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Leaders of American trade unions


John Valone

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John Valone

John Valone (born 1951, Chicago, Illinois), grew up in the Little Flower Parish of Chicago, a graduate of Little Flower High School and currently resides in Monee, Illinois. John Valone is an American, who has been President of Elevator Constructors Local 2 since 2004 and is Chairman of the Elevator Constructors Local 2 PAC Fund. His name has surfaced in court documents on March 8, 2008 in the Tony Rezko Federal Corruption Trial.[1][2] Donations and Charitable Cause Since 2008, John Valone has raised $30,000 a year for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund with his annual Local 2 Golf Outing. PAC Fund donation to Blagojevich through Rezko in court documents On March 8, 2008 a ten-page document surfaced on the Department of Justice Website as evidence in the Tony Rezko Federal Corruption trial. According to the document, John Valone's name surfaces at the bottom of page 2 "Rezko Donation Chart June 2001 to August 2004", it References the July 23, 2003; $10,000 Elevator Constructors Local 2 PAC fund contribut

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People from Will County, Illinois

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Thomas Van Arsdale

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Thomas Van Arsdale

Thomas Van Arsdale (February 16, 1924 - May 20, 2018) was the former head of the New York City Central Labor Council. He succeeded his father, Harry Van Arsdale, Jr., in the post by defeating Victor Gotbaum,[1] who was then the executive director of American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. Van Arsdale also served as business manager of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local #3, a position that he held for 12 terms. His most recent re-election coming in 2005. Van Arsdales's resignation as business manager in 2007 was followed by the unanimous election of Christopher Erikson to complete the unfinished term. He also served as the International Treasurer Emeritus of the same labor organization. At the communion breakfast for the Catholic Council of Electrical Workers on May 2, 2010, the 43rd Rev. Patrick Morris, OFM Scholarship was in honor of Thomas, and was given to four people. Van Arsdale died May 20, 2018 [2] External links Israel Bonds Honors Thomas Van Arsdale

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Olaf Tveitmoe

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Olaf Tveitmoe

Tveitmoe circa 1912 Olaf Anders Tveitmoe (December 7, 1865 - March 19, 1923) was a Norwegian-born American teacher, newspaper editor, and labor leader. Tveitmoe was a leading trade union functionary for the construction industry in the state of California for the first two decades of the 20th Century. He was the founding editor of the weekly newspaper Organized Labor, which he edited for 20 years. He is best remembered for tangential trade union activity as the founder and president from 1904 to 1912 of the Asiatic Exclusion League, a political organization which sought to bolster American domestic wage levels by restricting immigration from Japan, China, and Korea. Biography Early years Olaf Anders Tveitmoe was born at Valdres in Oppland, Norway.[1] He emigrated to the United States in 1882, settling in Holden Township, Goodhue County, Minnesota, where he worked variously as a farmhand.[1] He entered a college preparatory program at St. Olaf's School (today's St. Olaf College) in the fall of 1886, gaining

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People from Lincoln County, Oregon

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Dennis Van Roekel

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Dennis Van Roekel

Dennis Van Roekel is an American labor leader who served as president of the National Education Association, the largest labor union in the United States. Background Van Roekel was born in Le Mars, Iowa. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Iowa in Iowa City and a master's degree in math education from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. He taught math for more than 20 years at Paradise Valley High School in Phoenix, Arizona. He has held key positions in all levels of the teachers union, including Paradise Valley Education Association President, Arizona Education Association President, and served two terms as NEA Secretary-Treasurer, and NEA Vice President. He was elected NEA President by the 2008 NEA Representative Assembly, succeeding Reg Weaver in that position.[1] Dennis Van Roekel is a recognized activist on children education who has testified in front of United States Congress on education policy.[2] Presidency As NEA President, Van Roekel has been a vocal supporter of

Leaders of American trade unions

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National Education Association people

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Jacqueline B. Vaughn

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Jacqueline B. Vaughn

Jacqueline Barbara Vaughn (née Robinson; July 27, 1935 – January 22, 1994) was an American Chicago Public Schools special education teacher and labor leader. Vaughn was the first African-American and first woman to head the nation's third largest teachers union local. She served as President of the Chicago Teachers Union from 1984 until 1994, the Illinois Federation of Teachers (1989–1994), and Vice-President of the American Federation of Teachers (1974–1994). She led what has been called one of the "mightiest teachers unions in the nation."[3] Vaughn was famous for her fashion sense and her no-nonsense negotiation style in contract talks. Her ability to build consensus between the leadership team, the teachers and school support staff garnered respect from those in and out to the educational system. Vaughn spent much of her career trying to reform the educational system. Through her vision, the CTU Quest Center was created to give school professionals a place to design more effective teaching methods and st

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American women trade unionists

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Anthony Verrelli

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Anthony Verrelli

Anthony S. Verrelli is an American carpenter, union leader and Democratic Party politician who represents the 15th Legislative District in the New Jersey General Assembly.[1] Early Life Born in Trenton, he grew up in Lawrence Township where he attended Notre Dame High School[2]. He became a carpenter and active union member, eventually becoming President of Carpenters Local Union 254. He has previously lived in Ewing Township and served on the township zoning board in addition to other county-wide advisory boards.[3] Currently a resident of Hopewell Township, Mercer County, New Jersey, Verrelli was elected to the Mercer County Board of Chosen Freeholders in 2016 succeeding long-time freeholder Anthony Carabelli and resigned from that position after being selected to fill the vacant seat in the Assembly.[4] New Jersey Assembly Previously a member of the Mercer County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Verrelli was sworn into office on August 5, 2018, to succeed Reed Gusciora, who left office after being sworn in

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Politicians from Trenton, New Jersey

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Philip Vera Cruz

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Philip Vera Cruz

Philip Vera Cruz in his later years Philip Vera Cruz (December 25, 1904 – June 12, 1994) was a Filipino American labor leader, farmworker, and leader in the Asian American movement. He was a co-founder of the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee, which later merged with the National Farm Workers Association to become the United Farm Workers. As the union's long-time vice president, he worked to improve the working conditions for migrant workers.[1] Early life Vera Cruz was born in Saoang, Ilocos Sur, the Philippines on December 25, 1904. As he grew older, he undertook some farm work there, which he described as much easier than the work he would do in California.[2] In 1926, Vera Cruz moved to the United States, where he performed a wide variety of jobs, including working in an Alaskan cannery, a restaurant, and a box factory.[3] He was briefly a member of the Industrial Workers of the World.[4] For a year, beginning in 1931, Vera Cruz studied at Gonzaga University.[5] In 1942, he was drafted into the

Leaders of American trade unions

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United Farm Workers people

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Trade unionists from California

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Baldemar Velasquez

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Baldemar Velasquez

Baldemar Velásquez (born February 15, 1947)[1] is an American labor union activist. He co-founded and is president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO. He was named a MacArthur Fellow (also known as the "Genius Grant") in 1989, and awarded the Order of the Aztec Eagle in 1994, the highest honor Mexico can bestow on a non-citizen.[2] Early life and education Velásquez was born in February 1947 in Pharr, Texas.[3] He was the third of nine children born to Cresencio and Vicenta Castillo Velásquez.[1][4][5] Baldemar's father was born into a Mexican American family in Driscoll, Texas.[4] His grandfather died when Cresencio was just 11 years old, forcing the young Cresencio to seek employment as a migrant worker.[4] Baldemar's maternal grandparents fled to Pharr in 1910 after the Mexican Revolution, and his mother, Vicenta, was born there in 1920.[4][5] His parents worked as migrant farm produce pickers in Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Texas.[5] Baldemar Velásquez later said that his parents instilled

Leaders of American trade unions

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People from Putnam County, Ohio

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Farmworkers

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Patric Verrone

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Patric Verrone

Patric Miller Verrone (born September 29, 1959) is an American television writer and labor leader. He served as a writer and producer for several animated television shows, most notably Futurama. Schooling and pre-television career Verrone graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1981 where he was an editor of the Harvard Lampoon. He graduated from Boston College Law School in 1984 after serving as editor of the Boston College Law Review. He practiced law in Florida and California before becoming a television writer. Career in television Verrone began his career as a variety show writer, which included a late 1980s job as monologue writer for The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.[1] Shortly after his work on The Tonight Show, Verrone wrote for the popular animated program Rugrats in 1991. From there, he worked for the entirety of The Critic's run on television, before moving on to write for Muppets Tonight (for which he won an Emmy[2]) and Pinky and the Brain. Eventually, Verrone became a majo

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Harvard Lampoon alumni

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Writers Guild of America

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Troy Vincent

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Troy Vincent

Troy Darnell Vincent (born June 8, 1970) is a former American football cornerback for the Miami Dolphins, Philadelphia Eagles, Buffalo Bills and Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Dolphins with the 7th overall pick in the 1992 NFL Draft. He played college football for Wisconsin, and has been named as a first-time nominee to the 2017 College Football Hall of Fame. On September 28, 2011, Vincent was named as one of the Preliminary Nominees for the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2012 in his first year of eligibility, and each year since.[1] He was previously inducted into the Sports Hall of Fame for the Philadelphia Eagles and was entered into the Hall of Fame for the State of Pennsylvania, the University of Wisconsin and Pennsbury High, his high school alma mater. Vincent is currently Executive Vice President of Football Operations for the NFL.[2] Professional career Career Achievements On November 22, 2017 former Wisconsin and NFL defensive back Troy Vincen

Trade unionists from New Jersey

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Alan Viani

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Alan Viani

Alan Viani was head of the Department of Research at DC37, the largest municipal union in New York City, from 1973 to 1985. He was later involved with resolving the 2005 NYC transit strike. In 1965, Viani helped lead a strike by over eight thousand workers for the New York City Department of Welfare. The strike was largely successful, as it led to a clear statement of the rights of city employees to collective bargaining.[1] It also led to the appointment of Victor Gotbaum as DC37's Executive Director.[2] Viani was later an assistant to DC37 Department of Research head Daniel Nelson, and took over the position after Nelson's death in 1973.[2] He was DC37's lead negotiator in this role until 1985, when he joined the New York City Office of Collective Bargaining.[3] In 1993, he retired to become a mediator and arbitrator.[3] In 2005, Viani was part of a three-member mediation team that helped the two sides to resolve their differences in the 2005 New York transit strike.[4] In 2015, Viani was appointed as a

Leaders of American trade unions

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Shannon J. Wall

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Shannon J. Wall

Shannon J. Wall (March 4, 1919, Portland, Oregon – February 2, 2007) was a merchant seaman and an American labor leader. He was president of the National Maritime Union (or NMU, now part of the Seafarers International Union of North America) from 1973 to 1990. His father and mother ran a small dry cleaning company.[1] He joined the United States Merchant Marine and became a merchant seaman. He joined the NMU shortly thereafter. When the Merchant Marine was incorporated into the U.S. armed forces during World War II, he became a boatswain and served in the Pacific on both freight and troop carriers.[1] In 1951, he was appointed a staff representative (or "port patrolman") for a union local in San Francisco, California, roaming the port and talking to workers to ensure the union's contract was being honored. He became a staff representative in San Pedro, California, in 1954. As he rose within the union's ranks, he moved to New Jersey to represent the union in East Coast shipping matters.[1] Wall was elected

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Activists from Portland, Oregon

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People from Sequim, Washington

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Louis Waldman

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Louis Waldman

Louis Waldman (January 5, 1892 – September 12, 1982) was a leading figure in the Socialist Party of America from the late 1910s and through the middle 1930s, a founding member of the Social Democratic Federation, and a prominent New York labor lawyer. He was expelled from the New York State Assembly in 1920 during the First Red Scare.[1] Background Louis Waldman was born on January 5, 1891, in Yancherudnia, Ukraine, not far from Kiev, the son of a Jewish innkeeper who was one of the few literate men of the village. Waldman emigrated to America in the summer 1909 at the age of 17, arriving in New York City to join his sisters on September 17.[2] Waldman first worked in a metal shop before becoming an apprentice garment lining cutter in one of the sweatshops of the city. He joined a union and participated in the 11-week New York cloakmakers' strike of 1910, while attending high school in the evenings.[3] Upon conclusion of the strike and resumption of his job, Waldman was fired and blacklisted for carrying ou

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Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire

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Lawyers from New York City

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Michael P. Walsh

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Michael P. Walsh

Michael P. Walsh (August 25, 1838 - April 2, 1919) was an American printer and labor union activist from Milwaukee, Wisconsin who held various local elected offices, as well as serving two terms as a member of the Wisconsin State Assembly from Milwaukee, initially as the nominee of the Milwaukee Trades Assembly, a labor federation which was also an antecedent to that state's Union Labor Party; but then was re-elected as a Democrat.[1] Background Walsh was born in Castlebar, County Mayo, Ireland on August 25, 1838; came to Wisconsin in about the year 1842 with his family and settled at Milwaukee, where he received a common school education, beginning his printing education as an apprentice printer in 1851 at the Milwaukee Sentinel. He left Milwaukee in 1859, and later described himself with "has lived and worked in all the principal cities of the country." American Civil War He joined the Union Army as a private in Company E of the 49th New York Volunteer Infantry in June, 1861, rising to orderly sergeant.

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Leaders of American trade unions

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William English Walling

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William English Walling

William English Walling in 1906 William English Walling (1877–1936) (known as "English" to friends and family) was an American labor reformer and Socialist Republican born into a wealthy family in Louisville, Kentucky. He founded the National Women's Trade Union League in 1903. Moved by his investigation of the Springfield Race Riot of 1908 in the state capital of Illinois, he was among the co-founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909.[1] He wrote three books on socialism in the early 20th century. He left the Socialist Party because of its anti-war policy, as he believed United States participation in the Great War was needed to defeat the Central Powers. Early life and education William English Walling was born into wealth in Louisville, Kentucky, the son of Willoughby Walling, a physician who had inherited much real estate, and Rosalind (née English) Walling. He had an older brother, Willoughby George Walling. His father's family were planters who had he

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James H. Walsh

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James H. Walsh

James H. Walsh was an American labor organizer and a prominent Wobbly. Biography Walsh was the leader of the overalls brigade, a group of Wobblies who referred to themselves as "red blooded working stiffs."[1] In 1908, they rode the rails from Portland to the Industrial Workers of the World convention in Chicago. They held propaganda meetings at each stop, singing IWW songs and selling literature to finance their trip.[2] They traveled over 2,500 miles in their "Red Special" cattle car, ate in hobo jungles, and preached revolution in prairie towns.[2][3] While at the convention, they were primarily responsible for the split that drove Daniel DeLeon out of the Chicago IWW. In 1909, Walsh led a free speech fight in Spokane, Washington. References Philip Sheldon Foner, History of the labor movement in the United States, 1980, 4th edition, page 108 Melvyn Dubofsky, We Shall Be All, A History of the Industrial Workers of the World, University of Illinois Press Abridged, 2000, page 78 The I.W.W.: Its

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Dennis Weaver

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Dennis Weaver

William Dennis Weaver[1] (June 4, 1924 – February 24, 2006) was an American actor and former president of the Screen Actors Guild, best known for his work in television and films from the early 1950s until not long before his death in 2006. Weaver's two most notable roles were as Marshal Matt Dillon's trusty partner Chester Goode on the CBS western Gunsmoke and as Deputy Marshal Sam McCloud on the NBC police drama McCloud. He starred in the 1971 television film Duel, the first film of director Steven Spielberg. He is also remembered for his role as the twitchy motel attendant in Orson Welles' film Touch of Evil (1958). Early life Weaver was born June 4, 1924, in Joplin, Missouri, the son of Walter Leon Weaver and his wife Lenna Leora Prather. His father was of English, Irish, Scottish, Cherokee, and Osage ancestry. Weaver wanted to be an actor from childhood. He lived in Shreveport, Louisiana, for several years and for a short time in Manteca, California. He studied at Joplin Junior College, now Missouri So

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Randi Weingarten

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Randi Weingarten

Randi Weingarten (born December 18, 1957)[1] is an American labor leader, attorney, and educator. She is president of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) and a member of the AFL-CIO. She is the former president of the United Federation of Teachers. Randi Weingarten (far right) with former Senator Al Franken Early life Rhonda "Randi" Weingarten was born in 1957 in New York City, to Gabriel and Edith (Appelbaum) Weingarten. Her father was an electrical engineer and her mother a teacher.[1][2] Weingarten grew up in Rockland County, New York, and attended Clarkstown High School North in New City, New York.[2] A congregant of Beth Simchat Torah synagogue, she considers herself a deeply religious Jew.[3][4] Weingarten's interest in trade unions and political advocacy was formed during childhood. Her mother's union went on a seven-week strike when Weingarten was in the eleventh grade. Under New York state's Taylor Law, her mother could have been fired for taking part in a strike. Instead, she was fined

Leaders of American trade unions

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Women legal scholars

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Milton P. Webster

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Milton P. Webster

Milton Price Webster (1881-1965) was an American trade unionist, best remembered as a top leader of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP). As lead official for the union in contract negotiations, Webster was influential in securing a collective bargaining agreement with the Pullman Company — the first national contract won by any black-led American trade union. During the years of World War II Webster was a member of the Fair Employment Practice Committee and its successor organization, attempting to end racial discrimination in the defense industry. Webster also later served as a member of the International Board of the American Federation of Labor. Biography Early years Milton Price Webster was born on April 23, 1881 in Clarksville, Tennessee.[1] His father, Willis, was a barber and owned land in Clarksville with a small farm.[2] Willis had been enslaved as a young man and purchased his freedom. His mother Mary was the daughter of freed black Tennesseans (Julia (Donaldson) and Robert Fogg). Both

Leaders of American trade unions

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Labor unionists from Illinois

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William Weinstone

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William Weinstone

Will Weinstone, 1927. William Wolf Weinstone (1897–1985) was an American Communist politician and labor leader. Weinstone served as Executive Secretary of the unified Communist Party of America, the forerunner of today's Communist Party USA, from October 15, 1921 to February 22, 1922 and was an important figure in the party's activities among the auto workers of Detroit during the 1930s. Background William Weinstone was born December 15, 1897 in Vilnius, then part of the Tsarist Russian Empire. Will was the son of Jewish parents who emigrated from Russia to escape that nation's pervasive anti-semitism during the late Tsarist period. His original surname was "Weinstein," a name which Will Americanized when he was older. Career Early years In June 1919, Weinstone was elected as an alternate delegate to the Left Wing National Conference held in New York City, at which he was seated to replace a regular delegate on the last day of the gathering. Weinstone was elected as a delegate to the founding convention

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Jewish anti-racism activists

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Stan Weir (academic)

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Stan Weir (academic)

Stan Weir (1921–2001) was an influential blue-collar intellectual, socialist, and labor leader. A rank-and-file worker for most of his life, Weir worked as a seaman in the Merchant Marine during World War II, as an auto worker, longshoreman, truck driver, and painter, before taking a position at the University of Illinois, where he taught courses to union locals. Politically, he was a leading figure in the “Third Camp” tendency of Trotskyism, and was a member of the Workers Party and its successor the Independent Socialist League. The character Joe Link in Harvey Swados’s novel Standing Fast was based on Weir. In the 1980s he co-founded Singlejack Books, a publishing house for worker writers. A close friend to James Baldwin, Staughton Lynd and C.L.R. James, Weir was at the forefront of much of the labor movement during the second half of the twentieth century. References Voices from the Rank and File: Remembering Marty Glaberman and Stan Weir by Staughton Lynd, from Viewpoint Magazine In Memoriam: Sta

Leaders of American trade unions

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Industrial Workers of the World

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American labor leaders

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John Wells (filmmaker)

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John Wells (filmmaker)

John Marcum Wells (born May 28, 1956) is an American theater, film and television producer, writer and director. He is best known for his role as executive producer and showrunner of the television series ER, Third Watch, The West Wing, Southland, Shameless, Animal Kingdom and American Woman. His company, John Wells Productions, is currently based at Warner Bros. studios in Burbank, California. Wells is also a labor leader, having served as president of the Writers Guild of America, West from 1999 to 2001 and from 2009 to 2011.[1][2] Early life Wells was born in Alexandria, Virginia, the son of Marjorie Elizabeth (née Risberg) and Llewellyn Wallace Wells, Jr., an Episcopalian minister.[3][4] He has English, Irish, Scottish, Swedish, and Norwegian ancestry.[5] Wells graduated from the Carnegie Mellon School of Drama in 1979. A studio theatre at Carnegie Mellon University bears his name. While at CMU, he was one of the earliest actors to work at City Theatre, a prominent fixture of Pittsburgh theatre.[6] Ca

Leaders of American trade unions

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Screenwriters from Virginia

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Albert Weisbord

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Albert Weisbord

Drawing of Albert Weisbord used in the Communist Press, 1926. Probably drawn by Hugo Gellert. Albert Weisbord (1900–1977) was an American political activist and union organizer. He is best remembered, along his wife Vera Buch, as one of the primary union organizers of the seminal 1926 Passaic Textile Strike and as the founder of a small Trotskyist political organization of the 1930s called the Communist League of Struggle. Biography Early years Albert Weisbord was born December 9, 1900, to a Russian-Jewish family in New York City. His father was a manufacturer.[1] Weisbord attended primary, grammar, and high school in Brooklyn, New York. He worked variously as a newsboy, a clerk in a grocery store, as a worker in a clothing factory, and in a soda shop during his earlier years.[1] Weisbord entered the City College of New York in 1917, joining the Brooklyn Branch of the Socialist Party of America at that same time. He began teaching classes in the English language to immigrants to America at the Rand Schoo

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Activists from New York City

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Samuel Whitcomb Jr.

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Samuel Whitcomb Jr.

Samuel Whitcomb Jr. (September 14, 1792 – March 5, 1879) was a colporteur, journalist and a champion of the working class, public schools and democratic political values. Biographical Note Whitcomb was born in Hanover, Massachusetts. As an adult, he moved across the early United States more commonly than most people of his time. He served in the War of 1812. In 1817 he married Mary Simmons Joy. He held several jobs and careers that included book, peddling, landowner, clerk, and journalist. It was his business of selling books' subscriptions that allowed him to travel the country extensively, giving him opportunities to purchase land at bargaining prices, gather a unique knowledge of the common U.S. people, and to meet interesting and prominent people, including President Thomas Jefferson.[1] Visit to Monticello Two of those he met in 1824 were Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, while trying to sell subscriptions of William Mitford's multivolume book on The History of Greece. Though he did not sell any t

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Don West (educator)

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Don West (educator)

Don West (born Donald Lee West) (June 6, 1906 – September 29, 1992)[1] was an American writer, poet, educator, trade union organizer, civil-rights activist and a co-founder of the Highlander Folk School. Early life and career West was born in Devil's Hollow, Gilmer County, Georgia, the child of North Georgia sharecroppers. In high school he led a protest against an on-campus showing of the film The Birth of a Nation and was eventually expelled for other conflicts. He was also expelled from Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, for leading another protest against the paternalism of the campus, though he eventually returned and graduated in 1929. He went on to study under Alva Taylor and Willard Uphaus at the Vanderbilt Divinity School in Nashville and was influenced by the Social Gospel movement. While a student, he became a Socialist and participated in labor strikes in textile factories and coal mines. Like his eventual collaborator Myles Horton, he travelled to Denmark to tour the Danish f

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Claude C. Williams

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Claude C. Williams

Claude Clossey Williams (1895–1979) was a Presbyterian minister active for more than 50 years in civil rights, race relations, and labor advocacy.[1] He worked with the Southern Tenant Farmers Union, founded the People’s Institute for Applied Religion, and served as the national vice president of the American Federation of Teachers. He was also the director of Commonwealth College in Mena, Arkansas, from 1937-1939. As a young fundamentalist preacher in the rural South, Williams' initial motivation was the spiritual salvation of his parishioners, or in his words, to “save their never-dying, ever-precious souls from the devil’s hell eternal.”[2] This motivation later evolved into a quest for social justice for the poor throughout society, leading to confrontations with white supremacists and lifelong charges of Communist activities. As Williams put it, “I’ve been run out of the best communities, fired from the best churches, and flogged by the best citizens of the South.”[2] Early life Williams was born in r

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Ben H. Williams

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Ben H. Williams

Benjamin "Ben" Hayes Williams was a leader of the Industrial Workers of the World. Life Ben Williams was born in 1877 in Monson, Maine and named after president Rutherford B. Hayes.[1]:83 In 1888, he moved with his mother to Bertrand, Nebraska and started working as a printing apprentice. Williams graduated from Tabor College in 1904 with a bachelor's degree.[2] While at Tabor, he played on the football team, edited a campus magazine, and was president of the Phi Delta Literary Society.[3] He joined the Industrial Workers of the World in 1905 and from 1909 to 1917 edited the IWW's publication, Solidarity.[1]:47 Williams published newspaper articles and authored several works on labor movement.[4] He died in 1964. References Melvyn Dubofsky. We Shall be All: A History of the Industrial Workers of the World. University of Illinois Press, 2000. Catalogue of Tabor College. Tabor, Iowa, 1905. Warren R. Van Tine. Making of the Labor Bureaucrat: Union Leadership in the United States, 1870-1920. Amhe

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Myra Wolfgang

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Myra Wolfgang

Myra K. Wolfgang (May 1914 – April 1976) was a labor leader and women's rights activist in Detroit from the 1930s through the 1970s. She was most active in the labor movement, advocating for the working poor and for women in the workforce. Early life and family Myra (Komaroff) Wolfgang was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada in May 1914 to Jewish Eastern European Immigrants. Her parents, Abraham and Ida Komaroff, raised Myra and her two siblings in a politically liberal environment that valued independent thinking and their Jewish culture. Her parents did not emphasize religion, and chose to marry in Montreal's labor temple rather than a synagogue. Wolfgang was often quoted as saying she was, "a union-made union maid."[1] In 1915 the family moved to Detroit where her father started a business selling real estate. After World War I he opened an office in downtown Detroit and move his family into a larger home on Westminster Avenue.[2] After making her way through the Detroit school system, Myra went to study c

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James Williams (labor leader)

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James Williams (labor leader)

James A. Williams is an American labor leader and President of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUP).[1] Williams is also the current Chairman of American Income Life Insurance Company's Labor Advisory Board.[2] He graduated from Northeast Catholic High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1968. He served in the United States Army from 1969-1971 in the Vietnam War, where he was awarded two Bronze Stars, the Army Accommodation Medal, and an Air Medal.[1] Upon his return home, he became a "journeyman glazier."[1] References Wikimedia Commons has media related to James Williams (labor leader). "JAMES A. WILLIAMS - General President". IUPAT About US. IUPAT. Archived from the original on 2008-09-07. "Labor Advisory Board". American Income Life Insurance Company. Archived from the original on 12 July 2011. Retrieved 12 July 2011.

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William W. Winpisinger

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William W. Winpisinger

William Wayne Winpisinger (December 10, 1924 – December 11, 1997) was the eleventh International President of the million-member International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers from 1977 until his retirement in 1989. Well-read in the economics, history and mission of the American labor movement, he was a forceful and articulate spokesman for organized labor and was often invited to testify before House and Senate committees on legislation affecting working people. During his twelve years as IAM President, he substantially expanded the union's human rights, community services, job safety, public relations and organizing programs. Early life "Wimpy," as he was known, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Joseph "Joe Winnie" Winpisinger, a journeyman printer with The Plain Dealer, and Edith (Knodel) Winpisinger. He was President of his freshman class at John Marshall High School on Cleveland's West Side, but he left highschool before graduating. He enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve on October

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Roy Lee Williams

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Roy Lee Williams

Not to be confused with the American college basketball coach Roy Williams or the American football player, Roy Williams Roy Lee Williams (March 22, 1915 – April 28, 1989) was an American labor leader who was president of the Teamsters from May 15, 1981, to April 14, 1983. Early life and career Born in Ottumwa, Iowa, Williams was one of 12 children in a very poor family. He grew up in the Ozark Mountains in southwestern Missouri. He got work as a truck driver in 1935. Williams served in the United States Army in World War II and personally took 41 German soldiers prisoner, earning him the Silver Star. Teamsters After the war, Williams returned to trucking. He was elected business agent of the union's Wichita, Kansas local in 1948. He later was elected president of Joint Council 56 and president of Teamsters Local 41 in Kansas City, Missouri. He married and had two daughters. In 1955, Williams was elected a trustee of the Central States, Southeast and Southwest Areas Pension Fund, one of the union's larg

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Matthew Woll

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Matthew Woll

Matthew Woll (center). Matthew Woll (January 25, 1880 – June 1, 1956) was president of the International Photo-Engravers Union of North America from 1906 to 1929, an American Federation of Labor (AFL) vice president from 1919 to 1955 and an AFL-CIO vice president from 1955 to 1956. Early life Born in Luxembourg in 1880 to Michael and Janette Woll, the Roman Catholic Wolls emigrated to the United States and settled in Chicago, Illinois. Matthew Woll attended public school until the age of 15, then became an apprentice photo-engraver. He entered the Kent College of Law (then part of Lake Forest University) in 1901. He took night courses, graduated and was admitted to the bar in 1904. Early Trade Union Career In 1906, Woll was elected president of the International Photo-Engravers Union of North America (IPEU). During his tenure, IPEU organized more than 90 percent of all photo-engravers in the United States and Canada. A firm believer in arbitration rather than the strike, Woll forced nearly all IPEU local

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Jerry Wurf

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Jerry Wurf

Jerome "Jerry" Wurf (May 18, 1919 – December 10, 1981) was a U.S. labor leader and president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) from 1964 to 1981. Wurf was a friend of Martin Luther King Jr., and was arrested multiple times for his activism, notably during the Memphis Sanitation Strike[1] and was released just in time to hear Martin Luther King Jr's 'I've Been to the Mountaintop' oratory at the strike, assassination the next day, and attend his funeral. Background Wurf was born in New York City in 1919. The son of immigrants (his father was a tailor and textile worker) from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, he developed polio at the age of four. As a young man growing up in Brighton Beach, he was inclined towards radicalism by his family's poverty and by communists he met. For some time he joined the Young Communist League; he subsequently left it for the Young People's Socialist League. He was a critical of both groups, but preferred the YPSL due to his dislike of Sovie

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Leo Wolman

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Leo Wolman

Leo Wolman (February 24, 1890 – October 2, 1961) was a noted American economist whose work focused on labor economics. He also served on a number of important boards and commissions for the federal government. Early life Wolman was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1890 to Morris and Yetta (Wachsman) Wolman, first generation Polish-Jewish immigrants to the United States.[1] He attended Johns Hopkins University, receiving his A.B. degree in 1911 and his Ph.D. in political economy in 1913.[1][2] After receiving his doctorate, Wolman worked as a special agent for the Commission on Industrial Relations, a U.S. federal government commission which investigated industrial working conditions in the United States from 1912 to 1915.[1] Returning to academia after the Commission ended its work, he taught at Hobart College, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Michigan.[1] After the United States entered World War I in 1917, he served on the Council of National Defense (a U.S. federal government agency which

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William H. Wynn

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William H. Wynn

William H. "Bill" Wynn (1932 – February 21, 2002) was the first president of the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW), and the last president of the Retail Clerks International Union (RCIU), after the latter merged with the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America in 1979, to create the UFCW. He is best known for playing a leading role in completing the above merger, and, through that effort, making a pivotal contribution to the creation of the largest union affiliated to the AFL-CIO at the time. Wynn is also credited for instituting a fierce organizing culture at UFCW. Early life Bill Wynn came from a union family, with both of his parents, plus his uncle and brother-in-law, all active in the United Auto Workers.[1] Wynn became a union member himself in 1948 when, at the age of 15, he started working at The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, or A&P, superstore in his hometown of South Bend, Indiana.[2] Retail Clerks activism and career Wynn was

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Joseph Yablonski

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Joseph Yablonski

Joseph Albert "Jock" Yablonski (March 3, 1910 – December 31, 1969) was an American labor leader in the United Mine Workers in the 1950s and 1960s. He was murdered in 1969 by killers hired by a union political opponent, Mine Workers president Tony Boyle. His death led to significant reforms in the union. Early life and union career Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on March 3, 1910, the son of Polish immigrants,[1] Yablonski began working in the mines as a boy. He became active in the United Mine Workers after his father was killed in a mine explosion. He was first elected to union office in 1934. In 1940, Yablonski was elected as a representative to the international executive board, and in 1958 was appointed president of UMW District 5.[2] Yablonski clashed with Tony Boyle, who became president of the UMW in 1963, over how the union should be run and his view that Boyle did not adequately represent the miners. In 1965, Boyle removed Yablonski as president of District 5 (under reforms enacted by Boyle, dis

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Joseph "Chip" Yablonski

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Joseph "Chip" Yablonski

Joseph Albert "Chip" Yablonski, Jr. (born 1941) is an attorney in Washington, D.C. For much of his career, he was a partner in the firm Yablonski, Both and Edelman; the firm dissolved in 2006, and Yablonski is now a solo practitioner in the Law Offices of Joseph A. Yablonski. Chip Yablonski was born in 1941 to Joseph "Jock" and Margaret Yablonski. He obtained his bachelor's degree from St. Vincent College. He was awarded a J.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law in 1965 (he was managing editor of the law review). Yablonski clerked for Chief Judge Austin Staley on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. Later, he worked as an attorney for the National Labor Relations Board. Father's murder and union activism In the 1960s, Yablonski's father, Jock, made a number of attempts to reform the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA). Jock Yablonski ran for the presidency of UMWA in 1969 against W. A. Boyle and lost in an election riven with fraud. Jock Yablonski sued to overturn the

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Stephen Yokich

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Stephen Yokich

Stephen Phillip Yokich (August 20, 1935 – August 16, 2002)[1] was an American labor union activist who served as President of the United Auto Workers from 1994 to 2002. Early life and union career Yokich was born in Detroit, Michigan, in August 1935 to Stephen and Julia Yokich,[1][2] just six days before the first UAW convention.[1][3] He is of German, Lebanese, Serbian and Syrian descent.[1][4][5] Both of his grandfathers, most of his aunts and uncles, and his father were UAW members.[1][3][5][6][7][8] When he was 22 months old, his mother (a UAW member of Local 174 who was out on strike at the Ternstedt Plant) took him to his first picket line.[1][3][5][6][7][8] His father brought him to a picket line when he was six years old.[9] He served in the United States Air Force from 1952 to 1956, then became an apprentice in 1956 at the Heidrich Tool and Die Company in Oak Park, Michigan.[1][2][3][8][10] He joined UAW Local 155, the same local where his father had once been shop steward.[5][8][9] Many members o

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Kenneth Yablonski

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Kenneth Yablonski

Kenneth Yablonski (February 13, 1934 – September 8, 2002) was a noted attorney with the firm of Yablonski, Costello and Leckie in Washington, Pennsylvania. Kenneth Yablonski was born in 1934 to Joseph "Jock" and Ann Huffman Yablonski. He obtained a bachelor's degree from Waynesburg College in 1956 and received his J.D. from West Virginia University College of Law in 1959. In 1961, he co-founded the firm of Yablonski, Costello and Leckie, and remained with the firm for the rest of his life. In 1964, Yablonski won a precedent-setting case involving benefits to survivors of a mine disaster. A mine explosion occurred at U.S. Steel's Robena No. 3 Mine in Greene County, Pennsylvania on December 8, 1962. A total of 37 miners lost their lives. Yablonski won a court order forcing the local coroner to perform an inquest, which subsequently provided evidence that helped the families win expanded survivors' benefits from the Pennsylvania Workmens' Compensation Board. Father's murder and union activism In the 1960s,

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William H. Young (labor leader)

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William H. Young (labor leader)

William H. Young (born August 16, 1946) is an American labor union leader.[1] He was president of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC) from 2002 to 2009 and also a vice-president of the AFL-CIO.[2] Biography Young was born and raised in San Luis Obispo, California and joined the United States Postal Service in 1965 shortly after graduating from high school. After serving for two years in the US Army, he returned to the postal service and was elected a shop steward of NALC Branch 1115 (later incorporated into Central California Coast Branch 52) and became its president in 1971. In the succeeding years he rose through the union hierarchy first at state, then at national level. He was elected national vice president of the union in 1994 and national executive vice president in 1998. On October 28, 2002, he was elected the 17th president of the NALC (succeeding Vincent R. Sombrotto) after a rank-and-file ballot in which Young received 79% of the votes and took up his post in December of that year.

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Maud Younger

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Maud Younger

Maud Younger (January 10, 1870 – June 25, 1936) was an American suffragist, feminist, and labor activist. Early life Maud Younger was born in San Francisco, California, the daughter of a Scottish immigrant, dentist William John Younger. Her mother Anna Maria Lane, an heiress, died when Maud was twelve years old.[1] It was a prosperous, well-connected family; two of her sisters married Austrian barons, and her father moved to Paris in 1900.[2] Maud Younger was educated in San Francisco and New York. At 31, she visited the New York College Settlement House, and began her work in activism. "I went to see it, stopped for a week, and stayed five years," she recalled.[3] Labor activism Younger took up the cause of working women. She took several waitressing jobs to investigate working conditions in restaurants, and joined the New York Waitresses' Union.[4] She was referred to as ''the millionaire waitress."[5] After the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Younger went back to her hometown to pursue further work in l

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Frederick Nicholas Zihlman

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Frederick Nicholas Zihlman

Frederick Nicholas Zihlman Frederick Nicholas Zihlman (October 2, 1879 – April 22, 1935) was an American politician. Biography Born in Carnegie, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA, Zihlman moved to Maryland with his parents, who settled in Cumberland in 1882. He attended the public schools, and entered a glass factory in 1890 as an apprentice glass blower. He was later president of the local flint-glass workers' union from 1904 to 1909 and was a member of the national executive board in 1905 and 1906. He served as president of the Allegany Trades Council from 1904 to 1909, and as president of the Maryland State Federation of Labor in 1906 and 1907. He engaged in the real estate and insurance business in Cumberland in 1912. Politics Zihlman served as a member of the Maryland State Senate from 1909 to 1917, serving as Republican floor leader in 1914 and 1916. He was an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1914 to the Sixty-fourth US Congress, but was elected two years later as a Republican to the Sixty

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Steve Young (police officer)

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Steve Young (police officer)

Steve Young (January 6, 1953 – January 9, 2003) was national president of the Fraternal Order of Police in 2001.[1] Early life Born Kermit Steven Young on January 26, 1953 in Upper Sandusky, Ohio. He was a Lieutenant with the Marion Police Department in Marion, Ohio. Death Young died of cancer on January 9, 2003, at the young age of 50.[2] Young started both his FOP and police careers in 1976 with the Marion Police Department. He served as the state FOP president from 1988 to 1999 and was elected national president in 2001, receiving unanimous support after he ran unopposed. Young also served on state and national committees including President George W. Bush's Homeland Security Committee, to which he was appointed in 2002. He was inducted into the Department of Labor Hall of Honor in 2003.[3] References "U.S. Department of Labor - Labor Hall of Fame - Steve Young". 17 December 2007. Archived from the original on 17 December 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2016.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unkno

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W. C. Zumach

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W. C. Zumach

William C. Zumach (October 16, 1887 – July 1981) was an American Socialist from Milwaukee who served one term (1917–1921) as a member of the Wisconsin State Senate representing the Milwaukee-based 6th Senate district.[1] Background Zumach was born on a farm in Black Creek, Wisconsin but moved with his parents to Milwaukee three years later and attended Milwaukee Public Schools. At the age of 16 he ran away from home and traveled all over the United States and Mexico for three years, working at railroad construction, railroad bridge building, railroad freight transfers, on dredge boats, in logging and turpentine camps; prospected, drove pack trains in mountains; and worked on fruit, grain and hop ranches, and in hotels and factories. He returned to Milwaukee in 1910 and was employed in the engineering department for the City of Milwaukee. In 1913 he was appointed an inspector for the Wisconsin Railroad Commission, and in 1914 was appointed special agent for the U. S. Commission on Industrial Relations to inv

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Reg Weaver

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Reg Weaver

Reg Weaver is an American labor leader who served as president of the National Education Association. He is vice president of Education International.[1] A graduate of Danville High School in Illinois, he holds degrees from Illinois State University and Roosevelt University. He completed his second term as NEA president on August 31, 2008.[2] References http://www.ei-ie.org/en/aboutus/ NEA bio retrieved 21 jun 2007

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James P. Maher

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James P. Maher

James Paul Maher (November 3, 1865 – July 31, 1946) was an American labor union official, businessman, and politician. A Democrat, he is most notable for his service as a U.S. Representative from New York, a position he held for five terms (1911-1921). Early life Maher was born in Brooklyn, New York, one of several children born to Irish immigrants John and Maria Maher.[1] He attended the parochial schools of Brooklyn and graduated from Brooklyn's St. Patrick's Academy.[2] Apprenticed as a hatter, he moved to Danbury, Connecticut in 1887 and was employed as a hat sizer and in other positions on the factory floor.[2] Career He was active in his local union and the American Federation of Labor.[2] Maher became treasurer of the United Hatters of North America in 1897, a post he held until his election to Congress.[1][2] As a labor union leader, he gained a reputation for successful mediation and adjudication of worker-management disputes.[2] Maher returned to Brooklyn in 1902[2] and was active with several c

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James M. O'Brien

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James M. O'Brien

James M. O'Brien (1890–1958) was an American politician who served as mayor of Revere, Massachusetts. Early life O'Brien was born in 1890 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He served in the armed forces during World War I. Prior to entering politics he worked as a conductor the Bay State Street Railway and served as president and business agent of the railway's Carmen's Union.[1][2] Politics In 1920, O'Brien was named Revere's assistant commissioner of public works. He was fired by mayor John E. Walsh in November 1925.[3] The following month the Revere city council granted him a permit to open a gas station.[4] In 1929, O'Brien was elected city treasurer. During his tenure, O'Brien, a Democrat, clashed with the city's Republican mayor Andrew A. Casassa. In 1934, O'Brien challenged Casassa in the city's first nonpartisan election. He topped the ticket in the four-way primary election which also included former state senator Conde Brodbine and state representative Thomas F. Carroll. Crime was the main issue duri

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David A. Goodman

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David A. Goodman

David A. Goodman is an American writer, producer, and president of the Writers Guild of America West. He has been a writer for several television series, such as The Golden Girls,[1] his first job, Futurama, where he was also a co-executive producer and wrote the notable Star Trek parody episode "Where No Fan Has Gone Before", and Star Trek: Enterprise.[2] Goodman produced Stewie Griffin: The Untold Story, and is the writer of Fred: The Movie, a 2010 film based on the Fred Figglehorn YouTube series, as well as the sequel, Fred 2: Night of the Living Fred. Biography Goodman is a graduate of the University of Chicago, where he earned a BA in 1984. During commentary for the Futurama episode "Where No Fan Has Gone Before", which he wrote, Goodman mentioned that he is a dedicated Star Trek fan, with an encyclopedic knowledge of the original series, and correctly identified every episode number and name mentioned in dialogue. He also states in the commentary that his work for Futurama for the Star Trek episode w

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Beau Willimon

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Beau Willimon

Pack Beauregard Willimon[1] (born October 26, 1977) is an American playwright and screenwriter. He helped develop the American version of the series House of Cards and served as showrunner for the first four seasons. In 2018, Willimon created the drama series The First for Hulu, about a crew of astronauts & the first manned mission to Mars.[2] Early life and education Beau Willimon was born in Alexandria, Virginia,[3] to Nancy and Henry Pack Willimon.[4] His father was a captain[4] in the United States Navy and the family moved frequently.[5] Willimon lived in Hawaii, San Francisco, California,[6] and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, before settling in St. Louis, Missouri,[1] after Willimon's father retired to become a lawyer.[1] Willimon attended John Burroughs School, where he took drama classes taught by Jon Hamm[7][8] and graduated in 1995. He majored in visual arts and received a BA from Columbia University in 1999.[9] When he was an undergraduate, he met Jay Carson.[9][10] In 1998, he worked as a vol

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Morton Bahr

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Morton Bahr

Morton Bahr (July 18, 1926[1][2] – July 30, 2019) was an American labor union leader. He served as the president of the Communications Workers of America from 1985 to 2005, and as the president of the Jewish Labor Committee from 1999 to 2001. He served on the AFL–CIO executive council. [3] Bahr was born in Brooklyn, N.Y. and enrolled Brooklyn College at age 16, playing varsity baseball. He left before he graduated to enlist in the Merchant Marines during WWII.[4] References https://www.s9.com/Biography/bahr-morton/ [1] "Morton Bahr, who led Communications Workers of America, is dead at 93". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. August 2, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019. "CWA President Emeritus Morton Bahr Dies at 93". CWA. Retrieved 7 October 2019.

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