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Chichester Parkinson-Fortescue, 1st Baron Carlingford

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Chichester Parkinson-Fortescue, 1st Baron Carlingford

Chichester Samuel Parkinson-Fortescue, 2nd Baron Clermont and 1st Baron Carlingford, KP, PC (18 January 1823 – 30 January 1898), known as Chichester Fortescue until 1863 and as Chichester Parkinson-Fortescue between 1863 and 1874 and Lord Carlingford after 1874, was a British Liberal politician of the 19th century. Background and education Born Chichester Fortescue, Carlingford was the son of Chichester Fortescue (died 1826), Member of Parliament for Hillsborough in the Irish parliament. He came of an old Anglo-Irish family settled in Ireland since the days of Sir Faithful Fortescue (1581–1666), whose uncle, The 1st Baron Chichester, was Lord Deputy. The history of the family was written by his elder brother, Thomas Fortescue, who in 1852 was created Baron Clermont. His mother was Martha Angel, daughter of Samuel Meade Hobson. Carlingford was educated at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took a first in Classics (1844) and won the chancellor's English essay (1846).[1] In 1863, he assumed by Royal Licence the

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Charles Adderley, 1st Baron Norton

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Charles Adderley, 1st Baron Norton

For others named Charles Adderley, see the Charles Adderley navigation page "Colonial Self-Government". Caricature by Spy published in Vanity Fair in 1892. Charles Bowyer Adderley, 1st Baron Norton KCMG PC DL JP (2 August 1814 – 28 March 1905) was a British Conservative politician. Background and education Charles Bowyer Adderley was the eldest son of Charles Clement Adderley (d. 1818), offspring of an old Staffordshire family, and his wife, daughter of Sir Edmund Cradock-Hartopp, 1st Baronet.[1] Adderley inherited Hams Hall, Warwickshire, and the valuable estates of his great-uncle, Charles Bowyer Adderley, in 1826. He was educated at Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in 1838.[1] Political career In 1841, Adderley entered the House of Commons as Member of Parliament for North Staffordshire, retaining his seat until 1878, when he was created Baron Norton. Adderley's ministerial career began in 1858, when he was appointed President of the Board of Health and Vice-Presiden

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John Bright

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John Bright

John Bright (16 November 1811 – 27 March 1889) was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, one of the greatest orators of his generation and a promoter of free trade policies. A Quaker, Bright is most famous for battling the Corn Laws. In partnership with Richard Cobden, he founded the Anti-Corn Law League, aimed at abolishing the Corn Laws, which raised food prices and protected landowners' interests by levying taxes on imported wheat. The Corn Laws were repealed in 1846. Bright also worked with Cobden in another free trade initiative, the Cobden–Chevalier Treaty of 1860, promoting closer interdependence between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the Second French Empire. This campaign was conducted in collaboration with French economist Michel Chevalier, and succeeded despite Parliament's endemic mistrust of the French. Bright sat in the House of Commons from 1843 to 1889, promoting free trade, electoral reform and religious freedom. He was almost a lone voice in opposing the Crimean War

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James Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie

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James Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie

James Andrew Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie KT PC (22 April 1812 – 19 December 1860), also known as Lord Dalhousie, styled Lord Ramsay until 1838 and known as The Earl of Dalhousie between 1838 and 1849, was a Scottish statesman and colonial administrator in British India. He served as Governor-General of India from 1848 to 1856. He is credited with introducing passenger trains in railways, electric telegraph and uniform postage in India which he described as the "three great engines of social improvement". He also founded the Public Works Department in India.[1] To his supporters he stands out as the far-sighted Governor-General who consolidated East India Company rule in India, laid the foundations of its later administration, and by his sound policy enabled his successors to stem the tide of rebellion.[2] His period of rule in India directly preceded the transformation into the Victorian Raj period of Indian administration. He was denounced by many in Britain on the eve of his death as having fa

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George Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon

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George Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon

George William Frederick Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon, KG, KP, GCB, PC (12 January 1800 – 27 June 1870) was an English diplomat and statesman from the Villiers family. Background and education Villiers was born in London, the son of George Villiers and Theresa Parker. He went up to Cambridge at the early age of sixteen and entered St John's College on 29 June 1816.[1] In 1820, as the eldest son of an earl's brother with royal descent, he was able to take his MA degree under the statutes of the university then in force.[2] Career In the same year, he was appointed attaché to the British embassy at Saint Petersburg. There he remained three years, and gained that practical knowledge of diplomacy which was of so much use to him in later life. He had "received from nature a singularly handsome person, a polished and engaging address, a ready command of languages, and a remarkable power of composition".[2] Upon his return to England in 1823, he was appointed to a commissionership of customs, an office which

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Edward Cardwell, 1st Viscount Cardwell

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Edward Cardwell, 1st Viscount Cardwell

Cardwell caricatured by Ape in Vanity Fair, 1869 Edward Cardwell, 1st Viscount Cardwell, PC, FRS (24 July 1813 – 15 February 1886) was a prominent British politician in the Peelite and Liberal parties during the middle of the 19th century. He is best remembered for his tenure as Secretary of State for War between 1868 and 1874 and, with William Ewart Gladstone's support, the introduction of the Cardwell Reforms. The goal was to centralise the power of the War Office, abolish purchase of officers' commissions, and to create reserve forces stationed in Britain by establishing short terms of service for enlisted men. Background and education Cardwell was the son of John Henry Cardwell, of Liverpool, a merchant, and Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Birley. He was educated at Winchester and Balliol College, Oxford, from where he took a degree in 1835. He was called to the bar, Inner Temple, in 1838.[1] Political career Cardwell was employed in the Colonial Office in the late 1830s, and directly involved in draf

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EngvarB from April 2015

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Richard Hely-Hutchinson, 4th Earl of Donoughmore

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Richard Hely-Hutchinson, 4th Earl of Donoughmore

Richard John Hely-Hutchinson, 4th Earl of Donoughmore PC FRS (4 April 1823 – 22 February 1866), styled Viscount Suirdale between 1832 and 1851, was a British Conservative politician. Background Donoughmore was the son of John Hely-Hutchinson, 3rd Earl of Donoughmore, and the Hon. Margaret, daughter of Luke Gardiner, 1st Viscount Mountjoy.[1] Political career Donoughmore was appointed High Sheriff of Tipperary for 1847.[2] He entered the House of Lords on the death of his father in 1851. He held office as Vice-President of the Board of Trade and Paymaster General in Lord Derby's second government, and was promoted to the actual presidency of the Board of Trade in February 1859 on the resignation of J. W. Henley over the abortive 1859 Reform Bill. He remained in this post until the government fell in June of the same year. In 1858 he was admitted to the Privy Council.[3] In 1865 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.[4] Family Lord Donoughmore married Thomasina Jocelyn, daughter of Walter Steele,

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Thomas Milner Gibson

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Thomas Milner Gibson

Thomas Milner Gibson PC (3 September 1806 – 25 February 1884) was a British politician. Background and education Thomas Milner Gibson came of a Suffolk family, but was born in Port of Spain, Trinidad, where his father, Thomas Milner Gibson, was serving as an officer in the British Army. He was educated in Trinidad, in a school at Higham Hill also attended by Benjamin Disraeli, at Charterhouse, and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1830.[1] Political career In 1837 Gibson was elected to parliament as Conservative member for Ipswich, but resigned two years later, having adopted Liberal views, and became an ardent supporter of the free-trade movement. As one of Richard Cobden's chief allies, he was elected to the House of Commons as Member of Parliament for Manchester in 1841, and from 1846 to 1848 he was Vice-President of the Board of Trade in Lord John Russell's ministry. Though defeated in Manchester in 1857, he found another seat for Ashton-under-Lyne, and sat in the cabinet under Lord

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Henry Labouchere, 1st Baron Taunton

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Henry Labouchere, 1st Baron Taunton

For the writer and publisher (his nephew), see Henry Labouchère Henry Labouchere, 1st Baron Taunton, PC (15 August 1798 – 13 July 1869) was a prominent British Whig and Liberal Party politician of the mid-19th century. Background and education Labouchere was born in Over Stowey, Somerset, into a Huguenot merchant family.[1] His father was Peter Caesar Labouchere and his mother Dorothy Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Francis Baring. He was educated at Winchester College and Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his B.A. (1821) and his M.A. (1828).[1] Political career In 1826, Labouchere became MP for St Michael, as a Whig.[1] In 1830, he moved to the Taunton seat, which he held until 1859. In 1835 he was opposed by Benjamin Disraeli for the Taunton seat; Labouchere won by 452 votes to 282. He was first appointed to office by Lord Grey in 1832, serving as Civil Lord of the Admiralty .[1] After beginning the second Melbourne ministry as Master of the Mint, Privy Counsellor, and Vice-President of the Board of Trade

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J. W. Henley

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J. W. Henley

Joseph Warner Henley, PC, DL, JP (3 March 1793 – 8 December 1884), often known as J. W. Henley, was a British Conservative politician, best known for serving in the protectionist governments of Lord Derby in the 1850s. Political career Henley sat as Member of Parliament for Oxfordshire from 1841 until 1878 and served as President of the Board of Trade in Derby's first (1852) and second (1858–1859) governments. He was sworn of the Privy Council in 1852. From 1874 to 1878 he was the oldest member of the House of Commons. Family Henley married Georgiana, daughter of John Fane, in 1816. She died in June 1864. Henley survived her by 20 years and died in December 1884, aged 91.[1] Joseph Warner Henley (1793 – 1884), in the 1860s or 70s. References thepeerage.com Joseph Warner Henley Descendants of George Greaves and Mary Marriott The Magistracy of Buckinghamshire in 1861 Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs External links Hansard 1803–2005: contributions in Parliament by Joseph Warner Henle

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William Ewart Gladstone

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William Ewart Gladstone

William Ewart Gladstone PC FRS FSS (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British statesman and Liberal politician. In a career lasting over 60 years, he served for 12 years as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, spread over four terms beginning in 1868 and ending in 1894. He also served as Chancellor of the Exchequer four times. Gladstone was born in Liverpool to Scottish parents. He first entered the House of Commons in 1832, beginning his political career as a High Tory, a grouping which became the Conservative Party under Robert Peel in 1834. Gladstone served as a minister in both of Peel's governments, and in 1846 joined the breakaway Peelite faction, which eventually merged into the new Liberal Party in 1859. He was Chancellor under Lord Aberdeen (1852–1855), Lord Palmerston (1859–1865) and Lord Russell (1865–1866). Gladstone's own political doctrine—which emphasised equality of opportunity and opposition to trade protectionism—came to be known as Gladstonian liberalism. His popularity amongst the wo

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Edward Stanley, 2nd Baron Stanley of Alderley

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Edward Stanley, 2nd Baron Stanley of Alderley

Edward John Stanley, 2nd Baron Stanley of Alderley, PC (13 November 1802 – 16 June 1869), known as The Lord Eddisbury between 1848 and 1850, was a British politician. Background Stanley was the son of John Stanley, 1st Baron Stanley of Alderley, and Lady Maria Josepha, daughter of John Holroyd, 1st Earl of Sheffield.[1] He was educated at Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford.[2] Political career Stanley entered the House of Commons as Whig Member of Parliament (MP) for Hindon in 1831 and was later member for North Cheshire between 1832 and 1841, and between 1847 and 1848. He served under Lord Melbourne as Patronage Secretary to the Treasury from 1835 to 1841, as Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department in 1841 and as Paymaster-General in 1841 and under Lord John Russell as Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs between 1846 and 1852.[1] He was sworn of the Privy Council in 1841[3] and in 1848, two years before he succeeded to the barony of Stanley, he was created Baron Eddisbury, of Winnin

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Stafford Northcote, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh

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Stafford Northcote, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh

For the 4th Earl of Iddesleigh, see Stafford Northcote, 4th Earl of Iddesleigh Stafford Henry Northcote, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh, GCB, PC, FRS (27 October 1818 – 12 January 1887), known as Sir Stafford Northcote from 1851 to 1885, was a British Conservative politician. He served as Chancellor of the Exchequer between 1874 and 1880 and as Foreign Secretary between 1885 and 1886, and was one of only two people to hold the office of First Lord of the Treasury without ever being Prime Minister (the other being William Henry Smith, his successor-but-two, who, like Iddesleigh, also served in post in one of the Salisbury ministries). Background and education Northcote (pronounced "Northcut") was born at Portland Place, London, on 27 October 1818.[1] He was the eldest son of Henry Stafford Northcote (1792–1850), eldest son of Sir Stafford Henry Northcote, 7th Baronet. His mother was Agnes Mary (died 1840), daughter of Thomas Cockburn. His paternal ancestors had long been settled in Devon, tracing their descent from

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F. J. Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich

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F. J. Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich

Frederick John Robinson, 1st Earl of Ripon, PC (1 November 1782 – 28 January 1859), styled The Honourable F. J. Robinson until 1827 and known as The Viscount Goderich GOHD-rich[1] between 1827 and 1833, the name by which he is best known to history, was a British politician during the Regency era. He was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom between August 1827 and January 1828. A member of the rural landowning aristocracy, Robinson entered politics through family connections. In the House of Commons he rose through junior ministerial ranks, achieving cabinet office in 1818 as President of the Board of Trade. In 1823 he was appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer, a post he held for four years. In 1827 he was raised to the peerage, and in the House of Lords was Leader of the House and Secretary of State for War and the Colonies. When the Prime Minister, George Canning, died in 1827 Goderich succeeded him, but was unable to hold together Canning's fragile coalition of moderate Tories and Whigs. He resigned afte

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Richard Trench, 2nd Earl of Clancarty

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Richard Trench, 2nd Earl of Clancarty

Richard Le Poer Trench, 2nd Earl of Clancarty, 1st Marquess of Heusden GCB GCH PC (19 May 1767 – 24 November 1837), styled The Honourable from 1797 to 1803 and then Viscount Dunlo to 1805, was an Irish peer, a nobleman in the Dutch nobility, and a diplomat. He was an Irish, and later British, Member of Parliament and a supporter of Pitt. Additionally he was appointed Postmaster General of Ireland, and later, of the United Kingdom. Background and education Clancarty was the son of William Trench, 1st Earl of Clancarty and Anne, daughter of Charles Gardiner and his seat was Garbally Court in Ballinasloe, East County Galway where he was associated with the Great October Fair.[1] His brother was Power Le Poer Trench (1770–1839), archbishop of Tuam. He was educated at Kimbolton School and St John's College, Cambridge.[2] Political career Trench represented Newtown Limavady in the Irish House of Commons from 1796 to 1798. He sat further for Galway County from 1798 to a short time before the Act of Union, when h

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Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton

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Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton

Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton PC (27 October 1774 – 12 May 1848), of The Grange in Hampshire, of Ashburton in Devon and of Buckenham Tofts near Thetford in Norfolk, was a British politician and financier, and a member of the Baring family. Baring was the second son of Sir Francis Baring, 1st Baronet, and of Harriet, daughter of William Herring. Early life Alexander was born on 27 October 1774. He was the second son born to Harriet (née Herring) Baring (1750–1804) and Sir Francis Baring, 1st Baronet (1740–1810). Among his siblings was Maria (the mother of Francis Stainforth), Sir Thomas Baring, 2nd Baronet, Henry Baring (a Member of Parliament for Bossiney[1] and Colchester),[2] and George Baring (who founded the Hong Kong trading house of Dent & Co.). His father and his uncle, John Baring established the London merchant house of John and Francis Baring Company, which eventually became Barings Bank.[3] His paternal grandparents were Elizabeth (née Vowler) Baring and Johann Baring, a wool mercha

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George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland

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George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland

George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland, GCB, PC (25 August 1784 – 1 January 1849) was an English Whig politician and colonial administrator. He was thrice First Lord of the Admiralty and also served as Governor-General of India between 1836 and 1842. Background and education Born in Beckenham, Kent, Auckland was the second son of William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland, and Eleanor, daughter of Sir Gilbert Elliot, 3rd Baronet. His sister was the traveller and author Emily Eden, who would visit India for long periods and write about her experiences. He was educated at Eton, and Christ Church, Oxford, and was called to the Bar, Lincoln's Inn, in 1809. He became heir apparent to the barony after his elder brother William Eden drowned in the Thames in 1810.[1] Political career, 1810–1836 Auckland was returned to Parliament for Woodstock in 1810 (succeeding his elder brother, William), a seat he held until 1812, and again between 1813 and 1814. The latter year he succeeded his father in the barony and took his seat in the

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William Huskisson

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William Huskisson

William Huskisson PC (11 March 1770 – 15 September 1830) was a British statesman, financier, and Member of Parliament for several constituencies, including Liverpool. [1] He is commonly known as the world's first widely reported railway passenger casualty as he was run over and fatally wounded by Robert Stephenson's pioneering locomotive Rocket. Background and education Huskisson was born at Birtsmorton Court, Malvern, Worcestershire, the son of William and Elizabeth Huskisson, both members of Staffordshire families. He was one of four brothers. After their mother Elizabeth died, their father William eventually remarried and had further children by his second wife. Early life Huskisson was a student at Appleby Grammar School (later renamed Sir John Moore Church of England Primary School), a boarding school designed by Sir Christopher Wren on the Leicestershire/Derbyshire borders. In 1783, Huskisson was sent to a safehouse 3800 miles east of Paris to live with his maternal great-uncle Dr. Richard Gem, who

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Charles Poulett Thomson, 1st Baron Sydenham

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Charles Poulett Thomson, 1st Baron Sydenham

Charles Poulett Thomson, 1st Baron Sydenham, GCB, PC (13 September 1799 – 19 September 1841) was a British businessman, politician, diplomat and the first Governor General of the united Province of Canada.[1] Early life, family, education Born at Waverley Abbey House, near Farnham, Surrey, Thomson was the son of John Buncombe Poulett Thomson, a London merchant, by his wife Charlotte, daughter of John Jacob. His father was the head of J. Thomson, T. Bonar and Company, a successful trading firm that had dealings with Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire and was a principal merchant house in the Russian-Baltic trade.[2] After attending private schools until age 16, Thomson entered the family firm at Saint Petersburg. In 1817 he came home due to poor health, and embarked on a prolonged tour of Southern Europe. He returned to Russia in 1821 and over the next three years travelled extensively in Eastern Europe. He established permanent residence in London in 1824 but frequently visited the Continent, especially Pari

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William Vesey-FitzGerald, 2nd Baron FitzGerald and Vesey

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William Vesey-FitzGerald, 2nd Baron FitzGerald and Vesey

William Vesey-FitzGerald, 2nd Baron FitzGerald and Vesey, PC, PC (Ire), FRS, FSA (24 July 1783 – 11 May 1843) was an Irish statesman. Background and education FitzGerald was the elder son of James FitzGerald and Catherine, 1st Baroness FitzGerald and Vesey, daughter of Reverend Henry Vesey. He was educated at Christ Church, Oxford.[1] Political career FitzGerald first entered parliament in 1808 as member for Ennis (succeeding his father), a seat he held until October 1812, when he was replaced by his father, and again between January 1813 and 1818. He was implicated in the scandal involving the Duke of York and his mistress Mary Anne Clarke, but after bringing valuable evidence of the case the courts he was rewarded when he was appointed a Lord of the Irish Treasury and sworn of the Irish Privy Council in 1810. In 1812 he was admitted to the British Privy Council and made a Lord of the Treasury in England, Chancellor of the Irish Exchequer and First Lord of the Irish Treasury. He held the Irish offices un

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Charles Grant, 1st Baron Glenelg

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Charles Grant, 1st Baron Glenelg

Charles Grant, 1st Baron Glenelg PC FRS (26 October 1778 – 23 April 1866) was a Scottish politician and colonial administrator. Background and education Grant was born in Kidderpore, Bengal, India, the eldest son of Charles Grant, chairman of the directors of the British East India Company. His brother, Sir Robert Grant, was also an MP as well as Governor of Bombay. He was educated at Magdalene College, Cambridge, and became a fellow in 1802.[1] He was called to the bar in 1807. Political career In 1811 Grant was elected to the British House of Commons as Member of Parliament for Inverness Burghs. He held that seat until 1818, when he was returned for Inverness-shire. He was a Lord of the Treasury from December 1813 until August 1819, when he became Chief Secretary for Ireland and a Privy Counsellor. In 1823 he was appointed Vice-President of the Board of Trade; from September 1827 to June 1828 he was President of the Board of Trade and Treasurer of the Navy. Grant broke with the Tories over Reform and j

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John Charles Herries

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John Charles Herries

John Charles Herries PC (November 1778 – 24 April 1855), known as J. C. Herries, was a British politician and financier and a frequent member of Tory and Conservative cabinets in the early to mid-19th century. Background and education Herries was the eldest son of Charles Herries, a London merchant, by his wife Mary Ann Johnson, and was educated at Cheam and the University of Leipzig. Political career Herries worked his way up in the Treasury and eventually became Secretary to the First Lord of the Treasury, Commissary-General to the Army, Paymaster of the Civil List, Secretary to the Treasury (1823–1827), Chancellor of the Exchequer in Lord Goderich's government (1827–1828), Master of the Mint under the Duke of Wellington (1828–1830), briefly President of the Board of Trade (1830), Secretary at War under Sir Robert Peel (1834–1835), and finally President of the Board of Control in Lord Derby's first government (1852). During his tenure as Commissary-General, he used the help of Nathan Mayer Rothschild to

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William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland

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William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland

William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland, PC (Ire), FRS (3 April 1745 – 28 May 1814) was a British diplomat and politician who sat in the British House of Commons from 1774 to 1793. The subantarctic Auckland Islands group to the south of New Zealand, discovered in 1806, were named after him. Early life A member of the influential Eden family, Auckland was a younger son of Sir Robert Eden, 3rd Baronet, of Windlestone Hall, County Durham, and Mary, daughter of William Davison. His brothers included Sir Robert Eden, 1st Baronet, of Maryland, Governor of Maryland, Sir John Eden, 4th Baronet and Morton Eden, 1st Baron Henley. He was educated at Durham School, Eton and Christ Church, Oxford,[1] and was called to the bar, Middle Temple, in 1768. Career In 1771 Auckland published Principles of Penal Law, and soon became a recognized authority on commercial and economic questions. In 1772 he took up an appointment as Under-Secretary of State for the North, a post he held until 1778. He was Member of Parliament for Woodst

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Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst

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Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst

Shield of arms of Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst, KG, PC Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst, KG, PC (22 May 1762 – 27 July 1834) was a High Tory, High Church Pittite. For thirty years an MP and whence ennobled one of the government's main stalwarts on colonial policy. Not a good speaker in debates, he was nevertheless a competent administrator. If rather dull, he remained intensely loyal and at the centre of government for longer than all his contemporaries. A personal friend of William Pitt the Younger, he became a broker of deals across cabinet factions during the volatile Napoleonic era. After the Napoleonic Wars, Bathurst was on the 'conservative' wing of the Tory party. He came round towards arbitrating on a less than harsh colonial regime. Background and education Lord Bathurst was the elder son of Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst, by his wife Tryphena Scawen, daughter of Thomas Scawen. He was educated at Eton from 1773 to 1778 and then up to Christ Church, Oxford. The college was always considere

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James Graham, 3rd Duke of Montrose

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James Graham, 3rd Duke of Montrose

Shield of arms of James Graham, 3rd Duke of Montrose, KG, KT, PC James Graham, 3rd Duke of Montrose, KG, KT, PC (8 September 1755 – 30 December 1836), styled Marquess of Graham until 1790, was a Scottish nobleman and statesman. Background Montrose was the son of William Graham, 2nd Duke of Montrose, and Lady Lucy, daughter of John Manners, 2nd Duke of Rutland.[1] Political career Montrose was Member of Parliament for Richmond from 1780, and for Great Bedwyn from 1784 to 1790, when he succeeded his father in the dukedom. According to Robert Bain, Scotland can thank him for the repeal in 1782 of the Dress Act 1746 prohibiting the wearing of tartans.[2] He served as a Lord of the Treasury from 1783 to 1789, and as co-Paymaster of the Forces from 1789 to 1791. He was appointed a Privy Counsellor and Vice-President of the Board of Trade in 1789. He was Master of the Horse from 1790 to 1795, and from 1807 to 1821, Commissioner for India from 1791 to 1803, Lord Justice General of Scotland from 1795 to 1836, Pre

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Charles Jenkinson, 1st Earl of Liverpool

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Charles Jenkinson, 1st Earl of Liverpool

Charles Jenkinson, 1st Earl of Liverpool, PC (26 April 1729 – 17 December 1808), known as Lord Hawkesbury between 1786 and 1796, was a British statesman. He was the father of Prime Minister Robert Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool. Early years, family and education He was born in Oxfordshire, the eldest son of Colonel Charles Jenkinson (1693–1750) and Amarantha (daughter of Wolfran Cornewall). The earl was the grandson of Sir Robert Jenkinson, 2nd Baronet, of Walcot, Oxfordshire. The Jenkinson family was descended from Anthony Jenkinson (died 1611), who was a sea-captain, merchant, and traveller and the first known Englishman to penetrate into Central Asia. Liverpool was educated at Charterhouse School and University College, Oxford, where he graduated Master of Arts in 1752.[1] Political career In 1761, Liverpool entered parliament as member for Cockermouth and was made Under-Secretary of State by Lord Bute. He won the favour of George III, and when Bute retired Jenkinson became the leader of the "King's

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Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney

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Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney

Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney, PC (24 February 1733 – 30 June 1800) was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1754 to 1783 when he was raised to the peerage as Baron Sydney. He held several important Cabinet posts in the second half of the 18th century. The cities of Sydney in Nova Scotia, Canada, and Sydney in New South Wales, Australia were named in his honour, in 1785 and 1788, respectively. Background and education Townshend was born at Raynham, Norfolk, the son of the Hon. Thomas Townshend, who was the second son of Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend, also known as "Turnip" Townshend for his agricultural innovations. Thomas Townshend the younger's mother was Albinia, daughter of John Selwyn. He was educated at Clare College, Cambridge.[1] Political career Townshend was elected to the House of Commons in 1754 as Whig member for Whitchurch in Hampshire, and held that seat till his elevation to the peerage in 1783. He initially aligned himself with his great-uncle the

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Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle

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Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle

Shield of arms of Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle, KG, PC Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle KG PC (28 May 1748 – 4 September 1825) was a British peer, statesman, diplomat, and author. Life Howard in 1780 He was the son of Henry Howard, 4th Earl of Carlisle and his second wife Isabella Byron. His mother was a daughter of William Byron, 4th Baron Byron and his wife Hon. Frances Berkeley, a descendant of John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton. She was also a sister of William Byron, 5th Baron Byron and a great-aunt of George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, the poet. In 1798, Carlisle was appointed guardian to Lord Byron who later lampooned him in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers.[1] During his youth Carlisle was mentored by George Selwyn and was chiefly known as a man of pleasure and fashion. He was created a Knight of the Thistle in 1767, and entered the House of Lords in 1770. After he had reached thirty years of age, his appointment on a Commission sent out by Frederick North, Lord

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Thomas Robinson, 2nd Baron Grantham

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Thomas Robinson, 2nd Baron Grantham

Thomas Robinson, 2nd Baron Grantham PC (30 November 1738 – 20 July 1786) was a British statesman. He notably served as Foreign Secretary between 1782 and 1783. Background and education Grantham was born in Vienna, Austria, the son of Thomas Robinson, 1st Baron Grantham, British Ambassador to Austria at the time, by his wife Frances, daughter of Thomas Worsley. He was educated at Westminster School and at Christ's College, Cambridge,[1] Political career Grantham entered parliament as member for Christchurch in 1761,[2] and succeeded to the peerage, because of his father's death, in 1770. That year he was appointed to the Privy Council. In 1771 he was sent as British Ambassador to Spain and retained this post until war broke out between Great Britain and Spain in 1779. In 1772, while at the Summer Spanish Court in Aranjuez, he received correspondence from Richard Wall, the Spanish Minister of Foreign Affairs.[3] From 1780 to 1782 Grantham was President of the Board of Trade, and from July 1782 to April 1783

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George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville

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George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville

George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville, PC (26 January 1716 – 26 August 1785), styled The Honourable George Sackville until 1720, Lord George Sackville from 1720 to 1770 and Lord George Germain from 1770 to 1782, was a British soldier and politician who was Secretary of State for America in Lord North's cabinet during the American War of Independence. His ministry received much of the blame for Britain's loss of thirteen American colonies. His issuance of detailed instructions in military matters, coupled with his failure to understand either the geography of the colonies or the determination of the colonists, may justify this conclusion. He had two careers. His military career had distinction, but ended with a court martial. Sackville served in the War of the Austrian Succession and the Seven Years' War, including at the decisive Battle of Minden. His political career ended with the fall of the North government in March 1782. Background and education Sackville was the third son of Lionel Sackville, 1st Du

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William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth

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William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth

William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth, PC, FRS (20 June 1731 – 15 July 1801), styled as Viscount Lewisham from 1732 to 1750, was a British statesman who is most remembered for his part in the government before and during the American Revolution, and as the namesake of Dartmouth College. Background Dartmouth was the son of George Legge, Viscount Lewisham (d. 1732), son of William Legge, 1st Earl of Dartmouth. His mother was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Arthur Kaye, 3rd Baronet.[1] Having entered Trinity College, Oxford, in 1748,[2] he succeeded his grandfather in the earldom in 1750. Portrait of William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth, by Pompeo Batoni, 1752–56, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire Political career Lord Dartmouth was Secretary of State for the Colonies from 1772 to 1775. Lord Dartmouth's arrival in the Colonies was celebrated by Phillis Wheatley's famous poem, "To the Right Honourable William, Earl of Dartmouth." It was Lord Dartmouth who, in 1764, at the suggestio

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Wills Hill, 1st Marquess of Downshire

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Wills Hill, 1st Marquess of Downshire

Wills Hill, 1st Marquess of Downshire, PC (30 May 1718 – 7 October 1793), known as the Viscount Hillsborough from 1742 to 1751 and as the Earl of Hillsborough from 1751 to 1789, was a British politician of the Georgian era. Best known in North America as the Earl of Hillsborough, he served as Secretary of State for the Colonies from 1768 to 1772, a critical period leading toward the American War of Independence. Background Born at Fairford, Gloucestershire, Wills Hill was the son of Trevor Hill, 1st Viscount Hillsborough and Mary, daughter of Anthony Rowe. Political career Hill, known retrospectively as Downshire, was returned to Parliament for Warwick in 1741, a seat he held until 1756. He succeeded his father as second Viscount Hillsborough in 1742 (as this was an Irish peerage he was able to continue to sit in the British House of Commons). He was the same year appointed Lord Lieutenant of County Down and Custos Rotulorum of County Down.[1] In 1751 he was created Earl of Hillsborough in the Peerage o

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Robert Nugent, 1st Earl Nugent

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Robert Nugent, 1st Earl Nugent

Robert Craggs-Nugent, 1st Earl Nugent PC (1709 – 13 October 1788) was an Irish politician and poet. He was tersely described by Richard Glover as a jovial and voluptuous Irishman who had left popery for the Protestant religion, money and widows. Background The son of Michael Nugent and Mary, daughter of Robert Barnewall, 9th Baron Trimlestown, he was born at Carlanstown, County Westmeath, in 1709.[1] He succeeded his father in the Carlanstown property on 13 May 1739. Political career His wife's property included the borough of St Mawes in Cornwall, and Nugent sat for that constituency from 1741 to 1754, after which date he represented Bristol until 1774, when he returned to St Mawes. By 1782, he had become the longest continually-serving member of the Commons, and so became the Father of the House. In 1747 he succeeded Lord Doneraile as Comptroller of the Household to the Prince of Wales. Nugent lent the Prince large sums of money, which were never repaid; the appointments and peerages he received later

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William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne

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William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne

Coat of arms of William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne, KG, PC William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne, KG, PC (2 May 1737 – 7 May 1805; known as The Earl of Shelburne between 1761 and 1784, by which title he is generally known to history) was an Irish-born British Whig statesman who was the first Home Secretary in 1782 and then Prime Minister in 1782–83 during the final months of the American War of Independence. He succeeded in securing peace with America and this feat remains his most notable legacy.[1] He was also well known as a collector of antiquities and works of art.[2] Lord Shelburne was born in Dublin in 1737 and spent his formative years in Ireland. After attending Oxford University he served in the British army during the Seven Years' War. He took part in the Raid on Rochefort and the Battle of Minden. As a reward for his conduct at the Battle of Kloster Kampen, Shelburne was appointed an aide-de-camp to George III. He became involved in politics, becoming a member of parliament in 1760. Aft

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Charles Townshend

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Charles Townshend

Charles Townshend (28 August 1725 – 4 September 1767) was a British politician who held various titles in the Parliament of Great Britain. His establishment of the controversial Townshend Acts is considered one of the key causes of the American Revolution. Early life He was born at his family's seat of Raynham Hall in Norfolk, England, the second son of Charles Townshend, 3rd Viscount Townshend, and Audrey (died 1788), daughter and heiress of Edward Harrison of Ball's Park, near Hertford. He was a sickly child, suffered from epilepsy, and had a strained relationship with his parents.[1] Townshend was a brash young man, whose "wonderful endowments [were] dashed with follies and indiscretions." [2] Charles graduated from the Dutch Leiden University on 27 October 1745; while there he had associated with a small group of other English youth, who later became well known in various circles, including Dowdeswell, Wilkes, and Alexander Carlyle. The latter would chronicle their exploits in his Autobiography. Follow

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Samuel Sandys, 1st Baron Sandys

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Samuel Sandys, 1st Baron Sandys

Samuel Sandys, 1st Baron Sandys PC (10 August 1695 – 21 April 1770) was a British Whig politician who represented Worcester in the House of Commons from 1718 until 1743, when he was created Baron Sandys. He held numerous posts in the government of the United Kingdom, namely Chancellor of the Exchequer, Leader of the House of Commons, Cofferer of the Household and First Lord of Trade. He was also a justice in eyre.[1] Early life Sandys was the eldest son of Edwin Sandys MP (himself a descendant of Edwin Sandys, Archbishop of York), and his wife Alice, daughter of Sir James Rushout Bt MP.[2] He was educated at New College, Oxford, matriculating in 1711 aged 16.[3] He left Oxford in 1715 without graduating, and embarked on a Grand Tour of Continental Europe.[4] Opposition In 1718, at the age of 22, Sandys was elected MP for Worcester, as a Whig. He represented the seat for 25 years. Initially a supporter of Robert Walpole's government, in 1725 Sandys and his uncle Sir John Rushout went into opposition with

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George Montagu-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax

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George Montagu-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax

George Montagu-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax, KG, PC (6 October 1716 – 8 June 1771) was a British statesman of the Georgian era. Due to his success in extending American commerce he became known as "father of the colonies".[1] President of the Board of Trade from 1748 to 1761, he aided the foundation of Nova Scotia, 1749, the capital Halifax being named after him. Early life The son of the 1st Earl of Halifax, he was styled Viscount Sunbury until succeeding his father as Earl of Halifax in 1739 (thus also styled in common usage Lord Halifax). Educated at Eton College and at Trinity College, Cambridge,[2] he was married in 1741 to Anne Richards (died 1753), who had inherited a great fortune from Sir Thomas Dunk, whose name Halifax took. Career The Earl of Halifax and his secretaries Coat of arms of George Montagu-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax, KG, PC After having been an official in the household of Frederick, Prince of Wales, Halifax was made Master of the Buckhounds, and in 1748 he became President of the

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John Monson, 1st Baron Monson

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John Monson, 1st Baron Monson

John Monson, 1st Baron Monson PC (c. 1693 – 18 July 1748), known as Sir John Monson, 5th Baronet, from 1727 to 1728, was a British politician. Life He was the son of George Monson of Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, and Anne, daughter of Charles Wren of the Isle of Ely. He matriculated from Christ Church, Oxford, on 26 January 1708. On 4 April 1722, he was returned to the House of Commons for the city of Lincoln, and was re-elected on 30 August 1727.[1] He was appointed a knight of the Bath on 17 June 1725, when that order was reconstituted by George I. He succeeded in the family baronetcy, in March 1727, on the death of his uncle Sir William. On 28 May of the following year he was created a peer, with the title of Baron Monson of Burton, Lincolnshire. In June 1733, Monson was named Captain of the Honourable Band of Gentlemen Pensioners, and in June 1737 was appointed first commissioner of trade and plantations. In this office, he was confirmed when the board was reconstituted in 1745, and he continued to hold i

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Benjamin Mildmay, 1st Earl FitzWalter

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Benjamin Mildmay, 1st Earl FitzWalter

Benjamin Mildmay, 1st Earl FitzWalter PC (27 December 1672 – 29 February 1756), styled The Honourable Benjamin Mildmay until 1728 and known as The Lord FitzWalter between 1728 and 1730, was a British politician. He served as First Lord of Trade between 1735 and 1737 and as Treasurer of the Household between 1737 and 1755. Background Mildmay was a younger son of Benjamin Mildmay, 17th Baron FitzWalter, by the Honourable Catherine, daughter of William Fairfax, 3rd Viscount Fairfax of Emley.[1] Political career Mildmay served as Commissioner of Excise between 1720 and 1728. The latter year he succeeded his elder brother in the barony of FitzWalter and took his seat in the House of Lords.[1] In 1730 he was created Viscount Harwich, in the County of Essex, and Earl FitzWalter.[2] In 1735 he was sworn of the Privy Council and appointed First Lord of Trade under Sir Robert Walpole,[3] a post he held until 1737,[1][4] and then served as Treasurer of the Household between 1736 and 1755.[1] He was also Lord-Lieuten

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Thomas Fane, 6th Earl of Westmorland

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Thomas Fane, 6th Earl of Westmorland

Thomas Fane, 6th Earl of Westmorland PC (3 October 1681 – 4 June 1736), styled The Honourable Thomas Fane from 1691 to 1699, was a British peer and member of the House of Lords. He was the third son (second surviving son) of Vere Fane, 4th Earl of Westmorland and his wife Rachel Bence; as well as the younger brother of Vere Fane, and the older brother of John Fane, 7th Earl of Westmorland. As his older brother Vere died without issue in 1699, Thomas Fane inherited the Earldom of Westmorland, as well as his brother's further titles Baron Burghersh and Lord le Despencer. Fane held many offices, including that of Deputy Warden of the Cinque Ports between 1705 and 1708, First Lord of Trade between 1719 and 1735 and Lord-Lieutenant of Northamptonshire in 1735.[1] Furthermore, he was Gentleman of the Bedchamber to Queen Anne's husband, Prince George of Denmark, on 25 April 1704, and Lord of the Bedchamber to King George I in 1715.[1] In 1717, he was invested as a Privy Counsellor.[1] Fane married Catherine String

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Robert Darcy, 3rd Earl of Holderness

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Robert Darcy, 3rd Earl of Holderness

Robert Darcy, 3rd Earl of Holderness (1681-1721) (Charles d'Agar) Robert Darcy, 3rd Earl of Holderness, PC (24 November 1681 – 20 January 1721) was a British peer and politician. Life Darcy was the second (but eldest surviving) son of John Darcy, Lord Conyers, (himself the eldest son of Conyers Darcy, 2nd Earl of Holderness), and Bridget, daughter of Robert Sutton, 1st Baron Lexington. He was styled Lord Conyers when his father died in 1688 and later inherited his grandfather's earldom in 1692. He also inherited the titles of 10th Baron Darcy de Knayth and 7th Baron Conyers. In 1698 he matriculated fellow-commoner from King's College, Cambridge.[1] In 1714, the Earl of Holderness, as he now was, was appointed Lord Lieutenant of the North Riding of Yorkshire, admitted to the Privy Council. In 1718, he was appointed First Lord of Trade. He was also a Lord of the Bedchamber from 1719 to his death. On 26 May 1715, Holderness married Lady Frederica Schomberg (the eldest surviving daughter of the 3rd Duke of Sc

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Henry Howard, 6th Earl of Suffolk

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Henry Howard, 6th Earl of Suffolk

Henry Howard, 6th Earl of Suffolk, 1st Earl of Bindon PC (1670 – 19 September 1718)[1] was an English nobleman, styled Lord Walden from 1691 to 1706. Lord Howard was born in London, the son of Henry Howard, 5th Earl of Suffolk. He was admitted to Magdalene College, Cambridge, in 1685.[2] He was returned as Member of Parliament for Arundel in January 1694, but was unseated on petition by John Cooke in February. He was again returned for Arundel in 1695, holding the seat until 1698. From 1697 to 1707, he was Commissary-General of the Musters. In 1705, he was returned for Essex, but left the House of Commons when he was created Earl of Bindon in 1706. He was the Deputy Earl Marshal in England 1706–1718. In 1708, he was appointed to the Privy Council. In 1709, he succeeded his father as Earl of Suffolk. In 1715, he was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Essex and First Lord of Trade, offices he held until his death in 1718. Howard married his first wife, Lady Auberie Anne Penelope O'Brien, daughter of Henry O'Brien,

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William Berkeley, 4th Baron Berkeley of Stratton

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William Berkeley, 4th Baron Berkeley of Stratton

William Berkeley, 4th Baron Berkeley of Stratton PC, PC (I) (d. 24 March 1741), was a British politician and judge, of the Bruton branch of the Berkeley family. He was Master of the Rolls in Ireland between 1696 and 1731 and also held political office as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster from 1710 to 1714 and as First Lord of Trade from 1714 to 1715. Background Berkeley was the third son of John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton, by Christiana, daughter of Sir Andrew Riccard. Charles who held the title two years and John, an Admiral who held the title 16 years were elder brothers. He lived a much longer life.[1] He was born on unknown date between John's 1663 birth and 23 March 1672, all dates which would make him a septuagenarian per his funerary monument. Political and judicial career In 1696 Berkeley was appointed Master of the Rolls in Ireland[1] and sworn of the Irish Privy Council.[1][2] The following year he succeeded his elder brother in the barony.[1] In 1710 he was admitted to the Engl

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Francis North, 2nd Baron Guilford

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Francis North, 2nd Baron Guilford

Francis North, 2nd Baron Guilford (1673–1729) Francis North, 2nd Baron Guilford PC (14 December 1673 – 17 October 1729) was a British peer and member of the House of Lords. Life In 1685, he succeeded his father Francis North as Baron Guilford. In 1701 he was one of five peers of the realm who voted against the Act of Settlement (which excluded the House of Stuart from the English throne) in the House of Lords, and who felt strongly enough to enter written protests in the House of Lords Journal.[1] From 1703 to 1705, Guilford was Lord Lieutenant of Essex. In 1712, he was appointed to the Privy Council, and was First Lord of Trade from 1713 to 1714. Family North was twice married. His first wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Fulke Greville, 5th Baron Brooke, and Sarah Dashwood, whom he married in 1695. His second wife was Alicia Brownlow, daughter of Sir John Brownlow, 3rd Baronet, and Alice Sherard, whom he married around 1703. Guilford was succeeded by his son by his second wife Francis North, 3rd Baron Gu

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Charles Finch, 4th Earl of Winchilsea

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Charles Finch, 4th Earl of Winchilsea

Charles Finch, 4th Earl of Winchilsea PC (26 September 1672 – 16 August 1712) was a British peer[1] and Member of Parliament, styled Viscount Maidstone until 1689. He was the son of William Finch, Lord Maidstone (son of Heneage Finch, 3rd Earl of Winchilsea) and Elizabeth Wyndham. From 1702 to 1703 he served as Ambassador Extraordinary to Hanover. In 1702, he was appointed Vice-Admiral of Kent, and in 1704, Lord Lieutenant and Custos Rotulorum of that county. He was dismissed from all his Kentish offices in 1705. In 1711, he was sworn of the Privy Council and was appointed First Lord of Trade. Upon his death in 1712, he was succeeded as Earl of Winchilsea by his uncle, Heneage Finch. References "Charles Finch, 4th Earl of Winchilsea : M, #25287, b. 26 September 1672, d. 14 August 1712". Thepeerage.com. Retrieved 24 February 2019. Political offices Preceded byThe Earl of Stamford First Lord of Trade1711–1712 Succeeded byThe Lord Guilford Honorary titles Preceded byThe Earl of Romney Lor

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Thomas Grey, 2nd Earl of Stamford

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Thomas Grey, 2nd Earl of Stamford

Thomas Grey, 2nd Earl of Stamford, PC (c. 1654 – 31 January 1720) was a British peer and politician.[1] Grey was the only son of Thomas, Lord Grey of Groby, and inherited his title from his grandfather.[1] His mother was Lady Dorothy Bourchier, daughter of Edward Bourchier, 4th Earl of Bath. Grey took some part in resisting the arbitrary actions of James II, and was arrested in July 1685. After his release he took up arms on behalf of William of Orange in the Glorious Revolution, after whose accession to the throne he was made a Privy Counsellor (1694) and Lord Lieutenant of Devon (1696).[1] Politically he was described as an "unrepentant Whig", who reaffirmed his belief in the Popish Plot by voting against the motion to reverse the attainder on William Howard, 1st Viscount Stafford. In 1697 he became Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, and in 1699 President of the Board of Trade, being dismissed from his office upon the accession of Anne in 1702. From 1707 to 1711, however, he was again President of the

Whig (British political party) politicians

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17th-century English nobility

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Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth

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Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth

Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth (1640 – 28 July 1714) was a British peer in the peerage of England. Biography He was born the son of Sir Henry Frederick Thynne of Caus Castle, Shropshire, and Kempsford, Gloucestershire, and his wife, Mary, daughter of Thomas Coventry, 1st Baron Coventry of Aylesborough. He succeeded his father as 2nd baronet (1681) and married Frances, daughter of Heneage Finch, 3rd Earl of Winchilsea. He was descended from the first Sir John Thynne of Longleat House. He was educated at Kingston Grammar School and entered Christ Church, Oxford on 21 April 1657. He was invested as a Fellow of the Royal Society on 23 November 1664. He held the office of Envoy to Sweden between November 1666 and April 1669. He was returned as Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Oxford University between 1674 and 1679 and for Tamworth between 1679 and 1681. He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baronet Thynne, of Kempsford on 6 March 1679. He was High Steward of Tamworth from 1679 and also High Steward of the Roy

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Presidents of the Board of Trade

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Glorious Revolution

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John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater

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John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater

John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater KB PC (9 November 1646 – 19 March 1701) was a British nobleman from the Egerton family. He was the eldest son of John Egerton, 2nd Earl of Bridgewater and his wife Elizabeth Cavendish. His maternal grandparents were William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle and his first wife Elizabeth Basset. On 17 November 1664, he married Lady Elizabeth Cranfield, daughter of James Cranfield, 2nd Earl of Middlesex. She gave birth to a son, but died in childbirth. He married his second wife on 2 April 1673, Lady Jane Paulet, eldest daughter of Charles Paulet, 1st Duke of Bolton. Egerton served as a Member of Parliament for Buckinghamshire as a Whig for Buckinghamshire from 1685 to 1686. He also served as Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire following his father's death in 1686 but was dismissed after his first period in office by King James II for refusing to produce a list of Roman Catholics to serve as officers of the militia. He was later reinstated to the position when William III c

Whig (British political party) politicians

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18th-century English nobility

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18th-century Royal Navy personnel

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Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury

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Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury

Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury PC (22 July 1621 – 21 January 1683), known as Anthony Ashley Cooper from 1621 to 1630, as Sir Anthony Ashley Cooper, 2nd Baronet from 1630 to 1661, and as The Lord Ashley from 1661 to 1672, was a prominent English politician during the Interregnum and the reign of King Charles II. A founder of the Whig party, he was also the patron of John Locke. Cooper was born in 1621. Having lost his parents by the age of eight, he was raised by Edward Tooker and other guardians named in his father's will, before attending Exeter College, Oxford, and Lincoln's Inn. He married the daughter of Thomas Coventry, 1st Baron Coventry in 1639; that patronage secured his first seat in the Short Parliament. He soon lost a disputed election to the Long Parliament. During the English Civil Wars he fought as a Royalist then as a Parliamentarian from 1644. During the English Interregnum, he served on the English Council of State under Oliver Cromwell, although he opposed Cromwell's attempt

Lord Chancellors

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Post-Reformation Arian Christians

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Liz Truss

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Liz Truss

Elizabeth Mary Truss (born 26 July 1975),[1][2] known as Liz Truss, is a British politician serving as Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade since July 2019 and Minister for Women and Equalities since September 2019.[3] A member of the Conservative Party, she has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for South West Norfolk since the 2010 United Kingdom general election. Truss was Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs from 2014 to 2016, Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor from 2016 to 2017 and Chief Secretary to the Treasury from 2017 to 2019. After graduating from the University of Oxford in 1996, Truss worked in sales, as an economist, and was deputy director at the think-tank Reform, before becoming a member of parliament at the 2010 general election. As a backbencher, she called for reform in a number of policy areas, including childcare, maths education, and the economy.[4] She founded the Free Enterprise Group of Conservative MPs,

Councillors in the Royal Borough of Greenwich

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British Secretaries of State for the Environment

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