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Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners


Don Ameche

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Don Ameche

Don Ameche (born Dominic Felix Amici; May 31, 1908 – December 6, 1993)[1] was an American actor and comedian.[2][3] After playing in college shows, stock, and vaudeville, he became a major radio star in the early 1930s, which led to the offer of a movie contract from 20th Century Fox in 1935. As a handsome, debonair leading man in 40 films over the next 14 years, he was a popular star in comedies, dramas, and musicals. In the 1950s he worked on Broadway and in television, and was the host of NBC's International Showtime from 1961 to 1965. Returning to film work in his later years, Ameche enjoyed a fruitful revival of his career beginning with his role as a villain in Trading Places (1983) and won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Cocoon (1985). Early life Don Ameche was born as Dominic Felix Amici on May 31, 1908, in Kenosha, Wisconsin. His father, Felice Amici, was a bartender from Montemonaco, Ascoli Piceno, Marche, Italy. His mother, Barbara Etta Hertel, was of Scottish,

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Stefano Accorsi

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Stefano Accorsi

Stefano Lelio Beniamino Accorsi (Italian pronunciation: ; born 2 March 1971) is an Italian actor. Early life and background Accorsi was born in Bologna. He graduated from Bologna's Theatrical School in 1993, and acted in the theatre for several years before moving to cinema. Career In 1995 he played the lead in Jack Frusciante è uscito dal gruppo, one of his best known films. In 1998 he worked with Daniele Luchetti in I Piccoli Maestri, which competed for the Golden Lion at the Venice International Film Festival. In the same year he won three prizes for his role in Radiofreccia, directed by rock star Luciano Ligabue, including David di Donatello for Best Actor. He was the lead in the successful film L'ultimo bacio (The Last Kiss). He won the leading role in Maria de Medeiros’ Capitães de Abril (April Captains), and has worked with director Nanni Moretti in The Son's Room. In 2001, Accorsi also had the leading role in Ferzan Özpetek's Le fate ignoranti (His Secret Life – Festival Title/The Ignorant Fai

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Javier Bardem

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Javier Bardem

Javier Ángel Encinas Bardem (Spanish pronunciation: ;[2][3] born 1 March 1969) is a Spanish actor and environmental activist. Bardem won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as the psychopathic assassin Anton Chigurh in the 2007 Coen Brothers film No Country for Old Men. He has also received critical acclaim for roles in films such as Jamón, jamón, Carne trémula, Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Boca a boca, Los lunes al sol, Mar adentro, and Skyfall, for which he received both a BAFTA and a SAG nomination for Best Supporting Actor. Bardem has also won a Screen Actors Guild Award, a BAFTA, five Goya Awards, two European Film Awards, a Prize for Best Actor at Cannes (ex-aequo with Elio Germano) and two Volpi Cups at Venice for his work. He is the first Spanish actor to be nominated for an Oscar (Best Actor, 2000, for Before Night Falls), as well as the first Spaniard to win one, for Best Supporting Actor in No Country for Old Men, 2008. He received his third Academy Award nomination, and second B

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Ben Affleck

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Ben Affleck

Benjamin Géza Affleck-Boldt (born August 15, 1972) is an American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter. His accolades include two Academy Awards and three Golden Globe Awards. He began his career as a child and starred in the PBS educational series The Voyage of the Mimi (1984, 1988). He later appeared in the independent coming-of-age comedy Dazed and Confused (1993) and various Kevin Smith films, including Mallrats (1995) Chasing Amy (1997) and Dogma (1999). Affleck gained wider recognition when he and childhood friend Matt Damon won the Golden Globe and Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for writing Good Will Hunting (1997), which they also starred in. He then established himself as a leading man in studio films, including the drama Armageddon (1998), the romantic comedy Forces of Nature (1999), the war drama Pearl Harbor (2001), and the spy thriller The Sum of All Fears (2002). After a career downturn, during which he appeared in Daredevil and Gigli (both 2003), Affleck received a Golden Gl

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Kamel El Basha

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Kamel El Basha

Kamel El Basha or Kamel el-Bacha (Arabic: كامل الباشا‎) (born March 14, 1962 in Jerusalem, Palestine) is a Palestinian theatre actor and director and film actor who won the 2017 Volpi Cup for Best Actor (masculine) during the 74th Venice International Film Festival for his role as Yasser Abdallah Salameh in The Insult (also known in Arabic: قضية رقم ٢٣‎, romanized: Qadiyya raqm 23, lit. 'Case No. 23') by the Lebanese film director Ziad Doueiri.[1][2] It was El Basha's first major role on screen, although he had appeared in a number of theatrical productions, actually also directing some of them, in addition to a handful of films in small roles. He was born in al-Maliha (presently Malha), southeast of Jerusalem. He studied theatre in Baghdad, Iraq from 1979 to 1983. As a young Palestinian activist, El Basha was arrested by the Israeli authorities spending two years in prison. After his release, he acted in a great number of theatrical pieces, also writing some of them and directing almost 30 works on stage. H

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Fabrizio Bentivoglio

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Fabrizio Bentivoglio

Fabrizio Bentivoglio (born 4 January 1957) is an Italian cinema and theatre actor and a screenwriter. Biography Fabrizio Bentivoglio was born in Milan (his father is Venetian). After only one season in the juvenile team of Inter, he left his sporting career because of an injury to his left knee and attended the school of the Piccolo Teatro in Milan. He debuted on stage acting in Timon of Athens by William Shakespeare and also pursued his artistic career in cinema. Continuing his studies in medicine, he then moved to Rome. With Dario de Luca and in association with Studio Universal he founded the Tipota Movie Company. With the band Piccola Orchestra Avion Travel he has staged the show La guerra vista dalla luna. He has also filmed the short film Típota(1999) and has completed a tour performing his own songs. The soundtrack of Eternity and a Day (Italy/France/Greece, 1998) by Theo Angelopoulos contains the track "The Poet", with Bentivoglio's voice. Filmography The Blue-Eyed Bandit (1980) Masoch (19

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Italian male screenwriters

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Pierre Blanchar

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Pierre Blanchar

Pierre Blanchar (30 June 1892 – 21 November 1963) was a French actor.[1] He appeared in 54 films between 1922 and 1961. Blanchar was married to actress Marthe Vinot, with whom he had a daughter, actress Dominique Blanchar. Selected filmography The Gardens of Murcia (1923) The Thruster (1924) The Promised Land (1925) Le Joueur d'échecs (1927) The Farewell Waltz (1928) The Wedding March (1929) Captain Fracasse (1929) Les Croix de bois (1932) The Beautiful Sailor (1932) L'Atlantide (1932) The Devil in the Bottle (1935) The Volga Boatman (1936) Street of Shadows (1937) Culprit (1937) The Former Mattia Pascal (1937) Life Dances On (1937) The Man from Nowhere (1937) A Royal Divorce (1938) The Strange Monsieur Victor (1938) Night in December (1940) La Liberation de Paris (1944) La Symphonie pastorale (1946) Patrie (1946) After Love (1948) Doctor Laennec (1949) My Friend Sainfoin (1950) References "Pierre Blanchar". Allocine. Retrieved 24 April 2019. E

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Oleg Borisov

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Oleg Borisov

Oleg Ivanovich Borisov (Russian: Оле́г Ива́нович Бори́сов; 8 November 1929 – 28 April 1994) was a well-known Russian film and theatre actor, whose honors included the title of People's Artist of the USSR (1978), two USSR State Prizes (1978, 1991) as well as the Volpi Cup (1990). Biography Childhood and youth Oleg Borisov was born Albert Ivanovich Borisov on 8 November 1929 in Privolzhsk, Ivanovo Oblast, Russia, Soviet Union. His given name was Albert, which was chosen by his mother in honor of the Belgian prince Albert, who visited Moscow in 1929. His parents were agricultural professionals. His mother, Nadezhda Andreevna, was an agricultural engineer, and also played as an amateur actress at a local drama. His father, Ivan Borisov, was a wounded World War II veteran, who worked as director of Privolzhsk Agricultural Technical School. Becoming an actor Young Oleg Borisov was fond of acting and theatre, he was known as a good impersonator and comedian among his classmates at school. However, during the Sec

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Bourvil

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Bourvil

André Bourvil, born André Robert Raimbourg (French pronunciation: ​; 27 July 1917 – 23 September 1970), often known mononymously as Bourvil, was a French actor and singer best known for his roles in comedy films, most notably in his collaboration with Louis de Funès in the films Le Corniaud (1965) and La Grande Vadrouille (1966). For his performance in Le Corniaud, he won a Special Diploma at the 4th Moscow International Film Festival.[1] Biography His father was killed in the First World War before Bourvil was born. As a result, he spent his entire childhood in the village of Bourville, from which he took his stage name. He married Jeanne Lefrique on 23 January 1943. After a battle with Kahler's syndrome, which attacks the bone marrow, he died at the age of 53. He is buried in Montainville, Yvelines. Bourvil with his sons Philippe and Dominique Raimbourg, in 1959. Career In his comic performances Bourvil principally played roles of gentle and well-meaning characters who were often a bit obtuse or naïv

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Deaths from multiple myeloma

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Jim Broadbent

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Jim Broadbent

James Broadbent (born 24 May 1949) is an English actor.[1] He won an Academy Award and a Golden Globe Award for his supporting role as John Bayley in the feature film Iris (2001), as well as winning a BAFTA TV Award and a Golden Globe for his leading role as Lord Longford in the television film Longford (2006). Broadbent received four BAFTA Film Award nominations and won one for his performance in Moulin Rouge! (2001). He was also nominated for two Primetime Emmy Awards and four Screen Actors Guild Awards. Broadbent played Horace Slughorn in the fantasy films Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2009) and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2 (2011). He joined the cast of the television series Game of Thrones, playing a role of Archmaester Ebrose, in the seventh season (2017). His other notable roles were in Bullets over Broadway (1994), Topsy-Turvy (1999), Bridget Jones’s Diary (2001), Moulin Rouge! (2001), The Gathering Storm (2002), Hot Fuzz (2007), Another Year (2010), The Iron Lady (2011), Cl

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Guy Boyd (actor)

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Guy Boyd (actor)

Guy Boyd (born April 15, 1943) is an American character actor.[1] Boyd has starred in more than fifty films from the late 1970s to the present. He is probably best known for his role as Detective Jim McLean in Body Double (1984) and for the pivotal role of Frank Hackman on several episodes of Miami Vice. In 1984, he was honored at the Venice Film Festival with the Golden Lion Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role in Robert Altman's adaptation of David Rabe's play Streamers (1983).[1] In recent years Boyd was seen playing Captain Strickland on the science fiction television show Black Scorpion. He played Archbishop Kurtwell (a Catholic prelate accused of child sexual abuse) in the HBO drama The Young Pope. Also starred in Past Midnight, as Guy Canape. Awards Nominated, 3rd Genie Awards, "Best Performance by a Foreign Actor" for role in film Ticket to Heaven Selected filmography Between the Lines (1977) .... Austin Ticket to Heaven (1981) .... Eric Only When I Laugh (1981) .... Man in Bar

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Roberto Citran

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Roberto Citran

Roberto Citran (born 26 January 1955) is an Italian actor. Life and career Born in Padua, Citran graduated in psychology and founded the university film club "CINEMAUNO" in his hometown.[1] After some sporadic stage works he founded a small theater company, "Punto e Virgola".[1] Citran is probably best known for his films with the director Carlo Mazzacurati, Paduan like him, who made him debuting in a main role in 1989, in Il prete bello.[1][2] In 1994 Citran won a Volpi Cup for best supporting actor for his performance in Mazzacurati's Il toro.[3] Selected filmography Italian Night (1987) Little Misunderstandings (1989) The Amusements of Private Life (1990) Condominio (1991) Ask for the Moon (1991) Il toro (1994) Policemen (1995) Vesna Goes Fast (1996) Bits and Pieces (1996) Le acrobate (1997) The Truce (1997) Paz! (2002) El Alamein: The Line of Fire (2002) The Fugitive (2003) The Good Pope: Pope John XXIII (2003) The Life That I Want (2004) An Italian Romance (2004)

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Joseph Cotten

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Joseph Cotten

Joseph Cheshire Cotten Jr. (May 15, 1905 – February 6, 1994) was an American film, stage, radio and television actor. Cotten achieved prominence on Broadway, starring in the original stage productions of The Philadelphia Story and Sabrina Fair. He first gained worldwide fame in three Orson Welles films: Citizen Kane (1941), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), and Journey into Fear (1943), for which Cotten was also credited with the screenplay. He went on to become one of the leading Hollywood actors of the 1940s, appearing in films such as Shadow of a Doubt (1943), Love Letters (1945), Duel in the Sun (1946), Portrait of Jennie (1948), The Third Man (1949) and Niagara (1953). One of his final films was Michael Cimino's Heaven's Gate (1980). Early life Joseph Cotten modeled for The American Magazine (September 1931) Cotten in Horse Eats Hat (1936) Cotten and Edgar Barrier during the shooting of film sequences for the stage production Too Much Johnson (1938) Cotten and Katharine Hepburn on Broadwa

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Tom Courtenay

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Tom Courtenay

Sir Thomas Daniel Courtenay (born 25 February 1937) is an English actor who came to prominence in the early 1960s with a succession of films, including The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962), Billy Liar (1963), and Doctor Zhivago (1965). Since the mid-1960s, he has been known primarily for his work in the theatre, although he received Academy Award nominations for Doctor Zhivago and the film adaptation of The Dresser (1983), which he had performed in the West End and on Broadway. He was created a Knight Bachelor in February 2001 for his services to cinema and theatre. Early life Courtenay was born in Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, the son of Annie Eliza (née Quest) and Thomas Henry Courtenay, a boat painter.[1] He attended Kingston High School and went on to study English at University College London, where he failed his degree.[2] After this he studied drama at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) in London. Career Courtenay made his stage debut in 1960 with the Old Vic theatre company at

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Adam Driver

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Adam Driver

Adam Douglas Driver (born November 19, 1983) is an American actor.[1][2] A former Lance Corporal in the Marines, he rose to prominence with a supporting role in the HBO comedy-drama series Girls (2012–2017), for which he received three consecutive Emmy nominations. He gained wider recognition for playing Kylo Ren in the Star Wars sequel trilogy films The Force Awakens (2015), The Last Jedi (2017), and The Rise of Skywalker (2019). Driver began his film career in supporting roles in films such as Lincoln (2012), Frances Ha (2012), Inside Llewyn Davis (2013), and Silence (2016). He won the Volpi Cup for Best Actor for his lead role in the drama Hungry Hearts (2014) and the LAFCA Best Actor for playing a poet in Jim Jarmusch's Paterson (2016). He earned significant acclaim for starring as a police officer in BlacKkKlansman (2018) and a theater director in Marriage Story (2019), earning an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor nomination for the former. He made his Broadway debut in Mrs. Warren's Profession (2

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Carlo Delle Piane

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Carlo Delle Piane

Carlo Delle Piane (2 February 1936 – 23 August 2019) was an Italian film actor. From 1948 until his death, he appeared in more than 100 films.[1] Born in Rome, Province of Rome, Delle Piane made his debut at the age of twelve in Duilio Coletti's Heart; he starred in the stereotypal role of an arrogant but basically kind-hearted boy in many films until the mid-fifties.[2] The turning point of his career was the encounter with Pupi Avati, with whom Delle Piane experienced more significant and varied roles, going from comic surreal performances to melancholic and even dramatic shades.[2] In 1984 he won the Nastro d'Argento for Best Actor for his performance in Una gita scolastica.[3] For his role in Regalo di Natale he won the Volpi Cup at the 43rd Venice International Film Festival.[3] Selected filmography Cuore (1948) Ring Around the Clock (1950) Io sono il capataz (1950) Domani è troppo tardi (1950) Beauties in Capri, regia di Luigi Capuano e Adelchi Bianchi (1951) La famiglia Passaguai, regi

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Gérard Depardieu

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Gérard Depardieu

Gérard Xavier Marcel Depardieu (UK: ,[1][2] US: ,[1][3][4] French:  (listen); born 27 December 1948) is a French actor. He is one of the most prolific character actors in film history, having completed more than 170 films since 1967. He has received acclaim for his performances in The Last Metro (1980), for which he won the César Award for Best Actor, in Police (1985), for which he won the Volpi Cup for Best Actor, Jean de Florette (1986), and Cyrano de Bergerac (1990), winning the Cannes Film Festival for Best Actor, his second César Award for Best Actor, and his first Academy Award nomination for Best Actor. He co-starred in Peter Weir's comedy Green Card (1990), winning a Golden Globe Award and later acted in many big budget Hollywood movies including Ridley Scott's 1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992), Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet (1996), Randall Wallace's The Man in the Iron Mask (1998), and Ang Lee's Life of Pi (2012). He is a Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur and Chevalier of the Ordre national du Mérite. He

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Ernst Deutsch

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Ernst Deutsch

Ernst Deutsch, also known as Ernest Dorian (16 September 1890, Prague – 22 March 1969, Berlin), was a Jewish[1] Austrian actor. In 1916, his performance as the protagonist in the world première of Walter Hasenclever's Expressionist play The Son in Dresden was praised.[2] Deutsch also played the antihero Famulus in Paul Wegener's The Golem: How He Came into the World in 1920. He is known by English-speaking audiences for his role as Baron Kurtz in Carol Reed's 1949 film noir, The Third Man. Family Deutsch was the son of Prague-based Jewish merchant Ludwig Kraus and his wife, Louise.[1] He married childhood friend Anuschka Fuchsova (daughter of Prague industrialist Arthur Fuchs) in 1922.[3] Anuschka's cousin, Herbert Fuchs of Robettin, was the brother-in-law of author Franz Werfel. Life and career Deutsch grew up in Prague, and attended high school. He was a skilled tennis player, ranking seventh on the Austro-Hungarian tennis list. After high school, Deutsch served in the army. He was a childhood friend of

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Willem Dafoe

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Willem Dafoe

William James "Willem" Dafoe (born July 22, 1955) is an American actor who holds both American and Italian citizenship. He has received multiple accolades, including nominations for four Academy Awards and three Golden Globe Awards. He has frequently collaborated with filmmakers Paul Schrader, Abel Ferrara, Lars von Trier, and Wes Anderson. Dafoe was an early member of experimental theater company The Wooster Group, where he acted in several productions. He made his film debut in Heaven's Gate (1980), but was fired during production. He had his first leading role in the outlaw biker film The Loveless (1982) and then played the main antagonist in Streets of Fire (1984) and To Live and Die in L.A. (1985). He received his first Academy Award nomination for his role as Sergeant Elias Gordon in Oliver Stone's war film Platoon (1986). In 1988, Dafoe played Jesus in Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ and starred in Mississippi Burning, both of which were controversial. Following small roles in Born on

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George Dzundza

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George Dzundza

George Dzundza ( ZUUND-zə;[1] born July 19, 1945) is an American television and film actor. Early life and education Dzundza was born in Rosenheim, Germany, to a Ukrainian Unterlander father and Polish Galitzianer mother who were forced into factory labour by the Nazis.[2] He spent the first few years of his life in displaced persons camps with his parents and one brother.[3] Before immigrating to the United States in 1956, the family lived in Amsterdam for some years. His family then moved to the US, settling in New York City, where George attended Xavier High School. He is a naturalized U.S. citizen.[4] Career Dzundza had his own 1981 sitcom series Open All Night, about the owner of a "Store 364" convenience store in Inglewood, California.[5] He portrayed American Nazi leader Frank Collin in the 1981 made-for-television movie Skokie. In 1987, Dzundza played Sam Hesselman, a disabled man in a wheelchair, in No Way Out and Commander Daskal in The Beast. His other major film roles include The Deer Hunter

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Michael Fassbender

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Michael Fassbender

Michael Fassbender (born 2 April 1977) is an Irish-German actor. His feature film debut was in the fantasy war epic 300 (2007) as a Spartan warrior; his earlier roles included various stage productions, as well as starring roles on television such as in the HBO miniseries Band of Brothers (2001) and the Sky One fantasy drama Hex (2004–05). He first came to prominence for his role as IRA activist Bobby Sands in Hunger (2008), for which he won a British Independent Film Award. Subsequent roles include in the independent film Fish Tank (2009), as a Royal Marines lieutenant in Inglourious Basterds (2009), as Edward Rochester in the 2011 film adaptation of Jane Eyre, as Carl Jung in A Dangerous Method (2011), as the sentient android David 8 in Prometheus (2012) and its sequel, Alien: Covenant (2017), and in the musical comedy-drama Frank (2014) as an eccentric musician loosely inspired by Frank Sidebottom. In 2011, Fassbender debuted as the Marvel Comics supervillain Magneto in X-Men: First Class, and went on to

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Albert Finney

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Albert Finney

Albert Finney (9 May 1936 – 7 February 2019) was an English actor who worked in film, television and theatre. He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and worked in the theatre before attaining prominence on screen in the early 1960s, debuting with The Entertainer (1960), directed by Tony Richardson, who had previously directed him in the theatre. He maintained a successful career in theatre, film and television. He is known for his roles in Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (also 1960), Tom Jones (1963), Two for the Road (1967), Scrooge (1970), Annie (1982), The Dresser (1983), Miller's Crossing (1990), A Man of No Importance (1994), Erin Brockovich (2000), Big Fish (2003), The Bourne Ultimatum (2007), Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (2007), The Bourne Legacy (2012), and the James Bond film Skyfall (2012). A recipient of BAFTA , Golden Globe, Emmy and Screen Actors Guild awards, Finney was nominated for an Academy Award five times, as Best Actor four times, for Tom Jones (1963), Murder on the Orien

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Colin Firth

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Colin Firth

Colin Andrew Firth CBE (born 10 September 1960) is an English actor who has received an Academy Award, a Golden Globe Award, two BAFTA Awards, and three Screen Actors Guild Awards, as well as the Volpi Cup for Best Actor at the Venice Film Festival. In 2010, Firth's portrayal of King George VI in Tom Hooper's The King's Speech won him the Academy Award for Best Actor. Identified in the late 1980s with the "Brit Pack" of rising, young British actors, it was not until his portrayal of Fitzwilliam Darcy in the 1995 television adaptation of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice that he received more widespread attention. This led to roles in films, such as The English Patient, Bridget Jones's Diary, for which he was nominated for a BAFTA Award, Shakespeare in Love, and Love Actually. In 2009, Firth received widespread critical acclaim for his leading role in A Single Man, for which he gained his first Academy Award nomination, and won a BAFTA Award. In 2014, Firth portrayed secret agent Harry Hart in the film Kingsm

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Anthony Franciosa

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Anthony Franciosa

Anthony Franciosa (born Anthony George Papaleo, October 25, 1928 – January 19, 2006) was an American film, TV and stage actor. He began as a successful stage actor, gaining a Tony Award nomination for the drug-addiction play A Hatful of Rain. After relocating to Hollywood he made numerous feature films, including A Face in the Crowd (1957), The Long, Hot Summer (1958) , and Career (1959), for which he won the Golden Globe for Best Actor/Drama. In television he played lead roles in five television series: the sitcom Valentine's Day (1964–65), drama The Name of the Game (1968–71), Search (1972–73), Matt Helm (1975) and Finder of Lost Loves (1984).[1] Early life He was born in the Little Italy district of New York to an Italian-American family (his grandparents emigrated from Melfi, Basilicata, in the center of the boot of Southern Italy, in 1890),[2]. His parents separated when he was one and he was raised by his mother and aunt, adopting his mother's maiden name Franciosa as his professional name.[3] After

Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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Activists for African-American civil rights

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Balaban family

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Vincent Gallo

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Vincent Gallo

Vincent Gallo[1] (born April 11, 1961) is an American actor, director, model, musician, painter and former motorcycle racer. Though he has had minor roles in mainstream films such as Arizona Dream, The Funeral and Palookaville, he is most associated with independent movies, including Buffalo '66, which he wrote, directed, scored and starred in and The Brown Bunny, which he also wrote, directed, produced, starred in and photographed. In the early 2000s, he released several solo recordings on Warp Records. Early life Vincent Gallo was born in Buffalo, New York, the son of Janet, a hairdresser, and Vincenzo Vito Gallo, also a hairdresser and professional gambler.[2] Both of his parents emigrated from Sicily, Italy.[3] Career Films During Gallo's artistic period in the 1980s, when he worked as a musician and painter in New York City, he also began experimenting with film. He made the short film "If You Feel Froggy, Jump" and appeared in the 1981 film Downtown 81 with painter Jean-Michel Basquiat. In 1984, Gal

Film directors from New York (state)

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Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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Male actors from Buffalo, New York

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