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20th-century American women singers


Marilyn Duke

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Marilyn Duke

Marilyn (Marylin) Duke (née Manfrey Lecta Duke; October 3, 1916 Jackson, Georgia[1] – August 7, 1995 Clayton County, Georgia),[2][3] was an American singer from the swing era of the mid to late 1930s and early 1940s. She began as a soloist in 1933 on radio in Atlanta, then, beginning 1936, was carried on syndicated and network radio from New York City. In the first half of the 1940s, Duke traveled and recorded as a featured singer with big bands, notably with Vaughn Monroe. She distinguished herself as a rhythm singer – that is, a singer who swings.[b] And, while with the Monroe Orchestra, she was acclaimed for having an engaging personalty. Duke was a tall[c] brunette, and, according to journalists, attractive.[4] As for her hair color, Duke was a blonde when she re-joined Monroe's band in 1944. After her career with big bands – after 1945 – and into the late 1960s, she performed on-and-off as a nightclub pianist-singer in the metropolitan areas of Boston, New York City, and Newport, Rhode Island. Her record

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Laura Dukes

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Laura Dukes

Laura Ella Dukes (10 June 1907 – 10 or 14 October 1992),[nb 1] sometimes credited as Little Laura Dukes, was an American blues singer, dancer, and mandolin, banjo and ukulele player. She performed and recorded in Memphis, Tennessee, from the 1920s to the 1980s. Life She was born Laura Ella Smith in North Memphis, where her father had been a drummer in W. C. Handy's band.[2] He took her as a young child to theaters and taverns, where she began performing and later worked as a singer and dancer. She was often billed as "Little Laura" or "Little Bit", an allusion to her 4'7" height.[3] She met blues singer Robert McCollum, later known as Robert Nighthawk, in 1933, and began appearing with him as a duo. After initially learning guitar, she later took up the banjo, ukulele and mandolin.[4] She first recorded in 1934, playing mandolin on recordings made in Chicago by the Memphis Jug Band, featuring Will Shade, for OKeh Records.[5] She also made recordings in the early 1950s with the Will Batts band, which were r

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Pearl Eaton

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Pearl Eaton

Pearl Eaton Levant (August 1, 1898 – September 10, 1958) was an American Broadway performer, actress, choreographer, and dance supervisor of the 1910s and 1920s. Early life and career Eaton was born in Norfolk, Virginia. She began attending dance lessons in Washington D.C., along with her sisters Doris and Mary, at a young age. In 1911, all three sisters were hired for a production of Maurice Maeterlinck's fantasy play The Blue Bird at the Shubert Belasco Theatre in Washington. While Eaton had a minor role in the show, it served as her introduction to the world of professional theatre. After The Blue Bird, in 1912, the three Eaton sisters and their younger brother Joe began appearing in various plays and melodramas for the Poli stock company. They quickly gained reputations as professional, reliable, and versatile actors, and were rarely out of work. In 1915, all three sisters appeared in a new production of The Blue Bird for Poli; Doris and Mary were given the starring roles of Mytyl and Tytyl. The siblin

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Vilma Ebsen

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Vilma Ebsen

Vilma Ebsen (February 1, 1911 – March 12, 2007) was an American musical theatre and film actress best known for dancing in Broadway shows and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer musicals in the 1930s with her brother Buddy Ebsen. Ebsen was born in Belleville, Illinois. During her childhood, her family relocated to Orlando, Florida. She learned to dance at her father's dance studio in the 1920s, along with her siblings. Vilma and Buddy Ebsen moved to New York City in 1928, where they formed a vaudeville act. One of their early appearances together was in Eddie Cantor's Ziegfeld production Whoopee. When Whoopee closed after a year and a half, Vilma and Buddy Ebsen took their act to Atlantic City, New Jersey, where they caught the eye of celebrity columnist Walter Winchell. A one-paragraph rave review in Winchell's column brought attention to Ebsens. Along with her brother, Ebsen performed a dance act on Broadway, as well as around the United States in vaudeville theaters and supper clubs throughout the early 1930s. The two

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Sheena Easton

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Sheena Easton

Sheena Shirley Easton (née Orr; born 27 April 1959) is a Scottish singer and songwriter. She is a dual British-American citizen. Easton came into the public eye in an episode of the first British musical reality television programme The Big Time: Pop Singer, which recorded her attempts to gain a record contract and her eventual signing with EMI Records. Easton's first two singles, "Modern Girl" and "9 to 5", both entered the UK Top Ten, and she was the first UK female artist to appear twice in the same Top Ten since Ruby Murray. In 1981, "9 to 5" (retitled "Morning Train (Nine to Five)" for the US market) topped the US Hot 100, making her the third UK female solo artist to achieve this, following Petula Clark and Lulu, and she became one of the most successful British female performers of the 1980s. A six-time Grammy nominee in the U.S., Easton is a two-time Grammy Award winner, winning Best New Artist in 1982[1] and Best Mexican-American Performance in 1985,[2] for her duet with Luis Miguel on the song "Me

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Joan Edwards (radio singer)

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Joan Edwards (radio singer)

Joan Edwards (February 13, 1919 – August 27, 1981)[1] was an American singer in the old-time radio era.[2] She was perhaps best known for her work on the radio version of Your Hit Parade.[3]:778 She also was a vocalist for Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra. Early years Edwards' father was Ben Edwards, a song plugger. Music ran in her family; uncle Gus Edwards was a vaudeville entertainer, uncle Leo Edwards wrote music, and aunt Dorothy Edwards was a vocal teacher.[4] Despite the family's show business background, she was urged to go in a different direction. In fact, Gus Edwards told her, "Stay out of show business."[5] As a child, Edwards had a heart murmur, and doctors advised her to start playing the piano "to keep her busy outside of school hours."[6] She graduated from George Washington High School in Manhattan,[7] where she directed the glee club. She went on to major in music at Hunter College,[8] planning to be a teacher. However, her interest in singing and playing the piano won out, leading to a ca

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Linda Eder

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Linda Eder

Linda Eder (born February 3, 1961[1]) is an American singer and actress. She made her Broadway debut in the musical Jekyll & Hyde, originating the role of Lucy, for which she was nominated for the Drama Desk Award. Eder has performed in concert halls across the country including Carnegie Hall and Radio City Musical Hall. She has released her 18th solo album in 2018. Biography Eder was born in Tucson, Arizona, on February 3, 1961, and raised in Brainerd, Minnesota. Her parents, Georg (from Austria) and Laila (from Norway), exposed her to music at an early age. She cites Judy Garland,[2] Barbra Streisand,[3] and Eileen Farrell as her childhood inspiration. Eder cites Garland, specifically, as her greatest influence. Her first musical theater credit was as the Mother Abbess in a high school production The Sound of Music. Eder was 4th runner up in the 1980 Miss Minnesota Pageant. Before her work on Broadway, Eder sang in clubs in Minneapolis and performed at Harrah's Casino in Atlantic City, New Jersey. I

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Lu Elliott

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Lu Elliott

Lu Elliot (August 3, 1924 – March 5, 1987) was a jazz and blues singer and recording artist. She also recorded some soul songs. Some of the artists she worked with were BB King, The Duke Ellington Orchestra and the Sam Williams Express. Background Elliott was born on August 3, 1924.[1] She was a tuba player in her high school band.[2] As a teenager she won first prize at the amateur night held at Harlem's Apollo Theater.[3] She was married to guitarist Horace C. Sims, who had played in a band called Afro Cubanaires.[4][5] In 1952, she and her husband bought a 14-room house in East Orange, New Jersey.[6] During her career she had appeared on the Steve Allen Show and had spent a year working with BB King in the United States as well as touring Europe.[7][8] Her sister Billie Lee was also a singer.[9] Career 1940s to 1950s In September 1949 and new on the scene, she provided the vocals on "He's The Greatest Thing There Is" with the Duke Ellington Orchestra that was recorded in New York. She appeared on an

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Missy Elliott

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Missy Elliott

Melissa "Missy" Arnette Elliott (born July 1, 1971)[1] is an American rapper, singer, songwriter, record producer, dancer, and philanthropist. She embarked on her music career with all-female R&B group Sista in the early-mid 1990s and later became a member of the Swing Mob collective along with childhood friend and longtime collaborator Timbaland, with whom she worked on projects for Aaliyah, 702, Total, and SWV. Following several collaborations and guest appearances, she launched her solo career on July 15, 1997 with her debut album Supa Dupa Fly, which spawned the top 20 single "Sock It 2 Me". The album debuted at number three on the Billboard 200, the highest charting debut for a female rapper at the time.[4] Elliott's second album, Da Real World, was released on June 22, 1999 and produced the singles "She's a Bitch", "All n My Grill", and top five hit "Hot Boyz." The remix of the latter song broke the record for most weeks at number-one on the US R&B chart on the issue dated January 15, 2000; a

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Minnie Egener

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Minnie Egener

Minnie Egener at the Metropolitan Opera in 1915 Minnie Egener (1881 – 1938) was an American operatic mezzo-soprano. Biography She made her professional opera debut in 1904 at the Metropolitan Opera as one of the flower maidens in Richard Wagner's Parsifal. In 1906 she moved to Italy and spent the next several years performing in operas with various theaters throughout that nation. In 1910 she performed the role of Alissa in Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor with Luisa Tetrazzini at the Teatro Regio di Parma; she also appeared in small roles at Covent Garden and at the Manhattan Center.[1] Over the next four years she performed in several operas with the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company and the Chicago Grand Opera Company. In 1914 she returned to the Metropolitan Opera, where she performed mostly comprimario roles for the next eighteen years. Most notably, Egener performed in the original productions of Frederick Delius's A Village Romeo and Juliet in 1907,[2] Reginald De Koven's The Canterbury Pilgrims in 19

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Rosalind Elias

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Rosalind Elias

Rosalind Elias (born March 13, 1929) is an American mezzo-soprano who enjoyed a long and distinguished career at the Metropolitan Opera. Life and career Rosalind Elias was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, the 13th and youngest child of a Lebanese-American family. She received her first [1][2] singing lessons in Lowell from Miss Lillian Sullivan. She studied at the New England Conservatory. She appeared with the New England Opera from 1948-52. She then left for Italy to complete her vocal studies at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome, with Luigi Ricci and Nazzareno De Angelis.[3] Elias made her Metropolitan Opera debut as Grimgerde in Wagner's Die Walküre, on February 23, 1954. She sang 687 performances of 54 roles there, including Bersi in Giordano's Andrea Chénier, the title role in Bizet's Carmen, Rosina in The Barber of Seville, Laura in La Gioconda, Suzuki in Madama Butterfly, Siebel in Faust, Nancy in Martha, Cherubino and Marcellina in The Marriage of Figaro, Dorabella in Così fan tutte,

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Mary Ellis

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Mary Ellis

Mary Ellis (born May Belle Elsas, June 15, 1897 – January 30, 2003) was an American actress and singer appearing on stage, radio, television and film, best known for her musical theatre roles, particularly in Ivor Novello works. After appearing with the Metropolitan Opera beginning in 1918, she acted on Broadway, creating the title role in Rose-Marie. In 1930, she emigrated to England, where she gained additional fame and continued to perform into the 1990s. She also became known for film roles, including in The 3 Worlds of Gulliver in 1960.[1] Biography Ellis was born in Manhattan, New York City, to German parents, Herman Elsas and Caroline Elsas (née Reinhardt), who was a pianist.[1] She first became interested in performing around 1910, and under a vocational course trained her lyric soprano under the tutelage of Belgian contralto Freida de Goebele and Italian operatic coach Fernando.Tanara. She made her debut with the Metropolitan Opera on December 14, 1918, in the world premiere of Puccini's Il trittic

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Norma Millay Ellis

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Norma Millay Ellis

Norma Millay Ellis (1894 - May 14, 1986) was an American singer and actress, and sister of the famous poet and playwright Edna St. Vincent Millay.[1] Born in Rockland, Maine to Cora Lounella Buzelle and Henry Tolman Millay, Ellis was one of three sisters who were all, due to their parents’ divorce, largely brought up by their mother.[2] Having been a writer of poetry herself, Cora Millay ensured the presence of art and music in the Millay household, which became a vital part of the upbringing of Ellis and her two sisters.[3] Ellis would go on to perform with the Provincetown Players and appear on Broadway. She married painter and actor Charles Ellis.[1] At the time of her sister Edna St. Vincent Millay’s death in 1950, Ellis was left as the sole heir to her estate, leaving her to inherit Steepletop, a 650-acre farm in Austerlitz, New York, where Millay had spent the last twenty-five years of her life, as well as rights to all of her creative and intellectual property. In 1973, Ellis would go on to create the

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Ruby Elzy

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Ruby Elzy

Ruby Elzy in 1935. Photo by Carl Van Vechten. Ruby Pearl Elzy (February 20, 1908 – June 26, 1943), was a pioneer American operatic soprano. Family and early life Elzy was born in Pontotoc, Mississippi and educated at Rust College, the Ohio State University (graduating in 1930) and the Juilliard School (graduating in 1934). At Juilliard she was a pupil of Lucia Dunham. Her sister Amanda Elzy (died 2004) was a prominent educationist after whom Amanda Elzy High School in Greenwood, Mississippi is named.[1] Their mother Emma Elzy (died 1985, aged 98) was a teacher and prominent member of the Methodist church, in whose memory the Mississippi Conference of the United Methodist Church presents an annual Emma K. Elzy award.[2] Ruby had another sister(Beatrice) and two brothers, Wayne and Robert. Their father Charlie abandoned the family when Ruby was five. Professional accomplishments Elzy entertained at the White House, December 15, 1937, for First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt's luncheon for the wives of U.S. Supreme

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Shirley Ellis

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Shirley Ellis

Shirley Marie O'Garra[1] (stage name: Shirley Ellis; married name: Shirley Elliston;[2] January 19, 1929 [though her Social Security card shows January 20, 1927] – October 5, 2005[3]) was an American soul music singer and songwriter of West Indian origin.[4][5] She is best known for her novelty hits "The Nitty Gritty" (1963) (US no. 8), "The Name Game" (1964) (US no. 3) and "The Clapping Song" (1965) (US no. 8 and UK no. 6). "The Clapping Song" sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[6] Career By 1954, she had written two songs which were recorded by The Chords.[5] Ellis was originally in the group The Metronomes and she went on to marry the lead singer, Alphonso Elliston. All her solo hits were written by her and her manager, record producer, and songwriting partner, Lincoln Chase. Ellis had recording contracts with the Kapp Records subsidiary Congress and later Columbia and Bell, but retired from the music industry in 1968. Personal life Shirley O'Garra was born to William H. and Pet

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Lorraine Ellison

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Lorraine Ellison

Lorraine Ellison (March 17, 1931 – January 31, 1983)[1] was an American soul singer known for her recording of the song "Stay with Me"[2] (sometimes known as "Stay With Me Baby") in 1966. Life and career Born Marybelle Luraine Ellison,[3] in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Ellison originally sang gospel music, working in the groups the Ellison Singers and the Golden Chords in the early 1960s. She switched to the R&B genre in 1964. Her first chart entry was "I Dig You Baby" in 1965[4] on Mercury Records, which reached No. 22 on the US Billboard R&B chart. She signed with Warner Bros. Records, and in 1966 recorded "Stay with Me" at a last minute booking, following a studio cancellation by Frank Sinatra.[5] "Stay with Me" reached number 11 in the U.S. Billboard R&B chart and number 64 in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song was produced and written by Jerry Ragovoy. Later releases were on the subsidiary soul music record label, Loma Records.[6] "Stay with Me" would become her signature song.[

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Alexis Cohen

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Alexis Cohen

Alexis Cohen (October 17, 1983 – July 25, 2009) was a two-time reality TV show contestant and singer on American Idol made famous when she directed an expletive-filled televised rant at the show's judges,[1] after comparing her singing style to vocalists Grace Slick, Janis Joplin and Pat Benatar.[2] She was called Glitter Girl in the press.[3][4] Education Cohen was a graduate of East Stroudsburg North High School and attended Montgomery Community College and studied to be a veterinarian.[5] Singing career Cohen's first audition on American Idol was in 2008 during Season Seven in Philadelphia, where she sang "Somebody to Love" by Jefferson Airplane. All three judges voted "no," eliminating her from the competition. Cohen returned for a second audition in 2009 for Idol‘s Season Eight in Boston, singing the Madonna song, “Like a Virgin”.[6] She again reacted negatively on camera after judge Simon Cowell called her performance "horrendous."[7] Cohen's performances on American Idol brought her a measure of

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Jean Dickenson

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Jean Dickenson

Jean Dickenson is an American former singer. Early life Born in Montreal, Dickenson was the daughter of mining engineer Ernest Heathcote Dickenson [1] and novelist May Dickenson.[2] Her father's work took him to several countries, with the family living in the Philippines, India,[3] Europe, and South Africa before settling in Denver, Colorado, when Dickenson was 14 years old. There she began taking singing lessons after having previously studied piano. She graduated from the Lamont School of Music[4] after gaining her primary education in New York City and her secondary education in San Francisco.[5] While Dickenson was a student at Lamont, she won a national singing contest from a group of 200 sopranos.[2] Career During her final year at Lamont, Dickenson was featured on the NBC radio program Golden Melodies, which originated at KOA in Denver. After that, she sang on Hollywood Hotel and The American Album of Familiar Music.[4] A protege of Lily Pons,[6] Dickenson sang with symphonies in Denver and Milw

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Tiffany Darwish

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Tiffany Darwish

Tiffany Renee Darwish[1] (born October 2, 1971),[2] simply known by her mononym Tiffany, is an American singer, songwriter, actress, and former teen icon. She is most notable for her 1987 cover of the song "I Think We're Alone Now", originally recorded in 1967 by Tommy James and the Shondells, and released the second single from her eponymous album, Tiffany. Thanks to an original mall tour, "The Beautiful You: Celebrating The Good Life Shopping Mall Tour '87", Tiffany found commercial success;[3] both the single and the album peaked at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard 200 charts, respectively. The singles "Could've Been" and "I Saw Him Standing There", a cover version of The Beatles' "I Saw Her Standing There", followed soon after, with the former also claiming the No. 1 position on the Hot 100. Although Tiffany's second album, Hold an Old Friend's Hand, featured a top-10 single, charted in the upper register of the Billboard 200 in 1988, and ultimately became platinum-selling, it failed to repli

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Cindy Cash

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Cindy Cash

Cindy Cash is an American singer, author, and antiques dealer. Early years Cash is the daughter of singer Johnny Cash and his first wife, Vivian Liberto.[1] When she was a child, the family lived in Casitas Springs, California.[2] The couple divorced when she was nine years old. Her siblings include singer Rosanne Cash.[1] Career Cash performed with her father and her stepmother, June Carter Cash, as long as they performed together. Her first duet with him as part of his show came when she was 16, and she also sang with him in his last performance.[1] For two years, she sang in the group The Next Generation, which included Loretta Lynn's daughter Peggy, Conway Twitty's daughter Kathy, and George Jones' and Tammy Wynette's daughter Georgette.[1] After she retired from entertaining, she operated an antique store in Ridgeland, Mississippi.[3] In 1997, Crown Publishing Group published her book, The Cash Family Scrapbook,[4] which contains a variety of material about (and written by) her and members of her fa

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Rosemary Butler

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Rosemary Butler

Rosemary Ann Butler (born April 6, 1947)[1] is an American singer. She began her career playing bass guitar and singing in an all-female band named the Ladybirds while attending Fullerton Union High School in Fullerton, California. The band appeared on several Los Angeles area television shows before opening for the Rolling Stones in 1964. She then joined all-female hard rock band Birtha[2] who released two albums for Dunhill Records. After they split in 1975, she became a popular back-up singer in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Her vocals were featured on Bonnie Raitt's album, Sweet Forgiveness, on songs "Gamblin' Man", "Runaway", "Sweet Forgiveness" and "Two Lives." Butler has worked extensively as a back-up singer for Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor, Warren Zevon, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt, Boz Scaggs, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Jackson Browne, and Rosanne Cash among others. She released a solo album, Rose, in 1983. She achieved her greatest visibility and success as a solo artist in Japan in the early 1980s,

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Consuelo Luz Arostegui

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Consuelo Luz Arostegui

Consuelo Luz Arostegui is an American singer. She performs and records as "Consuelo Luz" is known for her Ladino and Sephardic music. Early life Consuelo Luz Arostegui was born in Manhattan of Latin American parents and moved to Greece with them when she was a baby. She is the daughter of a Sephardic Chilean mother and a Cuban father of Basque descent.[1] Although raised Catholic, Luz was made aware of her Jewish ancestry at an early age.[1] Her parents were United Nations diplomats which had her growing up in many countries, including Greece, the Philippines, Spain, Italy and Peru. Education Luz studied Spanish through the Overseas Cambridge University in Lima, Peru and later studied literature and music at the New School for Social Research in New York City. Further studies included drama at the Stella Adler Theater Studio. Career In 1974, she moved her family to New Mexico where she met Rabbi Chavah Carp in Taos, who presented her with a collection of ancient Ladino prayers with text and music with a

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Christy Baron

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Christy Baron

Christy Baron is an American jazz and pop singer and actress. A native of Munhall, Pennsylvania, Baron is a graduate of the drama department at Carnegie Mellon University.[1] While a student there, she performed at jazz clubs in the Pittsburgh area.[2] In 1984, she moved to New York City, playing the piano in jazz clubs. She also got work singing TV commercials and acting. On Broadway, she portrayed Fantine in Les Miserables for six years.[3] During her career, she has worked with David Sanborn, Natalie Cole, Carly Simon, and Dr. John.[4] Her acting career includes acting at the Williamstown Theatre Festival[1] and in the feature film Pants on Fire (2000).[5] In 1997, a standing-room-only crowd attended Birdland jazz club when Baron and her band opened there.[2] She has performed with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra,.[1] and for a year she was a featured performer in the musical revue Mad Hattan in the New York New York Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada.[2] Christopher Loudon, reviewing Baron's album Take Th

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Michèle Crider

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Michèle Crider

Michèle Crider (born 1959, Quincy, IL) is an American lirico spinto operatic soprano. She has appeared in many of the great opera house in the world including the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, the Metropolitan Opera in New York, San Francisco Opera, Los Angeles Opera, and the state operas of Vienna, Munich, Berlin and Hamburg. She has sung alongside the great conductors such as Riccardo Muti, Daniel Barenboim, Zubin Mehta, James Levine, Nello Santi, Christoph von Dohnányi, Semyon Bychkov, Seiji Ozawa, Riccardo Chailly and Colin Davis. Education Michele Crider is a graduate of Quincy Senior High School in Quincy, IL. She studied voice at Culver-Stockton College and then at the University of Iowa, where she performed her first opera role in Madama Butterfly and came to the attention of University of Iowa alumnus Simon Estes. She won the District Metropolitan Opera Auditions twice. Afterwards she left Iowa and went to Zurich where she continued her studies at the studio of the Zurich Opera House. In 1988 s

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Vivian Blaine

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Vivian Blaine

Vivian Blaine (November 21, 1921 – December 9, 1995) was an American actress and singer, best known for originating the role of Miss Adelaide in the musical theater production of Guys and Dolls, as well as appearing in the subsequent film version, in which she co-starred with Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons and Frank Sinatra. Early years She was born Vivian Stapleton, in Newark, New Jersey to Leo Stapleton, an insurance agent,[1] and Wilhelmina Tepley.[2] The cherry-blonde-haired Blaine appeared on local stages as early as 1934 and she started touring after graduating from South Side High School.[3] Personal appearances Blaine was a touring singer with dance bands starting in 1937. At one point in the 1940s, she was the top-billed act at New York's Copacabana nightclub. In his book, Dean and Me: (A Love Story), Jerry Lewis wrote about appearing at the club when Blaine was on the same bill: "We [Lewis and Dean Martin, as the double act Martin and Lewis] weren't even the top-billed act. That honor went to a Br

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Sharon Bryant (singer)

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Sharon Bryant (singer)

Sharon Bryant (born August 14, 1956, Westchester County, New York) is an American R&B singer. She began her career as the lead singer of the R&B group Atlantic Starr in 1976. Career Bryant sang lead on songs such as "When Love Calls" and "Circles". She left the group in pursuit of a solo career in 1984, and had moderate solo success with that effort.[1] She would not achieve success on her own again until five years later, when the ballad "Foolish Heart" reached the top ten on Billboard's R&B chart. Another major R&B hit from the accompanying self-titled album, "Let Go" was also a moderate pop hit, cracking the top 40 on the pop charts (at #34)[2] and charting at No. 37 on Radio & Records Magazine's Top 100. In 2013, Bryant appeared as a background vocalist on Empire of the Sun's second album Ice on the Dune on the song "Keep a Watch".[3][4] Discography Albums With Atlantic Starr Atlantic Starr (1978) Straight to the Point (1979) Radiant (1980) Brilliance (1982) Yours Fore

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Emilia Conde

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Emilia Conde

Emilia Conde (née Rodriguez, September 2, 1930[1] or 1931[2] – February 28, 1998) was a Puerto Rican singer, pianist, guitarist, and composer. Biography Conde was born in Yauco, Puerto Rico to parents Juan Rodriguez and Marina Pacheco.[2] Her father died when she was very young, and she was raised by her great aunt, Leonor Damiani-Dionisi.[3] At a young age, she studied piano with Rosita Escalona de Nin, and performed her first piano recital at age nine. Her musicianship earned her a Puerto Rican government scholarship to attend the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York.[3] As a student, she studied classical piano, harmony, theory and voice,[4] and was awarded a Bachelor of Music with Distinction in 1953.[5] Conde pursued a singing career as a protégé of Pablo Casals, and was further encouraged by musicians such as José Iturbi and Alexander Schneider, who recognized her talent.[4] She further developed her singing voice, taught by Maria Ester Robles, Dolf Swing, and Carlo Menotti, who remained h

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Belinda Carlisle

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Belinda Carlisle

Belinda Jo Carlisle (born August 17, 1958) is an American singer, musician, and author. She gained worldwide fame as the lead singer of the Go-Go's, one of the most successful all-female bands in history, and went on to have a prolific career as a solo artist. Raised in Southern California, Carlisle began her music career in 1977 as the drummer of the Los Angeles punk band Germs, and went on to join the Go-Go's as the lead singer after the band's formation in 1978. With their chart-topping debut release Beauty and the Beat in 1981, the group helped popularize new wave music in the United States, and were the first all-female band in history who wrote their own songs and played their own instruments to achieve a No. 1 album. The Go-Go's have sold over 7 million records worldwide.[1] After dissolution of the Go-Go's in 1985, Carlisle went on to have a successful solo career with radio hits such as "Mad About You", "I Get Weak", "Circle in the Sand", "Leave a Light On", and "Heaven Is a Place on Earth", which

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Robin Beck

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Robin Beck

Robin Beck (born November 7, 1954) is an American singer. She topped the singles chart in the United Kingdom in 1988,[1] and Germany in 1989, with her single "First Time", which had come to the public's attention via its use in a Coca-Cola commercial. Other well-known songs of hers are "Save Up All Your Tears", "In My Heart to Stay", "Tears in the Rain" and "Close to You". Also, "First Time" was successfully covered or sampled many times, the most recent was made by Sunblock in 2006, peaking at number nine on the UK Singles Chart. Beck also performed it with German pop star Helene Fischer. Career Prior to this achievement, she had spent time as a backing singer, supporting the efforts of Melissa Manchester, Chaka Khan, and Leo Sayer. She also sang on radio jingles for Jam Creative Productions, in particular "the ultimate one" for BBC Radio One in the UK.[2][3] Her first album was released in 1979, and featured Irene Cara and Luther Vandross on backing vocals.[4] On the Billboard Dance Club Songs chart, the

Jewish American songwriters

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Jennifer Aylmer

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Jennifer Aylmer

Jennifer Aylmer (born 1972) is an American operatic soprano noted for significant performances with the Metropolitan Opera,[1] New York City Opera, and as an oratorio soloist with major ensembles such as the National Symphony, and the Oratorio Society of New York.[2] Highlights of her varied career include performance of Julie Taymor's production of Die Zauberflöte (with baritone Nathan Gunn), and numerous contemporary operatic roles, such as the premiere of the role of Amy in Mark Adamo's Little Women (with Joyce DiDonato and Daniel Belcher) at the Houston Grand Opera, premiere of Bella in Tobias Picker's An American Tragedy (with Nathan Gunn and Patricia Racette), and performance of Stella in André Previn's A Streetcar Named Desire at the Austin Lyric Opera. She has received critical praise from major newspapers including the New York Times, hailing her "awesome accuracy," and the Chicago Sun Times, describing her as "dazzling," "regal," and "fatally attractive."[3] Alymer graduated from the Eastman Schoo

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Laura Aikin

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Laura Aikin

Laura Aikin (born June 20, 1964) is an American operatic coloratura soprano.[1] She is noted for her portrayal of the title character in Lulu, which has received very positive reviews in the press.[2][3][4] She has also appeared as Mozart's Queen of the Night, Zerbinetta by Richard Strauss and in contemporary opera at international opera houses and festivals. Life Born in Buffalo,[5] Aikin is the daughter of a metal worker and a housewife, growing up together with four sisters in modest circumstances. At the age of 15 she experienced an opera on stage for the first time. She first studied art at the State University of New York in Buffalo,[5] and then music at Indiana University, as well as on a German Academic Exchange Service scholarship with Reri Grist at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater München.[5] In 1991, Aikin made her debut at an opera gala in Berlin.[6] From 1992 to 1998 she was a member of the ensemble of the Staatsoper Unter den Linden in Berlin where she performed more than 300 times.[5] He

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Charlotte Caffey

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Charlotte Caffey

Charlotte Irene Caffey (born October 21, 1953) is an American rock and roll musician and songwriter, best known for her work in the Go-Go's in the 1980s, including writing "We Got the Beat". Career Caffey began her musical career as a bass guitar player in the early Los Angeles punk band The Eyes before joining the Go-Go's in 1978 and switching to guitar.[1] She remained friends with fellow band member Belinda Carlisle after the initial break up of the Go-Go's and wrote songs for Carlisle's solo albums. From 1988 till 1992, she led her own band, The Graces, with Meredith Brooks and Gia Ciambotti, who released the album Perfect View in 1989. Caffey also co-wrote the theme song to the television series Clueless with Anna Waronker, and played piano on the album version of "Foolish Games" by Jewel, as well as co-writing the No. 1 U.S. country hit "But for the Grace of God" with Keith Urban.[1] Caffey wrote the book, music, and lyrics for Lovelace: A Rock Musical with Anna Waronker. The rock musical debuted at

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Shonali Bhowmik

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Shonali Bhowmik

Shonali Bhowmik (born 20th century) is an American musician, actress, screenwriter, and producer. She also was one of the hosts of the Upright Citizens Brigade show Variety SHAC.[1] She has performed in the bands Tigers and Monkeys and Ultrababyfat.[2] Early life Bhowmik grew up in Nashville, Tennessee. She has a sister named Ruchi Bhowmik, and her parents are named Dilip Bhowmik and Shuba Bhowmik. She attended law school in Atlanta, Georgia.[3] Career Ultrababyfat She began Ultrababyfat with her best friend, Michelle Dubois, as they had been playing music since they were children. David Cross discovered Ultrababyfat in Atlanta. Bhowmik then toured with Cross while filming his Let America Laugh DVD.[4] Tigers and Monkeys Dmitri Martin helped Bhowmik come up with the name for the band by asking her what her two favorite animals were. Bhowmik did not want to use her name to promote the show for a band consisting of three people from Florida.[4] Variety SHAC Bhowmik hosted Variety SHAC throughout its ent

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Fiona Apple

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Fiona Apple

Fiona Apple McAfee-Maggart (born September 13, 1977) is an American singer-songwriter and pianist. Her accolades include one Grammy Award, and an additional seven Grammy Award nominations in various categories. The daughter of actor Brandon Maggart, Apple was born in New York City, and raised between there and her father's home in Los Angeles. Classically trained on piano as a child, she began composing her own songs when she was eight years old. Her debut album, Tidal, written when Apple was 17, was released in 1996 and received a Grammy Award for Best Female Vocal Rock Performance for the single "Criminal". She followed with When the Pawn... (1999), produced by Jon Brion, which was also critically and commercially successful and was certified platinum. For her third album, Extraordinary Machine (2005), Apple again collaborated with Brion, and began recording the album in 2002. However, Apple was reportedly unhappy with the production and opted not to release the record, leading fans to erroneously protest

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Daniele Alexander

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Daniele Alexander

Daniele Alexander (born December 2, 1954 in Fort Worth, Texas) is an American country music singer. She began her career as a teenager, performing jazz initially before moving to Las Vegas, Nevada to sing in casinos. She also charted in the Top 20 on the Billboard charts with the single "She's There", a single from her 1989 Mercury Records album First Move.[2] A second album, I Dream in Color, produced a duet with labelmate Butch Baker in "It Wasn't You, It Wasn't Me," the last chart single for either artist. Alexander exited Mercury in 1991, and later co-wrote two songs on Mila Mason's 1997 debut That's Enough of That. Discography Albums Title Album details Peak positions US Country First Move Release date: August 22, 1989 Label: PolyGram/Mercury Records 59 I Dream in Color Release date: January 10, 1991 Label: PolyGram/Mercury Records — "—" denotes releases that did not chart Singles Year Single Peak chartpositions Album US Country[1] CAN Country 1989 "She'

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Deborah Allen

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Deborah Allen

Deborah Allen (born Deborah Lynn Thurmond on September 30, 1953[1]) is an American country music singer, songwriter, author, and actress.[2] Since 1976, Allen has issued 12 albums and charted 14 singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart. She recorded the 1983 crossover hit "Baby I Lied", which reached No. 4 on the country chart and No. 26 on the Billboard Hot 100. Allen has also written No. 1 singles for herself, Janie Fricke, and John Conlee; Top 5 hits for Patty Loveless and Tanya Tucker; and a Top 10 hit for The Whites. Early life and rise to fame Allen was born Deborah Lynn Thurmond in Memphis, Tennessee, United States.[2] She was a beauty queen when she was a teenager.[1] Musically, she was influenced by Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison, Aretha Franklin, Al Green, Ray Charles, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and the current music which was being played in Memphis on WHBQ and WDIA, as well as country musicians such as Brenda Lee, Patsy Cline, Tammy Wynette, Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson, W

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Reneé Austin

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Reneé Austin

Reneé Austin[2] is an American soul, R&B, gospel, singer, songwriter, actor and speaker.[1] She is a six-time Minnesota Music Award Winner including 'Female Vocalist of the Year'. Austin has a wide vocal range, and has opened for Los Lobos, Tower of Power, Delbert McClinton, Blues Traveler, Big Head Todd & the Monsters, Keb Mo and more.[3] She released three albums between 1997 and 2005, and supplied backing vocals on Tommy Castro's 2005 album, Soul Shaker.[4] Austin was also part of a group of women who performed in Morgan Freeman's PBS Blues Divas, as well as singing for a live WWE season premier, whose television audience was six million. Her singing voice has been compared by critics to those of Mavis Staples, Tina Turner, Gladys Knight, Anita Baker, Regina Belle, and also as a female version of Michael McDonald.[5] The Philadelphia Inquirer commented that she "embraces a deliciously wide range of roots styles: She swings nimbly on R&B, and fires off some rousing gospel. For good measure,

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Karrin Allyson

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Karrin Allyson

Karrin Allyson (pronounced KAR-in; born Karrin Allyson Schoonover on July 27, 1963) is an American jazz vocalist. She has been nominated for five Grammy Awards and has received positive reviews from several prominent sources, including the New York Times, which has called her a "singer with a feline touch and impeccable intonation."[1] Early life and education Karrin Allyson was born in Great Bend, Kansas; her father was a Lutheran minister and her mother was a psychotherapist, teacher, and classical pianist.[2] She grew up in Omaha, Nebraska, and spent her last year of high school in San Francisco. In her youth, she studied classical piano, sang at her local church and in musical theatre, and also began songwriting. Allyson attended the University of Nebraska at Omaha on a classical piano scholarship; she majored in classical piano and minored in French. She was lead singer for an all-female rock band called Tomboy. She also developed an avid interest in jazz, performing both in a jazz swing choir in coll

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Suzy Bogguss

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Suzy Bogguss

Susan Kay Bogguss (born December 30, 1956) is an American country music singer and songwriter. She began her career in the 1980s as a solo singer. In the 1990s, six of her songs were Top 10 hits, three albums were certified gold, and one album received a platinum certification. She won Top New Female Vocalist from the Academy of Country Music and the Horizon Award from the Country Music Association. Early life and rise to success Susan Kay Bogguss[2] was born on December 30, 1956, in Aledo, Illinois, United States, the youngest of four born to Barbara "B.J." (née Stewart) and Charles "Bud" Bogguss. Charles was an Army officer who served in the Pacific Ocean theatre of World War II,[3] and later became a machinist who worked at an International Harvester plant at East Moline.[4] B.J. was a secretary-auditor for a Midwest grocery chain.[4] Her grandmothers played piano at theaters.[5] At age 5, she began singing in the Angel Choir of the College Avenue Presbyterian Church in her hometown. With her parents' en

Proper Records artists

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Deanna Bogart

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Deanna Bogart

Bogart in 2010 Deanna Bogart (born September 5, 1959, Detroit, Michigan, United States), is an American blues/fusion singer, pianist, and saxophone player/composer/arranger/producer.[1] Background She began her career in the Baltimore and Washington D.C. area of Maryland with the ensemble Cowboy Jazz, and following that band's breakup in 1986, a stint playing with Root Boy Slim. In the early 1990s she began her solo career. Awards: 4x BMA (Blues Music Awards) Horn instrumentalist of the year. In 2013, Bogart was nominated for a Blues Music Award in the 'Pinetop Perkins Piano Player' category.[2][3] She gets her musical oxygen in the genre free zone. Discography 1991: Out to Get You 1992: Crossing Borders 1996: New Address 1998: The Great Unknown 2001: Deanna Bogart Band Live 2002: Timing Is Everything 2006: Real Time 2009: Eleventh Hour 2012: Pianoland 2014: Just a Wish Away References Ankeny, Jason. "Biography: Deanna Bogart". AllMusic. Retrieved July 29, 2010. "Blues Music

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Carla Bozulich

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Carla Bozulich

Carla Ragin Bozulich (born December 24, 1965)[1] is an American musician based in Los Angeles, known as the lead singer, lyricist and founder of The Geraldine Fibbers and Evangelista and as a founding member of Ethyl Meatplow and Scarnella. The Geraldine Fibbers made two albums for Virgin Records. Their first album was described as "...a Country Feedback Masterpiece" by Vice Magazine.[2] Bozulich's Evangelista project began in 2006. The album was under her own name and titled Evangelista.[3] The album was released by Constellation Records, and was that label's first release by a non-Canadian artist.[4] In 2007, The Sunday Times called "Evangelista", "A vivid inner darkness which shames rock's weeping millionaires."[5] On the albums Hello, Voyager (2008), Prince of Truth (2009) and In Animal Tongue (2011), Bozulich adopted Evangelista as a band name. Some consistent members include bassist Tara Barnes, keyboardist/sampler Dominic Cramp, guitarist Nels Cline, violinist Jessica Moss, organist Nadia Moss, drumme

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Coe Glade

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Coe Glade

Coe Glade (August 12, 1900 - September 23, 1985) was an American opera singer.[1][2] She was born in Chicago.[1] She was a mezzo soprano.[1] She sang in the opening program at Radio City Music Hall in 1932[1] and at the Hiram Walker Canadian Club at the Chicago World's Fair in 1934.[3] Glade sang the lead role in Carmen more than 2,000 times.[3] She is buried in Myrtle Hill Memorial Park in Tampa, Florida. References "Coe Glade, 85, Dead; Sang in Many Operas". September 25, 1985 – via NYTimes.com. "Naamloos document". www.operanostalgia.be. Heise, Kenan. "COE GLADE, SANG LEAD IN CARMEN 2,000 TIMES". chicagotribune.com. External links Coe Glade at Find a Grave Photograph of Glade by Maurice Seymour An evening of reminiscenses with Coe Glad and Charles Mintzer, 1983

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Meredith Brooks

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Meredith Brooks

Meredith Brooks's Bitch single logo. Meredith Ann Brooks (born June 12, 1958) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist best known for her 1997 hit song "Bitch", for which she was nominated for a Grammy Award. Career Brooks started her music career in 1976 as a member of an all-female band called Sapphire, based in Eugene, Oregon, touring and recording with CMS Records in the Pacific Northwest. Her bandmates were Janis Gaines, Cynthia Larsen, Patricia French and Pam Johnson. Seeking greater success, Brooks pushed the band to move to Seattle without Gaines on keyboards, reducing Sapphire to a foursome. In Seattle, Sapphire recorded at Kaye-Smith Studios at the same time as Heart.[1] When this version of the band split in 1982, Brooks moved to Los Angeles to develop a solo career, releasing an album titled Meredith Brooks in 1986, which saw limited success in Mexico. In 1987, she joined Charlotte Caffey and Gia Ciambotti to form the trio the Graces, releasing the single "Lay Down Your Arms" which rose t

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Edie Brickell

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Edie Brickell

Edie Arlisa Brickell (born March 10, 1966) is an American singer-songwriter widely known for 1988's Shooting Rubberbands at the Stars, the debut album by Edie Brickell & New Bohemians, which went to No. 4 on the Billboard albums chart. She is married to Paul Simon. Early life Brickell was born in Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas, to Larry Jean (Sellers) Linden and Paul Edward Brickell.[1][2] She was raised with her older sister, Laura Strain. She attended Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts[3] in Dallas, and later studied at Southern Methodist University until she joined a band and decided to focus on songwriting. Music career Edie Brickell & New Bohemians In 1985, Brickell was invited to sing one night with friends from her high school in a local folk rock group, New Bohemians. She joined the band as lead singer. After the band was signed to a recording contract, the label changed the group's name to Edie Brickell & New Bohemians. Their 1988 debut album, Shooting Ru

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Inez Catalon

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Inez Catalon

Inez Catalon (c. September 23, 1913[1][a] – November 23, 1994)[2] was an American Creole ballad singer, who was one of the most well-known performers of the genre known as Louisiana "home music".[3][4] These are a cappella versions of ballads and love songs, drinking songs, game songs, lullabies and waltzes performed by women in the home, passed down from earlier generations to provide entertainment for the family before radio and television existed. Home music is not considered part of the public performance repertoire of Cajun and zydeco music because the songs were sung in the home by women, rather than in the dance halls of southwestern Louisiana which featured almost exclusively male performers.[5] Catalon was a recipient of a 1993 National Heritage Fellowship awarded by the National Endowment for the Arts, which is the United States government's highest honor in the folk and traditional arts.[6] Early life Inez Catalon was born in Maurice, Louisiana[2] and grew up in nearby Kaplan, Louisiana, the you

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Marcella Craft

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Marcella Craft

Marcella Craft (August 11, 1874 – December 12, 1959) was an American operatic soprano who performed internationally in the late 19th century and early 20th century.[1] Personal life Born Marcia Craft in Indianapolis, Indiana, she moved with her family to Riverside, California in 1887. Craft graduated from Riverside High School in 1893. During the graduation ceremony, at Riverside's Loring Opera House, she performed her first public solo.[2] Encouraged by the community, and with contributions from local businessmen, Craft studied opera in Boston, Massachusetts under maestro Charles R. Adams. Upon completion of her studies, she traveled to Italy for additional tutoring. In 1917 Craft purchased a home for her parents on Prospect Avenue in Riverside. After leaving Germany in 1932, she returned to Riverside and also lived in the Prospect Avenue home until her death in 1959.[2] She is buried in Riverside's Evergreen Cemetery.[3][4] Career While in Italy Craft's tutor changed her name to Marcella, and she star

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Nedda Casei

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Nedda Casei

Nedda Casei (September 9, 1932 – January 20, 2020) was an American operatic mezzo-soprano.[1] Career Early in her career, Casei was selected by Leopold Stokowski to sing the role of Jocasta, in Igor Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex. She made her operatic debut at the Theatre Royal de la Monnaie, Brussels in 1960 and also debuted at La Scala, Milan in the same year. During her career she appeared at the Teatro San Carlo, Prague Opera, Los Angeles Opera, Chicago Lyric Opera and other major opera houses and concert halls. She starred at the Vancouver Festival as Hansel in Hansel and Gretel, and received ovations for her interpretation of Cherubino in Le Nozze di Figaro and Musetta in Leoncavallo's La Bohème at San Remo and Barcelona's Teatro Gran Liceo, as well as Carmen at the Salzburg Festspeilhaus. She was a leading mezzo-soprano with New York's Metropolitan Opera for 21 years, her roles including Carmen, Rosina, Suzuki, Marina, Adalgisa and Cherubino. She also sang in concert and on TV throughout Europe, South Afr

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Jacky Clark Chisholm

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Jacky Clark Chisholm

Jacky Cullum Clark–Chisholm (born Jacqueline Lenita Cullum; December 29, 1948 in Selma, Alabama) [1] is an American Grammy Award-winning gospel singer who is most known as the oldest member of the American gospel singing group The Clark Sisters. Biography Early life and career Clark–Chisholm was born December 29, 1948 in Detroit Michigan, the oldest of six children to legendary gospel music innovator Dr. Mattie Moss-Clark and Leo Cullum Sr. For high school, Clark–Chisholm attended Mumford High School in Detroit, Michigan; graduating in 1967. Influenced by their mother's work, Clark–Chisholm and her younger sisters formed the gospel singing group The Clark Sisters. The group flourished and became known for their classic gospel performances including "Is My Living In Vain?" and "You Brought the Sunshine". Solo career On March 29, 2005, Clark–Chisholm released her first solo album, Expectancy, on the Entheos Records label. On this album she teamed up with songwriter/producer Carnell Murrell, Autun Foster, an

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Maxine Brown (soul singer)

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Maxine Brown (soul singer)

Maxine Ella Brown (born August 18, 1939) is an American soul and R&B[1] singer. Background and career Maxine Brown began singing as a child, performing with two New York City based gospel groups called the Angelairs and the Royaltones when she was a teenager.[2] In 1960, she signed with the small Nomar record label, who released the deep soul ballad "All in My Mind" (which was written by Maxine) late in the year.[3] The single became a hit, climbing to number two on the US R&B charts (number 19 pop), and it was quickly followed by "Funny",[4] which peaked at number three. Brown was poised to become a star and she moved to the bigger ABC-Paramount in 1962, but left the label after an unsuccessful year and recording several non-chart singles for the label, and signed to the New York-based uptown soul label, Wand Records, a Scepter Records subsidiary, in 1963.[4] Brown recorded a string of sizable hits for Wand over the next three years. Among these were the Carole King/Gerry Goffin songs "Oh No No

ABC Records artists

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20th-century American women singers

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Wand Records artists

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Sallie Blair

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Sallie Blair

Sallie Blair (1934 – February 17, 1992) was an American jazz singer. She began her career performing as a band act with Johnny Otis and Duke Ellington before joining Cab Calloway's Cotton Club Revue. Blair recorded for Bethlehem, MGM, Scepter, and Bell Records, but she was best known for her live performances. Because of her voluptuous figure and blonde hair, Miles Davis called her the "brown Marilyn Monroe."[1] Life and career Blair was born Sarah Bolling Mason Hutchins in Baltimore, Maryland in 1934. She was the daughter of Sarah (Pat) Mason and pro golfer Carlos Hutchins.[2] She attended Douglass High School and began performing at 16 in 1950.[3] Accompanied by her mother, she used the stage name Sally Blair (later spelled Sallie), while performing at local clubs such as Gamby's, the Casino, and Eddie Leonard's Spa. She performed in clubs in Chicago and Los Angles before replacing an ailing act at New York's Waldorf-Astoria.[3] After graduation, she toured with Duke Ellington and Johnny Otis.[2] In 1953,

Singers from Maryland

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American female composers

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Scepter Records artists

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