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Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners


Pierre Fresnay

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Pierre Fresnay

Pierre Fresnay (4 April 1897 – 9 January 1975) was a French stage and film actor. Biography Born Pierre Jules Louis Laudenbach, he was encouraged by his uncle, actor Claude Garry, to pursue a career in theater and film. During the 1920s, Fresnay appeared in many popular stage productions, most notably in the title role of Marcel Pagnol’s Marius (1929), which ran for over 500 performances. His first great screen role was as Marius in the 1931 film adaptation of the play of the same name. He replayed the role in the next two parts of Marcel Pagnol's Marseilles Trilogy, Fanny (1932) and César (1936).[1] Fresnay (left) with Erich von Stroheim in the 1937 film La Grande Illusion He appeared in more than 60 films, eight of which were with Yvonne Printemps, with whom he lived since 1934. In that same year, he appeared in Alfred Hitchcock's first version of The Man Who Knew Too Much. In 1937, he portrayed the aristocratic French military officer Captain de Boeldieu in Jean Renoir's masterpiece La Grande Illusi

Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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Laureates of the prix du Brigadier

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Order of the Francisque recipients

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Götz George

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Götz George

Götz George (German pronunciation: ; 23 July 1938 – 19 June 2016) was a German actor, son of actor couple Berta Drews and Heinrich George. His arguably best-known role is that of Duisburg detective Horst Schimanski in the TV crime series Tatort. Early years George was born in Berlin into a well known acting family: his father, Heinrich George, was a film and theater actor, and his mother, Berta Drews, a character actress. George is named after his father's favorite, Imperial Knight Götz von Berlichingen. His father was imprisoned by the Soviets and starved in the Soviet concentration camp Sachsenhausen Speziallager Nr. 7 Sachsenhausen. George grew up in Berlin with his elder brother Jan and his mother. He attended school in Berlin-Lichterfelde and later attended the Lyzeum Alpinum in Zuoz, Switzerland. He was married to Loni von Friedl from 1966 to 1976; the couple's daughter, Tanja-Nicole, was born in 1967. Since 1997 he lived together with Hamburg journalist Marika Ullrich ; the couple married in 2014.[2]

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Commanders Crosses of the Order of Merit of the...

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German Film Award winners

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Jean Gabin

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Jean Gabin

Jean Gabin (French: ; 17 May 1904 – 15 November 1976) was a French actor and sometime singer. Considered a key figure in French cinema, he starred in several classic films including Pépé le Moko (1937), La grande illusion (1937), Le Quai des brumes (1938), La bête humaine (1938), Le jour se lève (1939), and Le plaisir (1952). Gabin was made a member of the Légion d'honneur in recognition of the important role he played in French cinema. Biography Gabin in Le Jour Se Lève (1939) Early life Gabin was born Jean-Alexis Moncorgé in Paris, the son of Madeleine Petit and Ferdinand Moncorgé, a cafe owner and cabaret entertainer whose stage name was Gabin,[1][2] which is a first name in French. He grew up in the village of Mériel in the Seine-et-Oise (now Val-d'Oise) département, about 22 mi (35 km) north of Paris. He attended the Lycée Janson de Sailly. Gabin left school early, and worked as a laborer until the age of 19 when he entered show business with a bit part in a Folies Bergères production. He continued

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Deaths from cancer in France

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20th-century French singers

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Hugh Grant

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Hugh Grant

Hugh John Mungo Grant[1] (born 9 September 1960)[2] is an English actor and film producer. Grant has received a Golden Globe, a BAFTA, and an Honorary César for his work. As of 2018, his films have grossed a total of nearly US$3 billion worldwide from 29 theatrical releases.[3] He first received attention after earning the Volpi Cup for his performance in the film Maurice (1987) but achieved international success after appearing in Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994).[4] He used this breakthrough role as a frequent cinematic persona during the 1990s, delivering comic performances in films such Notting Hill (1999) and Mickey Blue Eyes (1999). For Four Weddings and a Funeral, Grant won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy and the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role. One of the best known figures in 1990s British popular culture, Grant was then in a high-profile relationship with Elizabeth Hurley, which was the focus of much attention in the British and international

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Actors at the Royal Exchange, Manchester

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People associated with the News International p...

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David Alan Grier

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David Alan Grier

David Alan Grier (born June 30, 1956)[1] is an American actor and comedian. He is best known for his work on the sketch comedy television show In Living Color. Early life One of three children,[2] Grier was born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of mother Aretas Ruth (née Blaney), a school teacher, and father William Henry Grier, a psychiatrist and writer who co-wrote the book Black Rage.[3] Grier graduated from Detroit's magnet high school, Cass Tech, and received a B.A. in Radio, Television and Film[4] from the University of Michigan, and an M.F.A. from the Yale School of Drama in 1981. When Grier was young, his family marched with Martin Luther King, Jr. in a March on Poverty in Detroit, where King gave an early version of the "I Have A Dream" speech.[5] Career Immediately after graduating from Yale, Grier landed the role of Jackie Robinson in the short-lived Broadway musical The First, directed by Martin Charnin and written by Joel Siegel. Grier got his start on the National Public Radio radio drama ad

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American male musical theatre actors

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Film producers from Michigan

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Alec Guinness

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Alec Guinness

Sir Alec Guinness, CH, CBE (born Alec Guinness de Cuffe; 2 April 1914 – 5 August 2000) was an English actor. After an early career on the stage, Guinness was featured in several of the Ealing Comedies, including The Ladykillers and Kind Hearts and Coronets in which he played nine different characters. He is known for his six collaborations with David Lean: Herbert Pocket in Great Expectations (1946), Fagin in Oliver Twist (1948), Col. Nicholson in The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor), Prince Faisal in Lawrence of Arabia (1962), General Yevgraf Zhivago in Doctor Zhivago (1965), and Professor Godbole in A Passage to India (1984). He is also known for his portrayal of Obi-Wan Kenobi in George Lucas' original Star Wars trilogy; for the original film, he was nominated for Best Supporting Actor at the 50th Academy Awards. Guinness was one of three British actors, along with Laurence Olivier and John Gielgud, who made the transition from Shakespearean theatre to blo

Honorary Golden Bear recipients

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BAFTA winners (people)

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Best Actor BAFTA Award (television) winners

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Fosco Giachetti

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Fosco Giachetti

Fosco Giachetti (28 March 1900, in Sesto Fiorentino – 22 December 1974, in Rome) was an Italian actor. Fosco Giachetti was the protagonist of Lo squadrone bianco (1936), directed by Augusto Genina. He became the leading man in Fascist propaganda films such as Tredici uomini e un cannone (1936), Sentinelle di bronzo (1937), Scipione l'Africano, Edgar Neville's Italian Carmen fra i rossi (1939), L'assedio dell'Alcazar (1940) and Bengasi (1942). In 1942, he also co-starred in Goffredo Alessandrini's two part Noi Vivi and Addio Kira!. Un colpo di pistola (1942) by Renato Castellani and Fari nella nebbia (1942) by Gianni Franciolini were not as successful as his earlier films. After the war, he returned to the stage. He worked in Spain with Edgar Neville in Nada and in Carne de horca. He had a supporting role in 1959 Dino Risi's successful comedy Il mattatore. In 1964, he appeared in an adaptation of A. J. Cronin's novel, The Citadel. In 2003, the Galleria Fosco Giachetti in Sesto Fiorentino was opened in his

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People from Sesto Fiorentino

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Italian male stage actors

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Ian Hart

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Ian Hart

Ian Hart (born Ian Davies; 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor best known for playing Quirinus Quirrell in the 2001 fantasy film Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, as well as portraying Joe O'Reilly in Michael Collins.[1] Early life Hart was born Ian Davies in Knotty Ash, a district of Liverpool, Lancashire, one of three siblings, and was brought up in a Roman Catholic family.[2] He attended the Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School and was in his teens a member of the Everyman Youth Theatre before studying drama at the now-defunct Mabel Fletcher College of Music and Drama in Liverpool. He then moved on and started acting in 1980. Career From 1988-91, Hart studied video production at South Mersey College (now part of Liverpool Community College). He portrayed a POUM militia volunteer in the Spanish Civil War in Land and Freedom (1995), an unemployed Liverpool shipyard worker in Liam (2000). His best known role, however, is that of Professor Quirrell in Harry Potter and the Philosoph

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EngvarB from November 2013

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21st-century English male actors

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Emil Jannings

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Emil Jannings

Emil Jannings (born Theodor Friedrich Emil Janenz, 23 July 1884 – 2 January 1950) was a German actor, popular in 1920s film in Hollywood. He was the first Oscar recipient, honored with the Academy Award for Best Actor at the 1929 ceremony. Jannings is the only German ever to have won that award. Jannings is best known for his collaborations with F. W. Murnau and Josef von Sternberg, including 1930's The Blue Angel, with Marlene Dietrich. Der blaue Engel was meant as a vehicle for Jannings to score a place for himself in the new medium of sound film, but Dietrich stole the show. Jannings later starred in a number of Nazi propaganda films, which made him unemployable as an actor after the fall of the Third Reich. Childhood and youth Jannings was born in Rorschach, Switzerland, the son of Emil Janenz, an American businessman from St. Louis, and his wife Margarethe (née Schwabe), originally from Germany.[1][2] Jannings held German citizenship; while he was still young the family moved to Leipzig in the German

Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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People from Rorschach, Switzerland

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Deaths from cancer in Austria

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Sam Jaffe

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Sam Jaffe

Shalom "Sam" Jaffe (March 10, 1891 – March 24, 1984) was an American actor, teacher, musician, and engineer. In 1951, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in The Asphalt Jungle (1950) and appeared in other classic films such as Ben-Hur (1959) and The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951). He is also remembered for other outstanding performances such as the title role in Gunga Din (1939) and the High Lama in Lost Horizon (1937). Early life Jaffe was born to Russian Jewish parents Heida (Ada) and Barnett Jaffe in New York City, New York. His mother was a Yiddish actress in Odessa, Ukraine, prior to moving to the United States; his father was a jeweler. He was the youngest of four children; his siblings were Abraham, Sophie, and Annie. As a child, he appeared in Yiddish theater productions with his mother, who after moving to the United States became a prominent actress and vaudeville star. He graduated from Townsend Harris High School and studied engineering at City

Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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Ashkenazi Jews

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American people of Russian descent

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Curd Jürgens

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Curd Jürgens

Curd Gustav Andreas Gottlieb Franz Jürgens (13 December 1915 – 18 June 1982) was a German-Austrian stage and film actor. He was usually billed in English-speaking films as Curt Jurgens. Early life Jürgens was born on 13 December 1915 in the Munich borough of Solln, Kingdom of Bavaria, German Empire. His father, Kurt, was a trader from Hamburg, and his mother, Marie-Albertine, was a French teacher.[1][2] He began his working career as a journalist before becoming an actor at the urging of his actress wife, Louise Basler. He spent much of his early acting career on the stage in Vienna. Jürgens was critical of National Socialism in his native Germany. In 1944, he was sent to an internment camp in Hungary as a "political unreliable".[3] Jürgens became an Austrian citizen after the war. Career Jürgens went on to play soldiers in many war films. Notable performances in this vein include his breakthrough screen role in Des Teufels General (1955, The Devil's General), a fictional portrayal of World War I flying

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Male actors of German descent

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Commanders Crosses of the Order of Merit of the...

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Philip Seymour Hoffman

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Philip Seymour Hoffman

Philip Seymour Hoffman (July 23, 1967 – February 2, 2014) was an American actor, director, and producer. Best known for his distinctive supporting and character roles–typically lowlifes, eccentrics, bullies, and misfits—Hoffman acted in many films, including leading roles, from the early 1990s until his death in 2014. Drawn to theater as a teenager, Hoffman studied acting at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. He began his screen career in a 1991 episode of Law & Order and started to appear in films in 1992. He gained recognition for his supporting work, notably in Scent of a Woman (1992), Boogie Nights (1997), Happiness (1998), Patch Adams (1998), The Big Lebowski (1998), Magnolia (1999), The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999), Almost Famous (2000), Punch-Drunk Love (2002), and Along Came Polly (2004). He began to occasionally play leading roles, and for his portrayal of the author Truman Capote in Capote (2005), won multiple accolades, including the Academy Award for Best Actor. Hoffman's profile

Volpi Cup winners

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Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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Method actors

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Leslie Howard

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Leslie Howard

Leslie Howard Steiner (3 April 1893 – 1 June 1943) was an English stage and film actor, director, and producer.[1] He also wrote many stories and articles for The New York Times, The New Yorker, and Vanity Fair and was one of the biggest box-office draws and movie idols of the 1930s. Howard is probably best remembered for playing Ashley Wilkes in Gone with the Wind (1939). He had roles in many other notable films, including Berkeley Square (1933), Of Human Bondage (1934), The Scarlet Pimpernel (1934), The Petrified Forest (1936), Pygmalion (1938), Intermezzo (1939), "Pimpernel" Smith (1941), and The First of the Few (1942). He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor for Berkeley Square and Pygmalion. Howard's Second World War activities included acting and filmmaking. He was active in anti-German propaganda and rumoured to have been involved with British or Allied Intelligence, sparking conspiracy theories regarding his death in 1943 when the Luftwaffe shot down BOAC Flight 777 over the Bay of Bi

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American Theater Hall of Fame inductees

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20th-century English male actors

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Jack Lemmon

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Jack Lemmon

John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001) was an American actor who was nominated for an Academy Award eight times, winning twice. He starred in over 60 films, such as Mister Roberts (1955, for which he won the year's Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor), Some Like It Hot (1959), The Apartment (1960), Days of Wine and Roses (1962), Irma la Douce (1963), The Great Race (1965), The Odd Couple (1968, and its sequel The Odd Couple II (1998), both with frequent co-star Walter Matthau), Save the Tiger (1973, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor), The China Syndrome (1979), Missing (1982), and Glengarry Glen Ross (1992). Early life Lemmon was born on February 8, 1925, in an elevator at Newton-Wellesley Hospital in Newton, Massachusetts.[2] He was the only child of Mildred Burgess LaRue and John Uhler Lemmon, Jr., the president of the Doughnut Corporation of America.[3][4] John Uhler Lemmon II was of Irish heritage, and his son was raised Catholic.[5] His parents had a difficult marr

Honorary Golden Bear recipients

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Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actor winners

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Mitchell Lichtenstein

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Mitchell Lichtenstein

Mitchell Wilson Lichtenstein (born March 10, 1956) is an American actor, writer, producer and director. The son of Isabel (née Wilson) and Roy Lichtenstein,[1] he studied acting at Bennington College in Vermont.[1] In Ang Lee's film The Wedding Banquet (1993), Lichtenstein played the partner of a gay Taiwanese man living in the United States who is forced to marry by his parents.[2] Other credits include Streamers (1983). He produced, wrote, and directed the 2007 black comedy horror film Teeth, about the pitfalls and power of a girl as a living example of the vagina dentata myth.[3] The film premiered at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival to positive reviews.[3] His film Happy Tears premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival in 2009.[4] His film Angelica has been selected to be screened in the Panorama section of the 65th Berlin International Film Festival.[5] He is openly gay.[6] References Julianelli, Jane (February 2, 1997). "Actor Finds That His Roles Walk on the Darker Side of Life". New Y

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Jewish American male actors

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Bennington College alumni

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Luigi Lo Cascio

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Luigi Lo Cascio

Luigi Lo Cascio (born 20 October 1967) is an Italian actor. He won David di Donatello as Best actor for his starring role in I cento passi. In 2012 he debuted as film director and writer with La città ideale. Filmography 2000: I cento passi 2001: Luce dei miei occhi 2002: Il più bel giorno della mia vita 2003: The Best of Youth (La Meglio Gioventù) 2003: Good Morning, Night 2003: Mio cognato 2004: La vita che vorrei 2004: Eyes of Crystal 2005: The Beast in the Heart 2006: Mare Nero 2008: Miracle at St. Anna 2009: Baaria - La porta del vento 2010: Noi credevamo 2012: La città ideale 2013: Marina 2013: Il capitale umano 2014: The Dinner 2015: An Italian Name 2019: The Traitor Theatre 1989: Aspettando Godot 1989: I Coralli 1990: La Sposa 1992: La Signora delle Camelie 1992: La Morte di Empedocle 1994: Il labirinto di Orfeo 1994: Coriolano 1995: Verso Tebe 1996: Romeo e Giulietta 1997: La Famiglia Scroffenstein 1997: Gloria del Teatro Immaginario 19

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Sicilian actors

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People from Palermo

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Fabrice Luchini

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Fabrice Luchini

Fabrice Luchini (French pronunciation: ​; born Robert Luchini; 1 November 1951) is a French stage and film actor. He has appeared in films such as Potiche, The Women on the 6th Floor, and In the House. For his role in the 2015 film Courted he won the Volpi Cup for Best Actor at the 72nd Venice International Film Festival.[1] Life and career Fabrice Luchini was born in Paris, into an Italian immigrant family from Assisi[2] who were greengrocers. He grew up around the neighbourhood of Goutte d'Or in Paris's 18th arrondissement. When he was 13, his mother apprenticed him to a hairdresser in a trendy parlour in Avenue Matignon, where he would take the name of the hairdresser's son, Fabrice, in place of his real name, Robert. His first film role was in Tout peut arriver in 1969. He then appeared in Éric Rohmer's Le Genou de Claire in 1970 playing a small role as an adolescent. He went on to appear in Rohmer's Perceval le Gallois and Les Nuits de la pleine lune, and also in films directed by Nagisa Oshima, Pierr

Volpi Cup winners

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People of Umbrian descent

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Fredric March

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Fredric March

Fredric March (born Ernest Frederick McIntyre Bickel; August 31, 1897 – April 14, 1975) was an American actor, regarded as "one of Hollywood's most celebrated, versatile stars of the 1930s and 1940s".[1][2] He won the Academy Award for Best Actor for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931) and The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), as well as the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play for Years Ago (1947) and Long Day's Journey into Night (1956). March is one of only two actors, the other being Helen Hayes, to have won both the Academy Award and the Tony Award twice. Early life March was born in Racine, Wisconsin, the son of Cora Brown Marcher (1863–1936), a schoolteacher from England[3], and John F. Bickel (1859–1941), a devout Presbyterian Church elder who worked in the wholesale hardware business.[4] March attended the Winslow Elementary School (established in 1855), Racine High School, and the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he was a member of Alpha Delta Phi. He was also a member of an "interfraternity societ

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American Theater Hall of Fame inductees

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Military personnel from Wisconsin

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Joe Mantegna

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Joe Mantegna

Joseph Anthony Mantegna (, Italian pronunciation: ; born November 13, 1947) is an American actor, producer, writer, and director. Mantegna began his career on stage in 1969 with the musical Hair. He earned a Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Play for portraying Richard Roma in the first American production of David Mamet's play Glengarry Glen Ross, the first of many collaborations with Mamet.[1] Mantegna was awarded the Tony and Joseph Jefferson Awards for his role in David Mamet's Pulitzer Prize–winning play Glengarry Glen Ross. His long-standing association with Mamet includes the premieres of A Life in the Theatre, The Disappearance of the Jews and Speed-the-Plow on Broadway. Mantegna has also directed a highly lauded production of Mamet's Lakeboat, which enjoyed a successful theatrical run in Los Angeles, and he later directed the film version.[2] In addition to theatrical appearances directed by Mamet, Mantegna appeared in Mamet's films House of Games (1987), Things Change (1988), Homicide (1991)

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Male actors from Chicago

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People of Apulian descent

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John Marley

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John Marley

John Marley (born Mortimer Marlieb,[2] October 17, 1907 – May 22, 1984) was an American actor who was known for his role as Phil Cavalleri in Love Story and as Jack Woltz— the defiant film mogul who awakens to find the severed head of his prized horse in his bed—in The Godfather (1972).[3] He starred in John Cassavetes' feature Faces (1968)[3] and appeared in The Glitter Dome (1984). Early years Marley was born in Harlem in New York City to Russian-Jewish parents. He dropped out of the City College of New York, turning instead to a career in acting.[1] Career Military service Marley served in the United States Army Signal Corps during World War II.[1] Film and television Marley was a prolific character actor, appearing in nearly 150 films and television series during a career that spanned forty-five years. TV series included The Web, Peter Gunn, Johnny Staccato, Bourbon Street Beat, Rawhide, The Untouchables, Sea Hunt, 77 Sunset Strip, The Lloyd Bridges Show, Dr. Kildare, The Outer Limits, The Alfred Hi

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City College of New York alumni

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Burials at Cedar Park Cemetery (Emerson, New Je...

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Toshiro Mifune

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Toshiro Mifune

Toshiro Mifune (三船 敏郎 Mifune Toshirō, April 1, 1920 – December 24, 1997) was a Japanese actor who appeared in over 150 feature films. He is best known for his 16-film collaboration (1948–65) with Akira Kurosawa in such works as Rashomon, Seven Samurai, The Hidden Fortress, Throne of Blood, and Yojimbo. He also portrayed Miyamoto Musashi in Hiroshi Inagaki's Samurai Trilogy and one earlier Inagaki film, Lord Toranaga in the NBC television miniseries Shōgun, and Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto in three different films.[1] Early life Toshiro Mifune was born on 1 April 1920 in Qingdao, Shandong, China, which was at the time still under Japanese occupation following their capture of the city from German colonial rule during WWI. Hoping to preserve their control of the region, the Japanese government maintained a large garrison and also encouraged Japanese citizens to move there with promises of important and rewarding work. Among the Japanese living there before the Republic of China took over the city in 1922 were Tos

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Disease-related deaths in Japan

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Male actors from Dalian

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John Mills

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John Mills

Sir John Mills, CBE (born Lewis Ernest Watts Mills, 22 February 1908 – 23 April 2005) was an English actor who appeared in more than 120 films in a career spanning seven decades. On screen, he often played people who are not at all exceptional, but become heroes because of their common sense, generosity and good judgment. He received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his work in Ryan's Daughter (1970). Early life John Mills was born in Norfolk,[1] the son of Edith (Baker), a theatre box office manager, and Lewis Mills, a mathematics teacher.[2] Mills was born at Watts Naval School, where his father was a master. He spent his early years in the village of Belton where his father was the headmaster of the village school. He first felt the thrill of performing at a concert in the school hall when six years old.[3] He lived in a modest house in Gainsborough Road Felixstowe until 1929. His older sister was Annette Mills, remembered as presenter of BBC Television's Muffin the Mule (1946–55). He was

Best Supporting Actor Golden Globe (film) winners

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Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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People from Suffolk (before 1974)

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Liam Neeson

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Liam Neeson

Liam John Neeson OBE (born 7 June 1952)[1] is an actor from Northern Ireland.[2] He has been nominated for a number of awards, including an Academy Award for Best Actor, a BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role, and three Golden Globe Awards for Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama. Empire magazine ranked Neeson among both the "100 Sexiest Stars in Film History" and "The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time".[3] In 1976, Neeson joined the Lyric Players' Theatre in Belfast for two years. He then acted in the Arthurian film Excalibur (1981). Between 1982 and 1987, Neeson starred in five films, most notably alongside Mel Gibson and Anthony Hopkins in The Bounty (1984), and Robert De Niro and Jeremy Irons in The Mission (1986). He landed a leading role alongside Patrick Swayze in Next of Kin (1989). Neeson rose to prominence when he starred as Oskar Schindler in Schindler's List (1993). He has since starred in other successful films, including the drama Nell (1994), the historical biopic Michael Collins (1996)

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2019 controversies in the United States

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Current events

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Kenneth More

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Kenneth More

Kenneth Gilbert More, CBE (20 September 1914 – 12 July 1982) was an English film and stage actor. Raised to stardom by the veteran car based film-comedy Genevieve (1953), he appeared in many roles as a carefree, happy-go-lucky gent. His biggest hits from this period include Raising a Riot (1955), Reach for the Sky (1956), The Admirable Crichton (1957) and A Night to Remember (1958). He starred in Doctor in the House (1954), the first of the popular Doctor film series. Although his career declined in the early 1960s, two of his own favourite films date from this time – The Comedy Man (1964) and The Greengage Summer (1961) with Susannah York, "one of the happiest films on which I have ever worked."[2] He also enjoyed a revival in the much-acclaimed TV adaptation of The Forsyte Saga (1967) and the Father Brown series (1974). Biography Early life Kenneth More was born in Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire, the only son of Charles Gilbert More, a Royal Naval Air Service pilot, and Edith Winifred Watkins, the da

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Marcello Mastroianni

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Marcello Mastroianni

Marcello Vincenzo Domenico Mastroianni (Italian pronunciation: ; 28 September 1924 – 19 December 1996) was an Italian film actor. His prominent films include: La Dolce Vita; 8½; La Notte; Divorce Italian Style; Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow; Marriage Italian Style; The 10th Victim; A Special Day; City of Women; Henry IV; Dark Eyes; and Everybody's Fine. His honours included British Film Academy Awards, Best Actor awards at the Cannes Film Festival and two Golden Globe Awards. Early life Mastroianni was born in Fontana Liri, a small village in the Apennines in the province of Frosinone, Lazio, and grew up in Turin and Rome. He was the son of Ida (née Irolle) and Ottone Mastroianni, who ran a carpentry shop,[1] and the nephew of sculptor Umberto Mastroianni. During World War II, after the division into Axis and Allied Italy, he was interned in a loosely guarded German prison camp, from which he escaped to hide in Venice. His brother Ruggero Mastroianni was a film editor who edited a number of his brother's f

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Paul Muni

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Paul Muni

Paul Muni (born Frederich Meshilem Meier Weisenfreund; September 22, 1895 – August 25, 1967) was an American stage and film actor who grew up in Chicago. Muni was a five-time Academy Award nominee, with one win. He started his acting career in the Yiddish theatre. During the 1930s, he was considered one of the most prestigious actors at the Warner Bros. studio, and was given the rare privilege of choosing which parts he wanted. His acting quality, usually playing a powerful character, such as the lead in Scarface (1932), was partly a result of his intense preparation for his parts, often immersing himself in study of the real character's traits and mannerisms. He was also highly skilled in using makeup techniques, a talent he learned from his parents, who were also actors, and from his early years on stage with the Yiddish theater in Chicago. At the age of 12, he played the stage role of an 80-year-old man; in one of his films, Seven Faces, he played seven different characters. He made 22 films and won the

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Matthew Modine

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Matthew Modine

Matthew Avery Modine (born March 22, 1959)[1] is an American actor, activist and filmmaker, who rose to prominence through his role as United States Marine Corps Private Joker in Stanley Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket. His other film roles include the title character in Alan Parker's Birdy, the high school wrestler Louden Swain in Vision Quest, Drake Goodman in Pacific Heights and Dr. Ralph Wyman in Short Cuts. On television, Modine portrayed Dr. Martin Brenner in Stranger Things, the oversexed Sullivan Groff on Weeds, Dr. Don Francis in And the Band Played On and Ivan Turing in Proof. Modine has been nominated twice for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television for his work in And the Band Played On and What the Deaf Man Heard and won a Special Golden Globe for him and the rest of the ensemble in Short Cuts.[2] He was also nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special for And the Band Played On. Early life Modine,

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Oscar Martínez (actor)

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Oscar Martínez (actor)

Oscar Martínez in 2019. Oscar Martínez (Buenos Aires, 23 October 1949) is an Argentine actor, author and theatre director.[1][2] He received the Premio Konex de Platino in 1991 for his film work, and again in 2001 for his work as a theatre actor. He also received the Volpi Cup for Best Actor at the 73rd Venice Film Festival for his role in the comedy-drama The Distinguished Citizen.[3] Selected filmography Wild Tales (2014) The Distinguished Citizen (2016) Toc Toc (2017) Ilusiones (es) References Pieza clave de Arthur Miller se estrena en Chile con destacado elenco argentino El actor trasandino Óscar Martínez protagonizará desde el próximo 1 de junio "El descenso del Monte Morgan" en el Teatro Nescafé de las Artes. Relatos salvajes', del argentino Damián Szifrón, cosecha aplausos y risas en Cannes 17 may 2014 AFP/AFP "Los actores (desde la izquierda) Ricardo Darín, Erica Rivas, Óscar Martínez, Leonardo Sbaraglia y María Marull presentan el 17 de mayo de 2014 en Cannes 'Relatos salvajes' ju

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Silvio Orlando

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Silvio Orlando

Silvio Orlando (born 30 June 1957) is an Italian actor. Orlando was born in Naples. He has worked with numerous Italian directors, such as Nanni Moretti, Daniele Luchetti, Carlo Mazzacurati, Gabriele Salvatores and others. He has also appeared in several TV series, most recently The Young Pope. In 1988, Orlando directed two theatre works written by Peppino De Filippo: Don Rafelo 'o trombone and Cupido scherza e spazza. In 2008 he was the protagonist of Roberto Paci Dalò's play L'assedio delle ceneri. Filmography Kamikazen - Ultima notte a Milano (1987) Palombella rossa (1989) Matilda (1990) La settimana della sfinge (1990) Vicini di casa (1991, TV series) Il portaborse (1991) Un'altra vita (1992) Sud (1993) Arriva la bufera (1993) Michele alla guerra (1994, Franco Rossi) La scuola (1995) La mia generazione (1996) Il cielo è sempre più blu (1996) I magi randagi - seconda uscita (1996) Vesna va veloce (1996) Ferie d'agosto (1996) Nirvana (1997) Auguri professore (1997) A

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Chris Penn

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Chris Penn

Christopher Shannon Penn (October 10, 1965 – January 24, 2006) was an American actor. Penn was typically cast as a tough character, featured as a villain or a working-class lug, or in a comic role and was known for his roles in such films as The Wild Life, Reservoir Dogs, The Funeral, Footloose, Rush Hour, Corky Romano, True Romance, Beethoven's 2nd, Short Cuts, The Boys Club, All the Right Moves, At Close Range, Pale Rider, and in the video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas. Penn was found dead in his condominium on January 24, 2006, at the age of 40. An autopsy revealed the primary cause for his death was "nonspecific cardiomyopathy" (heart disease).[1][2] Early life Penn was born in Los Angeles, California, the youngest of three boys born to Leo Penn, an actor and director, and Eileen Ryan (née Annucci), an actress. His paternal grandparents were Jewish emigrants from Lithuania and Russia,[3] and his mother was a Roman Catholic of Italian and Irish descent.[4] His brothers are actor Sean Penn and music

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Sean Penn

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Sean Penn

Sean Justin Penn (born August 17, 1960)[1] is an American actor, director and filmmaker. He has won two Academy Awards, for his roles in the mystery drama Mystic River (2003) and the biopic Milk (2008). Penn began his acting career in television, with a brief appearance in episode 112 of Little House on the Prairie, December 4, 1974, and directed by his father Leo Penn. Following his film debut in the drama Taps (1981), and a diverse range of film roles in the 1980s, including Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982), Penn garnered critical attention for his roles in the crime dramas At Close Range (1986), State of Grace (1990), and Carlito's Way (1993). He became known as a prominent leading actor with the drama Dead Man Walking (1995), for which he earned his first Academy Award nomination and the Best Actor Award at the Berlin Film Festival. Penn received another two Oscar nominations for Woody Allen's comedy-drama Sweet and Lowdown (1999) and the drama I Am Sam (2001), before winning his first Academy Award f

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Themis Panou

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Themis Panou

Themis Panou (Greek: Θέμης Πάνου) is a Greek actor best known for his acting with the National Theater of Greece as well as his starring role in the film Miss Violence directed by Alexandros Avranas.[1] He is the first and only Greek actor to win the Volpi Cup for Best Actor, an award given at the Venice Film Festival. In 2016, he was one of the main actors in the Greek feature Lines directed by Vassilis Mazomenos. Selected filmography Year Title Awards 1984 Loafing and Camouflage 2003 A Touch of Spice 2013 Miss Violence Volpi Cup for Best ActorHellenic Film Academy Award for Best Actor 2016 Lines References McCredie-Dando, Alice (7 August 2014). "MIFF 2014 Campus Critics review: Miss Violence". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 3 September 2014.

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Jacques Perrin

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Jacques Perrin

Jacques Perrin (born Jacques André Simonet; 13 July 1941) is a French actor and filmmaker.[1] He is occasionally credited as Jacques Simonet. Simonet was his father's name and Perrin his mother's. Life and career Perrin was born in Paris. His father, Alexandre Simonet, was a theatre director and his mother, Marie Perrin, was an actress. He is also the nephew of the actor Antoine Balpêtré. Perrin was trained as an actor at the Conservatoire National Supérieur d'Art Dramatique. He gave over 400 performances of L'Année du bac, by José-André Lacour, on the parisian stage (starting in 1958). He was given his first juvenile film roles by Italian director Valerio Zurlini. He appeared alongside Claudia Cardinale in the romantic comedy La Ragazza con la valigia and Marcello Mastroianni in Family Diary. He then played several roles in films of Henri-Georges Clouzot (The Truth in 1960) or Mauro Bolognini (Corruption in 1963) and leading roles in four films by Pierre Schoendoerffer : La 317e Section (1965), Le Crabe

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Massimo Troisi

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Massimo Troisi

Massimo Troisi (19 February 1953 – 4 June 1994) was an Italian actor, screenwriter, and film director. He began his acting career in a theatre and rose to prominence for his roles in television series. Troisi is best known for his works in the films I'm Starting from Three (1981) and Il Postino: The Postman (1994), and was posthumously nominated for two Oscars for the latter. Early years and TV star Troisi was born into a large family in San Giorgio a Cremano, a town near Naples. His father was a train engineer. Some of his family experiences were later told in his first films. After secondary school, Troisi wrote some poems inspired by his favourite author, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and, in 1969, started to play in a small local theatre together with some childhood friends (including Lello Arena and Enzo Decaro). The early death of his mother condemned Troisi to a harsh period of activity, which is said to have had a role in the development of his increasingly serious heart problems which were brought on during

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Wesley Snipes

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Wesley Snipes

Wesley Trent Snipes (born July 31, 1962) is an American actor, director, film producer, martial artist, and author. His prominent film roles include New Jack City (1991), White Men Can't Jump (1992), Passenger 57 (1992), Demolition Man (1993), and the Marvel Comics character Blade in the Blade film trilogy (1998–2004). He formed a production company, Amen-Ra Films, in 1991, and a subsidiary, Black Dot Media, to develop projects for film and television. He has been training in martial arts since the age of 12, earning a 5th dan black belt in Shotokan Karate and 2nd dan black belt in Hapkido.[1] In 2010, Snipes began serving a three-year prison sentence in McKean County, Pennsylvania for misdemeanor failure to file U.S. federal income tax returns.[2] He was released from prison in 2013.[3] Early life Snipes was born in Orlando, Florida, the son of Marian (née Long), a teacher's assistant, and Wesley Rudolph Snipes, an aircraft engineer.[4][5] He grew up in the Bronx, New York. He attended the High School of

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David Strathairn

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David Strathairn

David Russell Strathairn ([1] born January 26, 1949) is an American actor. Strathairn came to prominence in the 1980s and the 1990s performing in the films of fellow Williams grad John Sayles, including Return of the Secaucus 7 (his screen debut), The Brother from Another Planet, Matewan, City of Hope, Eight Men Out, and Limbo. Strathairn was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor for portraying journalist Edward R. Murrow in Good Night, and Good Luck (2005). He is also recognized for his role as CIA Deputy Director Noah Vosen in the 2007 film The Bourne Ultimatum, a role he reprised in 2012's The Bourne Legacy. He played a prominent role as Dr. Lee Rosen on the Syfy series Alphas from 2011 to 2012 and played Secretary of State William H. Seward in Steven Spielberg's Lincoln (2012). He won an Emmy and was nominated for a Golden Globe for his role in the TV film, Temple Grandin (2010). Early life Strathairn was born in San Francisco, California, the second of three children of Thomas Scott Strathairn

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River Phoenix

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River Phoenix

River Jude Phoenix (né Bottom; August 23, 1970 – October 31, 1993) was an American actor, musician, and animal activist. He was the older brother of Rain Phoenix, Joaquin Phoenix, Liberty Phoenix, and Summer Phoenix. Phoenix's work encompassed 24 films and television appearances, and his rise to fame led to his status as a "teen idol".[1] He began his acting career at age 10, in television commercials. He starred in the science fiction adventure film Explorers (1985), and had his first notable role in 1986's Stand by Me, a coming-of-age film based on the novella The Body by Stephen King. Phoenix made a transition into more adult-oriented roles with Running on Empty (1988), playing the son of fugitive parents in a well-received performance that earned him a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, and My Own Private Idaho (1991), playing a gay hustler in search of his estranged mother. For his performance in the latter, Phoenix garnered enormous praise and won a Volpi Cup for Best Actor at t

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Naseeruddin Shah

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Naseeruddin Shah

Naseeruddin Shah (born 20 July 1949) is an Indian film and stage actor and director in the Hindi language film industry. He is considered among the finest actors of India and is a prominent figure in Indian parallel cinema.[1] He has won numerous awards in his career, including three National Film Awards, three Filmfare Awards and an award at the Venice Film Festival. The Government of India has honoured him with the Padma Shri and the Padma Bhushan awards for his contributions to Indian cinema.[2] Early life Shah was born in Barabanki town of Uttar Pradesh, into a Muslim family that originally came from Meerut.[3] He is one of the three sons of Aley Mohammed Shah and his wife Farrukh Sultan. He is a descendant of a 19th-century Sayyid Afghan warlord Jan-Fishan Khan (Sayyid Muhammad Shah), who participated in the First Anglo-Afghan War and helped the British in the subsequent Indian Rebellion of 1857.[4] Shah did his schooling at St. Anselm's Ajmer and St Joseph's College, Nainital. He graduated in arts fr

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Ljubiša Samardžić

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Ljubiša Samardžić

Ljubiša Samardžić (Serbian Cyrillic: Љубиша Самарџић; 19 November 1936 – 8 September 2017), nicknamed Smoki, was a Serbian actor and director, best known as Šurda in the Vruć vetar TV series, and Inspector Boško Simić in the comedy crime series Policajac sa Petlovog brda (The Policeman from Petlovo Brdo) and film of the same name. Early life Samardžić was born in Skopje, the son of an impoverished[1] coal miner born in Krivošije (in Montenegro) and a mother from Kosovo and Metohija.[2] His parents met in Priština.[1] He grew up in the village of Jelašnica near Niška Banja, where his father Dragoljub (died 1948[1]) also worked in the local mine.[3] He finished gymnasium in Niš.[2] His acting talent was discovered very early and he won a scholarship with director Bojan Stupica. Samardžić was educated at the Belgrade Academy of Arts. After graduation, he obtained a role in Igre na skelama (1961). Samardžić was a member of the Central Committee of Yugoslav Communist Party in late 1980s. Career In the 1960s,

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James Stewart

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James Stewart

James Maitland Stewart (May 20, 1908 – July 2, 1997) was an American actor and military officer who is among the most honored and popular stars in film history. Known for his distinctive drawl, down-to-earth persona, and authentic, everyman acting style, Stewart's film career spanned over 55 years and 80 films. With the strong morals he portrayed both on screen and in his personal life, Stewart epitomized the "American ideal" in the 20th-century United States. The characters he played spanned a wide range of subjects and appealed to large audiences. His emotional film performances contributed to his cinematic acclaim. Stewart began his career as a performer on Broadway which earned him a film contract at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). He began his career portraying idyllic and moral characters and established himself as a movie star working with Frank Capra for You Can't Take It with You (1938) and then Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), which earned him his first of five Academy Award nominations for Best Act

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Brad Pitt

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Brad Pitt

William Bradley Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an American actor and film producer. He has received multiple awards and nominations including an Academy Award as producer under his own company, Plan B Entertainment. Pitt first gained recognition as a cowboy hitchhiker in the road movie Thelma & Louise (1991). His first leading roles in big-budget productions came with the drama films A River Runs Through It (1992) and Legends of the Fall (1994) and horror film Interview with the Vampire (1994). He gave critically acclaimed performances in the crime thriller Seven and the science fiction film 12 Monkeys (both 1995), the latter earning him a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor and an Academy Award nomination. Pitt starred in the cult film Fight Club (1999) and the heist film Ocean's Eleven (2001) and its sequels, Ocean's Twelve (2004) and Ocean's Thirteen (2007). His greatest commercial successes have been Troy (2004), Mr. & Mrs. Smith (2005), World War Z (2013), and Once Upon a Time in H

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Joaquin Phoenix

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Joaquin Phoenix

Joaquin Rafael Phoenix (né Bottom; born October 28, 1974)[a][3] is an American actor, producer, and activist. For his work as an actor, Phoenix has received a Grammy Award, a Golden Globe Award and three Academy Award nominations. Phoenix started acting in television series with his brother River Phoenix and sister Summer Phoenix. His first major film release was in the film SpaceCamp (1986). During his period as a child actor he was credited as Leaf Phoenix, his self-given name. He later went back to his birth name, Joaquin, and received positive reviews for his supporting work in a wide range of films, most notably for the film adaptation of the novel To Die For (1995) and the period film Quills (2000). He received international attention for his portrayal of Commodus in the 2000 historical epic film Gladiator, which earned him a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. He has subsequently earned Best Actor nominations for portraying musician Johnny Cash in the biopic Walk the Line (2005

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Henri Vilbert

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Henri Vilbert

Henri Vilbert (6 April 1904 – 19 April 1997) was a French actor.[1] He appeared in more than a hundred films from 1921 to 1982. Selected filmography Film Year Title Role Notes 1972 La Scoumoune 1963 Le Diable et les Dix Commandements 1958 Tabarin Morelli 1957 Lovers of Paris 1954 Letters from My Windmill Love in a Hot Climate Proibito Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves 1953 Napoleon Road 1952 The Man in My Life Léon Fontaine Directed by Guy Lefranc 1949 Manon 1938 In the Sun of Marseille 1936 Mayerling 1935 Fanfare of Love 1934 Madame Bovary 1932 Happy Hearts 1931 The Man in Evening Clothes TV Year Title Role Notes 1973 Les Cinq Dernières Minutes 1956-1957 La Famille Anodin References [1] External links Henri Vilbert on IMDb

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James Wilby

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James Wilby

James Jonathon Wilby (born 20 February 1958) is an English actor. Early life and education Wilby was born in Rangoon, Burma to a corporate executive father.[1] He was educated at Terrington Hall School, North Yorkshire and Sedbergh School in Cumbria (prior to 1974 in West Riding of Yorkshire), and from there went on to study for a degree in Mathematics at Grey College, University of Durham, and then at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Career Wilby's first appearance on screen was in the Oxford Film Company 1982 production Privileged alongside Hugh Grant. He is known to an international audience for roles in Maurice (1987), for which he received Venice Film Festival's Best Actor award with co-star Hugh Grant. He then starred in A Handful of Dust (1988), for which he won the Bari Film Festival Best Actor award. Then came A Tale of Two Cities (1989), Howards End (1992), the critically acclaimed Regeneration (1997), Ismail Merchant's Cotton Mary (1999), Gosford Park (2001) and Alain Robbe-Grillet's C'est Gr

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Michael Wright (actor)

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Michael Wright (actor)

Michael Wright (born April 30, 1956) is an American film and television actor, who is best known for his role as Eddie King Jr., in the 1991 Robert Townsend film The Five Heartbeats. Career Wright's body of work in television includes the 1983 NBC science fiction miniseries V, the 1984 sequel V: The Final Battle, and V: The Series as Elias Taylor. He appeared in the 1987 episode "The Savage" of Miami Vice, and on the 1997 HBO series Oz as Omar White from 2001-2003. Wright has appeared on New York Undercover, and as Lazarus Prime on Black Lightning. Wright's film roles include the 1987 drama The Principal as Victor Duncan, also starring James Belushi, and the 1994 film Sugar Hill with Wesley Snipes. He played Clinton, the leader of The Del Bombers gang in the cult film The Wanderers. His most recent film is 2005's The Interpreter. Filmography The Wanderers (1979) - Clinton Streamers (1983) - Carlyle V (miniseries) (1983) - Elias Taylor (2 episodes) V The Final Battle (1984) - Elias Taylor (3 episo

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Xia Yu (actor)

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Xia Yu (actor)

Xia Yu (Chinese: 夏雨; pinyin: Xià Yǔ, born 28 October 1976) is a Chinese actor.[1]He was rocketed to international stardom after he won the Best Actor award from the Venice Film Festival 1994 for his role in film In the Heat of the Sun and became the youngest actor to win that award in the history of the festival when he was 18 years old. Biography Xia Yu was born on 28 October 1976 in Qingdao, Shandong Province. His father was once an actor and then became a painter.[2] Xia was initially discovered by Jiang Wen who cast him in his semi-autobiographical film In the Heat of the Sun (1994). Despite being chosen partly because of his facial resemblance to a young Jiang, Xia's performance as a spirited and moving performance of a renegade youth in the film conquered audiences.[2] He was rocketed to international stardom after he won the Best Actor award from the Venice Film Festival (the youngest actor to win that award in the history of the festival), Singapore International Film Festival and Golden Horse Awar

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Ermete Zacconi

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Ermete Zacconi

Ermete Zacconi (14 September 1857, Montecchio Emilia, Province of Reggio Emilia – 14 October 1948 in Viareggio) was an Italian stage and film actor and a representative of naturalism and verism in acting. His leading ladies on stage were his wife Ines Cristina Bagni and Paola Pezzaglia. He had lead roles in plays by William Shakespeare, Carlo Goldoni, Alfred de Musset, Henrik Ibsen, August Strindberg. He also performed in films. His most notable film roles include L'emigrante (1915), Summer Rain (1937), Processo e morte di Socrate (1939), and Le Comte de Monte Cristo (1943). References "Zacconi Ermete". Internetowa encyklopedia PWN (in Polish). Retrieved 23 April 2007. "Zacconi Ermete". WIEM Encyclopedia (in Polish). Retrieved 23 April 2007. External links Ermete Zacconi on IMDb

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Volpi Cup for Best Actor

The Volpi Cup (Italian: Coppa Volpi) is the principal award given to actors at the Venice Film Festival and is named in honor of Count Giuseppe Volpi di Misurata, the founder of the Venice Film Festival. The name and number of prizes have been changed several times since their introduction, ranging from two to four awards per edition and sometimes acknowledging both leading and supporting performances. The festival was officially competitive for the first time in 1934. The acting award was named Grande medaglia d'oro dell'Associazione Nazionale Fascista dello Spettacolo per il migliore attore (Great Gold Medal of the National Fascist Association for Entertainment for the Best Actor). After a four-year hiatus caused by the war, the festival was once again competitive in 1947. The acting award in the immediate post-war period was named Premio Internazionale per il migliore attore (International Award for the Best Actor).[1][2][3][4] The festival was again competitive in 1980 but the acting awards given by the

Awards for male actors

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Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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Film awards for lead actor

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Burt Lancaster

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Burt Lancaster

Burton Stephen Lancaster (November 2, 1913 – October 20, 1994) was an American actor and producer. Initially known for playing "tough guys", he went on to achieve success with more complex and challenging roles. He was nominated four times for Academy Awards, and won once for his work in Elmer Gantry in 1960. He also won a Golden Globe Award for that performance and BAFTA Awards for Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) and Atlantic City (1980). During the 1950s his production company Hecht-Hill-Lancaster was highly successful, making films such as Trapeze (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), and Separate Tables (1958). The American Film Institute ranks Lancaster as #19 of the greatest male stars of classic Hollywood cinema.[1] Early life Burton Stephen Lancaster was born on November 2, 1913, in Manhattan, New York, at his parents' home at 209 East 106th Street, the son of Elizabeth (née Roberts) and mailman James Henry Lancaster.[2] Both of his parents were Protestants of working-class

Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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People from East Harlem

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Liberalism in the United States

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Luca Marinelli

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Luca Marinelli

Luca Marinelli (born 22 October 1984) is an Italian actor. Life and career Born in Rome to a father of south Italian ancestry from Apulia, Marinelli enrolled at the Silvio D'Amico National Academy of Dramatic Art, graduating in 2009.[1] Pretty active on stage since 2006, his breakout role was Mattia, the leading character in the Saverio Costanzo's 2010 drama film The Solitude of Prime Numbers.[1] In 2013 he was appointed EFP Shooting Star at the Berlin International Film Festival for his performance in Paolo Virzì's Every Blessed Day.[2] He won the David di Donatello and the Nastro d'Argento for his supporting role as the antagonist Fabio "The Gipsy" in the Italian superhero film They Call Me Jeeg. Filmography Year Title Notes 2010 The Solitude of Prime Numbers 2011 The Last Man on Earth 2011 Waves 2011 Nina 2012 Mary of Nazareth 2012 Every Blessed Day Nominated—David di Donatello for Best ActorNominated—Nastro d'Argento for Best ActorNominated—Italian Golden

Volpi Cup for Best Actor winners

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Volpi Cup winners

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David di Donatello winners

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