Shanna Alt's folder

Memorabilia


White House Farm murders

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White House Farm murders

The White House Farm murders took place near the village of Tolleshunt D'Arcy, Essex, England, during the night of 6–7 August 1985. Nevill and June Bamber were shot and killed inside their farmhouse, along with their daughter, Sheila Caffell, and Sheila's six-year-old twin sons, Daniel and Nicholas Caffell. The only surviving member of June and Nevill's immediate family was their adopted son, Jeremy Bamber, then 24 years old, who said he had been at home a few miles away when the shooting took place.[1] The police at first believed that Sheila, diagnosed with schizophrenia, had fired the shots then turned the gun on herself. But weeks after the murders Jeremy Bamber's ex-girlfriend told police that he had implicated himself. The prosecution argued that, motivated by a large inheritance, Bamber had shot the family with his father's semi-automatic rifle, then placed the gun in his unstable sister's hands to make it look like a murder–suicide. A silencer the prosecution said was on the rifle would have made it



Winston Churchill

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Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, army officer, and writer. He was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945, when he led Britain to victory in the Second World War, and again from 1951 to 1955. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as a Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and imperialist, for most of his career he was a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but from 1904 to 1924 was a member of the Liberal Party. Of mixed English and American parentage, Churchill was born in Oxfordshire to a wealthy, aristocratic family. He joined the British Army in 1895, and saw action in British India, the Anglo–Sudan War, and the Second Boer War, gaining fame as a war correspondent and writing books about his campaigns. Elected an MP in 1900, initially as a Conservative, he defected to the Liberals in 1904. In H. H. Asquith's Liberal government, Churchill served a



Lucas Black

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Lucas Black

Lucas York Black (born November 29, 1982) is an American film and television actor. He is best known for his roles in the CBS television series American Gothic (1995–1996) as well as roles in films such as Sling Blade (1996), Flash (1997), Crazy in Alabama (1999), All the Pretty Horses (2000), Friday Night Lights (2004), Jarhead (2005), The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006), Get Low (2009), Legion (2010), and Seven Days in Utopia (2011). Beginning in 2014, he portrayed Special Agent Christopher LaSalle on CBS's NCIS: New Orleans until early in the sixth season. Early life Black was born in Decatur, Alabama,[1] to Jan Gillespie, an office worker, and Larry Black, a museum employee.[2] He has two older siblings and was raised a Southern Baptist.[3] He grew up in Speake, Alabama,[1] played football for the Speake Bobcats, and graduated from high school in May 2001.[4] Career Black made his film debut in Kevin Costner's film The War.[5] He subsequently was cast as Caleb Temple in CBS's television serie



Murder of Odin Lloyd

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Murder of Odin Lloyd

The murder of Odin Lloyd occurred on June 17, 2013, in North Attleborough, Massachusetts. His death made international headlines when Aaron Hernandez, at the time a tight end for the New England Patriots of the National Football League, was investigated as a suspect in the case. Lloyd had been a linebacker for a New England Football League(NEFL) semi-professional football team, the Boston Bandits,[1] since 2007.[2] Hernandez was arrested on June 26, 2013, and charged with the murder. Ninety minutes after his arrest, Hernandez was released by the Patriots.[3] Police also arrested two other men in connection with Lloyd's death: Carlos Ortiz on June 27, 2013, and Ernest Wallace on June 28, 2013.[4][5] Prosecutors say both men were with Hernandez when they drove to the location of the murder.[6] On August 22, 2013, Hernandez was indicted by a grand jury for the murder of Odin Lloyd. Nearly eight months later, Ortiz and Wallace were also indicted for the murder. On April 15, 2015, Hernandez was found guilty of f



Elton John

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Elton John

Sir Elton Hercules John CH CBE (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight; 25 March 1947[1]) is an English singer, songwriter, pianist, and composer. He has worked with lyricist Bernie Taupin since 1967; they have collaborated on more than 30 albums. John has sold more than 300 million records, making him one of the best-selling music artists.[2][3][4] He has more than fifty Top 40 hits in the UK Singles Chart and US Billboard Hot 100, including seven numbers ones in the UK and nine in the US, as well as seven consecutive number-one albums in the US.[5][6] His tribute single "Candle in the Wind 1997", rewritten in dedication to Princess Diana, sold over 33 million copies worldwide and is the best-selling single in the history of the UK and US singles charts.[7][8][9] He has also produced records and occasionally acted in films. John owned Watford F.C. from 1976 to 1987 and from 1997 to 2002, and is an honorary life president of the club. Raised in the Pinner area of London, John learned to play piano at an early age, and



Ryan Reynolds

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Ryan Reynolds

Ryan Rodney Reynolds (born October 23, 1976) is a Canadian-American actor, comedian, film producer and screenwriter. He began his career starring in the Canadian teen soap opera Hillside (1991–1993) and had minor roles before landing the lead role on the sitcom Two Guys and a Girl between 1998 and 2001. Reynolds then starred in a range of films, including comedies such as National Lampoon's Van Wilder (2002), Waiting... (2005), and The Proposal (2009). He also performed in dramatic roles in Buried (2010), Woman in Gold (2015), and Life (2017), and starred in action films such as Blade: Trinity (2004), Green Lantern (2011), and Safe House (2012). Reynolds' biggest commercial success came with the superhero films Deadpool (2016) and Deadpool 2 (2018), in which he played the title character. The former set numerous records at the time of its release for an R-rated comedy and his performance earned him nominations at the Critics' Choice Movie Awards and the Golden Globe Awards. Reynolds was awarded a star on th



Queen Victoria

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Queen Victoria

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India. Known as the Victorian era, her reign of 63 years and seven months was longer than that of any of her predecessors. It was a period of industrial, cultural, political, scientific, and military change within the United Kingdom, and was marked by a great expansion of the British Empire. Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn (the fourth son of King George III), and Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. After both the Duke and his father died in 1820, she was raised under close supervision by her mother and her comptroller, John Conroy. She inherited the throne aged 18 after her father's three elder brothers died without surviving legitimate issue. The United Kingdom was an established constitutional monarchy in which the sovereign held relatively li



Coronaviridae

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Coronaviridae

Coronaviridae is a family of enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses. The viral genome is 26–32 kilobases in length. The particles are typically decorated with large (~20 nm), club- or petal-shaped surface projections (the "peplomers" or "spikes"), which in electron micrographs of spherical particles create an image reminiscent of the solar corona. The newest addition is the 2019-nCoV, showing so far a lower mortality rate than the MERS- and SARS-coronavirus members. Virology Diagram of coronavirus virion structure The 5' and 3' ends of the genome have a cap and poly(A) tract, respectively. The viral envelope, obtained by budding through membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and/or Golgi apparatus, invariably contains two virus-specified (glyco)protein species, S and M. Glycoprotein S comprises the large surface projections, while M is a triple-spanning transmembrane protein. Toroviruses and a select subset of coronaviruses (in particular the members of subgroup A in the genus Betaco



Wiki

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Wiki

Interview with Ward Cunningham, inventor of the wiki A wiki ( (listen) WIK-ee) is a knowledge base website on which users collaboratively modify and structure content directly from a web browser. In a typical wiki, text is written using a simplified markup language and often edited with the help of a rich-text editor.[1] A wiki is run using wiki software, otherwise known as a wiki engine. A wiki engine is a type of content management system, but it differs from most other such systems, including blog software, in that the content is created without any defined owner or leader, and wikis have little inherent structure, allowing structure to emerge according to the needs of the users.[2] There are dozens of different wiki engines in use, both standalone and part of other software, such as bug tracking systems. Some wiki engines are open source, whereas others are proprietary. Some permit control over different functions (levels of access); for example, editing rights may permit changing, adding, or removing m



Sikorsky S-76

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Sikorsky S-76

The Sikorsky S-76 is an American medium-size commercial utility helicopter, manufactured by the Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation. The S-76 features twin turboshaft engines, four-bladed main and tail rotors and retractable landing gear. Development The development of the S-76 began in the mid-1970s as the S-74, with the design goal of providing a medium helicopter for corporate transportation and the oil drilling industry; the S-74 was later redesignated the S-76 in honor of the U.S. Bicentennial. Sikorsky's design work on the S-70 helicopter (which was selected for use by the United States Army as the UH-60 Black Hawk) was utilized in the development of the S-76, incorporating S-70 design technology in its rotor blades and rotor heads.[3][4] It was the first Sikorsky helicopter designed purely for commercial rather than military use.[5] The prototype first flew on March 13, 1977.[6] Initial US Federal Aviation Administration type certification was granted on November 21, 1978, with the first customer delivery



Zodiac

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Zodiac

The Earth in its orbit around the Sun causes the Sun to appear on the celestial sphere moving along the ecliptic (red), which is tilted 23.44° with respect to the celestial equator (blue-white). The zodiac is an area of the sky that extends approximately 8° north or south (as measured in celestial latitude) of the ecliptic, the apparent path of the Sun across the celestial sphere over the course of the year. The paths of the Moon and visible planets are also within the belt of the zodiac.[1] In Western astrology, and formerly astronomy, the zodiac is divided into twelve signs, each occupying 30° of celestial longitude and roughly corresponding to the constellations: Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius, and Pisces.[2][3] These astrological signs form a celestial coordinate system, or even more specifically an ecliptic coordinate system, which takes the ecliptic as the origin of latitude and the Sun's position at vernal equinox as the origin of longitud



2019–20 Wuhan coronavirus outbreak

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2019–20 Wuhan coronavirus outbreak

The 2019–20 coronavirus outbreak is an ongoing epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2, which started in December 2019. It was first identified in Wuhan, capital of Hubei province China, after 41 people presented with pneumonia of no clear cause. It can spread between people, with the time from exposure to onset of symptoms generally between 2 and 14 days.[5] Symptoms may include fever, cough, and shortness of breath.[6] Complications may include pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. There is no vaccine or specific antiviral treatment, with efforts typically to management symptoms and support functioning.[7] Hand washing is recommended to prevent spread of the disease.[8] Anyone who is suspected of carrying the virus is advised to monitor their health for two weeks, wear a mask, and seek medical advice by calling a doctor rather than directly visiting a clinic.[9] As of 19 February 2020, 75,662 cases have been confirmed, including in all provinces of China and more t



Coronavirus

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Coronavirus

A coronavirus is one of a number of viruses that cause diseases in mammals and birds. In humans, the viruses cause respiratory infections, including the common cold, which are typically mild, though rarer forms such as SARS, MERS and COVID-19 can be lethal. Symptoms vary in other species: in chickens, they cause an upper respiratory disease, while in cows and pigs coronaviruses cause diarrhea. There are no vaccines or antiviral drugs to prevent or treat human coronavirus infections. Coronaviruses comprise the subfamily Orthocoronavirinae in the family Coronaviridae, in the order Nidovirales.[5][6] They are enveloped viruses with a positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome and a nucleocapsid of helical symmetry. The genome size of coronaviruses ranges from approximately 26 to 32 kilobases, the largest among known RNA viruses. The name coronavirus is derived from the Latin corona, meaning "crown" or "halo", which refers to the characteristic appearance of the virus particles (virions): they have a fringe remin



European Union

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European Union

The European Union (EU) is a political and economic union of 27 member states that are located primarily in Europe.[12] Its members have a combined area of 4,233,255.3 km2 (1,634,469.0 sq mi) and an estimated total population of about 447 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states in those matters, and only those matters, where members have agreed to act as one. EU policies aim to ensure the free movement of people, goods, services and capital within the internal market,[13] enact legislation in justice and home affairs and maintain common policies on trade,[14] agriculture,[15] fisheries and regional development.[16] For travel within the Schengen Area, passport controls have been abolished.[17] A monetary union was established in 1999, coming into full force in 2002, and is composed of 19 EU member states which use the euro currency. The EU and European citizenship were established when the Maastricht Treaty came into force



Brexit

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Brexit

Brexit ([1] a portmanteau of "British" and "exit") is the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU). Following a June 2016 referendum, in which 52% voted to leave and 48% voted to stay, the UK government formally announced the country's withdrawal in March 2017, beginning the Brexit process. The withdrawal was delayed by deadlock in the UK parliament. Following a general election, parliament ratified the withdrawal agreement, and the UK left the EU at 11 p.m. GMT on 31 January 2020. This began a transition period that is set to end on 31 December 2020, during which the UK and EU will negotiate their future relationship.[2] The UK remains subject to EU law and remains part of the EU customs union and single market during the transition, but is no longer part of the EU's political bodies or institutions.[3][4] Withdrawal was advocated by Eurosceptics and opposed by pro-Europeanists, with both spanning the political spectrum. The UK joined the European Communities (EC) (principally the



Deaths in 2020

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Deaths in 2020

The following deaths of notable individuals occurred in 2020. Names are reported under the date of death, in alphabetical order by surname or pseudonym. A typical entry reports information in the following sequence: Name, age, country of citizenship at birth, subsequent nationality (if applicable), what subject was noted for, cause of death (if known), and reference. February 20 19 Lucien Aimé-Blanc, 84, French police officer.[1] Pete Babando, 94, Canadian ice hockey player (Detroit Red Wings, Chicago Black Hawks, Boston Bruins), Stanley Cup champion (1950).[2] Anatoly Bichukov, 85, Russian sculptor.[3] Beatriz Bonnet, 89, Argentine actress (Mansedumbre), complications from Alzheimer's disease.[4] Heather Couper, 70, British astronomer and broadcaster, President of the British Astronomical Association (1984–1986).[5] Jean Daniel, 99, Algerian-born French journalist, founder of L'Obs.[6] Gust Graas, 95, Luxembourgian painter and businessman.[7] Jos van Kemenade, 82, Dutch politicia



Elizabeth II

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Elizabeth II

Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926)[a] is Queen of the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth realms.[b] Elizabeth was born in London as the first child of the Duke and Duchess of York, later King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, and she was educated privately at home. Her father acceded to the throne on the abdication of his brother King Edward VIII in 1936, from which time she was the heir presumptive. She began to undertake public duties during the Second World War, serving in the Auxiliary Territorial Service. In 1947, she married Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, a former prince of Greece and Denmark, with whom she has four children: Charles, Prince of Wales; Anne, Princess Royal; Prince Andrew, Duke of York; and Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex. When her father died in February 1952, Elizabeth became head of the Commonwealth and queen regnant of seven independent Commonwealth countries: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan, and Ceylon. She has reign




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