the favored design but lost at the conclusion of the competition to the General Dynamics 401, later the YF-16 (now Lockheed F-16). Among the Boeing Model 908-909 features include a frameless bubble canopy for better visibility and a Pratt & Whitney F100 turbofan engine. Wind tunnel tests were conducted at the Langley Research Center as Test 281.[1] The Lightweight Fighter proposals were delivered to the Air Force by the February 18, 1972 deadline. The Boeing Model 908-909 was the winner of a preliminary analysis. Other submitted designs included the General Dynamics Model 401 and Northrop Model P-600 which were deemed second and third place, respectively. The General Dynamics Model 401 was renamed the YF-16 and was the eventual winner ...more...

Boeing military aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Sikorsky–Boeing SB-1 Defiant

topic

Sikorsky–Boeing SB-1 Defiant

The Sikorsky–Boeing SB-1 Defiant (stylized as "SB>1") is the Sikorsky Aircraft and Boeing entry for the United States Army's Future Vertical Lift program, succeeding the Joint Multi-Role initiative. It is a compound helicopter with rigid coaxial rotors, powered by two Honeywell T55s, and should make its first flight in 2019. Development Sikorsky Aircraft and Boeing are jointly producing a medium-lift-sized demonstrator they call SB>1 Defiant[1][2] (also widely known as "SB-1")[3][4] for phase one of the program. Originally planned to fly in late 2017, its first flight was delayed in April 2017 to early 2018.[5] The first flight finally occurred on march 21, 2019 at Sikorsky West Palm Beach site, in Florida, as announced in a short press release.[6] A video published on YouTube by Sikorsky-Boeing on the SB1 Defiant channel[7] the same day shows the Defiant slowly flying at about five meters from the tarmac before landing, using only the main rotor. Once flight testing begins, the aircraft will be evaluated b ...more...

United States military helicopters

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Compound helicopters

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Sikorsky aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User


Boeing Passenger Air Vehicle

topic

Boeing Passenger Air Vehicle

The Boeing Passenger Air Vehicle (PAV) is an American autonomous personal air vehicle prototype developed by the Boeing NeXt division of Boeing with the assistance of Aurora Flight Sciences.[1] Development Boeing subsidiary Aurora Flight Sciences designed and developed an electric VTOL prototype in one year.[1] First, a model 1:10 was used to test the concept, it was flown with and without a fuselage. The following flight tests with a 1:4 scale concept aircraft were conducted by Aurora.[2] The PAV first flew on January 22, 2019, in Manassas, Virginia, hovering before further tests and a transition to forward flight,[1] with aerodynamic lift through the wings. Design The three-surface aircraft has twin booms each supporting four lift rotors slightly angled alternatively outward and inwards, a pusher propeller and the rear wing has vertical surfaces at each end. Specifications (PAV) Data from Boeing[1] General characteristics Crew: None (autopilot)[2] Capacity: 2 passengers, 225 kg (496 lb) payloa ...more...

Electric helicopters

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Boeing aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User

Electric aircraft

Revolvy Brain (revolvybrain)

Revolvy User



Next Page
Javascript Version
Revolvy Server https://www.revolvy.com
Revolvy Site Map