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2020 deaths


Frederick Ballantyne

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Frederick Ballantyne

Sir Frederick Nathaniel Ballantyne, GCMG (5 July 1936 – 23 January 2020) was the Governor-General of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines from 2002–2019. A trained cardiologist and former chief medical officer of the country, he was appointed governor-general on 2 September 2002. He succeeded Dame Monica Dacon, who had been acting in the position after the death of Charles Antrobus. Early life and medical career Ballantyne was born on 5 July 1936, as his parents' only child.[5] His father owned a small hotel, and he has described himself as "from a business family".[6] Ballantyne was the first member of his family to attend high school.[7] On the advice of an acquaintance who had studied medicine in the United States, he chose to attend university in that country (rather than in Britain or Canada, as was usual for Vincentians at the time). He completed an initial degree in chemistry at Howard University (in Washington, D.C.), and then went on to the SUNY Upstate Medical University (in Syracuse, New York) to stu

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People from Saint Andrew Parish, Saint Vincent ...

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Howard University alumni

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Bruno Léchevin

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Bruno Léchevin

Bruno Léchevin (27 January 1952 – 6 February 2020) was a French trade unionist.[1][2] He was President of the French Environment and Energy Management Agency from 2013 to 2018. Biography Léchevin was born in 1952 in Sallaumines, a former mining town in Pas-de-Calais. After his schooling, Léchevin became a certified carpenter.[3] He joined the Young Christian Workers in 1967, and participated in the May 68 events.[4] He served as President of the Young Christian Workers from 1974 to 1978.[5] Léchevin began his career at Électricité de France in 1979 as a storekeeper in Lyon.[6] At the same time, he was taking courses at the Catholic University of Lyon. In 1980, he became a permanent member of the French Democratic Confederation of Labour. He became a federal secretary for the confederation, and participated in the protests for the 35-hour workweek.[7] He left his position in 1999. In 1986, Léchevin founded Électriciens sans frontières.[8] In 2000, he became a member of the Commission de régulation de l'éne

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Claire Clouzot

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Claire Clouzot

Claire Clouzot (2 August 1933 – 2 February 2020) was a French film director and journalist.[1] Biography Clouzot was the daughter of photographer Rémy Duval and the granddaughter of director Henri-Georges Clouzot. She worked as a photographer and journalist before she began directing in 1980,[2] with the film L’Homme Fragile,[3] starring Richard Berry, Françoise Lebrun, and Didier Sauvegrain.[4] Clouzot was a delegate at International Critics' Week from 2002-2004 when the films Reconstruction and Or (My Treasure) won the Camera d'Or.[5][6] She died in February 2020 at the age of 86.[7] Filmography L'homme en question (1976) L'Homme Fragile (1981) Rémy Duval, 28 place des Vosges (1986) Publications Le Cinéma français depuis la Nouvelle Vague (1972) Autobiographie d'une pionnière du cinéma, 1873-1968, Alice Guy (1978) Catherine Breillat. Indécence et pureté (2004) La Saga des Clouzot et le cinéma (2007) References "Décès de la critique Claire Clouzot". Le Film Français (in French).

French directors

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French journalists

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2020 deaths

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Gyurme Dorje

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Gyurme Dorje

Gyurme Dorje (1950 – 5 February 2020) was a Scottish Tibetologist and writer. In Edinburgh he studied classics at George Watson's College and developed an early interest in Buddhist philosophy.[1] He held a PhD in Tibetan Literature (SOAS) and an MA in Sanskrit with Oriental Studies (Edinburgh). In the 1970s he spent a decade living in Tibetan communities in India and Nepal where he received extensive teachings from Kangyur Rinpoche, Dudjom Rinpoche, Chatral Rinpoche, and Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche. In 1971 Dudjom Rinpoche encouraged him to begin translating his recently completed History of the Nyingma School (རྙིང་མའི་སྟན་པའི་ཆོས་འབྱུང་) and in 1980 his Fundamentals of the Nyingma School (བསྟན་པའི་རྣམ་གཞག) - together this was an undertaking that was to take twenty years, only reaching completion in 1991.[2] In the 1980s Gyurme returned to the UK and in 1987 completed his 3 volume doctoral dissertation on the Guhyagarbhatantra and Longchenpa's commentary on this text at the School of Oriental and African Stu

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Alumni of SOAS University of London

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Scottish Buddhists

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Terry Fair (basketball)

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Terry Fair (basketball)

Terry Fair (born June 25, 1960) was an American professional basketball player. He played college basketball for University of Georgia before playing professionally in Israel. A two-time Israeli Premier League champion and Israeli State Cup winner. Fair died at age 59 in his hometown of Macon, Georgia. Early life and college career Fair attended Southwest Macon High School in Macon, Georgia, where he was named a consensus All-American as a senior after he led the Patriots to the 1979 national championship while averaging 21.1 points and 15.2 rebounds per game.[1] Fair played college basketball for the University of Georgia, alongside Dominique Wilkins, Derrick Floyd and Lamar Heard, helped lead the Bulldogs reach numerous firsts during their careers. Georgia earned its first postseason bid ever in 1981 with an invitation to the NIT. The Bulldogs returned to the NIT in 1982 and advanced to the semifinals at the Madison Square Garden. Fair completed his career as the Bulldogs' all-time leader in steals (194

Hapoel Holon players

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Hapoel Tel Aviv B.C. players

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James Dunn (diplomat)

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James Dunn (diplomat)

James Stanley Dunn AM (6 January 1928 – 31 January 2020) was an Australian public servant and diplomat. He was Australia's consul in Portuguese Timor from 1962 to 1964. In 1977 Dunn's report on war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by Indonesian troops in East Timor was released, prompting international attention.[1] He alleged that American weapons had been used in the Indonesian invasion of East Timor in 1975.[2] He also argued that Australia's policy related to East Timor was inadequate.[3] His book Timor: A People Betrayed (published 1983) was a tribute to the tragedy of the Timorese. The book was launched by Gordon McIntosh at the Lakeside Hotel in Canberra.[4] In a review published in Woroni, Dunn was praised for his sincere tone.[5] J.A.C. Mackie, writing for The Canberra Times wrote that the book was "disappointingly unconvincing".[6] In the 2001 Queen's Birthday Honours, Dunn was made a Member of the Order of Australia for "service to humanity as an advocate for the rights of the East T

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Members of the Order of Australia

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Australian diplomats

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Margareta Hallin

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Margareta Hallin

Gunhild Margareta Hallin Ekerot (20 February 1931 – 9 February 2020) was a Swedish opera singer, composer and actress.[1][2] Early life and debut Hallin was born on 20 February 1931, in Karlskoga.[1] She made her debut during her time as a student at the University College of Opera[A] in 1955 as Rosina in Rossini's Barberaren i Sevilla.[3] Career As Tsu in the opera Tranfjädrarna at Blancheteatern, 1958 Hallin joined the Royal Swedish Opera as a full-time employee in 1956, where she performed in roles such as Zerbinetta in Ariadne på Naxos by Richard Strauss, the title role of Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor, Sophie in Rosenkavaljeren by Strauss, Leonora in Verdi's Trubaduren, Amelia in Maskeradbalen, the title role in Aida, and Gilda in Rigoletto.[4] Hallin was appointed Hovsångerska (Royal Court singer) along with Erik Saedén, in 1966, and was awarded the Jussi Björling Scholarship in 1970. Her last performance at the Opera was in the title role of Cherubini's Médée.[4][5] Hallin's voice has been de

21st-century Swedish women singers

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21st-century women opera singers

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Mirella Freni

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Mirella Freni

Mirella Freni (Italian: , born Mirella Fregni, 27 February 1935 – 9 February 2020)[1] was an Italian operatic soprano who had a career of 50 years and appeared at major international opera houses. She received international attention at the Glyndebourne Festival, where she appeared as Zerlina in Mozart's Don Giovanni and as Adina in Donizetti's L'elisir d'amore. Freni is associated with the role of Mimi in Puccini's La bohème,[2] which she sang at La Scala in Milan and the Vienna State Opera in 1963, conducted by Herbert von Karajan.[3] She also performed the role in a film of the production and as her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City in 1965.[3] In the earliest opera DVDs, she portrayed her characters convincingly in both acting and singing.[4] Freni was married for many years to the Bulgarian bass Nicolai Ghiaurov, with whom she performed and recorded. Her obituary from The New York Times describes her as a "matchless Italian prima donna".[1] Life Born Mirella Fregni in Modena, she had th

2020 deaths

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21st-century Italian opera singers

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21st-century Italian women singers

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Waqar Hasan

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Waqar Hasan

Waqar Hasan (Urdu: وقارحسن‎; 12 September 1932 – 10 February 2020) was a Pakistani cricketer who played in 21 Test matches from 1952 to 1959, and the last surviving member of Pakistan's inaugural Test squad.[1] He scored 1,071 runs in Test cricket, and played in 99 first-class matches.[2] Cricket career Waqar Hasan (left) and Imtiaz Ahmed come out to bat during the Second Test against New Zealand in 1955. Waqar Hasan attended Government College, Lahore, where he played for the cricket team.[3] He toured England with the Pakistan Eaglets team of young cricketers in 1951.[3] An "attractive stroke-making right-handed batsman, who was ideal in a crisis",[4] he played in Pakistan's first 18 Tests, including its first five victories. In Pakistan's first Test series, against India in 1952–53, he was the highest scorer on either side, with 357 runs at an average of 44.62, playing several defiant innings when Pakistan were in trouble.[5] He was less successful on the 1954 tour of England, with 103 runs at 14.71,

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Pakistani corporate directors

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Cricketers from Amritsar

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Erazim Kohák

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Erazim Kohák

Erazim Kohák in 2007 Erazim Kohák (21 May 1933 – 8 February 2020) was Czech philosopher and writer. His early education was in Prague. After communists took over Czechoslovakia in 1948, his family escaped to the United States. He died in February 2020 at the age of 86.[1] Academic life Kohák was born in Prague in May 1933. He studied at Colgate University, earning a B.A. in 1954, and then studied philosophy, theology and religious studies at Yale University (M.A. in 1957, PhD in 1958). He also worked at Gustavus Adolphus College and Boston University (Professor in 1977). After the Velvet revolution in 1989, he returned to Czechoslovakia to become a professor at Charles University in Prague. Since 2006, he has been a senior research fellow in the Centre of Global Studies in the Institute of Philosophy at the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague. Other activities He supported several non-governmental ecological organizations and was a member of the honorary board of Děti Země (Children of the Earth) and Spo

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Writers from Prague

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Boston University faculty

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Irwin Kremen

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Irwin Kremen

Irwin Kremen (1925 – February 5, 2020) was an American artist who began making art while Director of the Duke University Graduate Program in Clinical Psychology, when he was 41, after earning a PhD six years earlier in clinical psychology at Harvard University. Kremen's artwork mainly consists of non-representational collage, sculpture, and painting. In his later years he defined a fourth grouping which he called "multimodes."[1] These are syntheses of the other three or sometimes of just two. Early on, he worked in the first three modes but in 1969, while on sabbatical in Florence, Italy as a Fellow at Villa I Tatti, the Harvard Center for Renaissance Studies, he began to compose collages of weathered paper and continued this for a decade.[2][3] Becoming unhappy with conventional methods of gluing collage elements, he developed a conservational method of affixing the disparate pieces together via tiny hinges of Japanese paper.[4][5] In the late 1970s, while continuing collage making, Kremen returned to thr

2020 deaths

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American artists

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Jewish American artists

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Paula Kelly (actress)

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Paula Kelly (actress)

Angie Dickinson and Kelly in an episode of the NBC TV series Police Woman (1976) Paula Alma Kelly (October 21, 1942 – February 8, 2020) was an American actress, singer, and dancer in films, television and theatre. Kelly made her Broadway debut as Mrs. Veloz in the 1964 musical Something More!, sharing the stage with Barbara Cook. Her other Broadway credits include The Dozens (1969), Paul Sills' Story Theatre (1971), Ovid's Metamorphoses (1971), and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), based on the music of Duke Ellington, appearing with Gregory Hines and Phyllis Hyman. Early years Born in Jacksonville, Florida,[1] the daughter of a jazz musician, Kelly was raised in New York City's Harlem. She attended the Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art, majoring in music, and continued her studies at the Juilliard School of Music, where she majored in dance under Martha Hill. Graduating with an M.S. degree, she performed as a soloist with major modern dance companies such as Martha Graham, Donald McKayle, a

Deaths from respiratory disease

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2020 deaths

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Dancers from New York (state)

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Robert Massin

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Robert Massin

Robert Massin (13 October 1925 – 8 February 2020) was a French graphic designer, art director and typographer, notable for his innovative experimentation with expressive forms of typographic composition. Massin stopped using his first name in the 1950s. Biography Massin was born in 1925 in Bourdinière-Saint-Loup, a commune in the Eure-et-Loir department in north-central France. He began working as a designer following World War II. Massin's immediate influence in the 1950s was innovative French book designer Pierre Faucheux. Faucheux emphasized the idea that each new book should be a new object determined by type choice, proportion and déroulement, the development of a visual concept over several pages. Faucheux also emphasized the idea that the choice of typeface should have some relationship to the meaning of the text. These ideas are apparent in much of Massin's most famous work. For over twenty years Massin acted as art director of Éditions Gallimard, one of the leading French publishers of books. An e

People from Eure-et-Loir

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French graphic designers

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Ignatius Datong Longjan

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Ignatius Datong Longjan

Ignatius Datong Longjan (May 19, 1944 – February 10, 2020) was a Nigerian politician who was a Senator representing the Plateau South district in the 9th National Assembly.[1][2] He was also the deputy Governor of Plateau State.[3][4] Political Career In the All Progressive Congress Plateau South Senatorial District primaries, scored 972 votes to beat the other contestants for the party's ticket.[5] In the February 25, 2019 general election, Inec declared the election inconclusive as results were cancelled in Jos North Local Government,[6] in the supplementary election, he polled 140,918 while Kefas Peter Dandam of the People's Democratic Party polled 132,441 votes.[7][8] Death Longjan died in February 2020 at a Turkish hospital.[9][10][11] References "National Assembly | Federal Republic of Nigeria". www.nassnig.org. "Longjan, Plateau South senator is dead". Punch Newspapers. Sadiq, Lami (26 January 2015). "Nigeria: Longjan Denies Defecting to APC". Daily Trust. All Africa. Retrieved 25 Januar

All Progressives Congress politicians

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People from Plateau State

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Members of the Senate (Nigeria)

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François André

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François André

François André (19 July 1967 – 11 February 2020) was a French politician representing the Socialist Party. He was re-elected to the French National Assembly on 18 June 2017, representing the department of Ille-et-Vilaine.[1] He was first elected as a councilor for Rennes as part of the PS in 2001. In 2008, André was elected as the head of the Canton of Rennes-Nord-Ouest. He decided not to vote for the PS candidate in the 2017 French presidential election, Benoît Hamon, in the first round, and instead voted for Emmanuel Macron, the candidate for En Marche![2] He died from lung cancer on 11 February 2020, aged 52.[3] See also 2017 French legislative election References http://www.francetvinfo.fr/elections/resultats/ille-et-vilaine_35/ille-et-vilaine_3eme-circonscription "Législatives. Rennes-Montfort : François André (PS) réélu sans surprise". Ouest-france.fr. 18 June 2017. Retrieved 11 February 2020. "Ille-et-Vilaine. Le député François André est décédé". Ouest-France (in French). 11 February 202

People from Pontivy

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Politicians from Brittany

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Deaths from cancer in France

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Claire Bretécher

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Claire Bretécher

Claire Bretécher (French: ;[1] 17 April 1940 – 10 February 2020)[2][3] was a French cartoonist, known particularly for her portrayals of women and gender issues. Her creations included Les Frustrés, and the unimpressed teenager Agrippine. Biography Bretécher was born in Nantes[4] and got her first break as an illustrator when she was asked to provide the artwork for Le Facteur Rhésus by René Goscinny for L'Os à Moelle in 1963. She went on to work for several popular magazines and in 1969 invented the character "Cellulite". In 1972 she joined Gotlib and Mandryka in founding the Franco-Belgian comics magazine L'Écho des savanes.[5] Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, she published successful collections, such as The Destiny of Monique (1982). In 2001, Bretécher's series Agrippine was adapted into a 26-episode TV series by Canal+. Claire Bretécher was the widow of French constitutionalist Guy Carcassonne with whom she had a son. Awards 1975: Best French Author at the Angoulême International Comics Festival, F

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French women cartoonists

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Comics creator BLP pop

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Efigenio Ameijeiras

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Efigenio Ameijeiras

Efigenio Ameijeiras Efigenio Ameijeiras Delgado (September 21, 1931 – February 10, 2020) was a Cuban military commander affiliated with Fidel Castro from the 1950s. Biography Ameijeiras was born in September 1931.[1] A self-declared anti-communist, he was one of the band of Castro's active guerrillas that became known as the 26th of July Movement, named after the raid on Moncada Barracks on 26 July 1953, though he is not mentioned as one of the participants. He is reported to have been gaoled in 1955 on 'moral charges', with an alias of 'Jomeguia'.[2] In December 1956, he was among 82 of Castro's guerrillas on board the yacht Granma that sailed from Tuxpan, Mexico to Punta de las Coloradas, in Oriente Province, Cuba.[3] He fought with the guerillas in the Sierra Maestra, and took part in an attack on El Uvero barracks on 28 May 1957.[4] In 1958 he served as the leader of Company B of the guerrillas in Guantanamo Province.[5] After the revolution on 1 January 1959, he served as the Head of the National Rev

Deaths from sepsis

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People from Puerto Padre

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Marilyn Jenkins

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Marilyn Jenkins

Marilyn A. Jenkins [״Jenks״] (September 18, 1934 – February 7, 2020) was a catcher who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Listed at 5 ft 6 in (1.68 m), 140 lb., she batted and threw right-handed.[1][2] The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, created by Chicago Cubs’ owner Philip K. Wrigley in anticipation of losing male players to the World War II draft, gave a new name to the baseball game. Since its 1943 season opener, the circuit developed a select group of women that changed the ballgame forever between the 1940s and 1950s. Born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Marilyn Jenkins played for her hometown team Grand Rapids Chicks during the last three seasons of the league. In addition, she enjoyed one of the most pleasant experiences lived by any player in the league's history. Jenkins was a modest but dedicated ballplayer who earned the responsibility of learning the game correctly at a very early age. She started a long time relationship of ten years with the Chicks whe

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Grand Rapids Chicks players

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American baseball players

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David Gistau

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David Gistau

David Gistau Retes (19 June 1970 – 9 February 2020)[1] was a Spanish journalist, scriptwriter and novelist. Career After finishing his journalism studies at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid,[2] Gistau worked for several major Spanish publications, like La Razón, ABC and El Mundo.[3] In his later years, he primarily wrote as a columnist, earning him an appreciable degree of public notoriety. Published books A que no hay huevos (2004)[4] La España de Zetapé (2005)[5] ¿Qué nos estás haciendo, ZP? (2007)[6] Ruido de fondo (2008)[7] Golpes bajos (2017)[8] Gente que se fue (2019)[9] Personal life A father of three sons and a daughter, Gistau died on 9 February 2020 after what had seemed like a smooth recovery from a brain injury he had sustained while training at a boxing gym in November 2019.[1] Following his passing, many public figures such as political leaders Pedro Sánchez[10] and Pablo Casado,[11] as well as fellow authors Arturo Pérez-Reverte and Manuel Jabois and the president

21st-century Spanish novelists

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People from Madrid

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Complutense University of Madrid alumni

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Delphine Forest

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Delphine Forest

Delphine Forest (28 August 1966 - 31 January 2020) was a French actress. She appeared in more than ten films since 1988. She died on 31 January 2020.[1] Selected filmography Film Year Title Role Notes 1992 The Amusements of Private Life 1990 There Was a Castle with Forty Dogs Europa Europa 1989 Boris Godunov TV Year Title Role Notes 1989 The Betrothed Lucia Mondella References Disparition de la comédienne Delphine Forest (in French) External links Delphine Forest on IMDb

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Actresses from Paris

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French film actresses

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Paul Koralek

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Paul Koralek

Paul Koralek CBE RA (7 April 1933 – 7 February 2020) was a British architect and founding member of the architecture company Ahrends, Burton and Koralek, best known for designing in the Brutalist style, as seen in buildings such as the Berkeley Library, part of the Library of Trinity College Dublin.[1] Life and education Paul George Koralek was born in Vienna, Austria on 7 April 1933. His family left Austria in 1938 after the Anschluss, the reunification of Austria and then-Nazi Germany. From 1951 he studied at the Architectural Association School of Architecture, London, graduating in 1956. After graduation, he worked with Philip Powell.[2] Later, whilst working in New York City with Marcel Breuer, Koralek submitted and won the competition to design the new Berkeley Library in Trinity College Dublin. In the same year, 1961, he founded the architectural company Ahrends, Burton and Koralek with his former classmates, Peter Ahrends and Richard Burton.[3][4] Career Koralek was known for his Brutalist style w

Brutalist architects

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Alumni of the Architectural Association School ...

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Patrick Jordan

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Patrick Jordan

Albert Patrick Jordan (20 October 1923 – early 2020) was a British theatre, film and television actor. He was born and raised in Harrow, Middlesex, the son of Margaret, a cook, and Albert Jordan, a regimental sergeant major. An accident while playing bows and arrows with his two brothers left him with a distinctive scar on his right cheek. He made his stage debut in a 1946 Old Vic production of Richard II at the New Theatre, which was directed by Ralph Richardson and featured Harry Andrews, Renée Asherson and Alec Guinness. The same ensemble went on to perform in other Shakespearean plays, including Coriolanus and The Taming of the Shrew, and Jordan remained friends with Asherson and Guinness. Jordan's screen roles included several war films, including The Battle of the River Plate (1956), The Longest Day (1962), The Heroes of Telemark (1965), Play Dirty (1968), and Too Late the Hero (1970). He is perhaps best remembered for his uncredited speaking role as Imperial Officer Cass, an aide to Grand Moff Tarkin

20th-century British male actors

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British male stage actors

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Giancarlo Bergamini

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Giancarlo Bergamini

Giancarlo Bergamini (2 August 1926 – 4 February 2020) was an Italian fencer. He won one gold and two silver medals at two Olympic Games.[2][3] Bergamini died in February 2020 at the age of 93.[4] References sports-reference "Olympics Statistics: Giancarlo Bergamini". databaseolympics.com. Archived from the original on 17 October 2012. Retrieved 22 September 2010. "Giancarlo Bergamini Olympic Results". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 18 December 2009. Retrieved 22 September 2010. "Lanzo Intelvi: l'ultima "stoccata" del mito Giancarlo Bergamini" (in Italian). www.laprovinciadicomo.it. Retrieved 11 February 2020.

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Italian male fencers

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Fencers at the 1956 Summer Olympics

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Christie Blatchford

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Christie Blatchford

Christie Marie Blatchford (May 20, 1951 – February 12, 2020) was a Canadian newspaper columnist, journalist and broadcaster. She published four non-fiction books. Life and work Blatchford was born in Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec. Her father, who was in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II, managed a hockey arena in Noranda. When Blatchford was in grade 11, the family moved to Toronto when her father became manager of the North Toronto Memorial Arena.[2] She attended North Toronto Collegiate Institute, graduating in 1970.[4] She then studied journalism at Ryerson University, and worked for the student paper The Ryersonian.[2] Her nephew is sports reporter Andy Blatchford.[5] Blatchford had a number of journalists in her family. Her grandfather, Andy Lytle was a sports writer and editor for the Vancouver Sun in the 1920s and again in the 1950s and a sports editor at the Toronto Daily Star in the 1930s and 1940s. Her uncle, Tommy Lytle, was a Toronto Star editor until his retirement in 1974.[6] She bega

Toronto Sun

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Canadian radio reporters and correspondents

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Canadian war correspondents

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Benon Biraaro

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Benon Biraaro

Benon Biraaro (1 March 1958 – 12 February 2020) was a Ugandan military officer. Sometimes his last name is written as "Biraro". He was a high-ranking commander in the Uganda People's Defence Force (UPDF). While still in the active military, he served as the commandant of the Uganda Senior Command and Staff College in Kimaka, Jinja. In 2016, he ran (unsuccessfully) for President of Uganda on behalf of his Farmers Party of Uganda.[1] Background and formal education Benon Biraaro was born on 1 March 1958 in Isingiro District. He attended Makerere University, in Kampala, Uganda's oldest and largest public university, graduating in 1982 with a Bachelor of Arts in political science. Later, he attended Cranfield University in the United Kingdom, graduating with a Masters in Global Strategic Studies.[1][2] Military education His military education included the following courses:[1] Officer Cadet Course Junior Staff College in the United Kingdom Junior Command and Staff College at the Nigerian Defence Academy,

2020 deaths

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People from Isingiro District

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People from Western Region, Uganda

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Bob Cashell

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Bob Cashell

Robert Alan Cashell (April 22, 1938 – February 11, 2020) was an American businessman and politician. He served as the mayor of Reno, Nevada from 2002 to 2014. He served as the 28th Lieutenant Governor of Nevada from 1983 to 1987 and on the Nevada System of Higher Education Board of Regents from 1979 to 1982. He served as a board member for Station Casinos from June 17, 2011 until his death on February 11, 2020. He was a member of the Republican Party and a former member of the Democratic Party. Biography Due to his large contributions to students a field house at University of Nevada was constructed and named after him. He is also a prominent businessman, owning Cashell Enterprises, a hotel/casino company. He bought Bill & Effies, a truck stop, in 1967 and renamed it Boomtown Reno. He sold it in 1988 after turning the property into a casino/resort. He managed several properties including: Karl's Silver Club (now the defunct Bourbon Square Casino) in Sparks, the Bourbon Street Hotel and Casino (now dem

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Catholics from Texas

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Catholics from Nevada

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Takis Evdokas

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Takis Evdokas

Takis Evdokas (Greek: Τάκης Ευδόκας; 19 June 1928 – 12 February 2020) was a Greek Cypriot far-right politician, psychiatrist and writer. He was the founder of the Democratic National Party which advocated union of Cyprus and Greece (Enosis).[2][3] References "ΕΥΔΟΚΑΣ ΤΑΚΗΣ". ellinismos.gr. 2014. Retrieved 30 December 2018. "ΙΔΡΥΣΗ ΚΑΙ ΠΟΡΕΙΑ ΔΗΜΟΚΡΑΤΙΚΟΥ ΣΥΝΑΓΕΡΜΟΥ" (PDF) (in Greek). DISY. Retrieved 2013-03-03. "Cyprus" (PDF). Inter-Parliamentary Union. Retrieved 2013-03-03.

Cypriot politicians

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Date of birth unknown

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Jean-Pierre Gallet

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Jean-Pierre Gallet

Jean-Pierre Gallet (7 April 1943 – 11 February 2020) was a Belgian journalist who worked for RTBF.[1] Biography Gallet began working in media in 1976 with La Première. He then hosted the television program bulletin d'information from 1982 to 1988 with Georges Moucheron, Jean-Jacques Jespers, and Françoise Van De Moortel. He became news director in 1995, then left the organization in 2004. Jean-Pierre Gallet died on 11 February 2020.[2] References "Jean-Pierre Gallet, ancien présentateur du JT nous a quittés". RTBF (in French). 11 February 2020. "Jean-Pierre Gallet, ancien présentateur de la RTBF, est décédé à l'âge de 76 ans". SudInfo.be (in French). 11 February 2020.

Belgian journalists

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Raj Kumar Gupta (politician)

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Raj Kumar Gupta (politician)

Raj Kumar Gupta (c. 1935 – 11 February 2020) was an Indian politician from Punjab belonging to Indian National Congress. He was a legislator of the Punjab Legislative Assembly. He also served as the chairman of Punjab Small Industries and Export Corporation.[1] Biography Gupta was elected as a member of the Punjab Legislative Assembly from Jullundur Central in 2002.[2] He was not nominated from Indian National Congress in 2007. After this incident he joined Bharatiya Janata Party. He returned to Indian National Congress in 2010.[3] Gupta died on 11 February 2020 at the age of 85.[4][5] References "Rajkumar Gupta Assuming Charge As Chairman PSIEC". Outlook. 22 September 2008. Retrieved 12 February 2020. "Punjab Assembly Election Results in 2002". www.elections.in. Retrieved 28 December 2019. "Punjab elections: In Jalandhar, Raj Kumar Gupta denied Congress ticket yet again". The Indian Express. 17 January 2017. Retrieved 12 February 2020. "Captain Amarinder Singh mourns passing away of Ex-MLA R

Bharatiya Janata Party politicians from Punjab

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Indian National Congress politicians from Punja...

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1930s births

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David Lacy-Scott

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David Lacy-Scott

David Geffrey Lacy-Scott (18 August 1920 – 2 February 2020) was an English amateur cricketer. Born in Calcutta in August 1920, Lacy-Scott was educated at Marlborough College and Peterhouse, Cambridge University.[1][2] He served in the British Indian Army during the Second World War, receiving an emergency commission in to the Royal Indian Army Service Corps on 27 October 1941.[3][4] He relinquished his commission on account of ill-health, 22 December 1945, and was granted the honorary rank of Captain.[5] Lacy-Scott made ten first-class cricket appearances for Cambridge University Cricket Club as an opening batsman, almost all of which came in the 1946 English cricket season. He won a Blue in 1946 but only played one first-class match for Cambridge after the season, appearing in 1948 against Free Foresters. He also made one appearance for Kent against Sussex in August 1946, having previously played in two Minor Counties Championship matches for Kent's Second XI in 1938 and 1939.[1] He latterly resided in ru

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People educated at Marlborough College

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Alumni of Peterhouse, Cambridge

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Leonard Appleyard

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Leonard Appleyard

Sir Leonard Vincent Appleyard KCMG (2 September 1938 – 7 February 2020)[1] was a British diplomat.[2] Education Born in 1938, Appleyard was educated at The Read School, an independent school for boys (now co-educational) in the village of Drax in North Yorkshire, followed by Queens' College at the University of Cambridge, from which he gained a degree (with Honours) in Classical Chinese. He spoke Mandarin, Russian, Hungarian and French.[2] Career Appleyard served at the British Embassy in the People's Republic of China between 1966 and 1968 (during the country's Cultural Revolution). He served as First Secretary in the British High Commission in India from 1971–1974,[3] and later returned to China as ambassador in 1994 until 1997, a period which witnessed the Taiwan Strait Crisis (1995–96) and also the 'handover' of Hong Kong from UK rule to the People's Republic of China. Appleyard also served as the UK's ambassador to Hungary, in the Treasury, in the Cabinet Office as Deputy Cabinet Secretary, as Secre

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People associated with Bournemouth University

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Members of HM Diplomatic Service

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Saïd Amara (handball)

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Saïd Amara (handball)

Saïd Amara (28 March 1944 – 10 February 2020) was a Tunisian handball player and coach.[1][2] References "Tunisia-Former national handball coach Saïd Amara passes away". Tunisie Numerique. 10 February 2020. "Handball : Décès de l'ex-sélectionneur national, Saïd Amara (Photos)". Mosaïque FM (in French). 10 February 2020.

Handball coaches of international teams

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Tunisian male handball players

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2020 deaths

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Michael Berridge

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Michael Berridge

Sir Michael John Berridge, FRS FMedSci FBPhS (22 October 1938 – 12 February 2020)[3] was a Southern Rhodesian born British physiologist and biochemist. Born and raised in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), he was best known for his work on cellular transmembrane signalling, in particular the discovery that inositol trisphosphate acts as a second messenger, linking events at the plasma membrane with the release of Ca2+ within the cell.[4] As of 2009, he was the Emeritus Babraham Fellow in the Signalling Programme Department of the Babraham Institute, Cambridge, and honorary professor of cell signalling at the University of Cambridge.[5] Education Born in Gatooma in Southern Rhodesia, Berridge gained a BSc in zoology and chemistry at the University of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, Salisbury (1960), where his interest in insect physiology was stimulated by Eina Bursell. He came to the UK to study with insect physiologist Sir Vincent Wigglesworth at the Department of Zoology of the University of Cambridge, gaining hi

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Alumni of University of London Worldwide

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Foreign associates of the National Academy of S...

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Valeri Butenko

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Valeri Butenko

Valeri Pavlovich Butenko (Russian: Валерий Павлович Бутенко; 16 July 1941 – 13 February 2020[1]) was a Russian football midfielder and referee, and a Master of Sports of the USSR, known for having acted as referee at one 1986 FIFA World Cup Group D match - the game between Algeria and Northern Ireland on 3 June 1986. After retiring, Butenko served as a match supervisor. His younger brother Andrei Butenko was a football referee as well. References "Умер Валерий Бутенко" [Valeri Butenko has died] (in Russian). Russian Premier League. 13 February 2020. External links Profile Short bio Biography at Yandex Dictionary Valeri Butenko at FootballFacts.ru (in Russian)

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Soviet football referees

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1986 FIFA World Cup referees

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Frederick R. Koch

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Frederick R. Koch

Frederick Robinson Koch (August 26, 1933 – February 12, 2020)[1] was an American collector and philanthropist, the eldest of the four sons born to American industrialist Fred Chase Koch, founder of what is now Koch Industries, and Mary Clementine (née Robinson) Koch. Early years Koch was born in Wichita, Kansas. His paternal grandfather, Harry Koch, was a Dutch immigrant, who founded the Quanah Tribune-Chief newspaper and was a founding shareholder of Quanah, Acme & Pacific Railway. Among his maternal great-great-grandparents were William Ingraham Kip, an Episcopal bishop; William Burnet Kinney, a politician; and Elizabeth Clementine Stedman, a writer. Beginning in eighth grade, Koch attended a boarding school called Pembroke-Country Day School in Kansas City, Missouri.[4][5] He attended high school at Hackley School in Tarrytown, New York.[5] Koch studied humanities at Harvard College and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1955. His father and his three younger brothers, Charles G. Koch and

21st-century philanthropists

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2020 deaths

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Businesspeople from Kansas

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Bill Britten

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Bill Britten

William Cohen (1928 – February 4, 2020)[1] was an American actor born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to an opera actor and singer. As Bill Britten, he is best known for his portrayal of Bozo the Clown[2] in the New York City market. (See New York Daily News, March 27, 1960.) College Education And Early Career Britten performed as a mimic and pantomimist for local parties in Philadelphia to finance his college education. He earned a degree in drama at Temple University. After serving in the U.S. Army, where he wrote, performed and produced shows for Special Services, he earned a Master's Degree in drama at the University of Washington in Seattle. He taught speech and drama at a Seattle high school, performed on local television, appeared as a clown for a local gas station franchise and trained with two puppet theaters funded by the University of Washington. Following his college education, Britten studied puppetry with Frank Paris, who created and was puppeteer for the original Howdy Doody marionette that a

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University of Washington School of Drama alumni

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Temple University alumni

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Théo Klein

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Théo Klein

Théo Klein (25 June 1920 – 28 January 2020) was a French lawyer who notably presided over the Conseil Représentatif des Institutions juives de France from 1983 to 1989.[1] Klein was a Zionist and a French patriot, yet advocated for secular values. He was highly critical of Israeli foreign policy and the nation's unconditional supporters. Biography Klein was born in Paris, and was the great-grandson of the former chief rabbi of Colmar, Salomon Klein.[2] He was born into an Alsatian Jewish family.[3] He was educated at the École Maïmonide in Montreal.[4] Klein earned a degree in law from Sciences Po. Klein joined the Eclaireuses et Eclaireurs israélites de France shortly before the Second World War, and then continued practicing with them in Vichy after the war. During the war, he was commissioner for the Marseille and Grenoble sectors.Michel, Alain (1993). Juifs, Français et Scouts : les E.I.F. de 1923 à nos jours (in French). Paris: Université Paris I. From 1942 to 1944, he was one of the leaders of the Je

Holocaust survivors

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Burials at Montparnasse Cemetery

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Sciences Po alumni

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Des Britten

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Des Britten

Sir Desmond John Britten KNZM (27 December 1939 – 13 February 2020) was a New Zealand restaurateur, radio broadcaster, television chef, cookbook writer and Anglican priest. He served as Wellington City Missioner for 17 years, and was knighted in 2012. Early life and family Britten was born in Otane in Hawke's Bay on 27 December 1939.[1][2] The son of a sheep farmer, he was educated at Napier Boys' High School, but left without any qualifications and then worked for a few years on the family farm.[2] Career as broadcaster and restaurateur Briten began his broadcasting career as a disc jockey in Napier and then Hamilton.[2] After two years in Australia, he joined the NZBC as an announcer on Wellington radio station 2ZB.[2] His dances for children at the Wellington Town Hall, known as the "Coca Cola Hi-Fi Club", proved popular.[2] In 1964, Britten and his wife Lorraine opened their fine-dining restaurant, "The Coachman", in Courtenay Place, Wellington, which they ran for 28 years.[2][3] In the 1970s, Britte

Deaths from cancer in New Zealand

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2020 deaths

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New Zealand restaurateurs

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George Coyne

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George Coyne

George V. Coyne, S.J. (January 19, 1933 – February 11, 2020) was a Jesuit priest and astronomer who was director of the Vatican Observatory and head of the observatory's research group at the University of Arizona from 1978 to 2006. From January 2012 until his death, he taught at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, New York. His career was dedicated to the reconciliation of theology and science, while his position on scripture was absolute: "One thing the Bible is not," he said in 1994, "is a scientific textbook. Scripture is made up of myth, of poetry, of history. But it is simply not teaching science."[1] Early years and education George Coyne was born in Baltimore on January 19, 1933, the third of eight siblings. He entered the Jesuit novitiate in Wernersville, Pennsylvania, after attending Loyola High School in Blakefield, Maryland, on scholarship and graduating in 1951. He earned his bachelor's degree in mathematics and his licentiate in philosophy at Fordham University in 1958.[2][3] He carried out a spect

People from Baltimore

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2020 deaths

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21st-century American Jesuits

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Maurice Girardot

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Maurice Girardot

Maurice Girardot (December 22, 1921 – February 8, 2020) was a French basketball player. He competed in the 1948 Summer Olympics. Girardot was part of the French basketball team, which won the silver medal.[1] Girardot died in February 2020 at the age of 98.[2][3] References Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill. "Maurice Girardot Olympic Results". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 14 June 2018. Maurice GIRARDOT profile https://actu.fr/ile-de-france/maurepas_78383/yvelines-maurepas-cofondateur-club-basket-est-decede_31397454.html External links profile

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Communes of the Metropolitan City of Naples

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Medalists at the 1948 Summer Olympics

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Jørgen E. Larsen

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Jørgen E. Larsen

Jørgen Erik Larsen (July 25, 1945 – February 7, 2020) was a Danish football coach and player. He spent most of his active career at Herfølge Boldklub, playing 197 games for the club.[2] In 1978, he was named sports director of Herfølge BK and manager of the club in 1987. In 1993, he was named new national team coach of Ghana, and later on he became the national team coach of Qatar.[2] He was the manager of Qatari team Al Rayyan Sports Club,[3] coaching Fernando Hierro, Mario Basler, and the brothers Frank and Ronald de Boer at the club.[2] He was manager of Malaysian team Kedah FA, and attracted former Herfølge player Thomas Abel to the club in the summer of 2002.[4] In November 2005, Larsen was signed as a manager of Brønshøj BK in the second-tier Danish 1st Division.[2] Honours Qatari League: 1994-95 References Jørgen E. Larsen er død, Sjællandske Medier, February 11, 2020. Globetrotter til Brønshøj, Tipsbladet, November 4, 2005. Pengene flyder i olie-paradiset, Tipsbladet, February 17, 2005.

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Al-Rayyan SC managers

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Pahang FA managers

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Paul English (drummer)

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Paul English (drummer)

Paul English (November 6, 1932 – February 12, 2020) was Willie Nelson's longtime drummer who started playing with him in Fort Worth in 1955,[1] although he did not become Nelson's regular drummer until 1966. In the years in between he played with Delbert McClinton among others. In the early days, one of his duties was to serve as a strong armed collection agent for overdue payments from club owners for the band. He was the husband of second wife, Janie English.[2][3] English was the titular "Paul" of the Willie Nelson album Me and Paul as well as the title track of that album. [4] English had a role in Nelson's movie Red Headed Stranger (1986). English joined Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp, and Neil Young as the first members of Farm Aid’s board of directors in 1985, and he served as the organization's treasurer for many years.[5] English died on February 12, 2020, after a bout of pneumonia, at the age of 87.[6] References stillisstillmoving.com » Paul English Willis, Dru (2008-03-08). "Willie and

2020 deaths

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Country musicians from Texas

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People from Vernon, Texas

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Javier Arevalo

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Javier Arevalo

Javier Arevalo (29 April 1937 – 12 February 2020) was a contemporary Mexican artist whose work was the subject of many exhibitions, worldwide, including in Europe, Latin America, United States, Mexico and Japan. His influence was greatest in Mexico City, and Guadalajara, Jalisco. He also taught Art at the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City.[1] Life Arevalo was born on 29 April 1937 in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. His grandmother was a traditional healer, whose concepts stayed with him. She tutored him and did not allow him to attend school. When he was ten years old he won first prize at a contest for children in Guadalajara and began studying drawing, painting and calligraphy with a painter named Jorge Martínez, an assistant to Orozco.[2] In 1950 he began to draw cover illustrations for textbooks for the medical school of the Universidad Autónoma de Guadalajara. In 1951 he won first place in a show for young artists in Guadalajara. During 1952-54 he studied calligraphy in a specialized school in weste

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Mexican contemporary artists

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Mexican artists

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Michael Bushby

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Michael Bushby

Michael Howard Bushby (29 July 1931 – 8 February 2020) was an English cricketer. He played 43 first-class matches for Cambridge University Cricket Club between 1952 and 1954.[1][2] An opening batsman, Mike Bushby captained Cambridge University in 1954.[3] His highest score was 113 against Lancashire in 1954.[4] See also List of Cambridge University Cricket Club players References "Michael Bushby". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 11 April 2017. "Mike Bushby". CricketArchive. Retrieved 14 February 2020. Wisden 1955, p. 607. "Cambridge University v Lancashire 1954". CricketArchive. Retrieved 14 February 2020. External links Michael Bushby at ESPNcricinfo

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People educated at Dulwich College

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Sportspeople from Macclesfield

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Renzo Chiocchetti

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Renzo Chiocchetti

Renzo Chiocchetti (17 November 1945 – 13 February 2020) was an Italian cross-country skier.[1] He competed at the 1972 Winter Olympics and the 1976 Winter Olympics.[2] References "Lutto nel mondo sportivo fassano: è morto Renzo "Nacio" Chiocchetti". rainews. Retrieved 14 February 2020. Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill. "Renzo Chiocchetti Olympic Results". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 28 June 2019.

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Italian male cross-country skiers

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Cross-country skiers at the 1972 Winter Olympics

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Christophe Desjardins

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Christophe Desjardins

Christophe Desjardins (24 April 1962 – 13 February 2020) was a French violist and specialist in contemporary music.[1] Biography Born in Caen, Christophe Desjardins entered the Conservatoire de Paris in 1982, at the age of 20, in Serge Collot's class. He also studied at the Hochschule der Künste in Berlin.[2] In 1990, he was solo violist at the Théâtre de la Monnaie in Brussels. He joined the Ensemble intercontemporain in Paris in 1990. Desjardins premiered works for viola by Ivan Fedele, Luciano Berio, Pierre Boulez, Michael Jarrell, Michaël Levinas, Emmanuel Nunes, Jonathan Harvey, Wolfgang Rihm.[1] In addition to numerous world premieres, Desjardins taught at several universities, including the Juilliard School in New York. From 2010 to 2013, he taught at the Hochschule für Musik Detmold.[1] Discography Voix d'alto, works by Luciano Berio and Morton Feldman, Paris, AEON, 2004. Emmanuel Nunes, La main noire, AEON, 2007. References Guillaume Decalf (2020-02-13). "Mort de Christophe Desjardins,

21st-century French musicians

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Deaths from cancer in France

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Juilliard School faculty

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Délizia

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Délizia

Délizia Adamo better known as Délizia (June 23, 1952 – February 9, 2020) was a singer of Italian–Belgian origin and sister of international singer Salvatore Adamo. She had her debut single "Prend le chien" at age 14. It was written by her brother Adamo.[1] She followed courses in drawing and took part in a comedy production at Théatre de l'Ancre in Charleroi, where she interpreted Kataeiv's "Je veux voir Moscou". She also followed dramatic arts courses at the Royal Conservatory of Brussels. In 1974, Salvatore Adamo wrote her some songs releasing "Qui te retient" and "Aime-moi" as singles. The next year, she took part in some of his tours. In 1976 and again in 1978, she participated in pre-selections for the Belgian entry to Eurovision Song Contest but without success. She had a comeback in 1982 with "Une première danse", a song co-written by Michel Legrand and Charles Aznavour. Discography EP 1966 Face A1 : Prends le chien (S. Adamo) Face A2 : Monsieur le professeur (S. Adamo) Face B1 : J’ai rendez-vous

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Belgian female singers

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Simone Créantor

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Simone Créantor

Simone Créantor (2 June 1948 – 12 February 2020)[2] was a French athlete, who specialised in the shot put. Biography Créantor was born at Grand-Bourg. She won thirteen titles French national championships in the shot put, five outdoor and eight indoor. She won the silver medal at the 1983 Mediterranean Games, and also in the 1987 Mediterranean Games. Her personal best, established in 1984, is 17.45m. prize list National French Championships in Athletics : winner of the shot put in 1972, 1981, 1985, 1986 and 1987 Indoors Athletics Championships of France: winner of the shot put in 1972, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1983, 1984, 1985 and 1986 Records personal records Épreuve Performance Location Date Shot Put 17.45 m 1984 notes and references "Simone Créantor est morte, ce mercredi 12 Février". francetvinfo.fr. Retrieved 2020-02-13. "L'athlète guadeloupéenne Simone Créantor est décédée". rci.fm. Retrieved 2020-02-13. Docathlé2003, French Athletics Federation, 2003 p. 397 E

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Competitors at the 1983 Mediterranean Games

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Competitors at the 1987 Mediterranean Games

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Jimmy Conway (footballer)

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Jimmy Conway (footballer)

James Patrick Conway (10 August 1946 – 14 February 2020) was an Irish international association footballer who played professionally in Ireland, England and the United States. He earned 20 caps for the Republic of Ireland national football team, playing mainly as a midfielder, and coached extensively at the professional and collegiate levels in the United States. Player Professional Born in Dublin, Conway began his career with Stella Maris. From there he moved to Bohemians in 1964 as a senior in his home city. In 1966, he moved to Fulham. A midfielder or winger, he spent ten years at Craven Cottage, scoring 67 times in 314 League games before a £30,000 fee brought him north to join Manchester City in August 1976. He was a member of the Fulham side that reached the 1975 FA Cup Final.[2] He played with his brother John at Fulham and his brother Tom also played professionally. Having played just 13 times for City, scoring the winning goal in the final game of the season against Coventry City when Manchester Ci

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Republic of Ireland football managers

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Republic of Ireland expatriate association foot...

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Enrique Marin

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Enrique Marin

Enrique Marin (15 December 1935 – 9 February 2020) was a Spanish painter and sculptor.[1] Biography Marin was educated at the Escuela de Artes y Oficios de Sevilla in Seville, then at the École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts in Paris, where he worked with René Jaudon, Pierre-Eugène Clairin, Jean-Eugène Bersier, and Lucien Coutaud. Marin moved to Paris in 1958, and frequently traveled to Brittany. He then lived in Auxerre in the Burgundy region, where he owned an engraving workshop.[2][3] He died in Auxerre on 9 February 2020.[4] Exhibitions Galerie Anne Colin, Paris (1965, 1966, and 1971) Hotel Sandelin Museum, Saint-Omer (1977) Biblioteca Nacional de España, Madrid (1982) Milan Public Library, Milan (1983) Fundación El Monte, Seville (1995) Musée de la faïence, Quimper Beaune Museum of Fine Arts, Beaune (2003-2004) Musées de Sens, Sens (2010-2011)[5] Abbey of Saint-Germain d'Auxerre, Auxerre (2010-2011) Galerie du Présidial, Quimperlé (2013)[6] Centre d’Art Graphique de la Métairie

20th-century Spanish sculptors

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20th-century Spanish painters

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21st-century Spanish painters

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