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1972 United States presidential election


1972 United States presidential election

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1972 United States presidential election

The 1972 United States presidential election was the 47th quadrennial presidential election. It was held on Tuesday, November 7, 1972. Incumbent Republican President Richard Nixon from California defeated Democratic U.S. Senator George McGovern of South Dakota. Until 1984, this was the largest margin of victory in the Electoral College in a U.S. presidential election. Nixon easily swept aside challenges from two Republican congressmen in the 1972 Republican primaries to win re-nomination. McGovern, who had played a significant role in reforming the Democratic nomination system after the 1968 election, mobilized the anti-war movement and other liberal supporters to win his party's nomination. Among the candidates he defeated were early front-runner Edmund Muskie, 1968 nominee Hubert Humphrey, and Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm, the first African-American to run for a major party's presidential nomination. Nixon emphasized the strong economy and his success in foreign affairs, while McGovern ran on a platform

1972 United States presidential election

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United States presidential election, 1972

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Presidency of Richard Nixon

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1000 percent

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1000 percent

"1000 percent" or "1000%" in a literal sense means to multiply by 10. This article deals with its use in American English as a metaphor meaning very high emphasis, or enthusiastic support.[1] It was used in the 1972 U.S. presidential election by presidential candidate George McGovern who endorsed his running mate, Thomas Eagleton, "1000 percent" following a scandal, then soon after dropped him. Communication experts Judith Trent and Jimmy Trent agree with journalist Theodore H. White who called it, "possibly the most damaging single faux pas ever made by a presidential candidate."[2] 1972 election It was most famously used by Democratic Presidential candidate George McGovern in 1972. It backfired badly and became a byword for foolish and insincere exaggeration, and today is often used in irony or sarcasm.[3] On July 25, 1972, just over two weeks after the 1972 Democratic Convention, McGovern's running mate for vice president, Thomas Eagleton, admitted the truth of news reports that he had received electros

1972 United States presidential election

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United States presidential election, 1972

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Political terminology of the United States

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1972 Republican National Convention

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1972 Republican National Convention

The 1972 National Convention of the Republican Party of the United States was held from August 21 to August 23, 1972, at the Miami Beach Convention Center in Miami Beach, Florida. It nominated President Richard M. Nixon and Vice President Spiro T. Agnew for reelection. The convention was chaired by then-U.S. House Minority Leader and future Nixon successor Gerald Ford of Michigan. It was the fifth time Nixon had been nominated on the Republican ticket for vice president (1952 and 1956) or president (1960 and 1968). Hence, Nixon's five appearances on his party's ticket matched the major-party American standard of Franklin D. Roosevelt, a Democrat who had been nominated for vice president once (in 1920) and president four times (in 1932, 1936, 1940 and 1944). Site selection The Miami Beach Convention Center was the site of the 1972 Republican National Convention San Diego, California, had originally been selected as host city for the convention on July 23, 1971, with the event expected to take place at the

1972 United States presidential election

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1972 conferences

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1972 in Florida

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The Boys on the Bus

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The Boys on the Bus

The 2003 printing of The Boys on the Bus, with cover artwork by Ralph Steadman. The Boys on the Bus (1973) is author Timothy Crouse's seminal non-fiction book detailing life on the road for reporters covering the 1972 United States presidential campaign.[1] The book was one of the first treatises on pack journalism ever to be published, following in the footsteps of Gay Talese's 1969 "fly on the wall" look into the New York Times called The Kingdom and the Power. The Boys on the Bus evolved out of several articles Crouse had written for Rolling Stone. When released, the book became a best-seller and is still in print today, often being used as a standard text in many university journalism courses. Several very recognizable reporters, whose bylines could be seen into the 21st century, are at turns critiqued, lampooned and glorified in the book, including R.W. "Johnny" Apple, Robert Novak, Walter Mears, Haynes Johnson, David Broder, Hunter S. Thompson, Thomas Oliphant, Curtis Wilkie, Carl Leubsdorf, and Jul

1973 non-fiction books

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1972 United States presidential election

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American political books

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Canuck letter

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Canuck letter

The Canuck letter was a forged letter to the editor of the Manchester Union Leader, published February 24, 1972, two weeks before the New Hampshire primary of the 1972 United States presidential election. It implied that Senator Edmund Muskie, a candidate for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination, held prejudice against Americans of French-Canadian descent. Reportedly the successful sabotage work of Donald Segretti and Ken W. Clawson;[1][2] in a childish scrawl with poor spelling, the author of the Canuck letter claimed to have met Muskie and his staff in Florida, and to have asked Muskie how he could understand the problems of African Americans when his home state of Maine has such a small black population, to which a member of Muskie's staff was said to have responded, "Not blacks, but we have Canucks" (which the letter spells "Cannocks"); the author further claims that Muskie laughed at the remark. While an affectionate term among Canadians today,[3] "Canuck" is a term often considered derogatory

1972 United States presidential election

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1972 documents

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Anti-Quebec sentiment

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Committee for the Re-Election of the President

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Committee for the Re-Election of the President

The Committee for the Re-election of the President (also known as the Committee to Re-elect the President), abbreviated CRP, but often mocked by the acronym CREEP,[1] was, officially, a fundraising organization of United States President Richard Nixon's 1972 re-election campaign. History Planning began in late 1970 and an office opened in the spring of 1971. Besides its re-election activities, CRP employed money laundering and slush funds, and was involved in the Watergate scandal.[2] The CRP used $500,000 in funds raised to re-elect President Nixon to pay legal expenses for the five Watergate burglars. This act helped turn the burglary into an explosive political scandal. The burglars, as well as G. Gordon Liddy, E. Howard Hunt, John N. Mitchell, and other Nixon administration figures, were imprisoned over the break-in and their efforts to cover it up. The acronym CREEP was derisively applied to the CRP as a nickname by Nixon's opponents; the pejorative became popular due to the Watergate scandal.[3][4]

1972 United States presidential election

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Watergate scandal

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Members of the Committee for the Re-Election of...

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1972 Democratic National Convention

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1972 Democratic National Convention

The 1972 Democratic National Convention was the presidential nominating convention of the Democratic Party for the 1972 presidential election. It was held at Miami Beach Convention Center in Miami Beach, Florida, on July 10 – 13, 1972. Lawrence F. O'Brien served as permanent chairman of the convention, while Yvonne Braithwaite Burke served as vice-chair, becoming the first African American and the first woman of color to hold that position.[1][2] On the last day of the convention, Lawrence F. O'Brien departed and Burke was left to preside for about fourteen hours.[2][3] The convention nominated Senator George McGovern of South Dakota for president and Senator Thomas Eagleton of Missouri for vice president. Eagleton withdrew from the race just 19 days later after it was disclosed that he had previously undergone mental health treatment, including electroshock therapy, and he was replaced on the ballot by Sargent Shriver of Maryland, a Kennedy in-law. The convention, which has been described as "a disastrous

1972 United States presidential election

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July 1972 events in North America

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1972 conferences

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1972 Democratic Party presidential primaries

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1972 Democratic Party presidential primaries

The 1972 Democratic presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Democratic Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 1972 U.S. presidential election. Senator George McGovern of South Dakota was selected as the nominee through a series of primary elections, caucuses, and state party conventions, culminating in the 1972 Democratic National Convention held from July 10 to July 13, 1972, in Miami, Florida. Major candidates As 1972 approached, President Richard Nixon faced uncertain re-election prospects. Nixon had been elected in 1968 on a platform to end American involvement in Vietnam, but his strategy of gradually handing over operational control of the conflict to the South Vietnamese military (Vietnamization) was proceeding more slowly than planned. Nixon had in fact widened the conflict by invading Cambodia in 1970, a move that ignited criticism in the press and Congress and widespread disorder on college campuses. The Paris Peace Talks had bogged down,

1972 United States presidential election

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Democratic Party (United States) presidential p...

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United States presidential election, 1972

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Democrats for Nixon

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Democrats for Nixon

Democrats for Nixon was a campaign to promote Democratic support for the then-incumbent Republican President Richard Nixon in the 1972 presidential election. The campaign was led by the former Democratic governor of Texas, John Connally. Connally, who was serving as the United States Secretary of the Treasury, announced that he would be supporting Nixon for re-election and would spend his time until the elections working on behalf of the incumbent.[1] A Democrat who had been Governor of Texas and United States Secretary of the Navy under John F. Kennedy, Connally formally announced the formation of the organization in August 1972. Polling cited by Connally indicated that as many as 20 million Democrats would cross over to vote for Nixon and invited "all those millions of Democrats who realize that in this Presidential election President Nixon is simply the better choice". Connally stated that he was troubled by Senator George McGovern's campaign and felt that the Democratic party "is becoming an ideological

1972 United States presidential election

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Factions in the Democratic Party (United States)

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Factions of the Democratic Party (United States)

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Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72

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Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72

Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail '72 is a 1973 book that recounts and analyzes the 1972 presidential campaign in which Richard Nixon was re-elected President of the United States. Written by Hunter S. Thompson and illustrated by Ralph Steadman, the book was largely derived from articles serialized in Rolling Stone throughout 1972.[1][2] The book focuses almost exclusively on the Democratic Party's primaries and the breakdown of the party as it splits between the different candidates. Of particular focus is the manic maneuvering of the George McGovern campaign during the Miami convention as they sought to ensure the Democratic nomination despite attempts by the Hubert Humphrey campaign and other candidates to block McGovern. Thompson began his coverage of the campaign in December 1971, just as the race toward the primaries was beginning, from a rented apartment in Washington, D.C. (a situation he compared to "living in an armed camp, a condition of constant fear"). Over the next 12 months, in volumin

1973 non-fiction books

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1972 United States presidential election

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Allison and Busby books

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Gay Voter's League

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Gay Voter's League

Gay Voter's League of San Francisco is a defunct political organization of LGBT Americans who campaigned for both Republican and Democratic candidates. In 1971 former members of San Francisco's Gay Activists Alliance, headed by Reverend Ray Broshears, formed the Gay Voters' League. The group sought to include conservative candidates, which put it at odds with other LGBT political organizations at the time.[1] In 1972, the group campaigned for the re-election of President Richard Nixon[2] and for seven other candidates (four Republicans and three Democrats).[3] In October 1972, representative of the Committee to Re-elect the President addressed gay voters on behalf of Richard M. Nixon's campaign in San Francisco.[3] The Gay Voters League was active through 1981.[1] [4] References "Gay Voters' Guide" (PDF). San Francisco Cruisader. Retrieved July 29, 2018. "Republican Party (United States)". Glbtq.com. Archived from the original on July 3, 2014. Retrieved June 29, 2014. "League due Nixon pitch". Con

California Republicans

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LGBT conservatism in the United States

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1972 United States presidential election

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1972 Republican Party presidential primaries

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1972 Republican Party presidential primaries

The 1972 Republican presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Republican Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 1972 U.S. presidential election. Incumbent President Richard Nixon was again selected as the nominee through a series of primary elections and caucuses culminating in the 1972 Republican National Convention held from August 21 to August 23, 1972, in Miami, Florida. This is the earliest Republican Convention where one of the candidates is still alive as of 2020. Primary race Nixon was a popular incumbent president in 1972, as he seemed to have reached détente with China and the USSR. He shrugged off the first glimmers of what, after the election, became the massive Watergate scandal. Polls showed that Nixon had a strong lead. He was challenged by two minor candidates, liberal Pete McCloskey of California and conservative John Ashbrook of Ohio. McCloskey ran as an anti-war and anti-Nixon candidate, while Ashbrook opposed Nixon's détente poli

1972 United States presidential election

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Republican Party (United States) presidential p...

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United States presidential election, 1972

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Young Voters for the President

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Young Voters for the President

Young Voters for the President was an entity created by Richard Nixon's 1972 campaign for President of the United States to mobilize youth voters in support of Nixon's reelection.[1] Richard Nixon won 52 percent of "under 30" voters in the 1972 U.S. presidential election. As of March 1972, only 22 percent of voters between the ages of 18 and 24 identified with the Republican Party.[1] Young Voters for the President was created by public relations consultant Ken Rietz, whose plan for capturing the support of younger voters for the Republican Party in the 1972 presidential election was brought to the attention of the White House by United States Senator Bill Brock.[2] Rietz was subsequently hired as director of the new group, leading a full-time staff of 120 persons, plus what was claimed to be 400,000 volunteers.[2] Pam Powell, a 24 year-old Nixon supporter and the daughter of actor Dick Powell, was retained as chair of the group, becoming its public face.[2][3][a] Rietz identified that young voters were

1972 United States presidential election

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Richard Nixon

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United States presidential election, 1972

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Roger Stone

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Roger Stone

Roger Jason Stone Jr.[a] (born August 27, 1952) is an American political consultant,[3] author, and lobbyist. In November 2019, subsequent to the Mueller Report and Special Counsel investigation, he was convicted on seven counts, including witness tampering and lying to investigators. He awaits sentencing.[4] Since the 1970s, Stone worked on the campaigns of Republican politicians Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Jack Kemp, Bob Dole,[5] and Donald Trump. In addition to frequently serving as a campaign adviser, Stone was previously a political lobbyist. In 1980, he co-founded a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm with Paul Manafort and Charles R. Black Jr.[6][7][8] The firm recruited Peter G. Kelly and was renamed Black, Manafort, Stone and Kelly in 1984.[9]:124 During the 1980s, BMSK became a top lobbying firm by leveraging its White House connections to attract high-paying clients including U.S. corporations, trade associations, as well as foreign governments. By 1990, it was one of the leading lobbyists for

Watergate scandal

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People convicted of obstruction of justice

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1972 United States presidential election

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