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Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign


Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

The 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump was formally launched on June 16, 2015, at Trump Tower in New York City. Trump was the Republican nominee for President of the United States in the 2016 election, having won the most state primaries, caucuses, and delegates at the 2016 Republican National Convention.[9] He chose Mike Pence, the sitting Governor of Indiana, as his vice presidential running mate. On November 8, 2016, Trump and Pence were elected president and vice president of the United States. Trump's populist[10][11] positions in opposition to illegal immigration and various trade agreements, such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership,[12][13][14][15] earned him support especially among voters who were male, white,[16] blue-collar, working class, and those without college degrees.[17][18] Many of Trump's remarks were controversial and helped his campaign garner extensive coverage by the mainstream media, trending topics, and social media.[19][20] Trump's campaign rallies attracted large crowds, as w

Mike Pence

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Roger Ailes

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Roger Ailes

Roger Eugene Ailes (May 15, 1940 – May 18, 2017) was an American television executive and media consultant. He was the chairman and CEO of Fox News and Fox Television Stations, from which he resigned in July of 2016 for engaging in multiple sexual harassment acts with 23 known victims. Ailes was a media consultant for Republican presidents Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, and for Rudy Giuliani's first mayoral campaign. In 2016, he became an adviser to the Donald Trump campaign, where he assisted with debate preparation. Ailes suffered from hemophilia, a medical condition in which the body is impaired in its ability to produce blood clots. He died on May 18, 2017 at the age of 77 after suffering a subdural hematoma that was aggravated by his hemophilia. Early life Ailes was born and grew up in the factory town of Warren, Ohio, the son of Donna Marie (née Cunningham) and Robert Eugene Ailes, a factory maintenance foreman.[1] Ailes suffered from hemophilia and was often hospitalized as a y

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All articles needing sections

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Deaths from bleeding

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1,000 Days, 1,000 Songs

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1,000 Days, 1,000 Songs

1,000 Days, 1,000 Songs (originally called 30 Days, 30 Songs, then 30 Days, 50 Songs) is a musical project launched on October 10, 2016 by Dave Eggers which was originally supposed to release one song per day from then until November 8, 2016, which is Election Day in the United States. Each of the songs is performed by one of 40 musicians or projects, and the songs all advocate against voting for Donald Trump in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.[1][2] Eggers worked on the project with Jordan Kurland, the owner of Zeitgeist Artist Management.[3][4] The two of them previously worked on two similar election-related projects, including the "90 Days, 90 Reasons" campaign in 2012.[5] Eggers originally got the idea for the project when attending a Trump rally in Sacramento, California in June 2016.[6] The first song in the project was "Million Dollar Loan" by Death Cab for Cutie. See also Donald Trump in music References Kornhaber, Spencer (12 October 2016). "Donald Trump Is Terrific Protest-Music Inspirat

Donald Trump-related lists

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Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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2016 United States presidential election in pop...

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Act of Love (politics)

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Act of Love (politics)

Act of Love is a phrase used by American politician Jeb Bush to describe the act of immigrating illegally to the United States for the purpose of improving a family's economic condition, and also a U.S. political advertisement released by the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump as part of an attack on Bush's approach to illegal immigration to the United States. Background Bush made the statement in answer to a question put by a reporter during a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the presidency of his father, George H. W. Bush, held at the George Bush Presidential Library in April 2014.[1] During the August 6, 2015 Republican Presidential debate, when moderator Chris Wallace asked Bush if he stood by this statement, Bush responded, "I do. I believe that the great majority of people coming here illegally have no other option. They want to provide for their family." He added that "there should be a path to earned legal status" for illegal immigrants.[2][3] The advertisement, released in August 201

Works about illegal immigration to the United S...

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Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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2016 United States Republican presidential prim...

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2016 United States presidential election

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2016 United States presidential election

The 2016 United States presidential election was the 58th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016. The Republican ticket of businessman Donald Trump and Indiana Governor Mike Pence defeated the Democratic ticket of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and U.S. Senator from Virginia Tim Kaine, despite losing the popular vote.[2] Trump took office as the 45th president, and Pence as the 48th vice president, on January 20, 2017. Trump emerged as his party's front-runner amidst a wide field of Republican primary candidates, while Clinton defeated Senator Bernie Sanders and became the first female presidential nominee of a major American party. Trump's populist, nationalist campaign, which promised to "Make America Great Again" and opposed political correctness, illegal immigration, and many free-trade agreements,[3] garnered extensive free media coverage.[4][5] Clinton emphasized her extensive political experience, denounced Trump and many of his supporters as bigots, and advoca

Hillary Clinton 2016 presidential campaign

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Spoken articles

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Neal Tapio

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Neal Tapio

Neal Tapio (born September 19, 1970) is an American businessman, South Dakota state senator, and a former candidate for U.S. Representative for South Dakota's at-large congressional district.[2] Tapio gained notoriety as an early supporter of Donald Trump and served as the Trump presidential campaign director for South Dakota.[3] Early life and education Neal Tapio was born in Watertown, South Dakota. Tapio graduated from Watertown High School in Watertown, South Dakota in 1988. Tapio attended Moorhead State University in Moorhead, Minnesota where he graduated in 1992 with a Bachelors in Business Administration. Tapio, directly out of college, worked as a staff assistant to then-U.S. Senator Larry Pressler in Washington, D.C. for two years. Business career Drilling and fraccing equipment, which Tapio's machines were used on in the Bakken formation. He worked in the finance industry for Wells Fargo in Rapid City, South Dakota. Tapio later founded New Horizon Homes in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Before en

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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People from Codington County, South Dakota

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People from Watertown, South Dakota

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American Desk

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American Desk

The American Desk is a prospective office for trade deals at the White House announced by president-elect Donald Trump in October 2016.[1][2] Mr. Trump said he intends to merge bureaux for trade policy in the Office of the United States Trade Representative, the United States Department of Commerce and other agencies with a new Office of Trade, which will report to the American Desk.[1] The aim of the American Desk is to fold layers of inefficient bureaucracy,[2] and prevent the delocalization of US corporate entities who employ US citizens.[1] In my administration, all trade policymaking will be consolidated in one Office. It will report to an American Desk and it will be located inside the Department of Commerce. The mission of the American Desk will be to protect the economic interests of the American worker, and the national interests of the United States. — Donald Trump, October 20, 2016 speech in Ohio[3] References Mauldin, William (October 20, 2016). "Trump Seeks 'American Desk' for Trade, Wh

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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White House

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Foreign trade of the United States

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Juanita Broaddrick

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Juanita Broaddrick

Juanita Broaddrick is an American former nursing home administrator. In 1999, after previously saying otherwise in a sworn statement, she alleged that U.S. President Bill Clinton raped her in April 1978 when he was the Attorney General of Arkansas. Clinton's attorney, David Kendall, denied the allegations on his client's behalf, and Clinton declined to comment further on the issue. Rumors had circulated about Broaddrick's allegation for years and it had been recorded in a letter prepared by a Republican rival of Clinton's around 1991, but she refused to speak to news media until 1999. In a sworn statement in 1997 with the placeholder name "Jane Doe #5",[1] Broaddrick filed an affidavit with Paula Jones' lawyers stating there were unfounded rumors and stories circulating "that Mr. Clinton had made unwelcome sexual advances toward me in the late seventies. ... These allegations are untrue".[2] She then recanted that statement to investigators of potential misconduct by Clinton led by Kenneth Starr, while insis

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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American businesspeople

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Mark Burns (pastor)

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Mark Burns (pastor)

John Mark Burns (born September 21, 1979) is an American evangelical Christian who serves as the pastor of Harvest Praise & Worship Center in South Carolina.[1] He was a supporter of Republican nominee Donald Trump's 2016 candidacy for the U.S. presidency. In February 2018, Burns announced his candidacy to replace retiring Republican Trey Gowdy in South Carolina's 4th congressional district.[2] Burns is co-founder of the NOW Television Network.[3] Early life and education Burns was born in Anderson, South Carolina, on September 21, 1979, as John Mark Burns, to parents Otis and Debra Burns. At an early age, he began playing the keyboard and singing gospel music with his family group, the Burns Brothers of Belton, South Carolina, traveling extensively around the country. In 1995, at the age of 16, Burns was licensed as a minister of the gospel under his father at the Mt. Pleasant Missionary Baptist Church, in Pelzer, South Carolina. While preaching, he attended Belton-Honea Path High School but did not r

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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American Christians

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Cambridge Analytica

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Cambridge Analytica

Cambridge Analytica Ltd (CA) was a British political consulting firm which combined misappropriation of digital assets, data mining, data brokerage, and data analysis with strategic communication during the electoral processes.[5][6] It was started in 2013[7] as an offshoot of the SCL Group. After closing operations with legal proceedings including bankruptcy, members of the SCL Group have been continuing operations under the legal entity Emerdata Limited.[8][9] The company closed operations in 2018 in the course of the Facebook–Cambridge Analytica data scandal, although related firms still exist.[10] The company was partly owned by the family of Robert Mercer, an American hedge-fund manager who supports many politically conservative causes.[9][11] The firm maintained offices in London, New York City, and Washington, DC.[12] CEO Alexander Nix has said CA was involved in 44 US political races in 2014.[13] In 2015, CA performed data analysis services for Ted Cruz's presidential campaign.[11] In 2016, CA worked

2016 United Kingdom European Union membership r...

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Brexit

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Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Carrier Air Conditioner move to Mexico

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Carrier Air Conditioner move to Mexico

On February 10, 2016, Carrier Air Conditioner, a division of United Technologies, announced that it was moving its manufacturing operations to Mexico. A cellphone video shot by an employee and posted on YouTube rapidly went viral, making this particular plant closing a national news story, after which Donald Trump made the company's decision to move to Mexico, "a centerpiece of his stump speeches attacking free trade."[1] The move played a role in the Donald Trump presidential campaign, 2016, as a symbol of his protectionist position on international trade, and a lesser role in the 2016 presidential campaign of Bernie Sanders. Shortly after becoming President-elect, Trump and Vice-President elect Mike Pence announced a deal with Carrier to keep some of the manufacturing jobs in Indiana, while others would still move to Mexico, in exchange for large tax credits granted to the corporation. Decision to move production offshore On February 10, 2016 Carrier announced its plans to move its manufacture of air con

Bernie Sanders 2016 presidential campaign

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2010s YouTube videos

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Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Chalkening

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Chalkening

One of the chalkings at Emory University The Chalkening was a protest that occurred on university campuses across the United States in March and April 2016 in support of the presidential candidacy of Donald Trump. Those who promoted it included Students for Trump and the Trump campaign.[1][2] This protest mainly took the form of chalk writing in public areas on campus with slogans such as "Trump 2016".[3] See Internet meme References Max Kutner,[1]"Armed with chalk, Trump supporters are a new breed of College Republicans", Newsweek, April 9, 2016 Tesfaye, Sophia (April 11, 2016). "Trump's Call for College Supporters to Express Themselves With Chalk Leaves Campuses Full of Racist Messages". AlterNet. Retrieved June 14, 2016. Katie Rogers, “Pro-Trump Chalk Messages Causing Conflicts on Campuses", The New York Times, April 1, 2016.

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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April 2016 events in the United States

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Kellyanne Conway

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Kellyanne Conway

Kellyanne Elizabeth Conway (née Fitzpatrick; born January 20, 1967) is an American pollster, political consultant, and pundit who serves as counselor to the president in the administration of U.S. president Donald Trump. She was previously Trump's campaign manager, having been appointed in August 2016; Conway is the first woman to have run a successful U.S. presidential campaign.[1] She has previously held roles as campaign manager and strategist in the Republican Party, and was formerly president and CEO of The Polling Company, Inc./WomanTrend.[2] Conway, who lived in Trump World Tower from 2001 to 2008 and conducted private polls for Trump in late 2013 when he was considering running for governor of New York, initially endorsed Ted Cruz in the Republican presidential primaries in 2016 and chaired a pro-Cruz political action committee.[3][4][5][6] After Cruz withdrew from the race, Trump appointed Conway as a senior advisor and later campaign manager.[7][8] On December 22, 2016, Trump announced that Conway

St. Joseph High School (Hammonton, New Jersey) ...

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American political pundits

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2016 Donald Trump Chicago rally protest

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2016 Donald Trump Chicago rally protest

On March 11, 2016, the Donald Trump presidential campaign canceled a planned rally at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), in Chicago, Illinois, citing "growing safety concerns" due to the presence of thousands of protesters inside and outside his rally.[5][6] Thousands of anti-Trump demonstrators responding to civic leaders' and social media calls to shut the rally down had gathered outside the arena, and several hundred more filled seating areas within the UIC Pavilion, where the rally was to take place. When the Trump campaign announced that the rally would not take place, there was a great deal of shouting and a few small scuffles between Trump supporters and anti-Trump protesters. Prelude Plans to protest the Trump rally were launched a week in advance by a variety of community and student groups who largely organized via social media. Some 43,000 undergraduate and graduate students had signed a petition asking UIC to cancel the rally by March 6.[7] That same day, Latino leaders in the city, l

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Political riots

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Protests against Donald Trump

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Justin R. Clark

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Justin R. Clark

Justin Reilly "JC" Clark (born June 3, 1975) is an American lawyer and Senior Counsel to the re-election campaign of President Donald Trump.[2] He formerly held the positions of Director of Public Liaison and Director of Intergovernmental Affairs at the White House.[3][4] Prior to his government service, Clark was a partner at the law firm of Davis, Clark & Bonafonte LLC.[5] Biography Clark grew up in West Hartford, Connecticut and is a graduate of Conard High School and Wesleyan University.[5] While at Wesleyan he lettered as a midfielder and a defenseman for the varsity lacrosse team and was a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity.[6] He received his JD from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 2004.[5] Following law school, he clerked for Associate Justice Peter T. Zarella of the Connecticut Supreme Court and was appointed by Connecticut Governor Jodi Rell to serve on the Judicial Review Council from 2009-2013.[6][7] Clark was a co-founder of the Connecticut based law firm of Davis

Kentucky Republicans

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Connecticut Republicans

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Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Cuckservative

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Cuckservative

"Cuckservative" is a pejorative[1] formed as a portmanteau of "cuck", an abbreviation of the word cuckold, and the political designation conservative.[2] It has become a label used by white nationalists and the alt-right in the United States.[3][4][5][6] The word "cuckservative" reached a high level of mainstream political conversation around mid-July 2015, where it gained media attention just a few weeks before the start of the first Republican primary debate for the 2016 United States presidential election.[4][7] The term, as well as the shortened form "cuck" for cuckold, originated on websites such as 4chan (specifically the /pol/ imageboard) and 8chan, the right-wing message board My Posting Career,[1][3] the blog The Right Stuff,[8] and other sites in the alt-right movement.[3][9][10] Definition and origin One definition of "cuckservative" is a conservative who sells out,[11] having bought into all of the key premises of the left,[12] and sympathizes with liberal values.[7] According to white suprema

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Anti-immigration politics in the United Kingdom

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White nationalism in the United Kingdom

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Correll v. Herring

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Correll v. Herring

Correll v. Herring et al., 212 F.Supp.3d 584 (E.D. Vir. 2016),[1] was a case argued before the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. The case centered on the constitutionality of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s election laws regarding the binding of political party delegates to a presidential nomination convention as part of the Never Trump movement prior to the 2016 Republican National Convention. The case was filed on June 24, 2016. On July 11, 2016, Judge Robert Payne issued a memorandum opinion permanently enjoining the Commonwealth of Virginia from enforcing the section of Virginia election law under challenge.[2] The ruling is considered a symbolic victory in Republican delegate efforts to deny Donald Trump the Republican nomination.[3] Case history On March 1, 2016, the Republican and Democratic parties held presidential primaries in Virginia. Trump and Hillary Clinton won those contests. Under Virginia law, Republican and Democratic delegates were obligated to vote, on th

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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United States case law

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Stop Trump movement

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Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President

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Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President

Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President — What We Don't, Can't, and Do Know is the sixteenth book by Kathleen Hall Jamieson, published in October 2018 by Oxford University Press.[1] The book concludes that Russia very likely delivered Trump's victory in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.[2] Presuppositions Jamieson begins with five premises:[3] Answering former governor Mike Huckabee, it is more likely that Russian trolls changed the election's outcome than that unicorns exist. Any case for Russian influence would be based on the preponderance of the evidence, as in a legal trial, rather than advanced with certainty like e=mc2. Donald Trump is the duly elected president of the United States. Trolls did not elect Trump, voters did. Russians created protests and counterprotests reflecting on the incumbent president and his chosen successor. Russians changed the course of careers (Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Donna Brazile, and James Comey) Russians changed public opinion of c

Hillary Clinton 2016 presidential campaign

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Works about computer hacking

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Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Devil's Bargain

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Devil's Bargain

Devil's Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Storming of the Presidency is a 2017 book by Bloomberg Businessweek journalist Joshua Green about the partnership between Donald Trump and Steve Bannon that led to their 2016 political victory and the putative rise of the alt-right.[1][2][3] Prior to writing the book, Green had worked as a journalist for The Atlantic and Bloomberg, where he garnered experience reporting on conservatives.[4] He had previously written a profile on Bannon in 2015, and interviewed Bannon for the book.[4][5] The book describes Bannon's role in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and how he helped lead Trump to success by capitalizing on the support of white males.[6] The New York Review of Books called Green's work a "cautionary tale".[4] The New York Times described Green's research as "deeply reported".[1] The Washington Post commented Green was able to shed a light on Bannon's political operations.[3] The Guardian concluded Devil's Bargain successfully illuminated the "symb

Steve Bannon

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Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Books about the 2016 United States presidential...

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Donald Trump (Last Week Tonight)

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Donald Trump (Last Week Tonight)

"Donald Trump" is a segment of the HBO news satire television series Last Week Tonight with John Oliver that is devoted to Donald Trump, who later became the President of the United States. It first aired on February 28, 2016, as part of the third episode of Last Week Tonight's third season, when Trump was the frontrunner for the Republican Party nomination for the presidency. During the 22-minute segment, comedian John Oliver discusses Trump's 2016 presidential campaign and his career in business. Oliver outlines Trump's campaign rhetoric, varying political positions, and failed business ventures. The comedian also criticizes Trump for making bigoted and untrue statements, and says the Trump family name was changed at one point from the ancestral name "Drumpf". The segment went viral on YouTube and Facebook. By Super Tuesday on March 1, two days after broadcast, Google searches for "Donald Drumpf" had surpassed those for both Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, who were then competing against Trump for the Republican

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Viral videos

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A. J. Delgado

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A. J. Delgado

Arlene "A. J." Delgado is a former Mediaite columnist who joined the Donald Trump presidential campaign in September 2016.[1] She is a Harvard Law graduate who practiced law in New York City. Career Delgado's writings have been published in The American Conservative, National Review, The Miami Herald, The Washington Post, Breitbart, The Daily Caller, and Fox News. She appears regularly on Hannity. She self-published her book Hip To Be Square: Why It's Cool To Be A Conservative in 2012. Delgado has written about why Latinos should vote for Trump in The Washington Post.[2] On television, Delgado has regularly defended Trump from numerous allegations of sexual harassment. On MSNBC with Brian Williams on October 12, 2016, Delgado called the claims of women who accused Trump of assault "mind boggling" and "dubious".[3] After the election, she joined Donald Trump's transition team as a campaign advisor.[4] She did not join the administration after she found out she was pregnant: The baby's father is fellow Trump

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Women columnists

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Drain the swamp

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Drain the swamp

Swampland near Benton Ridge, Ohio; the channel pictured is used to "drain the swamp". Drain the swamp is a phrase which since the 1980s has frequently been used by American politicians. The phrase alludes to the physical draining of swamps to keep mosquito populations low to combat malaria,[1] and Washington D.C. being founded on a supposed swampy ground.[2] It has been used as a metaphor by: Helen Hunt Jackson (1830–1885) who wrote that to "clear the swamp" (the first obvious step to reclaiming "poisonous and swampy wilderness") was an apt metaphor for how to start addressing "the disgrace to us of the present condition of our Indians." [3] Winfield R. Gaylord (1870–1943) to describe the socialist desire to "drain" the "capitalist swamp".[1] Victor L. Berger (1860–1929), who in his book Broadsides referred to changing the capitalist system as "drain[ing] the swamp".[4] A. Philip Randolph (1889–1979) and Bayard Rustin (1912-1987) in A Freedom Budget for All Americans (1966), argued that "The bree

Sayings

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Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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American political catchphrases

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Diamond and Silk

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Diamond and Silk

Lynnette Hardaway and Rochelle Richardson, known as Diamond and Silk, are American live-stream video bloggers, social media personalities, political activists and Fox Nation hosts. They are known for their commentary in support of United States President Donald Trump. The two women received media attention during the 2016 campaign and again in April 2018 when they alleged that Facebook had notified them they were "unsafe to the community."[1] In response, they accused Facebook of blocking and censoring their Facebook page. There is, however, no evidence that Facebook blocked or censored Diamond and Silk's Facebook page.[2][3][4] On April 26, 2018, at Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa)'s invitation they testified in front of Congress about their perceived censorship.[5][6] Subsequently, Republican members of Congress brought up the two women's censorship claims at Mark Zuckerberg's testimony before U.S. Congress.[7] Since 2018, Diamond and Silk have traveled the country on their Chit Chat Tour.[8][9] History Diamo

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Entertainer duos

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Economic anxiety

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Economic anxiety

Economic anxiety is the state of concern about the future of one's economic prospects. Also referred to as economic insecurity, higher levels of economic anxiety have been shown to be positively correlated with a fear of crime.[1] Economic anxiety can increase due to loss of household income or decreased purchasing power, causing affected individuals to self-report having more issues with societal structure and a lower quality of life. [2] Examples Economic anxiety has been widely cited (e.g. by commentators at FiveThirtyEight) as a major reason for Donald Trump's victory in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.[3][4] Other commentators, however, argued that economic anxiety was less of an important factor in predicting support for Trump than "cultural anxiety," or the feeling that one is a stranger in America and that illegal immigrants should be deported.[5] The term has also been used sarcastically in response to racist statements and actions by Trump's supporters, to mock the attempts by certain politica

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Donald Trump presidential campaign, 2016

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Anxiety

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List of economic advisors to Donald Trump

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List of economic advisors to Donald Trump

As part of Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign, various economists and businesspeople have served both in a formal and an informal capacity, to advise Trump on macroeconomics and associated government policy decisions. During the transition to the presidency, Trump gained additional advisors, and after the inauguration some of his advisors will officially become part of the Trump administration (including the NEC, NTC, advisors, czars, counselors, OMB, CEA, Treasury, Commerce, USTR, SBA, SEC, and the Fed) while others will remain in the private sector as informal advisors with varying degrees of influence. Background During his presidential campaign Trump released initial details of his economic policies when his campaign officially began in June 2015, and more details during the first Republican debates which began in August 2015. Although critical of certain aspects of Trump's early economic plans, especially increasing tariffs as opposed to free trade policies,[1] Larry Kudlow and Steve Moore woul

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Donald Trump-related lists

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People associated with the 2016 United States p...

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List of Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign endorsements

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List of Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign endorsements

This is a list of notable individuals and organizations who voiced their endorsement for the office of the president of Donald Trump as the Republican Party's presidential nominee for the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Endorsements Former U.S. federal government Vice Presidents Vice President Dick Cheney in 2003 Dick Cheney, 46th Vice President of the United States (2001–09) and 17th United States Secretary of Defense (1989–93) Vice President Dan Quayle in 1989 Dan Quayle, 44th Vice President of the United States (1989–93)[1] Federal Cabinet-level officials John Ashcroft, 79th United States Attorney General (2001–05)[2] William Bennett, 3rd United States Secretary of Education (1985–88) [3] John Rusling Block, 21st United States Secretary of Agriculture (1981–86)[4] John R. Bolton, 25th United States Ambassador to the United Nations (2005–06)[5] Elaine Chao, 24th United States Secretary of Labor (2001–09)[2] Edwin Meese, 75th United States Attorney General (1985–88)[6] Jim

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2016 United States Republican presidential prim...

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Fire and Fury

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Fire and Fury

Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House is a 2018 book by Michael Wolff which according to Wolff, details the behavior of U.S. President Donald Trump, the staff of his 2016 presidential campaign, and the White House staff. The title refers to a quote by Trump about the conflict with North Korea. The book became a New York Times number one bestseller. Reviewers generally accepted Wolff's portrait of a dysfunctional Trump administration, but were skeptical of many of Wolff's particular claims. The book highlights descriptions of Trump's behavior, chaotic interactions among senior White House staff, and derogatory comments about the Trump family by former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon. Trump is depicted as being held in low regard by his White House staff, leading Wolff to state that "100% of the people around him" believe Trump is unfit for office.[1] Background According to Michael Wolff, when he approached Donald Trump about writing a book on his presidency, Trump agreed to give him access

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Michelle Fields

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Michelle Fields

Michelle Fields (born January 10, 1988)[1] is an American political journalist who formerly wrote for The Huffington Post and was a reporter for Breitbart News, as well as a Fox News contributor. After graduating from college Fields was hired as a reporter at The Daily Caller. She later became a correspondent for PJ Media. Fields is a former panelist on the Fox News program Cashin' In. In 2016, Fields accused Donald Trump's campaign manager Corey Lewandowski of grabbing her arm at a press conference. At the time, Fields was a reporter for Breitbart but resigned her position in March 2016 due to the organization's handling of the Lewandowski incident. Early life Fields was raised in the Los Angeles area and attended Calabasas High School in Calabasas, California.[2] Fields is of partial Honduran descent and is the daughter of television and film writer Greg Fields.[2] She studied political science at Pepperdine University, graduating in 2011.[3] She served as the president of the Pepperdine chapter of Stude

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Foreign policy of Donald Trump (2015-2016)

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Foreign policy of Donald Trump (2015-2016)

This article describes the foreign policy positions taken by Donald Trump during his 2016 presidential campaign (announced June 16, 2015). Overview In a New York Times interview in July 2016, Presidential Nominee Trump "repeatedly defined American global interests almost purely in economic terms," with the nation's "roles as a peacekeeper, as a provider of a nuclear deterrent against adversaries like North Korea, as an advocate of human rights and as a guarantor of allies' borders" being "quickly reduced to questions of economic benefit to the United States."[1] A 68-page document likely written by and under the direction of the Trump administration's national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster was released by the Trump administration in December 2017,[2] which has been referred to as outlining the administration's doctrine pertaining to foreign policy goals.[3] United States Armed Forces and defense spending Trump stated in a December 2015 Republican primary debate that "Our military is a disast

Policies of Donald Trump

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Boris Epshteyn

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Boris Epshteyn

Boris Alexandrovich Epshteyn (Russian: Бори́с Алекса́ндрович Эпштейн; born August 14, 1982) is a Russian-born American Republican political strategist, investment banker, and attorney. He was the Chief Political Analyst at Sinclair Broadcast Group until December 2019 [1][2] . He was a senior advisor to Donald Trump's 2016 campaign for President of the United States, and previously worked on the McCain-Palin campaign. Following Trump's election, he was named director of communications for the Presidential Inaugural Committee,[3] and then assistant communications director for surrogate operations in the administration, until he resigned in March 2017. Early life and education Epshteyn was born in 1982 in Moscow, Soviet Union, the son of Anna Shulkina and Aleksandr Epshteyn. His family is Russian Jewish.[4] In 1993, he immigrated as a refugee with his family to Plainsboro Township, New Jersey under the Lautenberg amendment of 1990.[5] Epshteyn is a graduate of Georgetown University School of Foreign Service (

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List of Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign primary endorsements

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List of Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign primary endorsements

This is a list of notable individuals and organizations who voiced their endorsement of Donald Trump as the Republican Party's presidential nominee for the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Primary campaign endorsements Former Executive Branch officials Buchanan in 2008 Gary Berntsen, former officer of the Central Intelligence Agency Directorate of Operations (1982–2005)[2] Pat Buchanan, White House Communications Director (1985–1987), senior advisor to Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, author, and columnist[3] Jeffrey D. Gordon, retired United States Navy officer, communications and foreign policy adviser, and Pentagon spokesman from (2005–2009)[2] Michael Johns, former White House speechwriter to President George H. W. Bush and co-founder and national leader of the U.S. Tea Party movement[4][5] Jeffrey Lord, White House associate political director for the Reagan administration (1987–1988) and political commentator[6] Joseph E. Schmitz, Inspector General of the Department of Defense (2002

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Tony Fabrizio

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Tony Fabrizio

Anthony Fabrizio (born 1960) is an American Republican pollster and strategist. In February 2018, he was questioned by Robert Mueller's Special Counsel team about polling data shared with pro-Kremlin pro-Putin individuals. He is the principal in Fabrizio, Lee & Associates, and was the pollster for Donald Trump's fall 2016 Presidential campaign, former Senator Bob Dole's 1996 Presidential campaign, U.S. Senator Rand Paul's U.S. Senate and 2016 Presidential campaign, and former Governor Rick Perry's 2012 Presidential campaign, among others. He also served as a pollster for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in the 2014 midterm elections. Fabrizio is a silent owner of Multi Media Services Corporation (MMSC).[1] MMSC was the biggest vendor to the top pro-Trump Rebuilding America Now super PAC.[1] Career In 1996, Fabrizio served as chief pollster and strategist to Bob Dole's Presidential campaign, which was unsuccessful. He has also worked for several dozen U.S. Senators and Governors, including Tim Pawlenty, Ra

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Marco Gutierrez

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Marco Gutierrez

Marco Gutierrez is a Mexican-American right-wing political activist and the co-founder of Latinos for Trump, an online organization dedicated to promoting the candidacy of Donald Trump in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.[1][2] In July 2016, Gutierrez said that this group had 20,000 members.[3] He gained significant media attention in September 2016 when he said on MSNBC that the spread of Latino culture in the United States, if it was not stopped, would lead to "taco trucks on every corner."[4] Subsequently, the New York Daily News reported that he and his wife, Jennifer, had filed for personal bankruptcy fourteen times and that he had had his real estate license revoked.[5] He has also argued that Trump's plan to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border is both physical and symbolic, and has praised Trump's leadership abilities.[6] References Weikel, Dan (2016-08-28). "'Viva Trump!' Small but vocal group of Latinos rally for Trump in Orange County". Los Angeles Times. "A Trump dad and his Bernie da

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Great America PAC

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Great America PAC

Great America PAC is a Super PAC that supported Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.[2] It was founded in 2016 by Eric Beach, a political strategist who is a veteran of presidential campaigns.[3] Beach soon brought on Ed Rollins, a long time Republican campaign consultant and strategist who served as the campaign manager for Ronald Reagan's 1984 presidential campaign.[4] The PAC continued in operation after Trump was elected in 2016; it raised $11.1 million between 2017 to mid-2019, despite being condemned by the Trump 2020 campaign because the PAC has no official connection to the campaign.[5] Leadership The PAC is run by co-chairs Eric L. Beach and Ed Rollins.[3] Former Navy SEAL and Trump supporter Carl Higbie was brought on to serve as the PAC's spokesman he has since been removed from that position.[6] The "hybrid PAC/Super PAC" spent $26.6 million during the 2016 election cycle. Its largest contributor in 2016 was Isaac Perlmutter, chairman and former CEO of Marvel Entertainment, who gave

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Free the Delegates

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Free the Delegates

Free the Delegates was an American political effort within the Republican Party, formed in June 2016 by delegate and Rules Committee member Kendal Unruh to the 2016 Republican National Convention (July 18-21, 2016) with the goal of nominating a candidate other than Donald Trump, who won a plurality of primary votes and pledged delegates.[1][2] By June 19, hundreds of delegates to the Republican National Convention had begun raising funds and recruiting members in support of an effort to persuade the party convention rules committee to free delegates to vote as they individually wished, rather than according to the results of state caucuses and primaries.[3][4][5][6] History The movement was founded and launched in June by a delegate and RNC rules committee member, Kendal Unruh, with a nationwide conference call connecting 30 convention delegates in 15 states.[7] Less than a week later, the group's second phone conference included over 1,000 delegates, about 400 of whom were pledged to the movement.[6][8]

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Started in 2016 in the United States

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Stop Trump movement

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Rick Gates (political consultant)

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Rick Gates (political consultant)

Richard William Gates III[1] (born April 27, 1972) is an American former political consultant and lobbyist who pleaded guilty to conspiracy against the United States and making false statements in the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections.[2] He is a longtime business associate of Paul Manafort and served as deputy to Manafort when the latter was campaign manager of the Donald Trump presidential campaign in 2016, and after under Kellyanne Conway.[3] Gates and Manafort were both indicted in October 2017 on charges related to their consulting work with pro-Russian political figures in Ukraine.[3] Additional charges were filed in District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia on February 21, 2018, however these charges were withdrawn on February 27, 2018, without prejudice, as agreed to in his plea bargain with Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III.[4] On December 17, 2019, Gates was sentenced to 45 days jail and three years of probation.[5] Early life Gates is the s

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Get Me Roger Stone

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Get Me Roger Stone

Get Me Roger Stone is a 2017 American documentary film written and directed by Dylan Bank, Daniel DiMauro and Morgan Pehme. The film explores the life and career of Republican political strategist and lobbyist Roger Stone, a longtime advisor to Donald Trump. The film was released on Netflix on May 12, 2017. Background Bank, DiMauro and Pehme began filming with Roger Stone in late 2011 after Pehme had met Stone at a political function.[1] Inspired by a New Yorker article by writer Jeffrey Toobin, the filmmakers embarked on a five-year journey to make a documentary about Stone in order to tell the story of his transformative effect on modern politics–which reaches its climax in 2016 with the election of Donald Trump to the Presidency of the United States of America.[2] Release The film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 23, 2017, to critical acclaim. Entertainment Weekly called it a "staggering, shock-to-the-system political documentary."[3] The Atlantic described it as "an incisive portrait of

Netflix original documentary

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David M. Friedman

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David M. Friedman

David Melech Friedman (born August 8, 1958) is an American bankruptcy lawyer and the United States Ambassador to Israel. He joined the law firm Kasowitz, Benson, Torres & Friedman (then known as Kasowitz, Hoff, Benson & Torres) in 1994, where he met and represented Donald Trump, then chairman and president of The Trump Organization. He served as an advisor to Trump during his successful presidential campaign. In December 2016, President-elect Trump's transition team announced that Friedman was Trump's nominee for ambassador. His nomination was met with support from conservative Israeli and Jewish American activist groups, and opposition from liberal advocacy organizations, particularly J Street. He was confirmed by the full Senate on March 23, 2017, with a 52–46 vote,[1] officially sworn in by Vice President Mike Pence on March 29 and presented his credentials on May 15. Early life and education Friedman was one of four children born to Morris S. Friedman (d. 2005),[2] a Temple Hillel rabbi[3] and

Columbia College (New York) alumni

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In Trump We Trust

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In Trump We Trust

In Trump We Trust: E Pluribus Awesome! is a 2016 book by American far-right[1][2][3][4] commentator and author Ann Coulter in support of Donald Trump and his 2016 campaign for the presidency of the United States.[5] The e-book was a New York Times bestseller in September 2016.[6] References Rosenberg, Eli. "Ann Coulter once called Trump a 'god.' Now she says he's 'gutless' if he can't build the wall". Washington Post. Retrieved 16 February 2019. Sollenberger, Roger. "Ann Coulter, of All People, Just Handed Democrats Their Strategy for 2020". pastemagazine.com. Retrieved 16 February 2019. "Ann Coulter says Jews, like rest of Democratic base, 'hate white men'". www.timesofisrael.com. The Times of Israel. Retrieved 16 February 2019. Conroy, J. Oliver (17 October 2018). "Ann Coulter believes the left has 'lost its mind'. Should we listen?". The Guardian. Retrieved 16 February 2019. Harper, Jennifer (July 18, 2016). "Ann Coulter: In Trump we trust". The Washington Times. Retrieved August 26, 2016.

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Books about the Trump administration

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Make America Great Again

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Make America Great Again

Trump's MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN! sign used during his 2016 presidential campaign A button from Reagan's 1980 presidential campaign "Make America Great Again" (often abbreviated as MAGA) is a campaign slogan used in American politics that was popularized by Donald Trump in his 2016 presidential campaign. Ronald Reagan used the similar slogan "Let's make America great again" in his successful 1980 presidential campaign. Bill Clinton also used the phrase in speeches during his successful 1992 presidential campaign and again in a radio commercial aired for his wife Hillary Clinton's 2008 presidential primary campaign. Democratic pollster Douglas Schoen has called Trump's use of the phrase as "probably the most resonant campaign slogan in recent history", citing large majorities of Americans who believed the country was in decline.[1][2] The slogan has become a pop culture phenomenon, seeing widespread use and spawning numerous variants in the arts, entertainment, and politics, and used both by those who sup

Words and phrases introduced in 1980

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Words coined in the 1980s

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Last Week Tonight segments about Donald Trump

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Last Week Tonight segments about Donald Trump

John Oliver (pictured) has focused several segments in his Last Week Tonight show on Donald Trump. Donald Trump became the subject of segments featured in episodes of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver during Trump's Republican primary and general election campaigns, most of which were discussed in the show's opening news recap segment.[1] The ones listed have received prominent coverage from other media, and feature Trump or his actions as part of the main segment. "Donald Trump" "Donald Trump" was the core part of the third season's third episode, during which time Trump was the frontrunner for the Republican Party nomination for the United States Presidency.[2][3] Oliver discusses Trump's 2016 presidential campaign and his career in business, outlining his campaign rhetoric, varying political positions and failed business ventures. He also says the Trump family name was changed at one point from the ancestral name "Drumpf".[4][3] The segment popularized the term "Donald Drumpf" – which as Oliver stated

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Opposition to Donald Trump

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Hope Hicks

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Hope Hicks

Hope Charlotte Hicks (born October 21, 1988) is an American public relations consultant who in February 2020 was named counselor to President Donald Trump.[1] Hicks previously served as White House communications director from August 2017 until March 29, 2018.[2][3] From January to September 2017, she was White House director of strategic communications. A former model, Hicks was an employee of the Trump Organization before becoming press secretary and early communications director for the Trump 2016 presidential campaign, as well as the national press secretary for the presidential transition team.[4][5] She was Trump's longest-serving political aide at the time of her resignation.[6][7] On February 27, 2018, Hicks testified to a congressional committee that she had told "white lies" on Trump's behalf.[8][9][10] The next day, Hicks announced her intention to resign as White House communications director.[11][12] She left the White House a month later. In 2019, she began working for Fox Corporation as its

Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign

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Connecticut Republicans

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Corey Lewandowski

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Corey Lewandowski

Corey R. Lewandowski (born September 18, 1973)[1] is an American political operative, lobbyist and political commentator. He was a political commentator for One America News Network (OANN), Fox News and CNN, as well as a campaign manager of Donald Trump's 2016 campaign for President of the United States from January 2015 to June 2016. Prior to joining Trump's campaign, Lewandowski worked on several campaigns, for a Congressman, worked for the conservative advocacy group Americans for Prosperity and was a lobbyist. Corey also held the position of Seasonal Marine Patrol Officer Trainee for approximately 3.5 years and successfully graduated the New Hampshire part-time Police Officer Academy. Lewandowski himself has run unsuccessfully for office twice, once in Massachusetts and once in New Hampshire. On December 21, 2016, Lewandowski co-founded Avenue Strategies, a lobbying firm in an office overlooking the White House. He left the firm in May 2017. On August 1, 2019, Lewandowski announced that he was "very ser

American people of French-Canadian descent

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Paul Manafort

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Paul Manafort

Paul John Manafort Jr. (born April 1, 1949) is an American former lobbyist, political consultant, former attorney, and convicted felon who is serving a prison sentence for federal financial crimes.[3] A long-time Republican Party campaign consultant, he chaired the Trump Presidential campaign team from June to August 2016. He was convicted of tax and bank fraud in 2018 and forfeited his license to practice law in January 2019.[4][5] Manafort served as an adviser to the U.S. presidential campaigns of Republicans Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, and Bob Dole. In 1980, he co-founded the Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm Black, Manafort & Stone, along with principals Charles R. Black Jr., and Roger J. Stone,[6][7][8] joined by Peter G. Kelly in 1984.[9] Manafort often lobbied on behalf of foreign leaders such as former President of Ukraine Viktor Yanukovych, former dictator of the Philippines Ferdinand Marcos, former dictator of Zaire Mobutu Sese Seko, and Angolan guerrilla leader Jonas Sav

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Let Trump Be Trump

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Let Trump Be Trump

Let Trump Be Trump: The Inside Story of His Rise to the Presidency is a memoir about the successful 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump. It was originally published on December 5, 2017 by Center Street, an imprint of Hachette Book Group.[1] It was co-authored by Corey Lewandowski, Trump's first campaign manager, and David Bossie, the head of Citizens United and Trump's final deputy campaign manager.[2] It is the first book about the Trump campaign to be published by the campaign's insiders.[3] Content Let Trump Be Trump contains numerous anecdotes from the Trump campaign, including accounts that Trump regularly ate fast food and angrily swore at his aides. Some of these anecdotes, including that Trump preferred to eat two Big Macs, two Filet-o-Fish, and a chocolate milkshake from McDonald's, were revealed on December 2, 2017, when the Washington Post published excerpts of an advance copy of the book.[4] In the book, the authors also wrote that "Sooner or later, everybody who works for Donald Trump wi

Center Street (publisher) books

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