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20th-century American women singers


Peggy Connelly

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Peggy Connelly

Peggy Connelly (September 25, 1931 – June 11, 2007) was a singer and actress. Connelly was born in Shreveport, Louisiana and raised in Fort Worth, Texas. She had a career as a singer and actress, starting with local dance bands (the first Harvey Anderson's) in the Fort Worth-Dallas area. In 1956 she recorded an album of standards, Peggy Connelly with Rusell Garcia – That Old Black Magic, for Bethlehem Records, reissued by Fresh Sound on Russell Garcia's Wigville Band.[1] She also recorded two albums with The New Christy Minstrels. In 1957 she married Dick Martin.[2] They divorced in the early 1960s.[3] Connelly appeared in The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing (1955), Houseboat (1958), and the television show Take a Good Look with Ernie Kovacs.[2] She moved to Europe in the early 1970s and worked as a single act until the mid-1990s, when she, Sarah Tullamore and Wendy Taylor formed a trio called The Jazzberries. The Jazzberries played extensively in Paris and throughout Europe until they disbanded in 2000. Re

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People from Fort Worth, Texas

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Shawn Colvin

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Shawn Colvin

Shawn Colvin (born January 10, 1956)[1] is an American singer-songwriter and musician. While Colvin has been a solo recording artist for decades, she is perhaps best known for her 1997 Grammy Award-winning song "Sunny Came Home". Early life Colvin was born Shawna Lee Colvin in Vermillion, South Dakota, and spent her youth in Carbondale, Illinois and London, Ontario, Canada.[2] She is the second of four children.[3] She learned to play guitar at the age of 10[2] and grew up listening to her father's collection of music, which included artists such as Pete Seeger and the Kingston Trio.[4] Career Her first official paid gig came just after she started college at Southern Illinois University. With a strip of bars down the main street it wasn’t difficult to find a gig. “For $30 I played four 45-minute sets.” For the next year she was either playing somewhere or sitting in with someone else and started attracting a local following. Broadening her horizons, Colvin put a band together that featured Dennis Conroy

21st-century American women guitarists

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20th-century American women guitarists

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Fantasy Records artists

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Mapy Cortés

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Mapy Cortés

Maria del Pilar Cordero, better known as Mapy Cortés (Santurce, San Juan, Puerto Rico March 1, 1910 – Isla Verde, Puerto Rico August 2, 1998) was a Puerto Rican stage, film and television actress and dancer who participated in many films during the Golden Age of Mexican cinema, where she became one of the industry's most beloved and bankable stars of the 1940s. Biography Mapy Cortés began experimenting as an actress since an early age, working in Puerto Rican amateur theater. In the early 1930s, Mapy traveled to New York City, where she married childhood friend Fernando "Papi" Cortés. Under contract to a theatrical troupe headlined by Dominican baritone Eduardo Brito, the couple traveled to Spain. After the company disbanded, the couple began performing in different teatro de revista companies, primarily in Barcelona. In 1933, Mapy Cortés made her film debut as one of the two female leads in the comedy Dos Mujeres y un Don Juan (Two Women and a don Juan). By that time Cortés had a nephew, Paquito Cordero, w

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Puerto Rican expatriates in Mexico

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Randy Crawford

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Randy Crawford

Veronica "Randy" Crawford (born February 18, 1952, Macon, Georgia)[1] is an American jazz and R&B singer. She has been more successful in Europe than in the United States, where she has not entered the Billboard Hot 100 as a solo artist.[1] Her only appearance on the Hot 100 chart was in 1979 as a guest vocalist on The Crusaders's top 40 hit "Street Life". She has had five Top 20 hits in the UK, including her 1980 number 2 hit, "One Day I'll Fly Away", as well as six UK Top 10 albums. Despite her American nationality, she won Best British Female Solo Artist in recognition of her popularity in the UK at the 1982 Brit Awards.[2] In the late 2000s she received her first two Grammy Award nominations. Career Crawford first performed at club gigs from Cincinnati to Saint-Tropez, but made her name in mid 1970s in New York, where she sang with jazzmen George Benson and Cannonball Adderley.[3] She signed with Columbia Records and released her first single, "Knock On Wood" / "If You Say the Word" in 1972.[4][5]

Warner Records artists

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20th-century American women singers

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Smooth jazz singers

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Marilyn Cooper

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Marilyn Cooper

L-R: Elizabeth Taylor, Carmen Guitterez, Marilyn Cooper, and Carol Lawrence from the original Broadway cast of West Side Story sing "I Feel Pretty" (1957) Marilyn Cooper (December 14, 1934 – April 22, 2009)[1][2] was an American actress known primarily for her work on the Broadway stage. Life and career Born in New York City, Cooper made her Broadway debut in 1956 in the chorus of Mr. Wonderful. Next she was in the chorus of a revival of Brigadoon. In 1957, she played Rosalia, a Sharks girl who wants to go back to Puerto Rico ("Puerto Rico, you lovely island"), in the original Broadway production of West Side Story. In 1959, she went on to create the ensemble role of Agnes, the leader of the Hollywood Blondes, in the original Broadway production Gypsy. Before leaving the show, she briefly understudied the title role of Louise and played the part for one performance without having had an opportunity to rehearse Act 2.[3] In 1962, she graduated to a leading role, playing the ingenue in I Can Get It for You

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Drama Desk Award winners

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American musical theatre actresses

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Marilyn Cotlow

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Marilyn Cotlow

Cotlow in 1952. Marilyn Cotlow (born January 10, 1924) is an American lyric coloratura soprano best remembered for originating the role of Lucy in Gian Carlo Menotti's The Telephone. She sang professionally during the 1940s and 1950s in the United States and Europe, performing with such companies as the Metropolitan Opera. After retiring from the stage, Cotlow taught voice at the Peabody Conservatory and currently teaches privately out of her home. Several of her students have gone on to have successful careers, including Alessandra Marc and Jennifer Wilson. Early life and education Marilyn Rose Cotlow was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on January 10, 1924, to Sander and Bernice Cotlow. She had two brothers: William and Phillip. During the Great Depression, her father moved the family of five to Los Angeles in an effort to find work as an attorney. He was an amateur singer, who only allowed his family to listen to classical music or singers of good stature and renown. Marilyn Cotlow began vocal studies w

20th-century American opera singers

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20th-century American women singers

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Women music educators

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Muriel Costa-Greenspon

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Muriel Costa-Greenspon

Muriel Costa-Greenspon (December 1, 1937 – December 26, 2005) was an American mezzo-soprano who had a lengthy career at the New York City Opera from 1963 to 1993. She portrayed a gallery of character roles that extended from twentieth-century works by Leonard Bernstein, Benjamin Britten, Carlisle Floyd, Lee Hoiby, Arthur Honegger, Gian Carlo Menotti, and Douglas Moore, to the contralto heroines of Gilbert and Sullivan, and comic scene-stealers by Puccini, Mozart, and Donizetti. Biography Born Muriel Greenspon in Detroit to deaf parents, she attended Cass Technical High School and later to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she earned bachelor's (1959) and master's (1960) degrees in vocal performance. She studied voice under Joseph Blatt at the University of Michigan and later with Sam Morgenstern in New York City. She made her professional debut with the Detroit Grand Opera Association at the Detroit Opera House as Miss Todd in The Old Maid and the Thief in 1960. Over the next decade she appeare

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Classical musicians from Michigan

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Little Miss Cornshucks

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Little Miss Cornshucks

Little Miss Cornshucks (or Lil' Miss Cornshucks) was the stage name of Mildred Jorman (born Mildred Elizabeth Cummings; May 26, 1923 – November 11, 1999).[1] She was an American rhythm and blues and jazz singer and songwriter. In her stage show from the 1940s and early 1950s she portrayed herself as a simple farm girl. Her vocal style inspired later R&B and soul singers, among them LaVern Baker, Ruth Brown, Aretha Franklin, Otis Redding, Sam Cooke, Wynona Carr and Billy Wright.[2][3][4] Her own career never achieved full recognition in her lifetime.[5] Life Cummings was born in Dayton, Ohio.[4] She was the youngest child of a large musical family of African-American origin. Mildred began to sing with her sisters, as the Cummings Sisters, performing spirituals in the Dayton area. By the time she was seven, she was making solo appearances in young people's amateur talent shows. She developed a stage wardrobe that appealed to black southern agricultural workers who at that time were migrating from the so

American female jazz singers

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20th-century American women singers

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Jazz musicians from Ohio

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Nikka Costa

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Nikka Costa

Domenica "Nikka" Costa (born June 4, 1972) is an American singer whose music combines elements of pop, soul, and blues. She also had a career as a child singer starting in the early 1980s. She is the daughter of music producer Don Costa and is married to Australian producer/songwriter Justin Stanley. Early life Nikka Costa was born in Tokyo, Japan.[1] Her father Don Costa was a producer and musician. During her childhood Costa was surrounded by famous musicians and traveled around the world with her father.[1] At age 5 Costa recorded a single with Hawaiian singer Don Ho. Italian producers Danny B. Besquet and Tony Renis were working with her father on the album Don Costa Plays the Beatles when they had a brainstorm to produce an album with Nikka singing while her father played acoustic guitar. The album was well received in Europe and Costa became known as a child star. At age 9 Costa sang with Frank Sinatra in an appearance on the lawn of the White House.[2] Costa's career as a recording artist under her

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1983 albums

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21st-century women singers

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Roberta Dodd Crawford

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Roberta Dodd Crawford

Roberta Dodd Crawford (5 August 1897 – 14 June 1954) was an African-American lyric soprano and voice instructor who performed throughout the United States and Paris in the 1920s and 1930s. Roberta was born in Bonham, Texas before studying singing in Nashville, Chicago, and Paris. While in Paris, she married Prince Kojo Tovalou Houénou of Dahomey. When Houénou died in a French prison, Roberta was left without access to their marriage funds and returned to Paris where she lived through the Nazi occupation from 1940 until 1944. After the war, she returned to Texas where she died in 1954 in Dallas. Early life Roberta Dodd Crawford was born on 5 August 1897 in the Tank Town section of Bonham, Texas.[1] She was one of eight children of Joe and Emma Dodd (née Dunlap). She was active in the church choir and any other musical opportunities in Bonham while growing up. She worked at the Curtis Boarding House in town in 1914 and would often perform regular songs for customers.[2] Because of her singing talents, five wh

20th-century American opera singers

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Classical musicians from Texas

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Linda Creed

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Linda Creed

Linda Diane Creed (December 6, 1948 – April 10, 1986), also known by her married name Linda Epstein, was an American singer-songwriter and lyricist who teamed up with songwriter-producer Thom Bell to produce some of the most successful Philadelphia soul groups of the 1970s. Career Born in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia in December 1948, Creed was active in music at Germantown High School. After graduation, Creed decided against college and devoted her energies to writing and producing music. Her career was launched in 1970 when singer Dusty Springfield recorded her song "Free Girl." That same year, Creed teamed with Bell, a staff writer, producer, and arranger at Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff's record label Philadelphia International Records.[1] Their first songwriting collaboration, "Stop, Look, Listen (To Your Heart)", became a Top 40 pop hit for the Stylistics, beginning an extended collaboration that also yielded the group's most successful recordings, including "You Are Everything", "Betcha by Gol

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Musicians from Philadelphia

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Lella Cuberli

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Lella Cuberli

Lella Cuberli (September 29, 1945) is an American soprano, particularly associated with the Belcanto repertory. Born Lela Alice Terrell in Austin, Texas, she studied in Dallas and later in Milan. She made her professional debut in Siena, in 1973, and for some years pursued her career mainly in Italy, making her mark in Rossini, Donizetti and Bellini operas. She sang at Martina Franca from 1976 to 1982, as Amenaide, Adalgisa, and in Paisiello operas. She appeared at La Scala from 1978 to 1985, as Aminta, Ginevra, Rodelinda, Giunia, Contessa di Folleville . Other roles at the major opera houses of Italy have included; Donna Anna, Fiordiligi, Rossini's Elisabetta and Desdemona, etc. She also appeared at the Paris Opéra, the Aix-en-Provence Festival, the Vienna State Opera and the Salzburg Festival. Returning to the United States, she made her debut at the Lyric Opera of Chicago in 1989, as Amenaide, and at the Metropolitan Opera in 1990, as Semiramide. In 1990, she also made her debut at Covent Garden in Lond

20th-century American opera singers

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Women music educators

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Sheryl Crow

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Sheryl Crow

Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American musician, singer, songwriter, and actress. Her music incorporates elements of pop, rock, country, jazz, and blues. She has released ten studio albums, four compilations, two live albums, and has contributed to a number of film soundtracks. Her songs include "All I Wanna Do", "If It Makes You Happy", "My Favorite Mistake", "Everyday Is a Winding Road" and the theme song for the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies. She has sold more than 50 million albums worldwide.[1] Crow has garnered nine Grammy Awards (out of 32 nominations) from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. As an actress, Crow has appeared on various television shows including 30 Rock, Cop Rock, GCB, Cougar Town, Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert's Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear, as well as One Tree Hill.[2] Childhood and education Sheryl Suzanne Crow was born in Kennett, Missouri, the daughter of Bernice (née Cain), a piano teacher, and Wendell Wyatt Crow, a law

American pop singers

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21st-century American women guitarists

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Katie Crippen

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Katie Crippen

Catherine "Katie" Crippen (November 17, 1895 – November 25, 1929), also billed as Little Katie Crippen or Ella White, was an African-American entertainer and singer. Crippen was born in Philadelphia. She performed at Edmond's Cellar in New York City about 1920.[1] In 1921, she recorded four sides for Black Swan Records in the classic female blues style under her name and one under the pseudonym of Ella White, accompanied by Fletcher Henderson's Orchestra.[2][3] She toured in 1922–23 as the star of a revue, "Liza and Her Shuffling Sextet", which included Fats Waller.[1][4] She subsequently formed a revue, "Katie Crippen and Her Kids", in which she was accompanied by a teenaged Count Basie.[5][6] She was managed by her husband and musician Lou Henry.[7] In the later 1920s she appeared in revues at the Lafayette Theater in New York City and toured the RKO theater circuit with Dewey Brown as Crippen & Brown.[1] After a long illness, Crippen died of cancer in New York City on November 25, 1929. She is buri

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Deaths from cancer in New York (state)

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Lolita Cuevas

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Lolita Cuevas

Lolita Cuevas (1910–1994) was a Puerto Rican singer and actress. Her work as a vocalist was based on a compendium of Caribbean songs, and her interpretations of them are considered a fundamental piece in the historiography of Haitian music. Biography Lolita Cuevas was born in Mayagüez in 1910. Her family moved to Haiti when she was two, where she then spent her childhood. At the age of fifteen she gave her first concert as a professional singer in Port-au-Prince. From there her career took off, and she frequently sang for the radio and concerts around the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States. In 1941 her interpretation of La Borinqueña became popular in Puerto Rico, and she recorded versions of "In My Old San Juan" in French and Creole. In 1953 she recorded the album "Haitian Folk Songs" with guitarist and arranger Frantz Casseus. She died in 1994. External links "Mujeres pioneras puertorriqueñas" Consultado el 6 de abril de 2010 notas contenidas en el álbum "Haitian folk songs" del Smi

20th-century American women singers

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Haitian female singers

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Puerto Rican female singers

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Jill Cunniff

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Jill Cunniff

Jill Cunniff (born August 17, 1966) is an American musician and member of the band Luscious Jackson. Cunniff was born in New York City and attended college in San Francisco.[1][2] After returning to New York in 1991, she formed Luscious Jackson with friend Gabby Glaser. Cunniff plays bass, sings lead vocals, and has been the chief songwriter of the band.[3] Cunniff appeared in a 1996 episode of the Adult Swim series Space Ghost Coast to Coast as herself. Cunniff joined bandmate Vivian Trimble under the name Kostars and recorded an album released in 1996. In 2002, she formed a house music group named the Cooler Kids. Cunniff released a solo album, City Beach, in early 2007.[4][5] References "Jill Cunniff". AllMusic. Carlson, Jen (20 June 2007). "Jill Cunniff, Musician". Gothamist. Archived from the original on 29 November 2015. Retrieved 13 August 2014. Browne, David (6 November 1994). "RECORDINGS VIEW; A City-Cool Foursome Groovin' to the Beat". The New York Times. Retrieved 13 August 2014. He

20th-century American women singers

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21st-century American composers

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20th-century women singers

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Johnna Lee Cummings

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Johnna Lee Cummings

Johnna Lee Cummings is an American pop music singer known for her lead vocals with the early 90s girl group Boy Krazy; under the direction of Stock Aitken Waterman, Boy Krazy became a one-hit wonder on American Top 40 music charts with their hit song "That's What Love Can Do" which was originally released in 1991, but became a bigger hit after it was remixed and re-released two years later. Early life Cummings was born and raised in Philadelphia and moved to New York City at the age of 17.[1] Boy Krazy Boy Krazy had significant dance club success with their singles in the UK and the US and Canada. "That's What Love Can Do" is their most famous track, where it hit #18 in America in 1993, nearly 2 years after its release. The song had charted in the UK upon initial release at #86 in 1991. It re-entered the charts at #80 coinciding with the increase in American popularity. The American follow-up, "Good Times With Bad Boys" peaked at #59 in the US. In the UK, the group's second single released in that territo

20th-century American women singers

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20th-century women singers

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American female pop singers

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Linda Dangcil

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Linda Dangcil

Linda Dangcil (June 19, 1941 – May 7, 2009) was an American actress and dancer best known for her roles as Sister Ana in the ABC television series The Flying Nun and Carmen 'Raya' Alonso in the animated series Jem.[1] Dangcil was a native of San Francisco, California.[1] She graduated from Immaculate Heart High School in Los Angeles.[1] She returned to the high school throughout her career to choreograph and assist the school's theater productions.[1] Career She appeared on Broadway when she was a teenager in the 1950s in Peter Pan opposite Mary Martin, as well as in the show's television production.[1] As a result of her work in Peter Pan, the show's co-director, Jerome Robbins, selected Dangcil as one of the main dancers in the 1961 film adaptation of West Side Story.[1] She was cast as Sister Ana in The Flying Nun, which ran on ABC from 1967 until 1970. The series was set at the Convent San Tanco located near San Juan, Puerto Rico. Dangcil appeared as Sister Ana in 37 episodes of the show.[1] Dangcil'

20th-century American women singers

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20th-century American dancers

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Alumni of Immaculate Heart High School, Los Ang...

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Karen Dalton

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Karen Dalton

Karen J. Dalton (born Jean Karen Cariker; July 19, 1937 – March 19, 1993) was an American folk blues singer, guitarist, and banjo player. She was associated with the early 1960s Greenwich Village folk music scene, particularly with Fred Neil, the Holy Modal Rounders, and Bob Dylan.[1] Although she did not enjoy much commercial success during her lifetime, her music has gained significant recognition since her death. Artists like Nick Cave[2], Devendra Banhart[3], and Joanna Newsom[4] have noted her as an influence. Life and career Dalton was born Jean Karen Cariker in Bonham, Texas,[5] but was raised in Enid, Oklahoma. She also lived in Stillwater, Oklahoma and Lawrence, Kansas.[6] With two divorces behind her at the age of 21, Dalton left Oklahoma and arrived in Greenwich Village, New York City in the early 1960s.[7] She brought her twelve string guitar, long-neck banjo, and at least one of her two children with her.[5] And according to her daughter Abralyn Baird, at that point Dalton had lost two of her b

20th-century American women singers

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Musicians from Enid, Oklahoma

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Musicians from Oklahoma

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Vivian Dandridge

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Vivian Dandridge

Vivian Alferetta Dandridge (April 22, 1921 – October 26, 1991) was an American singer, actress and dancer. Dandridge is best known as being the older sister of actress and singer Dorothy Dandridge and the daughter of actress Ruby Dandridge. Dandridge was a member of the Dandridge Sisters musical group, along with Etta Jones and Dorothy Dandridge from 1934 until the group disbanded in 1940. Dandridge went on to appear in minor roles on films and television from 1940 through the early–1960's. Never really achieving notable success as her younger sister, Dandridge disappeared from the public eye by 1970. Dandridge died after suffering a stroke on October 26, 1991 at age 70. Early life and career Dandridge was born in Cleveland, Ohio, to Cyril Dandridge (October 25, 1895 – July 9, 1989),[2][3] and the former Ruby Jean Butler (March 3, 1900 – October 17, 1987), an aspiring entertainer. Dandridge's parents separated shortly before the birth of her sister Dorothy.[4] Initially, Ruby Dandridge put her two girls to

African-American actresses

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African-American female singers

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African-American female dancers

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Sis Cunningham

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Sis Cunningham

Agnes "Sis" Cunningham (February 19, 1909 – June 27, 2004)[1] was an American musician, best known for her involvement as a performer and publicist of folk music and protest songs. She was the founding editor of Broadside magazine, which she published with her husband Gordon Friesen and their daughters. Early life Agnes Cunningham was born in Oklahoma in 1909, the daughter of Ada Boyce and William Cunningham,[2] Blaine County, Oklahoma [small farmer], fiddler. Her father was a socialist and follower of Eugene Debs, socialist leader. As a child, she learned piano, accordion, and musical arrangement. In 1929, she attended the Weatherford (Oklahoma) Teachers' College where she studied music. After graduating from Weatherford Teachers' College, Agnes Cunningham worked in the public school system teaching music.[2] In 1932, Agnes Cunningham went on to the Commonwealth Labor College near Mena, Arkansas, where she studied labor organizing and Marxism. [Pietaro, 2004].[3] During her time there, Agnes Cunningham als

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Women folklorists

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20th-century women singers

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Phyllis Curtin

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Phyllis Curtin

Phyllis Curtin in 2010 Phyllis Curtin (née Smith; December 3, 1921 – June 5, 2016) was an American classical soprano who had an active career in operas and concerts from the early 1950s through the 1980s. She was known for her creation of new roles such as the title role in the Carlisle Floyd opera Susannah, Catherine Earnshaw in Floyd's Wuthering Heights, and in other works by this composer.[1] She was a dedicated song recitalist and retired from singing in 1984. She was named Boston University's Dean Emerita, College of Fine Arts in 1991.[1] Education and early career Born Phyllis Smith in Clarksburg, West Virginia, Curtin studied singing with Olga Averino at Wellesley College where she earned a bachelor's degree in Political Science. She pursued graduate studies in vocal performance under Boris Goldovsky at the New England Conservatory. In 1946 she made her professional opera debut with Goldovsky's opera company, the New England Opera Theater, as Tatyana in Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin.[2][3

20th-century American opera singers

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20th-century women singers

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Vanessa Daou

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Vanessa Daou

Vanessa Daou (born October 4, 1967) is an American singer, songwriter, poet, visual artist and dancer. Most notably a musician, her work is known among electronica, nu jazz and trip hop circles for her trademark spoken word and aspirated singing style as well as its erotic and literary subtexts. Daou's songs are represented by Downtown Music Publishing. Formative years Daou was born and spent her early childhood in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, relocating in 1984 to attend boarding school in Massachusetts. As a young adult, she attended Vassar College for two years and spent several years in New York City's Hell's Kitchen area before earning a scholarship to study dance at Columbia University. There, she would train with choreographer Eric Hawkins and explore visual art with Barry Moser and poetry with Kenneth Koch, whom she cites as having sparked her interest in spoken word. Daou ultimately graduated cum laude with a visual arts and art history degree from Barnard College/Columbia and frequently appear

American pop singers

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American women in electronic music

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20th-century American women singers

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Martha Davis (singer)

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Martha Davis (singer)

Martha Davis (December 14, 1917 – April 6, 1960) was an American singer and pianist whose musical comedy act, "Martha Davis & Spouse", was popular in the late 1940s and 1950s.[1][2] Career Davis was born in Wichita, Kansas, and raised in Chicago, Illinois. By the mid-1930s, she had met and been influenced by Fats Waller, and performed regularly as a singer and pianist in Chicago clubs. In 1939, she met, and later married, bass player Calvin Ponder (October 17, 1917 - December 26, 1970), who went on to play in Earl Hines' band. In 1948, Davis and Ponder moved to California, and Davis developed her recording career on Jewel Records in Hollywood with a trio including Ponder, Ralph Williams (guitar) and Lee Young (drums). Their cover of Dick Haymes' pop hit "Little White Lies" reached # 11 on the Billboard R&B chart, followed by a duet with Louis Jordan, "Daddy-O" in 1948, which reached #7 on the R&B chart that year. Davis and Ponder also began performing together on stage, developing a musical

20th-century American women singers

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Musicians from Wichita, Kansas

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Skeeter Davis

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Skeeter Davis

Skeeter Davis (born Mary Frances Penick; December 30, 1931 – September 19, 2004) was an American country music singer who sang crossover pop music songs including 1962's "The End of the World". She started out as part of the Davis Sisters as a teenager in the late 1940s, eventually landing on RCA Victor. In the late 1950s, she became a solo star. One of the first women to achieve major stardom in the country music field as a solo vocalist, she was an acknowledged influence on Tammy Wynette and Dolly Parton and was hailed as an "extraordinary country/pop singer" by The New York Times music critic Robert Palmer.[1] Life and career 1931–1947: Early life Davis was born Mary Frances Penick on December 30, 1931,[2] the first of seven children born to farmer William Lee and Sarah Rachel Penick (née Roberts), in Dry Ridge, Kentucky.[3] Because her grandfather thought she had a lot of energy for a young child, he nicknamed Mary Frances "Skeeter" (slang for mosquito).[4] When Davis was a toddler, her great-uncle was

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Kathryn Day

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Kathryn Day

Kathryn Day (née Bouleyn) is an American opera singer who has had an active international career spanning five decades. She began her career as a leading soprano under the name Kathryn Bouleyn in the 1970s and 1980s with companies like the New York City Opera, the San Francisco Opera, and the Opera Theater of Saint Louis. With the latter institution she created the role of Cora in the world premiere of Stephen Paulus' The Postman Always Rings Twice (1982). In the 1990s Day transitioned to leading mezzo-soprano roles with the aid of companies like the Seattle Opera and the Opéra de Montréal. In 2003 she portrayed Jeanne Loiuse de Pontalba in the world premiere of Thea Musgrave's Pontalba at the New Orleans Opera. She has been a regular presence at the Metropolitan Opera in mainly comprimario roles since 2005. She has appeared on several broadcasts of the Metropolitan Opera Live in HD. She has sometimes been billed as Kathryn Bouleyn Day. Education and early career as a soprano Born in Philadelphia, Day stud

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Lynn Davis (singer)

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Lynn Davis (singer)

Lynn Davis (born July 12, 1958) is an American singer, songwriter, musician, and record producer.[1] She rose to prominence after joining The George Duke Band in 1977. During her time with the band, she sang lead vocals on some of their biggest hits: "I Want You for Myself", "Party Down", and "Reach Out". Under the guidance of Epic Records musician and mentor George Duke, Davis continued booking success by contributing background vocals and writing songs for many singers including Tracie Spencer, La Toya Jackson, Patrice Rushen, Anita Baker, and many other singers.[2] Davis's musical genre has varied throughout her career including R&B, funk, soul, funk, adult contemporary, old skool, psychedelia, and pop. Her artistic influences include George Duke, Chaka Khan, Marvin Gaye, and Earth, Wind, and Fire. Throughout her career, Davis has written songs and contributed background vocals for over 100 different singers and musical groups.[3] Known for her wide, high-reaching vocal range, she is recognized as o

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Margaret Daum

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Margaret Daum

Margaret Daum Margaret Daum (March 25, 1906 – February 23, 1977) was an American classical soprano. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Daum studied singing at the Ithaca Conservatory of Music where she graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1928. In 1935 she appeared in several operettas by Gilbert and Sullivan on Broadway, portraying Casilda in The Gondoliers, Edith in The Pirates of Penzance, Elsie Maynard in The Yeomen of the Guard, Josephine in H.M.S. Pinafore, the Plaintiff in Trial by Jury, and Yum-Yum in The Mikado. She may be best-remembered for creating roles in the world premieres of two operas by Gian Carlo Menotti: the title role in Amelia Goes to the Ball (1 April 1937 at the Philadelphia Academy of Music) and Laetitia in The Old Maid and the Thief (on NBC Radio on April 22, 1939). She made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera on May 5, 1937 as Musetta in La bohème with Rosa Tentoni as Mimì, Armand Tokatyan as Rodolfo, Carlo Morelli as Marcello, and Gennaro Papi conducting. Daum also m

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N'Dea Davenport

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N'Dea Davenport

N'Dea Davenport (born Sept 22, 1966)[1] is an American singer, songwriter, dancer and producer. She was the lead vocalist in the UK acid jazz band the Brand New Heavies and made pioneering contributions to the genre of acid jazz. Biography Her diverse projects include collaborations with music producers and artists, such as Mark Ronson, Louie Vega, Roger Sanchez, Guru’s Jazzmatazz, Madonna, Natalie Merchant, Mos Def, Sly and Robbie, J Dilla, and Malcolm McLaren. Dance scholarships, acting and music were the core of her developments as an artist and entertainer. Immediately after finishing college, she left her then home of Atlanta, Georgia, en route to Los Angeles. There she engaged in theatrical productions and commercial music video and was embraced by artists in both art, music and popular culture. Her legacy as an artist began also with her involvement in the burgeoning Los Angeles underground club and rave scene in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Working simultaneously as a dance artist and recording

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Yvonne De Carlo

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Yvonne De Carlo

Yvonne De Carlo (born Margaret Yvonne Middleton; September 1, 1922 – January 8, 2007) was a Canadian-American actress, dancer, and singer. A brunette with blue-grey eyes, she became an internationally famous Hollywood film star in the 1940s and 1950s, made several recordings, and later acted on television and stage. Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, De Carlo was raised in the home of her Presbyterian maternal grandparents. Her mother enrolled her in a local dance school when she was three. By the early 1940s, she and her mother had moved to Los Angeles, where De Carlo participated in beauty contests and worked as a dancer in nightclubs. She began working in motion pictures in 1941, in short subjects. She sang "The Lamp of Memory" in a three-minute Soundies musical, and worked briefly at Columbia Pictures. In 1942, she signed a three-year contract with Paramount Pictures, where she was given uncredited bit parts in important films and was intended to replace Dorothy Lamour. Her first lead was for independ

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Taylor Dayne

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Taylor Dayne

Taylor Dayne (born Leslie Wunderman; March 7, 1962[2][3]) is an American singer, songwriter, and actress.[4][5] She rose to fame in 1987 after her debut single "Tell It to My Heart" reached the top 10 across fourteen international music charts. Dayne achieved six additional U.S. top 10 singles, including "Love Will Lead You Back", "Prove Your Love", and "I'll Always Love You". Dayne has sold over 75 million records worldwide, making her one of the world's best-selling music artists. Additionally, she has earned three Grammy Award nominations, an American Music Award, and multiple New York Music Awards. She has also received New York Hall of Fame honors and was ranked at number 18 on Rolling Stone's list of the best female dance artists of all-time. In December 2016, Billboard magazine ranked her as the 28th most successful dance artist of all-time.[6] Singing and acting career Early success Leslie Wunderman began singing professionally after graduating from high school in Baldwin, Nassau County, New York,

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Lea DeLaria

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Lea DeLaria

Lea DeLaria (born May 23, 1958) is an American comedian, actress, and jazz singer.[1][2][3] DeLaria is credited with being the first openly gay comic to appear on a late-night talk show with her 1993 appearance on The Arsenio Hall Show.[4] She is best known for her portrayal of inmate Carrie "Big Boo" Black on Netflix original series Orange Is the New Black. Early life DeLaria was born in Belleville, Illinois,[1][2] the daughter of Jerry Jean (née Cox), a homemaker, and Robert George DeLaria, a jazz pianist and social worker.[2][5] Her paternal grandparents were Italian.[3] She attended kindergarten through eighth grade at St. Mary's Elementary School in Belleville[6] and has referenced her Catholic upbringing in her performances. Career Uzo Aduba, Dascha Polanco, Samira Wiley, Lea DeLaria and Alysia Reiner from Orange Is the New Black in 2015 DeLaria's stand-up career began in 1982 when she moved to San Francisco and performed raunchy stand-up comedy in the Mission District.[7][8] Discussing her stan

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Mattie Delaney

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Mattie Delaney

Mattie Delaney (born c. 1905;[1] date of death unknown) was an American Delta blues singer and guitarist active in the 1930s. Only two recordings by her are known: "Down the Big Road Blues" and "Tallahatchie River Blues". Career Delaney may have been born Mattie Doyle south of Tchula, Mississippi,[1] but the researchers Bob Eagle and Eric LeBlanc suggest she was Mattie B. Delaney, born near Goodman, Mississippi.[2] Around 1927 she may have moved to Memphis, Tennessee. Contemporary witnesses remember seeing her perform at Swan Lake, Mississippi.[1] She recorded two songs for Vocalion Records in February 1930.[3] Her song "Down the Big Road Blues" was a variant of Tommy Johnson's "Big Road Blues".[4] One music journalist noted "Delaney issuing a matter-of-fact report in 'Tallahatchie River Blues'".[5] She was unusual for a female performer of the time, in that she played guitar accompaniment and sang topical songs. Nothing is known of her life after the recordings.[6] Two of Delaney's songs were included on

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Vaughn De Leath

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Vaughn De Leath

Vaughn De Leath (September 26, 1894 – May 28, 1943)[1] was an American female singer who gained popularity in the 1920s, earning the sobriquets "The Original Radio Girl" and the "First Lady of Radio." [2] De Leath was an early exponent of a style of vocalizing known as crooning. One of her hit songs, "Are You Lonesome Tonight?," recorded in 1927, achieved fame when it became a hit for Elvis Presley in 1960. Early life Born Leonore Vonderlieth in the town of Mount Pulaski, Illinois in 1894, her parents were George and Catherine Vonderlieth. At age 12, Leonore relocated to Los Angeles with her mother and sister, where she finished high school and studied music. While at Mills College, she began writing songs, but dropped out to pursue a singing career. She then adopted the stage name "Vaughn De Leath." Her vocals ranged from soprano to deep contralto. De Leath adapted to the emerging, less restrictive jazz vocal style of the late 1910s and early 1920s. Music career In January 1920, inventor and radio pione

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Vivian Della Chiesa

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Vivian Della Chiesa

Vivian Della Chiesa (October 9, 1915 – January 6, 2009) was an American lyric soprano who achieved a high level of popularity in the United States singing on the radio during the 1940s and the early 1950s. She performed a wide variety of classical and popular works from opera to musical theatre, jazz, and popular songs. She sang on a number of radio programs during her career, including The American Album of Familiar Music, The American Melody Hour, and The Standard Hour among others. A particularly important triumph for her radio career was a 1943 radio concert of Brahms’s Deutsches Requiem with conductor Arturo Toscanini and the NBC Symphony Orchestra. In addition to her radio career, Della Chiesa performed actively on the opera stage, mostly at the Chicago City Opera Company and the Chicago Opera Company, during the 1930s and 1940s. In the 1950s, she became a successful nightclub singer, headlining at major clubs in Las Vegas, Reno, and in major venues in other cities throughout the United States. After he

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May de Sousa

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May de Sousa

May Alvos de Sousa (November 6, 1884[1] – August 8, 1948[2]) was an American singer and a Broadway actress.[3] Biography De Sousa was the daughter of a Chicago police detective,[1] John De Sousa (born 1856 died 1941), and his wife, Carrie (1861—1910). She had a younger sibling, Marvin De Sousa (1891—1921).[1][4] She came to fame in 1898 as the singer of "Dear Midnight of Love", a ballad by Bathhouse John Coughlin.[5] May attracted such attention that at end of her first full season in 1901, whilst still only a teenager, she was engaged by Frank L. Perley as one of the principals for his touring company for the musical comedy The Chaperons. With thirty four speaking and singing roles and a chorus of sixty it was said to be the largest musical organization so far seen in America. Next she was engaged as understudy for the great Alice Nielson in San Francisco and in 1902 had the opportunity to accompany her to London but demurred on that occasion due to a fear of the sea crossing. Instead she joined the cast

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Jill Dennett

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Jill Dennett

Jill Dennett (May 26, 1913 – 1941) was a motion picture actress in Hollywood movies for a decade, beginning in 1932. She appeared in more than twenty films, all of the appearances in uncredited roles. She was an attractive redhead who was also a talented dancer and singer. Born in New York and died in Surrey, England at age 27. Career Stage to screen Dennett was the daughter of comedy star Dave Kramer of the Kramer & Boyle act. She had established herself as a favorite on the vaudeville circuit before entering films. In 1931 her eyes were insured by Lloyd's of London for $100,000. After a small part in Union Station (1932), Dennett appeared with her father on stage at the Hillstreet Theater in Los Angeles. Minor film actress After playing Daisy, the girl of the pavements in Union Station, she was given a contract for two additional films by Warner Bros.. She next depicted an ingénue in The Tinsel Girl (1932), a film directed by Michael Curtiz. This was followed by her portrayal of Tart in Two Seconds

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Zélie de Lussan

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Zélie de Lussan

Zélie de Lussan, from a 1907 publication. Zélie de Lussan, circa 1890 Zélie de Lussan (21 December 1861 – 18 December 1949) was an American opera singer of French descent who was successful in her native country but made most of her career in England. The wide range of her voice allowed her to sing both mezzo-soprano and soprano roles. Among de Lussan's most famous roles was the title role in Bizet's Carmen, which she performed 2,000 times. She appeared with Sir Thomas Beecham's opera companies, at Covent Garden and with the Carl Rosa Opera Company. After retiring from the stage she made her home in London, where she continued to teach singing for many years. Life and career Early years Zélie de Lussan was born in Brooklyn, New York, to French parents, Jean de Lussan and his wife, a professional soprano.[1] The young Zélie first appeared on stage at the age of nine but her parents forbade her to embark on a professional musical career. The Swedish singer Christina Nilsson heard her sing and persuaded th

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Zooey Deschanel

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Zooey Deschanel

Zooey Claire Deschanel (born January 17, 1980)[1] is an American actress, model, and singer-songwriter. She made her film debut in Mumford (1999) and next obtained a supporting role in Cameron Crowe's film Almost Famous (2000). Deschanel is known for her deadpan roles in comedy films such as The Good Girl (2002), The New Guy (2002), Elf (2003), The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (2005), Failure to Launch (2006), Yes Man (2008) and 500 Days of Summer (2009).[2][3][4] She has ventured into more dramatic territory with Manic (2001), All the Real Girls (2003), Winter Passing (2005), and Bridge to Terabithia (2007).[5][6] From 2011 to 2018, she played Jessica Day on the Fox sitcom New Girl, for which she received an Emmy Award nomination and three Golden Globe Award nominations. For a few years starting in 2001, Deschanel performed in the jazz cabaret act If All the Stars Were Pretty Babies with actress Samantha Shelton.[7] In 2006, Deschanel teamed up with M. Ward to form She & Him, and subsequently relea

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Karla DeVito

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Karla DeVito

Karla DeVito (born August 29, 1953) is an American actress and singer.[1][2][3] Early life and education DeVito attended Willow Crest Grade School in Mokena, Illinois and Lincoln-Way High School in New Lenox, Illinois. She appeared in school plays and was the runner-up for Homecoming Queen. She attended Loyola University Chicago and majored in theater. During her freshman year, she joined the Chicago cast of Godspell.[3] In 1971–72, Karla studied with Jo Forsberg at Second City Company in Chicago and was part of the Second City Children's Theatre group, with Bill Murray. In 1973, she was in the cast of the popular play Hair. Career DeVito toured with Meat Loaf's band in support of his album Bat Out of Hell. She is seen singing with Meat Loaf in the video clip of "Paradise by the Dashboard Light" and "Bat Out of Hell", synced to the original vocal by Ellen Foley. She subsequently performed on Jim Steinman's only solo album, Bad for Good, on the track "Dance in My Pants" and its subsequent video. She also c

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Laura Devon

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Laura Devon

Laura Devon (May 23, 1931 – July 19, 2007) was an American actress, singer, and model. Early life Laura Devon was born May 23, 1931 in Chicago. Her birth name has been given as either Mary Lou Briley[1] or Mary Laura Briley. Her father was identified in the press as Merrill Devon, an automotive engineer, and her mother as Velma Prather.[2] She attended school in Chicago and Grosse Pointe.[2] She entered Wayne State University, majoring in journalism and political science, where she learned how to act in school theater productions.[3] In 1954, she gave birth to her only child, Kevin, who became a noted screenwriter.[4] After performing in amateur theatricals and light opera,[5] her first professional part was a lead in a production of The Boy Friend at the Vanguard Playhouse in Detroit.[1] In 1962, she married Brian Kelly, son of Justice Harry F. Kelly, then a member of the Michigan Supreme Court and a former Michigan governor. Kelly was a fellow actor and, a month after their wedding, he and Devon appear

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Joan Diener

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Joan Diener

Joan Diener (February 24, 1930 – May 13, 2006) was an American theatre actress and singer with a three-and-a-half-octave range. Early life Born in Columbus, Ohio, Diener majored in psychology at Sarah Lawrence College and moonlighted as an actress while still a student.[1][2] Career She made her Broadway debut in the 1948 revue Small Wonder, directed by Burt Shevelove and choreographed by Gower Champion and co-starring Tom Ewell, Alice Pearce and Jack Cassidy.[3] She appeared in the 1950 comedy Season in the Sun, written by The New Yorker magazine's theatre critic, Wolcott Gibbs.[4] Diener met her future husband, theatre director Albert Marre in 1953, when she won the role of Lalume, the seductive wife of the Wazir, in Kismet, winning a Theatre World Award for her performance.[5] They were married three years later and subsequently had a son Adam and a daughter Jennifer.[1][2] She reprised the role of Lalume in Kismet in London's West End alongside Alfred Drake and Doretta Morrow, who had all starred in

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Varetta Dillard

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Varetta Dillard

Varetta Dillard (February 3, 1933 – October 4, 1993) was an American rhythm and blues singer in the 1950s whose biggest hit was "Mercy, Mr. Percy". Life and career She was born in Harlem, New York, and spent much of her childhood in hospital due to a congenital bone condition. By her mid-teens, her condition had stabilised, though she remained unable to walk without crutches or other assistance. She met Carl Feaster of doo-wop group The Chords, who encouraged her to enter talent contests as a singer, and in 1951 she won two consecutive competitions at the Apollo Theater. She was signed by Savoy Records, and had her first recording session with the company in September 1951. Although her early singles were commercially unsuccessful, she was invited by Alan Freed to perform at what later became recognised as the first major rock and roll concert: the Moondog Coronation Ball held in Cleveland, Ohio on March 21, 1952. Because of concerns over crowd safety, the concert was shut down by the authorities after the

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Marlene Dietrich

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Marlene Dietrich

Marie Magdalene "Marlene" Dietrich (, German: ; 27 December 1901 – 6 May 1992)[1] was a German-American[2][3][4] actress and singer. Throughout her long career, which spanned from the 1910s to the 1980s, she continually reinvented herself.[5] In 1920s Berlin, Dietrich acted on the stage and in silent films. Her performance as Lola-Lola in The Blue Angel (1930) brought her international acclaim and a contract with Paramount Pictures. Dietrich starred in Hollywood films such as Morocco (1930), Shanghai Express (1932), and Desire (1936). She successfully traded on her glamorous persona and "exotic" looks, and became one of the highest-paid actresses of the era. Throughout World War II, she was a high-profile entertainer in the United States. Although she still made occasional films after the war such as Witness for the Prosecution (1957), Dietrich spent most of the 1950s to the 1970s touring the world as a marquee live-show performer. Dietrich was known for her humanitarian efforts during the war, housing Germ

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Karen Dior

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Karen Dior

Karen Dior (February 14, 1967 – August 25, 2004) is a stage name of Geoffrey Gann, also known as Geoffrey Karen Dior. Gann used this name when he performed in drag as Karen Dior. He performed both in and out of drag as a pornographic and mainstream performer, film director, singer and writer. He also had a drag persona that he cultivated to appear completely androgynous, or equal parts male and female, which image appeared on the cover of his Sex CD. Gann was bisexual, and though he enjoyed performing in drag, identified as male, and not transsexual or transgender. Because he was so convincing in drag, many people assumed that he must be transgender. Life and career Karen Dior was born Geoffrey Gann in Missouri; He was adopted as an infant into a Southern Baptist family, and was raised in that religious tradition. Gann moved to Los Angeles at the age of 21 and began working in a beauty salon and performing in drag shows in West Hollywood bars. In 1989, he began appearing in bisexual and transgender adult fi

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Mattiwilda Dobbs

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Mattiwilda Dobbs

Mattiwilda Dobbs in 1957. Mattiwilda Dobbs (July 11, 1925 – December 8, 2015) was an African-American coloratura soprano and one of the first black singers to enjoy a major international career in opera. She was the first black singer to perform at La Scala in Italy, the first black woman to receive a long-term performance contract at the Metropolitan Opera, New York and the first black singer to play a lead role at the San Francisco Opera. Biography Dobbs was born in Atlanta, Georgia, one of six daughters of John and Irene Dobbs, who were leaders in the state's African-American community.[1][2] She began piano lessons at the age of seven, and sang in community and church choirs.[2] Education Dobbs attended Spelman College where she studied home economics and considered becoming a fashion designer. Her teachers encouraged her to study music, however, and she began to study voice, graduating with a degree in Spanish and music in 1946.[1][2] Following her graduation, she moved to New York City and studied

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Joan Dixon

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Joan Dixon

Joan Dixon (June 6, 1930 in Norfolk, Virginia – February 20, 1992 in Los Angeles) was an American film and television actress in the 1950s. She is known for her role in the film noir Roadblock (1951). Life and career Dixon's career, while under contract at RKO Pictures, was in the hands of Howard Hughes. He attempted but failed to make her into the star he made of Jane Russell (whom Dixon resembled). Hughes had personal contracts with Dixon, Russell, and Janis Carter. In September 1952, it was revealed that Hughes had an agreement with the Ralph E. Stolkin syndicate to lend RKO Pictures the sum of $8,000,000. The loan commitment was made as part of a sales accord following losses sustained by RKO in the previous two years. Earlier Hughes controlled RKO Radio studio. Joan eloped and married Chicago, Illinois camera manufacturer Theodore (Ted) Briskin in October 1952. Briskin was formerly the husband of Betty Hutton, having married and divorced her twice. Dixon and Briskin were married in a surprise ceremon

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Norma Donaldson

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Norma Donaldson

Norma C. Donaldson (August 18, 1928 – November 22, 1994) was an American actress and singer. Perhaps she is best known for her roles, as Miss Adelaide in the 1976 revival of Guys and Dolls; Lillie Belle Barber on the CBS television soap opera The Young and the Restless, in which she played from 1990 until her death in 1994. Biography Early life Donaldson was born Norma C. Donaldson in the Harlem section of New York City. Her parents were Laura, a housekeeper and Fredrick Donaldson (b. 1906; d. 1955). The first of two children, Donaldson attended Boys and Girls High School (known at the time as Girls' High School), studying there until her junior year. Career In 1949, Donaldson then aged 21, launched her career as a nightclub singer, booking gigs in throughout New York City. During her nightclub stint, Donaldson began touring with Harry Belafonte and later Lena Horne. Donaldson began her acting career in the late–1960s, first appearing in an episode of Callback! which aired on March 8, 1969 in which Barry

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Tamara Drasin

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Tamara Drasin

Tamara Drasin (c. 1905 – 22 February 1943), often credited as simply Tamara, was a singer and actress who introduced the song "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes"[1] in the 1933 Broadway musical Roberta. Tamara Drasin is sometimes confused with two other performers of the 1930s musical era, the dancers Tamara Geva and Tamara Toumanova. Early life Drasin was born around 1905 in the village of Sorochintsï in Poltava Governorate (modern-day Ukraine). Stage career With her dark, exotic looks and throbbing vocal style, Drasin was ideal casting material for European characters in musicals of the 1930s. In Free for All, she was Marishka Tarasov; in Roberta, she was Princess Stephanie of Russian nobility; and in Right This Way and Leave It to Me!, she portrayed Frenchwomen. In all, Drasin appeared in seven musicals, from 1927 to 1938. Music career Besides "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" and another ballad, "The Touch of Your Hand", in Roberta, Drasin introduced three other standards: "I Can Dream, Can't I?" and "I'll Be Seeing

20th-century American women singers

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American jazz singers

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20th-century women singers

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Patty Donahue

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Patty Donahue

Patricia Jean Donahue (March 29, 1956 – December 9, 1996) was the lead singer of the 1980s new wave group the Waitresses. She is best known for the band’s singles "I Know What Boys Like" and "Christmas Wrapping." Early life Patricia Jean Donahue was born in Akron, Ohio, on March 29, 1956.[1][2] Her parents divorced when she was two years old, and she told an interviewer that her mother raised her to be an independent woman.[3] Like her mother and sister, Donahue attended St. Joseph Academy in Cleveland.[3] She studied at Ohio State University but had to drop out for financial reasons, and tried to finish at Cleveland State University but left there too, dissatisfied with the school.[3] She eventually graduated from Kent State University.[4] In her early 20s, prior to singing with the band, she did work as a waitress.[4] Music career Donahue met Chris Butler while at Kent State.[3] Butler was in the art rock band Tin Huey but he had written a number of songs that were not used in their repertoire.[3] As h

Burials in Ohio

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Musicians from Akron, Ohio

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Kent State University alumni

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