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The Beach Boys

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The Beach Boys

The Beach Boys are an American rock band formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961. The group's original lineup consisted of brothers Brian, Dennis, and Carl Wilson, their cousin Mike Love, and their friend Al Jardine. Distinguished by their vocal harmonies and early surf songs, they are one of the most influential acts of the rock era.[1] The band drew on the music of jazz-based vocal groups, 1950s rock and roll, and black R&B to create their unique sound, and with Brian as composer, arranger, producer, and de facto leader, they often incorporated classical elements and unconventional recording techniques in innovative ways. The Beach Boys began as a garage band led by Brian and managed by the Wilsons' father Murry. In 1963, the band gained national prominence with a string of top-ten singles reflecting a southern California youth culture of surfing, cars, and romance, dubbed the "California Sound". From 1965, they abandoned beachgoing themes for more personal lyrics and ambitious orchestrations. In 1966

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Warner Records artists

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The Brain of Morbius

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The Brain of Morbius

The Brain of Morbius is the fifth serial of the 13th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 3 to 24 January 1976. The on-screen writer credit is given to Robin Bland, a pseudonym for script writer Terrance Dicks and script editor Robert Holmes. It is the first serial to feature the Sisterhood of Karn. The serial is set on the planet Karn. In the serial, the surgeon Mehendri Solon (Philip Madoc) seeks to create a body for the Time Lord war criminal Morbius (Stuart Fell and Michael Spice) from parts of other creatures that have come to the planet. Plot summary On the planet Karn, an insect-like alien is killed by Condo, a man with a hook for a hand, who takes its head to a castle and his master Solon. However, the head is unsuitable — Solon needs a head from a warm-blooded humanoid. The TARDIS materialises in the middle of a lightning storm, and the Fourth Doctor rushes out, ranting at the Time Lords for diverting him t

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The Creature from the Pit

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The Creature from the Pit

The Creature from the Pit is the third serial of the 17th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 27 October to 17 November 1979. It is the first serial made to feature David Brierley as the voice of K9. The serial is set on the planet Chloris. In the serial, Lady Adrasta (Myra Frances) imprisons the Tythonian ambassador Erato in a pit for fifteen years in order to maintain her control over the planet's limited metal supply. The alien time traveller the Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) attempts to negotiate peace and a trade agreement with Erato. Plot The use of an MK3 Emergency transceiver on the TARDIS identifies a distress signal and brings the craft to the lush jungle world of Chloris, where metal in all forms is a rare and prized commodity. The Fourth Doctor and Romana venture out to discover the remains of an enormous egg in the jungle, and when they meet the inhabitants they find a matriarchy ruled through fear by the i

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The Claws of Axos

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The Claws of Axos

The Claws of Axos is the third serial of the eighth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 13 March to 3 April 1971. In the serial, set in Britain, the alien organism Axos spreads its Axonite particles across the Earth to allow itself to feed on all life on the planet. Plot The Axons land on Earth, desperately in need of fuel. They propose to exchange the miracle substance they call Axonite for some much needed energy. Axonite is a "thinking" molecule that can replicate any substance... or so they claim. As it turns out, the ship is a single organism called Axos whose purpose is to feed itself by draining all energy through the Axonite (which is just a part of itself), including the energy of every life form on Earth. The deception about the Axonite's beneficial properties was to facilitate the distribution of Axonite across the globe. Meanwhile, the Master, who was captured by Axos and used his knowledge of Earth as

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Films with screenplays by Bob Baker

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Doctor Who articles needing attention

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The Dalek Invasion of Earth

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The Dalek Invasion of Earth

The Dalek Invasion of Earth is the second serial of the second season in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which originally aired in six weekly parts from 21 November to 26 December 1964. It was the second appearance of the Daleks and thus the first time an enemy re-appeared. The serial is set on the Earth in the 22nd century, where the Daleks occupy the planet following a meteorite strike and a deadly plague. In the serial, the First Doctor (William Hartnell), his granddaughter Susan Foreman (Carole Ann Ford), and teachers Ian Chesterton (William Russell) and Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) work with a human resistance group to travel to a Bedfordshire mine to stop the Daleks from mining out the Earth's core as part of their plan to pilot the Earth through space. This serial marks the final regular appearance of Carole Ann Ford as companion Susan. Plot After the TARDIS materialises, the Doctor surmises from the surroundings that they have landed in London, only to find it devasta

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Fiction set in the 22nd century

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The Dominators

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The Dominators

The Dominators is the first serial of the sixth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which originally aired in five weekly parts from 10 August to 7 September 1968. In the serial, the time traveller the Second Doctor (Patrick Troughton) and his travelling companions Jamie McCrimmon (Frazer Hines) and Zoe Heriot (Wendy Padbury) work with the Dulcians of the planet Dulkis to prevent the alien Dominators from blowing up Dulkis and using its irradiated remains as spaceship fuel. Plot An alien craft bearing the ruthless Dominators arrives on the peaceful planet of Dulkis. The craft lands on the Island of Death, a nuclear test site housing an anti-war museum, and soon absorbs all the radiation on the island. The robotic Quarks are sent out by the Dominators to prepare boreholes into the planet’s crust in order to convert the planet into rocket fuel. Toba uses the Quarks to fire on and kill three adventure seekers who stumble across his project. Their pilot Cully, however, survives

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Doctor Who articles needing attention

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The Curse of Peladon

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The Curse of Peladon

The Curse of Peladon is the second serial of the ninth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 29 January to 19 February 1972. The serial is set on the superstitious and mineral-rich planet Peladon. In the serial, the alien time traveller the Third Doctor (Jon Pertwee) and his travelling companion Jo Grant (Katy Manning) discover the High Priest Hepesh (Geoffrey Toone) conspiring to stop Peladon from joining the Galactic Federation so that the old ways on the planet are preserved. Plot The planet Peladon, led by its young king Peladon, is on the verge of joining the Galactic Federation, their delegates ready to deliberate and take a final vote. High Priest Hepesh is opposed, warning that the curse of Aggedor the Royal Beast of Peladon will visit doom upon them. The TARDIS materialises on the edge of a cliff below the castle. The Third Doctor and Jo barely leave the ship before it tumbles over the edge of the cliff; the

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Fiction set in the 4th millennium

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4th millennium in fiction

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The Curse of Fenric

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The Curse of Fenric

The Curse of Fenric is the third serial of the 26th season of the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 25 October to 15 November 1989. In the serial, the ancient evil force Fenric uses the vampiric Haemovores, the descendants of humanity from the future, to attack a World War II naval base in England and orders them to destroy life on Earth by poisoning it with chemicals. Unusually, two further versions of this story exist: the 1991 video release incorporated about six minutes of extra material into the original narrative, and the 2003 DVD included a 'Special Edition' edited into a single movie-length feature, with new special effects, re-editing of some scenes, and 12 minutes of unbroadcast footage. Plot The Seventh Doctor and Ace arrive at a British naval installation near Maiden's Point on the Northumberland coast during World War II. Befriending the base personnel, they learn that the base, run by Commander Millington, is bei

Television episodes about World War II

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Fiction set in 1943

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The Evil of the Daleks

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The Evil of the Daleks

The Evil of the Daleks is the mostly-missing ninth and final serial of the fourth season in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which originally aired in seven weekly parts from 20 May to 1 July 1967. This serial marked the debut of Deborah Watling as the Doctor's new companion, Victoria Waterfield. Only episode two, the episode in which Victoria first appears, is held in the BBC archives; the other six remain missing. Evil was initially intended to be the last Dalek story on Doctor Who. Writer Terry Nation, the creator of the Daleks, was trying to sell the Daleks to American television at the time and it was intended to give them a big send-off from the series. However this was not to be his last encounter with them. In 1993, readers of DreamWatch Bulletin voted The Evil of the Daleks as the best ever Doctor Who story in a special poll for the series' thirtieth anniversary. Plot In 1966 London, the Second Doctor and Jamie watch helplessly as the TARDIS is loaded onto a lorry and driv

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Fiction set in 1866

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Fiction set in 1966

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The Face of Evil

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The Face of Evil

The Face of Evil is the fourth serial of the 14th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 1 to 22 January 1977. This serial marked the debut of Louise Jameson as companion Leela. It was also the first story written for the series by Chris Boucher and the first directed by Pennant Roberts, who would both go on to work on the series again a number of times. In the serial, the powerful split-personality computer Xoanon (played by Tom Baker, Rob Edwards, Pamela Salem, Anthony Frieze, and Roy Herrick) attempts to create two super races from the descendants of a human expedition with eugenics—the savage Sevateem, and the psychic Tesh. The Fourth Doctor (Baker) seeks to repair this personality fault. The serial is generally well-received by reviewers, although fandom consider it to be overshadowed by other stories in Season 14.[1] It did however gain high ratings of over 11 million on first screening. Plot The Fourth Doctor,

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The Green Death

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The Green Death

The Green Death is the fifth and final serial of the tenth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts on BBC1 from 19 May to 23 June 1973. It was the last regular appearance of Katy Manning as companion Jo Grant. In the serial, the alien time traveller the Third Doctor (Jon Pertwee) and the organisation UNIT investigate a South Wales mine where waste from an oil plant has killed miners and made maggots grow to giant size. Plot The Third Doctor is making adjustments to the TARDIS' coordinate programmer in preparation for a visit to Metebelis Three, when Jo reads in the newspaper about the mysterious death of a miner named Hughes in the abandoned coal mine in Llanfairfach in South Wales. The miner, who had been doing a monthly inspection of the bottom of the mine shaft, was found dead and glowing bright green. Jo takes this opportunity to meet the acclaimed local environmentalist and Nobel Prize winner Professor Clifford Jones; while Brig

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Television episodes set in Wales

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Doctor Who articles needing attention

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The Ice Warriors

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The Ice Warriors

The Ice Warriors is the partly missing third serial of the fifth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts from 11 November to 16 December 1967. This serial marked the debut of the Ice Warriors. It was the third incomplete Doctor Who serial to be released with full-length animated reconstructions of its two missing episodes. Plot In the distant future at Brittanicus Base, senior control technician Jan Garrett and her staff struggle to control an ioniser they are using to slow the progress of glaciers rolling over Great Britain. Leader Clent is convinced they can avert a new Ice Age, but the group knows they are only a few hours away from being forced to abandon the base. Tensions rise when Penley, a maverick scientist who has defected from the team, is mentioned. The remaining senior scientist, Arden, is on the glacier searching for archaeological finds, where he discovers an armoured man within a block of ice. Arden and his colleagues

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Fiction set in the 6th millennium

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6th millennium in fiction

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The Invasion (Doctor Who)

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The Invasion (Doctor Who)

The Invasion is the partly missing third serial of the sixth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in eight weekly parts from 2 November to 21 December 1968. It marks the first appearance of UNIT and, notably, Corporal Benton, later to become a Sergeant during the Third Doctor era. It was the first incomplete Doctor Who serial to be released with full-length animated reconstructions of its two missing episodes. Plot After escaping the Land of Fiction, the Doctor, Jamie and Zoe find that they have materialized near the Moon in the late twentieth-century. A missile is fired from the surface, forcing the crew to land the TARDIS in England. With the visual stabiliser damaged, the TARDIS is rendered invisible and they decided to head to London to find Professor Edward Travers for his assistance. Hitching a lift with a van driver, they learn of International Electromatics, a mysterious company which has become the world's leading electronics producer. Arriv

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Doctor Who serials novelised by Ian Marter

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The Invasion of Time

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The Invasion of Time

The Invasion of Time is the sixth and final serial of the 15th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts on BBC1 from 4 February to 11 March 1978. This serial features the final appearance of Louise Jameson as the companion Leela. In the serial, the Vardans break the defences of Gallifrey to allow the Sontarans to invade and control the power of the Time Lords. Plot To the confusion of Leela and K9, the Fourth Doctor has a covert meeting with aliens before taking his companions to the Citadel at Gallifrey. Once there, he lays claim to the vacant Presidency as his right by Time Lord law - he is the only candidate, as established in the story The Deadly Assassin. While reviewing the presidential suite, he orders it lined with lead. During his induction ceremony, the Crown of Rassilon seems to reject him, and he's injured. Leela is accused of having attacked him, when in fact she tried to help him, and she's banished from the Citadel. Lat

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1978 British television episodes

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Fourth Doctor serials

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The Invisible Enemy (Doctor Who)

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The Invisible Enemy (Doctor Who)

The Invisible Enemy is the second serial of the 15th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 1 to 22 October 1977. The serial introduced the robot dog K9, voiced by John Leeson. In the serial, an intelligent virus intends to spread across the universe after finding a suitable spawning location on the moon Titan. Plot Mankind is colonising space at a fantastic rate. Some human space travellers are cruising near the outer planets of the solar system with their ship on autopilot. The ship's computer, and soon the human crew, is possessed by a strange virus. Reaching their destination, Titan Base, they proceed to take it over as a breeding ground. The station manager, Lowe is able to send out a distress call. The TARDIS is travelling through the same region, and is infected by the virus. The infection passes to the Fourth Doctor, but he is unaffected. He and Leela hear the distress call and go to investigate. While there,

Fiction about size change

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Films with screenplays by Bob Baker

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The Masque of Mandragora

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The Masque of Mandragora

The Masque of Mandragora is the first serial of the 14th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 4 to 25 September 1976. The serial is set in the fictional European duchy of San Martino in the late 15th century. In the serial, the astrologer Hieronymous (Norman Jones) seeks to summon the power of an intelligence called the Mandragora Helix to rule the Earth. Plot The Doctor shows Sarah some of the TARDIS interior, and they come across the secondary console room. Activating the viewscreen, the Doctor sees a swirl of living energy in the time vortex – the Mandragora Helix, which starts to draw them in. The intelligence within the Helix psychically attacks them as the Doctor tries to pilot the TARDIS through it. The ship ends up inside the Helix, and the Doctor and Sarah duck behind the TARDIS as a fragment of glowing Helix energy flies by. They escape in the TARDIS, not knowing that the fragment has entered with them. In

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Fiction set in the 15th century

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15th century in fiction

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The Mind of Evil

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The Mind of Evil

The Mind of Evil is the second serial of the eighth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts on BBC1 from 30 January to 6 March 1971. In the serial, the alien time traveller the Master (Roger Delgado) is plotting to start World War III by destroying a peace conference between the United States and China in London by using a nerve gas missile he hijacked from the organisation UNIT. All six episodes of the serial exist as black and white telerecordings after the original colour video tapes were wiped. For the serial's DVD release in 2013, a mixture of hand-colourised key-frames in conjunction with manual and automated colour interpolation for episode one, and the decoding of chroma dot signals recorded in the monochrome film for episodes 2–6, were employed to recolourise it. Plot The Third Doctor and Jo visit Stangmoor Prison to examine a new method of treating criminals, whereby negative impulses are removed from the mind using the Ke

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Doctor Who articles needing attention

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1971 British television episodes

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The Mind Robber

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The Mind Robber

The Mind Robber is the second serial of the sixth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in five weekly parts from 14 September to 12 October 1968. The serial is set outside of time and space in a world where fictional characters and mythological creatures including Medusa and the Minotaur exist. In the serial, the English fiction writer "the Master" (Emrys Jones) tries to recruit the time traveller the Second Doctor (Patrick Troughton) to replace the Master's role as the creative power in this realm because of the Master's advancing age. Plot In defeating the Dominators on Dulkis, the Doctor sets off a volcanic eruption. He leaves the TARDIS in the way and it gets buried in lava, blowing a fluid link in the TARDIS in the process. This forces the Doctor to use an emergency unit to take the TARDIS along with his companions, Jamie and Zoe, away from danger but out of reality itself. They land in a white void and as the Doctor fixes the TARDIS, Jamie and

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Television series based on Arthurian legend

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Medusa

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The Moonbase

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The Moonbase

The Moonbase is the half-missing sixth serial of the fourth season in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from 11 February to 4 March 1967. The story features the return, and first redesign, of the Cybermen. It was the fifth incomplete Doctor Who serial to be released with full-length animated reconstructions of its two missing episodes. Plot The TARDIS makes a bumpy landing on the Moon in the year 2070; dressed in spacesuits, the Second Doctor and his companions Ben, Polly and Jamie venture outside to explore the low-gravity environment. While they play, Jamie is injured. Some workers from the nearby Moonbase find Jamie and bring him inside for treatment while the remaining TARDIS crew follows. The time travellers learn that the Moonbase uses a machine called the Graviton to track and manage weather on Earth. Their arrival is ill-timed, as members of the international crew, led by the bullish Hobson, have begun to collapse under the inf

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Doctor Who articles needing attention

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Doctor Who serials novelised by Gerry Davis

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The Rescue (Doctor Who)

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The Rescue (Doctor Who)

The Rescue is the third serial of the second season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in two weekly parts on 2 January and 9 January 1965 on BBC1. It was written by outgoing story editor David Whitaker and directed by Christopher Barry. In the serial, the time travellers the First Doctor (William Hartnell), Ian Chesterton (William Russell), and Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) befriend Vicki (Maureen O'Brien), an orphan girl marooned on the planet Dido who is being threatened by an apparent native of Dido called Koquillion (Ray Barrett) while awaiting rescue. The Rescue was produced in a six-episode block with The Romans and was the first story produced in Doctor Who's second production block. Rehearsals and recording took place from 30 November to 11 December 1964, entirely in-studio. The two episodes were watched by 12 and 13 million viewers in the UK respectively and have received generally positive reviews from critics, who praise the character-based

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Fiction set in the 25th century

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The Pirate Planet

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The Pirate Planet

The Pirate Planet is the second serial of the 16th season in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 30 September to 21 October 1978. It forms the second serial of the Key to Time story arc. It was written by Douglas Adams, and featured some of his humour. In the serial, the tyrant Queen Xanxia (Rosalind Lloyd) and the Captain (Bruce Purchase) use the hollow planet Zanak as a spaceship that surrounds smaller planets, including Calufrax, the second segment of the powerful Key to Time in disguise, to plunder the planets' resources that help keep Xanxia alive. Plot The Key to Time tracer points the Fourth Doctor and Romana to the cold and boring planet of Calufrax, but when they arrive they find an unusual civilisation that lives in perpetual prosperity. A strange band of people with mysterious powers known as the Mentiads are feared by the society, but the Doctor discovers that they are good people but with an unknown purpose. He i

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1978 British television episodes

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The Monster of Peladon

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The Monster of Peladon

The Monster of Peladon is the fourth serial of the 11th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts on BBC1 from 23 March to 27 April 1974. The serial is set on the mineral-rich planet Peladon 50 years after the 1972 serial The Curse of Peladon. In the serial, the engineer Eckersley (Donald Gee) and the rogue Ice Warrior Commander Azaxyr (Alan Bennion) conspire to take over the planet and sell its minerals to Peladon's enemies in Galaxy Five. Plot On the planet Peladon a power struggle is in place between the trisilicate miners and the ruling class, with miners under the leadership of Gebek and hot-headed Ettis calling for improved conditions. The planet’s ruler Queen Thalira, daughter of the late King Peladon, is sympathetic, but knows her planet is vital to supply the war effort of the Galactic Federation of which it is a member. The Federation is in conflict with the warlike Galaxy Five confederation. The miners become concerned when

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Fiction set in the 4th millennium

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4th millennium in fiction

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The Ribos Operation

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The Ribos Operation

The Ribos Operation is the first serial of the 16th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 2 to 23 September 1978. This serial introduces Mary Tamm as the companion Romana. The serial is set on the primitive and superstitious planet Ribos. In the serial, the exiled Emperor of Levithia, Graff Vynda-K (Paul Seed), seeks a piece of the rare element jethrik on the planet. At the same time, the Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) and his travelling companion Romana look for the first segment of the powerful Key to Time, disguised as the same jethrik piece. Plot The White Guardian recruits the Fourth Doctor to collect the six hidden and disguised segments of the powerful Key to Time. He assigns him an assistant Time Lady named Romanadvoratrelundar, whom the Doctor calls Romana (despite her preference for "Fred" when given a choice by the Doctor). He warns him that the Black Guardian also seeks these segments, but for an evil purpose.

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Doctor Who serials novelised by Ian Marter

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The Robots of Death

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The Robots of Death

The Robots of Death is the fifth serial of the 14th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 29 January to 19 February 1977. Influenced by the works of Agatha Christie, Isaac Asimov and Frank Herbert, The Robots of Death was the second script written for the series by Chris Boucher, Philip Hinchcliffe's penultimate story as producer and Michael E. Briant's final contribution to the series as a director. It has been described by Radio Times as a "fan favourite", "suspenseful" and "beautifully designed" serial featuring Tom Baker "in his prime".[1] It was chosen to represent the era of the Fourth Doctor at the British Film Institute's 50th anniversary celebration of Doctor Who.[1] Plot The Fourth Doctor and Leela arrive via TARDIS on "Storm Mine 4", a large sand-crawling miner vehicle used to gather valuable minerals from a desert planet brought to the surface by powerful sandstorms. They find the vehicle has a minimal hum

Television episodes about robots

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Robots in television

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The Seeds of Doom

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The Seeds of Doom

The Seeds of Doom is the sixth and final serial of the 13th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts on BBC1 from 31 January to 6 March 1976. The serial is set in Antarctica and England. In the serial, the plant collector Harrison Chase (Tony Beckley) seeks to retrieve a malignant alien plant called a Krynoid for himself. Plot In Antarctica, British scientists Charles Winlett and Derek Moberley discover a pod buried in the permafrost and take it back to their camp. John Stevenson, the base botanist, identifies it as vegetable-based and estimates it has been buried in the ice for twenty thousand years. In London, Richard Dunbar of the World Ecology Bureau shows the Fourth Doctor photographs of the pod at the urging of his superior, Sir Colin Thackeray. The Doctor believes it to be extraterrestrial. He tells Dunbar to tell the expedition not to touch it until he arrives. Back at the base, Stevenson discovers that the pod is growing la

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1976 British television episodes

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The Sea Devils

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The Sea Devils

The Sea Devils is the third serial of the ninth season of the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts on BBC1 from 26 February to 1 April 1972. It was written by Malcolm Hulke and directed by Michael E. Briant. The serial is notable as the first appearance of the Sea Devils and features extensive location filming in cooperation with the Royal Navy, as well as an experimental electronic score by Malcolm Clarke. The serial is set in various locations in and beneath the English Channel. In the serial, the alien time traveller the Master (Roger Delgado) makes contact with the Sea Devils, a bipedal marine race that ruled the Earth before humanity, and plots to use them to reconquer the Earth from humanity. Plot The Third Doctor and Jo visit the Master, imprisoned on a small island in the English Channel. Despite his claim to have reformed, he refuses to reveal the location of his TARDIS. As they depart, the Doctor hears of ships mysterious

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The Sontaran Experiment

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The Sontaran Experiment

The Sontaran Experiment is the third serial of the 12th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was originally broadcast on BBC1 on 22 February and 1 March 1975. The serial is set on Earth more than 10,000 years in the future, immediately after the events of The Ark in Space. In the serial, the Sontaran Field Major Styre (Kevin Lindsay) performs experiments on humans he trapped there as part of the Sontarans' invasion stratagem. Plot Following on from The Ark in Space, the Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane Smith, and Harry Sullivan teleport down from the Nerva space station to Earth, ostensibly uninhabited. However, the system is not functioning well, and the Doctor begins repairing it. The other two explore the surrounding area, but Harry falls down a crevasse and Sarah goes to seek the Doctor's help. He is nowhere in sight. Roth, an astronaut, finds Sarah. He is obviously distressed, and explains that he has been tortured by an alien that lives in the rocks, together with its p

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Films with screenplays by Bob Baker

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Fiction set in the 11th millennium or beyond

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The Sound of Drums

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The Sound of Drums

"The Sound of Drums" is the twelfth episode of the third series of the revived British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It was broadcast on BBC One on 23 June 2007.[1] It is the second of three episodes that form a linked narrative, following "Utopia" and followed by "Last of the Time Lords". In the episode, set in the 21st century, the alien time traveller the Master (John Simm) uses a network of mobile phone satellites to hypnotise the world and influence the population of the United Kingdom into electing him Prime Minister. Following the election, he makes contact with an invading race he calls the Toclafane. Plot The Tenth Doctor, Jack, and Martha escape the Futurekind by using Jack's vortex manipulator to return to present-day London. They quickly learn that the Master has taken on the persona of Harold Saxon, and is the newly elected Prime Minister. The Master has created a phone network called Archangel which subliminally influences the population to vote for him. The three narrowly avo

Television episodes about mass murder

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Films with screenplays by Russell T Davies

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The Stones of Blood

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The Stones of Blood

The Stones of Blood is the third serial of the 16th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 28 October to 18 November 1978. Part 4 was broadcast during the week of the show's fifteenth anniversary. The serial is set in and around an English stone circle and on a prison spaceship in hyperspace. In the serial, the criminal Cessair of Diplos (Susan Engel) is hiding on Earth after escaping the ship before being prosecuted for stealing the Great Seal of Diplos, the third segment of the powerful Key to Time. Plot Tracking the third segment of the Key to Time, the Fourth Doctor, Romana and K9 arrive in modern-day Cornwall. They meet Professor Emilia Rumford and her friend Vivien Fay, studying the "Nine Travellers" standing stones in Boscombe Moor. Their work is disrupted by a Druidic sect that worships the Cailleach, the Druidic goddess of war and magic, led by de Vries. de Vries and the sect are hostile to the newcomers, but

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Fiction set in 1978

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The Sun Makers

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The Sun Makers

The Sun Makers is the fourth serial of the 15th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 26 November to 17 December 1977. The serial is set on Pluto. In the serial, the alien time traveller the Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) and his travelling companions Leela (Louise Jameson) and K9 (John Leeson) start a revolution among the humans against an alien corporation which has an economic hold over humanity. Plot The inhabitants of Pluto in the far future are taxed to desperation, including the functionary Cordo, who is so overwhelmed by the size of his tax bill that he decides to take his own life. He is interrupted by the arrival of the Fourth Doctor and Leela from the TARDIS, who save him and discover that false suns have been created around Pluto to provide the ability for some of mankind to live. However, the Company which owns the suns and the buildings on Pluto is using its economic stranglehold to extort ever growing taxes

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1977 British television episodes

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The Talons of Weng-Chiang

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The Talons of Weng-Chiang

The Talons of Weng-Chiang is the sixth and final serial of the 14th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts on BBC1 from 26 February to 2 April 1977.[1] In the serial, which is set in 19th-century London, the 51st century criminal Magnus Greel (Michael Spice) travels to the city and poses as an ancient Chinese god to find his missing time machine. Written by script editor Robert Holmes and directed by David Maloney, The Talons of Weng-Chiang was also the final serial to be produced by Philip Hinchcliffe, who had worked on the series for three seasons. One of the most popular serials from the series' original run on television, The Talons of Weng-Chiang has continued to receive acclaim from reviewers and it has been repeatedly voted one of the best stories by fans. Despite this, criticism has been directed towards the serial's stereotypical representation of Chinese characters and an unconvincing giant rat featured in the story. Plot

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Doctor Who stories set on Earth

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The Time Warrior

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The Time Warrior

The Time Warrior is the first serial of the 11th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 15 December 1973 to 5 January 1974. The serial introduced Elisabeth Sladen as new companion Sarah Jane Smith. It also marked the debut of the Sontaran race. The serial also introduces the name of the Doctor's home planet, Gallifrey. In the serial, the Sontaran Commander Linx (Kevin Lindsay) crash-lands his spaceship in medieval England. He agrees to give futuristic weaponry to the warrior Irongron (David Daker) and his men, in exchange for Linx being given shelter to perform repairs on the damaged spaceship. Plot The Sontarans debuted in this serial, as shown here at the Doctor Who Experience. In the Middle Ages, the bandit Irongron and his aide Bloodaxe, together with their rabble of criminals, find the crashed spaceship of a Sontaran warrior named Linx. The alien claims Earth for his Empire, then sets about repairing his ship,

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Fiction set in the 13th century

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13th century in fiction

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The War Games

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The War Games

The War Games is the seventh and final serial of the sixth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which originally aired in ten weekly parts from 19 April to 21 June 1969. In the serial, an unnamed alien race led by the War Lord (Philip Madoc) kidnap and brainwash soldiers from wars throughout Earth's history to fight in war games on another planet as part of the aliens' plot to conquer the galaxy. The time traveller the Second Doctor (Patrick Troughton) and his travelling companions Jamie McCrimmon (Frazer Hines) and Zoe Heriot (Wendy Padbury) form a resistance army to stop this plot and to return the kidnapped soldiers home. The War Games was the last regular appearance of Troughton as the Doctor and the last serial to be recorded in black and white. It also marks the last regular appearances of Padbury and Hines as companions Zoe and Jamie, and sees both the first naming and first appearance of the Doctor's race, the Time Lords. Plot On an alien planet, the Doctor uncovers

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The Visitation (Doctor Who)

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The Visitation (Doctor Who)

The Visitation is the fourth serial of the 19th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four twice-weekly parts on BBC1 from 15 to 23 February 1982. The serial is set in and near London in the 17th century. In the serial, a group of fugitive aliens called Terileptils plot to make the Earth their new home by spreading a deadly plague among humanity. Plot At the manor home of a 17th-century family, some unwelcome visitors arrive. In the console room, the Fifth Doctor is talking with Adric about the events of their previous adventure on Deva Loka (Kinda). Meanwhile, Nyssa is helping Tegan pack, as they plan to land back at Heathrow shortly after she left to join the Doctor (in Logopolis). Tegan and Nyssa enter the console room to find that they have landed at Heathrow... just 300-some years early. Tegan is distressed and storms out of the TARDIS. The four gather outside and immediately smell sulphur and head off to find the source. They are then attac

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Great Fire of London

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The Wheel in Space

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The Wheel in Space

The Wheel in Space is the mostly missing seventh and final serial of the fifth season in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which originally aired in six weekly parts from 27 April to 1 June 1968. This serial is the first appearance of Wendy Padbury as companion Zoe Heriot. Only two of the six episodes are held in the BBC archives; four still remain missing. Plot The explosion of the mercury fluid link forces the Second Doctor and Jamie to evacuate the TARDIS to avoid mercury fumes, and until the mercury can be replaced, the spacecraft is marooned. They find themselves on a space vessel, deserted apart from a Servo-Robot. The robot detects the intruders and redirects the rocket from aimless wandering. The shock of a course change causes the Doctor to hit his head, concussing him. The robot also releases a group of egg-shaped white pods into space which direct themselves toward a nearby spaceship shaped like a giant wheel, attaching themselves to its exterior. When the robot becomes ag

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Triclocarban

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Triclocarban

Triclocarban (sometimes abbreviated as TCC) is an antibacterial chemical once common in, but now phased out of, personal care products like soaps and lotions. It was originally developed for the medical field.[2] Although the mode of action is unknown, TCC can be effective in fighting infections by targeting the growth of bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus.[3] Additional research seeks to understand its potential for causing antibacterial resistance and its effects on organismal and environmental health.[4] Usage Triclocarban has been used as an antimicrobial and antifungal compound since the 1960s.[5] It was commonly found in personal care products as an antimicrobial in soaps, lotions, deodorants, toothpaste, and plastic.[6] As of 2005 about 80% of all antimicrobial bar soap sold in the United States contained triclocarban.[5] In 2011 United States consumers were spending nearly 1 billion dollars annually on products containing triclocarban and triclosan.[7] In December 2013, the Food and Drug Admini

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Endocrine disruptors

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Bathyscaphe Trieste

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Bathyscaphe Trieste

Trieste is a Swiss-designed, Italian-built deep-diving research bathyscaphe which reached a record depth of about 10,911 metres (35,797 ft) in the Challenger Deep of the Mariana Trench near Guam in the Pacific. On 23 January 1960, Jacques Piccard (son of the boat's designer Auguste Piccard) and US Navy Lieutenant Don Walsh achieved the goal of Project Nekton. It was the first manned vessel to reach the bottom of the Challenger Deep.[1] Design General arrangement drawing, showing the main features Trieste consisted of a float chamber filled with gasoline (petrol) for buoyancy, with a separate pressure sphere to hold the crew.[2] This configuration (dubbed a "bathyscaphe" by the Piccards), allowed for a free dive, rather than the previous bathysphere designs in which a sphere was lowered to depth and raised again to the surface by a cable attached to a ship. Trieste was designed by the Swiss scientist Auguste Piccard and originally built in Italy. His pressure sphere, composed of two sections, was built b

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Submarines of Italy

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Washington Navy Yard

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Traditional Chinese medicine

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Traditional Chinese medicine

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a branch of traditional medicine that is said to be based on more than 3,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, gua sha, massage (tui na), bonesetter (die-da), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy,[1] but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine. A Nature editorial described TCM as "fraught with pseudoscience", and said that the most obvious reason why it has not delivered many cures is that the majority of its treatments have no logical mechanism of action.[2] TCM is widely used in the Sinosphere,[1][3][4][5] where it has a long history, and in later years it is also practiced outside of China.[1][6] One of the basic tenets of TCM is that the body's vital energy (ch'i or qi) is circulating through channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions.[7] The concept of vital energy is pseudoscience. Concepts of the body and of disease used in TCM re

Pharmacy in China

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Tomb of Hilarus Fuscus

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Tomb of Hilarus Fuscus

tomb of Hilarus Fuscus The Tomb of Hilarus Fuscus(Latin: Hilarus Fuscus or Hilarius Fuscus) is a funerary monument, located near the fourth mile of the Appian Way or Via Appia Antica, to the southeast of Rome.[1][2] The tomb was restored by Luigi Canina in the mid-1800s. [3]An inscription bearing the names of those represented on the masonry disappeared in the period between 1978 and 1998. The sculptures are copies: the originals are now in the National Museum of the Baths of Diocletian.[4] The architecture of the tomb and the analysis of figures (particularly the hairstyle of the women) suggests the tomb was built at end of the Republican period, the beginning of the Imperial age (circa 30 BC).[4] The tomb is mentioned in the Émile Zola novel Roma published in 1896.[5] External links Raccolta di foto di resti romani su Roma Interactive References Becker, J. "Places: 242234873 (Tomb of Hilarus Fuscus)". Pleiades. Retrieved November 10, 2015. Umberto Leoni; Giovanni Staderini (1907). On the Appia

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Ancient Roman tombs and cemeteries in Rome

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Trimegestone

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Trimegestone

Trimegestone, sold under the brand names Ondeva and Totelle among others, is a progestin medication which is used in menopausal hormone therapy and in the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis.[4][1][3] It was also under development for use in birth control pills to prevent pregnancy, but ultimately was not marketed for this purpose.[5] The medication is available alone or in combination with an estrogen.[6][7] It is taken by mouth.[1] Side effects of trimegestone include headache, breast tenderness, nervousness, abdominal pain, bloating, muscle cramps, nausea, depression, and vaginal bleeding among others.[8][4] Trimegestone is a progestin, or a synthetic progestogen, and hence is an agonist of the progesterone receptor, the biological target of progestogens like progesterone.[1][4] It has weak antiandrogenic and antimineralocorticoid activity and no other important hormonal activity.[1][4] Trimegestone was first described in 1979 and was introduced for medical use in 2001.[9][10][11] It is sometimes d

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Secondary alcohols

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Alcohols

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Thessaloniki

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Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη, romanized: Thessaloníki (listen)), also known as Thessalonica (English: ), Saloniki or Salonica (Σαλονίκη, Saloníki ), is the second-largest city in Greece, with over 1 million inhabitants in its metropolitan area, and the capital of the geographic region of Macedonia, the administrative region of Central Macedonia and the Decentralized Administration of Macedonia and Thrace.[6][7] It is also known in Greek as η Συμπρωτεύουσα (i Simprotévousa), literally "the co-capital",[8] a reference to its historical status as the Συμβασιλεύουσα (Simvasilévousa) or "co-reigning" city of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, alongside Constantinople.[9] Thessaloniki is located on the Thermaic Gulf, at the northwest corner of the Aegean Sea. It is bounded on the west by the delta of the Axios/Vardar. The municipality of Thessaloniki, the historical center, had a population of 325,182 in 2011,[4] while the Thessaloniki Urban Area had a population of 824,676[4] and the Thessaloniki Metropol

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Capitals of Greek states

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Transcortin

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Transcortin

Transcortin, also known as corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) or serpin A6, is a protein produced in the liver in animals. In humans it is encoded by the SERPINA6 gene. It is an alpha-globulin.[5][6][7] Function This gene encodes an alpha-globulin protein with corticosteroid-binding properties. This is the major transport protein for glucocorticoids and progestins in the blood of most vertebrates. The gene localizes to a chromosomal region containing several closely related serine protease inhibitors (serpins) which have evolved by duplication events.[7] Binding Transcortin binds several steroid hormones at high rates: Cortisol - Approximately 75% of the cortisol in circulation is bound to transcortin. (The rest is bound to serum albumin.) Cortisol is thought to be biologically active only when it is not bound to transcortin. Cortisone[8] Deoxycorticosterone (DOC)[8] Corticosterone - About 78% of serum corticosterone is bound to transcortin. Aldosterone - Approximately 17% of serum aldoste

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Genes on human chromosome 14

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Glycoproteins

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Ukrainian Wikipedia

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Ukrainian Wikipedia

The Ukrainian Wikipedia (Ukrainian: Українська Вікіпедія, Ukrayins'ka Vikipediya) is the Ukrainian language edition of the free online encyclopedia Wikipedia. The first article was written on January 30, 2004. Currently (March 2020), Ukrainian Wikipedia has 1,000,308 articles and is the 17th largest Wikipedia edition.[1] Quality of articles and popularity In the Ukrainian Wikipedia one area of knowledge has been covered to an extent greater than all other Wikipedias — the subject of mining, due to the considerable contribution by one person, Volodymyr Biletsky, a professor at Donetsk National Technical University. Using as a basis his published Encyclopedia of Mining, Biletsky has contributed over 10,000 articles on the subject to Ukrainian Wikipedia.[2] Also, in 2013 the Institute of History of Ukraine at the National Academy of Science gave permission to the Ukrainian Wikipedia to use the digital version of the Encyclopedia of Ukraine's History that was published online. The Higher School Academy of Scien

Ukrainian-language websites

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21st-century encyclopedias

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Utopia (Doctor Who)

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Utopia (Doctor Who)

"Utopia" is the eleventh episode of the third series of the revived British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It was broadcast on BBC One on 16 June 2007.[1] It is the first of three episodes that form a linked narrative, followed by "The Sound of Drums" and "Last of the Time Lords". The episode serves to re-introduce the Master (John Simm), an alien villain of the show's original run who previously appeared in the 1996 television movie Doctor Who. Set close to the end of the universe 100 trillion years in the future, the episode involves Professor Yana (Derek Jacobi) attempting to send the last of humanity in a rocket to a place called "Utopia". Plot Captain Jack Harkness, the Doctor's former companion, is stranded on Earth and has based himself in 21st-century Cardiff to wait for the Doctor, knowing the Doctor would eventually land there to refuel with the Cardiff Rift. The Doctor lands the TARDIS in Cardiff to refuel. The Doctor sees Jack racing towards the TARDIS and dematerialises. Jack gr

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Underworld (Doctor Who)

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Underworld (Doctor Who)

Underworld is the fifth serial of the 15th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 7–28 January 1978. In the serial, the crew of an alien Minyan spaceship go on a hundred-thousand-year quest in search of a ship containing a genetic bank that would restore the Minyans' species. Plot In the history of the Time Lords, their involvement with the Minyans of Minyos is regarded as a disaster. The Minyans looked on them as gods but, having learnt much from their science, later expelled the Time Lords, who thereafter adopted a policy of non-intervention. The Minyans resented the Time Lords for their dominion over Minyos. Subsequently, the Minyans engaged in a civil war, using the advanced weapons the Time Lords gave them. In the final conflict, the Minyans destroyed their world. Two ships left Minyos before the final conflict, one carrying the race bank of the Minyans, the other intended to find the race bank and bring the Minya

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Films with screenplays by Bob Baker

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1980 science fiction novels

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Valproate

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Valproate

Valproate (VPA), and its valproic acid, sodium valproate, and valproate semisodium forms, are medications primarily used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder and to prevent migraine headaches.[1] They are useful for the prevention of seizures in those with absence seizures, partial seizures, and generalized seizures.[1] They can be given intravenously or by mouth.[1] Long and short acting formulations of tablets exist.[1] Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, sleepiness, and dry mouth.[1] Serious side effects can include liver problems and regular monitoring of liver function tests is therefore recommended.[1] Other serious risks include pancreatitis and an increased suicide risk.[1] The drug is known to cause serious abnormalities in babies if taken during pregnancy.[1][3] Because of this it is not typically recommended in women of childbearing age who have migraines.[1] It is unclear exactly how valproate works.[1][4] Proposed mechanisms include affecting GABA levels, blocking voltage-gated sodi

AbbVie Inc. brands

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World Health Organization essential medicines

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War of the Spanish Succession

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War of the Spanish Succession

The War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714) was a European conflict of the early 18th century, triggered by the death of the childless Charles II of Spain in November 1700, the last Habsburg monarch of Spain. His closest heirs were members of the Austrian Habsburg and French Bourbon families; acquisition of an undivided Spanish Empire by either threatened the European balance of power and thus involved the other leading powers. Related conflicts include Rákóczi's War of Independence in Hungary, the Camisard revolt in Southern France, Queen Anne's War in North America, and minor struggles in Colonial India. The 1700-1721 Great Northern War is viewed as connected but separate. Charles bequeathed an undivided monarchy of Spain[b] to Louis XIV's grandson Philip, who was proclaimed King of Spain on 16 November 1700. Disputes over territorial and commercial rights led to war in 1701 between the Bourbons of France and Spain and the Grand Alliance, whose candidate was Archduke Charles, younger son of Leopold I,

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1700s in France

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Women's rights in Iran

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Women's rights in Iran

In Iran, women's rights have changed according to the form of government ruling the country and attitudes towards women's rights to freedom and self-determination have changed frequently.[1] With the rise of each government, a series of mandates for women's rights have affected a broad range of issues, from voting rights to dress code.[2] The rights and legal status of Iranian women have changed since the early 20th century, especially during the past three systems of government. During the Qajar dynasty that ruled Iran from the late 1800s to the early 20th century, women were isolated; they were not engaged in politics and their economic contribution was limited to household work. These conditions changed during the Pahlavi dynasty that ruled the country from 1925 to 1979; women won much more freedom.[2] Women's rights and freedoms were established through the leader's wishes for Iran to become a more modern, European-style country.[3] These freedoms were retracted after the 1979 Iranian Revolution. Human R

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Iranian society

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Yossi Vardi

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Yossi Vardi

Joseph "Yossi" Vardi (Hebrew: יוסי ורדי‎, born September 2, 1942) is an Israeli entrepreneur and investor. He is one of Israel's first high-tech entrepreneurs. For over 47 years he has founded and helped to build over 85 high-tech companies in a variety of fields, among them software, energy, Internet, mobile, electro-optics and water technology.[1] Personal life Joseph Vardi was born in Tel Aviv. He studied at the Technion in Haifa, graduating with a B. Sc. in industrial management engineering. He went on to earn an M. Sc in Operations Research and a D. Sc. (his thesis received the Kennedy-Leigh Award). He is married to Talma and the father of Arik (co-founder of ICQ), Oded, and Dani.[2] Career Vardi began his entrepreneurial career in 1969, at the age of 26, as co-founder and first CEO of TEKEM (Hebrew: טכ"מ‎) (In Hebrew – abbreviation of "Technologia Mitkademet". In English: ATL-Advanced Technology Ltd.), one of the first software houses in Israel (later sold to Tadiran and then absorbed into Ness Tec

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3i Group people

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TED talk ID not in Wikidata

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Yusuf bin Ahmad al-Kawneyn

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Yusuf bin Ahmad al-Kawneyn

Yusuf bin Ahmad al-Kawneyn (Arabic: يوسف بن أحمد الكونين‎) (b. 12th century),[2][3] popularly known as Aw Barkhadle ("Blessed Father"),[4] Yusuf Al Kownayn, Yusuf Al Bagdhadi,[5] and Shaykh Abu Barakat al Barbari ("Blessed Father of Somalia),[6][7] was a Somali Muslim scholar and traveler. Based on reference to Yusuf Al Kawneyn in the Harar manuscripts, Dr. Enrico Cerulli has suggested that Al-Kawneyn was the founder and ancestor of the Walashma dynasty that governed both Sultanate of Ifat and Adal Sultanate during the middle ages.[8][9] Another genealogical tradition according to C.J Cruttenden is that Aw Barkhadle was a descendant of Ismail Sheikh Isaaq ibn Ahmed.[10] However, many accounts indicate Shaykh Yusuf al Kownayn and Shaykh Isaaq were known to be contemporaries and in contact at the same time (and not related).[11][12][13] Biography Sheikh Yusuf Al-Kawneyn was a native Somali scholar[14] who studied in his city Zeila and later in Iraq. As a result of his studies in Iraq, he was given the title

CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list

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12th-century philosophers

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12th-century jurists

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